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The Cultural Revolution

In: Historical Events

Submitted By jangwoodi
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Question: What was the Cultural Revolution all about? Why did Mao launch the Cultural Revolution? The Cultural Revolution could be regarded as a nightmare for the generation of my grandparents’ age. It was initiated by Mao Zedong and utilized by the counterrevolutionary clique that led by Lin Biao and Jiang Qing. This leading mistake was an unchangeable disaster to the whole state, the CCP, and all the Chinese people. This struggle lasted for ten years from 1966 to 1976. How could Chinese people endure this ordeal for ten year? We should understand the concept of the Cultural Revolution first according to the required readings. From 1966 to 1969, Mao wanted to change “the bourgeois dictatorship” to “the proletarian dictatorship,” which meant that Mao needed people to destroy the so-called “the capitalists.” The real meaning of the Cultural Revolution for Mao himself was to help the CCP to seize power from the KMP. For him, that meant to snatch the regime from the bourgeois leaders and gave it back to the proletarians. In 1966, the “Sixteen Articles” announced that the party should adjust those in power but took the path of “capitalism ”. The events about seizing power started from January 1967 in Shanghai. And one month later, Lin Biao and Jiang Qing led the counterrevolutionary people frame those older generations of proletarian revolutionaries up to say that the elders were disturbing the CCP by complaining their concerns about the Cultural Revolution. This movement was called the “February Adverse Current” . The radical mass organizations that composed by CRSG and PLA participated in the “February Adverse Current” in Shanghai. Since then, Mao relied on the radical side more than the conservative mass organizations----the party and the government. Finally, Liu Shaoqi was expulsed from the CCP and Lin Biao took his seat became Mao’s ally...

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