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The Dream Act Promotes Illegal Immigration

In: English and Literature

Submitted By behon
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The Dream Act Promotes Illegal Immigration
Today, there are about 80,000 undocumented students who will graduate from high school in the United States. Nearly 65,000 of these students will not only be graduating, but have been living in the country for five years or more. Undocumented students face various challenges as they move along the academic pipeline. Yet, a growing number of them are graduating from U.S. high schools each year prepared to enter our nation’s colleges and universities. These students are most likely in favor of the Dream Act, Development Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act. The dream act was a proposed legislation in the United States that was introduced to the Senate on August 1, 2001, and was re-introduced on March 26, 2009 (Miranda). This proposed bill will grant amnesty to illegal aliens who entered the country as children illegally but now meet the requirements and reverses current law to allow states to provide taxpayer subsidize in-state tuition to illegal aliens. Also, qualifying undocumented youths will be eligible for a 6 year long conditional path to citizenship that requires completion of a college degree or two years of military service (Miranda).
Undoubtedly, in order to qualify for The Dream Act, if it is passed, the person must meet five requirements. One requirement includes that the person who is applying must have entered the United States before the age of sixteen (Miranda). This condition should logically disqualify the chances of the applicant’s parents to qualify for The Dream Act, unless if they are under the age of sixteen. However, this poses an issue for if the minor does not have a guardian with citizenship already inhabiting the states this does not change the fact that it won’t stop the minor’s parents from entering the country illegally. The issue of illegal immigration does not diminish.
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