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The Dsm-Iv Appendix G

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Appendix G

The DSM-IV

The DSM-IV is an important tool for clinicians. It provides a standard for diagnoses to be standardized across psychology; however, the DSM-IV is not as precise for diagnosing personality disorders as some psychologists would like.

Give an example of each of the following problems identified in your readings and explain how these problems could negatively affect a diagnosis.

1. Some criteria used for reaching a diagnosis cannot be observed directly.
Diagnosing a patient is very difficult face to face depending on their problems and not being able to observe them you cannot gather all issues that need help/treating. If information about the patient gathered by another party or clinician it may be documented differently or some things may not be pick up on. All of this can lead to a misdiagnosis and worsening of the primary problem(s). A prime example would be autism. Many children have been misdiagnosed in the past because of some going by other’s general and/or comments about behavior.

2. Personality disorders can be similar to each other.
There are several symptoms that can overlap with other disorders. These are so similar those misdiagnoses are very possible especially if diagnosis is dependent on the information from one source in one setting. Misdiagnosis of these symptoms is even more prone if the information is second hand. For example: Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have some symptoms that are can cause misdiagnosis and mistreatment.

3. People with different personalities can be given the same diagnosis
If it is a general diagnosis, yes. People who have different personalities can have the same symptoms but their personalities can have them handle them in different ways. Also, if two people both are described to have manic highs they both may act out in different ways but suffer from the same condition. A conscientious person and narcissist can both be diagnosed with OCD or Bipolar disorder.

4. Do you think that personality disorders are true mental illnesses? Why or why not?
Yes. I do think personality disorders are true mental illnesses because just as with other disorders if it is not recognized and treated it can get worse. some people who sought help did find relief in dealing with their daily lives but with personality disorders many do not get the help they need.

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