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The Effect of Infrastructural Facilities on School Enrollment Rates and Learning Levels in Rural India

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Submitted By saraabr
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EFFECT OF CHANGES IN INFRASTRUCTURAL FACILITIES
ON SCHOOL ENROLLMENT RATES AND LEARNING LEVELS IN RURAL INDIA

Sara Abraham

Table of Contents Sl. No. | Content | Page No. | 1. | Methodology | 1 | 2. | Sampling Method | 1 | 3. | Scope and Challenges faced | 1 | 4. | Introduction | 2 | 5. | Performance of States | 2 | 6. | Inferences and Concluding Remarks | 4 | 7. | References | 5 | 8. | Appendix | 6 |

Methodology The primary data source for this project is the ASER reports from 2007,2009-2012. Analysis of the obtained data has been done by constructing state-wise tables for school infrastructural facilities and studying the trends in both, time-series and cross-sectional data. Only disaggregated data was available for school enrollment and learning levels (disaggregated age-group wise and gender-wise. While such data prove useful for analysis of gender, age and social gaps, for this project, they were more of an impediment). Ranking of different states was done for all of the disaggregated data and a weighted average (equal weights assigned to each state) was taken to determine the final ranking of states in terms of school attendance and learning levels.
Working papers from CDS and DSE, obtained from the respective websites and EPW articles have also been used to aid the analysis. Cross-checking as to whether the inferences drawn from the analyses are in line with other reports and studies have also been done.
Sampling Method
A sample of eight states – Kerala, Haryana, Punjab, UP, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, MP, West Bengal - have been arrived at depending on their state level educational attainments. I have attempted to include at least one at each different broad stage of educational attainment, ranging from worst to best in terms of school enrollment, drop-out rates, and learning levels.
Scope and Challenges Faced
The scope of…...

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