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The Effects of Factory Farming

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The Effects of Factory Farming on Human Life
DeVry University

The Effects of Factory Farming on Human Life
A lot of consumers who purchase food items from the supermarket to feed themselves or their families are not concerned with how the products they purchase will affect them or their loved ones. Some people are completely unaware of how the meats they consume are processed and manufactured. Some individuals who purchase a fresh hot meal from a fast food restaurant or cook a nice home cooked meal don’t have an inkling about where they foods they consume come from. A lot of individuals are under the impression that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) operates in the best interest of the consumer.
Over the years, the decline of family farms and increase of factory farming has caused harmful effects on human life. Some health problems that effect consumers are respiratory infections, food poisonings, obesity, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and obesity. A lot of individuals are becoming increasingly aware of the health effects of factory farming. Two solutions that would help decrease the harmful effects of factory farming are making the living and manufacturing conditions of the livestock more humane. Another solution to help decrease the harmful effects of factory farming are feeding the livestock a natural diet with limited use of antibiotics and pesticides.
The decline in family farms has caused a number of health concerns for some individuals. According to Pollan (2006), the evolution and production of corn have greatly impacted the decline of family farms. The influence of government policies on cheap corn production made it difficult for many family farms to sustain production and profitability (Pollan, 2006, p. 40). By the early 1980’s, many family farms were struggling to maintain due to the increase profit of feeding and...

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