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The Equal Rights Amendment

In: Social Issues

Submitted By merrit12duke
Words 1205
Pages 5
Merrit Duke
History of American Women
May 27, 2015
Equality: Too Much to Ask For? The Equal Rights Amendment has been the source of much debate for almost an entire century now. Since first purposed by Alice Paul in the 1920s one’s stance on the potential amendment has been a dividing factor in the political sphere. Though the amendment was shut down in the 1920s there has been discussion about adding the Equal Rights Amendment into the constitution today. If the potential amendment was to be brought back up my stance on the debate would be in support of the amendment. For some background on the debate on the Equal Rights Amendment it would be good to look back and see where activists in the past were split and what about the Equal Rights Amendment has divided them. The Antebellum era gave two different types of women activists, the true women and the Early Feminists. The True Women argued for gender distinctions, separate spheres, domesticity, and women as moral guardians in their natural role as a mother. The True Women would be the women who be apposed to the Equal Rights Amendment and would be active in the fight against it. Arguing against the True Women were the Early Feminists who stressed gender equality, suffrage for women, equal education, human rights, and saw women as rational beings. This group of activists would be in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. Next would be the Progressive era where the two parties in the debate would be the Early Feminists and the Female Reformists. The Early Feminists argued for female independence, saw women as sexual beings, fought for worker’s rights, fought for female economic independence, and the equality of opportunity. These activists welcomed the Equal Rights Amendment and saw it as a much needed progression in the fight for not only female rights but human rights. Elsie Hill, an Early Feminists, on the...

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