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The First Amendment: The Morse V. Frederick Case

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The First Amendment is an amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing the rights of free expression. These rights include freedom of assembly, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, and freedom of speech. The Government limits the number of control citizens get so that we are regulated and things are flowing properly. The First Amendment was used in the Morse v. Frederick case. Frederick felt that his freedom of speech was violated. He got suspended because he displayed a banner reading across the street from the school. Fredrick was trying to discuss the illegal drug sells across the street from the school. When they went to court, Fredrick got paid forty-five thousand dollars because his speech was denied. Another

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