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The Linguistic Assessment of a Young Child

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Mozuna2
Words 1217
Pages 5
The Linguistics Assessment of a Young Child’s Language
Melissa Ozuna
California State University, Los Angeles
Questions: 1, 5, 7, 8, 12

The Linguistic Assessment of a Young Child’s Language
Introduction
“The child begins to perceive the world not only through his eyes but also through his speech.” Like Lev Vygotsky, Holmes speaks about one of the everyday behavior we use and that’s language. Communication is done by engaging our brains and bodies to make sounds and transfer one person’s thoughts to another. No matter how many languages there are, language can still be broken down into the same building blocks of communication. Specifically, linguistics is analyzed with one of the smallest building blocks like phonology, to lexicon, to syntax, to morphology, and communicative competence. Just how small these building blocks of linguistics come together at its own pace, is exactly how small it is to learn language. Language learning can be done at its own pace, but with the help of assessments there are common turning points, procedures, and phases one can follow to truly understand an individual’s language development over time.
Method
Participants Rita is a 3 year and two month old female. She is the second child of the family living under the roof with both parents. Father works at a Police station and mother’s occupation is at a office profession. From her beginning till her present days she has spoken 100% English.
Procedure
The interview was conducted in the living room/ kitchen with a video recorder to be sure to get the most natural reactions from the child with an environment he is around every day. On record, the interviewer was able to catch the child interacting with the mother, father, older brother and of course the interviewer. The interview was done on a Saturday afternoon, when everybody was home. The interview was interpreted into text by the...

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