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The Master, Freuds Id, Ego and Superego

In: Film and Music

Submitted By katy3008
Words 1851
Pages 8
Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film The Master, set in 1950, examines dueling forces of the human psyche. The three main characters can be viewed metaphorically in terms of Freud’s id, ego and super ego. Anderson’s new film is a beautiful character study examining the inner workings of human psychology.
Freddy Quell is an immature, alcoholic, hypersexual, violent WWII veteran, possesses no self-control, impulsively chasing his cravings His behavior exactly fits of Freud’s id. His primitive qualities resound further in his hunched posture, which resembles an earlier stage of Human evolution.
Lancaster Dodd, a writer, scientist and philosopher and founder and self appointed ‘Master’ of The Cause, a cult seeking to raise humans to a state of perfection. Lancaster facilitates this progression through a process of hypnosis which allows individuals to access distant memories of past lives stretching back trillions of years through time holes, providing a deeper, purer sense of self; Lancaster even claims these applications can cure certain types of leukemia.
After losing a series of jobs and on the run from a group of farmers, Freddy, in a drunken stupor stumbles unnoticed aboard a docked ship, occupied by Lancaster Dodd and his entourage, just prior to casting off for sea. Freddy awakes unaware of his surroundings and unable to recall the events of the previous night. Hung over, he meets with Lancaster, who is more curious than upset about Freddy’s aggressive, disruptive, uninvited presence aboard his chartered ship. The two men share an appreciation of alcoholic beverages, although Lancaster’s is no where near as extreme as Freddy’s, whose animalistic behavior is fueled by extremely strong homemade hooch, metaphorically representing the id’s libidinal energy, which upon first sip Lancaster is enthralled with, praising Freddy’s brilliance in crafting. Lancaster...

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