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The Nature and Characteristics of Educational Research

In: Social Issues

Submitted By sasuke04
Words 259
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The nature of educational research is analogous with the nature of research itself, which is systematic, reliable and valid to find the “truth”, investigates knowledge, and solves problems (William Wiersma, 1991). Moreover, educational research process involves steps to collect the information in order to investigate problems and knowledge. However, the educational research is more complex because it can use various approaches and strategies to solve problems in educational setting. It also can involve many disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, behaviour, and history. In addition, educational research is important because of contributing knowledge development, practical improvement, and policy information (John W.Creswell, 2005). Therefore, educators can use those research findings to improve their competences and teaching and learning process.
Furthermore, the characteristics of educational research are a part of its nature. According to Gary Anderson (1998), there are ten characteristics of educational research. I tried to classify those into three categories, which are the purpose of research, the procedures of research, and the role of researcher. The purposes of research are to solve the problems, investigate knowledge, and establish the principles in educational phenomena. In short, it focuses on solving the problems and developing knowledge. Furthermore, procedure is an important characteristic of educational research, which involves colleting data with accurate observation, objective interpretation, and verification. Finally, researchers need to be experts and familiar with their field of study, using the data to develop solutions and increase knowledge. The researchers also need to be patient and careful to use every step of research’s procedures to achieve the purpose of...

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