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The Negative Political and Economic Impacts of Colonialism on Africa

In: English and Literature

Submitted By biotinforthewin
Words 2712
Pages 11
John Jackson
Professor Orgala
March 22, 2014
AFAM-101

The Negative Political and Economic Impacts of Colonialism on Africa In October 1884, Otto von Bismarck, the German Chancellor, summoned European countries to a conference in Berlin, Germany. At the conference diplomats from Europe and America signed the Berlin Convention, which ultimately ended the Berlin Conference. This conference was created to diminish intensifying colonial struggles in Africa. This conference effectively established the boundaries of European powers. The signing of the Berlin Conference led to the scramble for Africa, which is defined as “efforts to fully occupy” portions of Africa that remained independent. With the exception of a couple countries the continent of Africa became controlled by seven European powers, including: Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. After European powers possessed control over the continent, they began to transform African society and its politics. The reason I have for choosing this topic is that a thorough understanding of colonialism in Africa is key to comprehend the obstacles that the continent of Africa and it’s leaders have to face to lead their countries into prosperity (Schraeder). Peter J. Schraeder, author of the book African Politics and Society: A Mosaic in Transformation, credits the spread of the Roman Empire as the precursor to European colonialism. The Roman Empire’s spread to Africa started in 146 B.C. when the city of Carthage, (present day Tunisia), was conquered by the Romans. Over one hundred years later Julius Caesar, Emperor of Rome, brought new development to Africa by establishing Carthage as the center of Roman power in Africa. Schraeder states that it was Africa Proconsularis, a Roman province in Africa that acted as the main producers of crops, including wheat and olive oil. Although after the…...

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