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The Next Revolution

In: Social Issues

Submitted By flprsun
Words 372
Pages 2
Melissa Thomas
Professor Parker
GEO1000
23 June 2014
The Next Revolution
The next revolution, in my opinion, will be about the intrinsic right to privacy. In today’s modern society technology is a beacon of change and progress, but not every aspect of that evolution is in the best interest of the common people. After the events of September 11, 2001, the public wanted to be safe but and the government has done a good job thus far, but it is not until recently that the public has truly learned how their privacy had been intruded upon by the government in order to safeguard their way of life. With the government’s ever so increasing surveillance of any and all threats at home and overseas, the ordinary citizen’s privacy is circumnavigated by laws like the Patriot Act in the pursuit of the bigger picture (preventing another event like 9/11 from ever happening again at all costs). With data mining of online records from social networking websites (Facebook and Twitter), email communications (Yahoo Mail and Hotmail), and cellphones (phone calls and text messages) by sanctioned agencies (the National Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation), the question becomes when is surveillance no longer in the best interest of the general population that the government is intended to protect in the first place. Posting ones energized ideas and thoughts about current foreign politics on a politically askew discussion forum might land an ordinary citizen under the government’s radar or talking to a friend about his/her frustration with the current administration on the matters of national security could be seen as a red flag or even a potential threat. The First Amendment of the Constitution was created to safeguard the public’s basic right to freely communicate, however that is not the case, because the world that live in now brands ordinary people as a threat...

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