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The Peer Group Is the Most Important Agency of Socialisation.

In: Social Issues

Submitted By gracekgs
Words 1116
Pages 5
Socialization is a process whereby individuals are made aware of behaviours that are expected of them with regards to the norms, beliefs, attitudes, and values of the society in which they live. There are several agencies of socialisation including peers, family, workplace, mass media but is peers the most important agency of socialisation? This essay aims to evaluate this claim.
A Peer group is a very important social group. This is a primary agency of socialization. They are those who share a similar social position to you in terms of age, lifestyle, status or job. These are people you are regularly with. In course of a child’s growth, he/she is motivated to be with the friends of his age. It is mainly remarked from teen ages to adulthood. The socialization that takes place with peers is different from those of the family and school. Similar tastes, likes, dislikes and ideas influence of the creation of such groups e.g. those who are into the same sports or the same type of music form into friendship groups. Young people are most influenced by their peers. They feel most comfortable to be around them as they share similarities concluding to them being open with each other. Peer groups play a very big part of socialization because the teenage period of someone’s life is when they start to change and think differently and most of these things they experience together. They discuss certain issues, problems and matters which cannot be discussed with their adults in the family or school such as changes in hormones, problems in relationships etc. Socialization takes place by imitating the individuals who are part of the peer group. Things such as accent, fashions, hair styles, ways of behaviour, are often imitated.
Family is the a highly important and crucial agency of socializing a child. Soon after the birth, a child has to be with the mother and the child learns...

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