The Relationships Between Middle Ages and Renaissance Historical Art Periods

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Submitted By karren138
Words 1036
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The term “Middle Ages” was used by Italian historians in the 15th and 16th centuries. The culture at that time was similar to that of ancient Rome and Greece but different from the time between the fall of Rome and that time (Hanawalt, 1998). This period was later replaced by the Renaissance period and has been described as a period of rebirth where ancient techniques were revived and new ones developed leading to more success in the art industry. Artists were inspired by the recovery of Greco-Roman heritage from the East and the importation of Byzantine examples to the West (Zirpolo, 2008). This essay discusses the relationship between the Middle Ages and Renaissance historical art periods.

The Middle Ages was considered a period of ignorance, barbarism and superstition (Hanawalt, 1998). This period was called the dark ages due to the negative practices involved, but Scholars saw the period differently stating that the history was a continuous process from biblical times to their time. Most of them wrote about battles, feudalism, crusades, manorialism, kings and emperors, rise of towns, Universities and churches (Hanawalt, 1998). Representations of art during this period were modestly scaled with little creativity because artists did their work collectively and mainly for religious purposes. There was no competition in the art industry and traditional techniques were used to design objects. Art was used to spread religion in Europe and throughout other parts of the world and was viewed as a mere utilitarian object which did not have much value.

The Renaissance was a historical art period that led to the abandonment of the Middle Ages practice (Zirpolo, 2008). The artists abandoned the Middle Ages representations which were modestly scaled for monumental images that reflected their abilities. The field of art became more valuable and attractive to…...

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