The Role of a Teacher

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Submitted By dass
Words 338
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One student learns one fourth from the teacher


One fourth from own intelligence

One fourth from classmates and

One fourth only with time!”

This revered Sanskrit saying encompasses the various facets of learning. The
richness of any learning experience is a blend of all these aspects in the
right proportion. Their roles have an added dimension with the advances in
technology. Today , children are exposed to the seductive pull of digital
devices like mobiles which beep us out of sleep and checking e mail which
has become a compulsion. The internet is undoubtedly expanded our
connectivity and access to information. Ironically, as technology brings us
closer, we have distanced ourselves from relationships, the sheer joy of
reading a good book, the depth of a good friendship and our indulgence with introspection or self
reflection. Emotional bonding with parents has also been eroded due to lifestyle indulgences and societal pressures.

The role of a teacher is to help the children to revisit our rich tradition,

analyze this democratic access to information and introduce them to the

nuances of self evaluation, practical wisdom and empathy. Nurturing healthy relationships can be a window to view the
garden of life.
Today, in schools, we provide robust platform wherein every child is introduced to larger than life concepts which is a conscious
endeavor to shape him into a fine personality. We need to just hold their hands even when they walk in the sultry heat of life or
weathering the storms or step on the thorns of failure as they move on in their journey from innocence to wisdom, imperfect to
more perfect, rigid to adaptable and so on. The bigger transformation occurs from experiencing life at every juncture and accepting
the lessons it has to offer.
A true transformation enriches your mind and intellect. Akin to the radiance…...

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