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The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Mri) in Diagnoses of Pituitary Gland

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The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Diagnoses of Pituitary Gland
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The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Diagnoses of Pituitary Gland The pituitary gland is an important part of the body because it controls several hormonal glands such as adrenals and the thyroid. The gland is a nearly the size of a pea and has two parts referred to as the lobes (Maya & Pressman, 2010). The front part is the anterior pituitary while the back part is the posterior pituitary. The pituitary gland is part of a bony hollow called the pituitary fossa behind the bridge of the nose and below the brain’s base near the optic nerves. Maya and Pressman (2010) add that the pituitary gland is the most important part of the system because it produces hormones controlling the functions of other endocrine glands. The most common problem occurring in the pituitary gland is the development of a benign growth or tumor. The tumor causes the gland to secrete excess hormone, blocks its production or causes it to malfunction. Other causes of pituitary disorders include traumatic brain injury and pituitary infarction. Although pituitary disorder are able to alter quality of a person’s life significantly, medical or surgical treatment is available where efficient diagnosis is made. The present study investigates the role of imaging modalities in the evaluation of pituitary gland disorders. Particular emphasis is laid on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in diagnosing the pituitary gland.
Anatomy of the pituitary gland The sellar region of the brain is anatomically complex being bounded by sinus arteroinferiorly, the brainstem posterioly, the dorsum sella, the hypothalamic sellae, the suprasella, and the cavernous sinuses laterally (Drouin, 2010). The hypothelamus consists of a layer of tissue that extends from the...

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