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The Us and European Financial Crises

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The US and European Financial Crises

La inceputul verii lui 2007, prima data in SUA, apoi in Europa si Asia, criza financiara si-a facut aparitia relative neasteptat. Criza globala a erupt in septembrie 2008, cand datoriile din Grecia au ajuns la conditii extreme, care s-au stability in toamna lui 2009, dupa care a urmat Irlanda si toata Uniunea Europeana. Totul a inceput in Statele Unite ale Americii odata cu ipotecile din sectoarele imobiliare, care au crescut din 1995 pana in 2010 cand datoriile au cunoscut o cota negative. Aceasta situatie s-a extins si in Marea Britanie, Franta, Germania si chiar Australia, urmand acest exemplu negativ. Diferite organizatii financiare precum LIBOR au incercat sa remedieze situatia prin reducerea dobanzile la ipoteci spre exemplu, dar fara success aceasta interventie avantajand doar firma proprie. In jurul date de 10 august 2008 rezerva federala a SUA a achizitonat titluri de valoare valorand cateva miliarde de dolari pentru a introduce lichiditati pe piata creditelor. Totusi, fara interventia guvernului nu s-a putut rezolva nimic. Rezerva Federala si Trezoreria Statelor Unite ale Americii au incurajat sectorul bancilor private sa isi resolve singure problemele financiare, iar incercarea lor de a face aliante a dat din nou gres. In Uniunea Europeana, constituirea Zonei Euro a dus la libera miscare a capitalului, fenomen numit integrare financiara, insa tarile care au adoptat aceasta moneda nu mai poseda independent monedei proprii. Tarile care au trecut prin aceasta incercare si au esuat au fost Grecia, Irlanda, Portugalia, urmand Italia, acestea avand cele mai mari datorii.
Pe scurt, parerea mea personala este aceea ca aceasta crisa globala a pornit dIn SUA, Uniunea Europeana si celelalte care au urmat au suferit repercursiunile “jocului American”, aceasta tara, colonizata de europeni in fapt, s-a intors intentionat sau nu impotriva “navei mama”, studentul depasindu-si profesorul intr-un mod misel.
Realizator: Roata Andreea, grupa 930.
Surse : Lessons from the European economic and financial great crisis: A survey European Journal of Political Economy
The impact of the financial crisis on transatlantic information flows: An intraday analysis
Shadow banking and financial stability: European money market funds in the global financial crisis
The global financial crisis and integration in European retail banking
The European Crisis and the Role of the Financial System

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