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The Use of Guided Notes for Active Engagement During Teacher-Directed Lectures

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jessica14
Words 2191
Pages 9
The Use of Guided Notes for Active Engagement during
Teacher-Directed Lectures

By Anna Jessica B. Pantujan
Holy Cross of Davao College, Sta. Ana Ave., Davao City

Introduction

It has been said that students learn by doing. It follows that if one increases the doing, the result is an increase in learning (Blackwell & McLaughlin, 2005). Research indicates that student achievement improves when teachers provide opportunities for active engagement (Konrad, Joseph & Eveleigh, 2009). The major educational goals of student understanding of content and application of skills are commonly pursued via lecture in classroom settings. Students are held accountable for obtaining information from the lectures, and performance is evaluated on class exams and quizzes. Therefore, students should take thorough notes during lectures so they can refer to the content at a later time (Boyle, 2001).

Marzano, Pickering and Pollock (2001) identify note taking as one of the research based strategies for increasing student achievement. Despite the importance of this behavior, however, students are often poor note takers (Austin, Lee & Carr, 2004).

Since note-taking can be a difficult task for some students, the use of guided notes can give students a standard set of notes for future references (e.g., tests and quizzes) as well as eliminate the possible frustration, lack of motivation, and off-task behaviors that may exist due to poor note-taking skills (Anderson, Yilmaz & Wasburn-Moses, 2004).
Guided notes are teacher presented handouts that guide a student through a lecture with standard cues and prepared space in which to write key facts, concepts, and/or relationships (Heward, 1994, p. 304).

In this light, The Use of Guided Notes for Active Engagement during Teacher-Directed Lectures, aims to provide the teachers the research-based theories and principle...

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