The Vietnam Conflict

In: Historical Events

Submitted By dmari63
Words 1312
Pages 6
The Vietnam Conflict

Introduction
It is difficult to pinpoint the exact reasons why the U.S. became involved in the Vietnam Conflict. Perhaps one of the more convincing reasons can be attributed to the strong disdain most Americans had for Communism. The U.S. government feared that Communism, if not prevented, would spread throughout the nations. The federal government used President Eisenhower’s “domino theory,” which stated, “if one country in Southeast Asia collapsed to Communism then surrounding countries would soon fall” to rally support for their intentions to save Vietnam from Communism (Davidson, 2011, p. 839). The true reasons for U.S. involvement in the Vietnam Conflict is debatable, however one thing is clear, the war caused further division in a country already suffering from its own social issues.

There had been conflict in the Vietnam long before the U.S. became involved in the conflict. Vietnam had been occupied by foreign countries for many years, and by 1940, Vietnam was under both French and Japanese rule. Ho Chi Minh, a Communist Vietnamese revolutionary leader, vowed to create a Vietnam that was independent of foreign rule (Davidson, 2011, p. 839). Ho Chi Minh established the Viet Minh whose main purpose was to liberate Vietnam from French and Japanese control. Northern Vietnam supported the Viet Minh efforts to create an independent Vietnam and joined forces with southern communist Vietcong to overthrow South Vietnam and unite Vietnam under one Communist government.

The French were unwilling to relinquish control of Vietnam and decided to fight back. The U.S., in an effort to uphold its Cold War foreign policy of containment, which basically meant preventing the spread of Communism, decided to support the French by providing military aid. However, in 1954, the French decided to withdraw after a defeat at Dien Bein Phu. The Geneva…...

Similar Documents

Vietnam

...Talwinder Kaur Mrs. Dibble CP English / 3rd 5/3/12 Vietnam War Vietnam War primarily fought in South Vietnam between government forces aided by the United States and guerrilla forces aided by North Vietnam. The war began soon after the Geneva Conference conditionally divided (1954) Vietnam at 17° N lat. into the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) and the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam). It escalated from a Vietnamese civil war into a limited international conflict in which the United States was deeply involved, and did not end, despite peace agreements in 1973, until North Vietnam's successful offensive in 1975 resulted in South Vietnam's collapse and the unification of Vietnam by the North. What was it really like to be a soldier in the Vietnam War? The only real way to know was to be there, but the second-best way to find out is to read the stories of men and women who served in the Vietnam War. “On Monday morning, the 15th of November, he died in my arms of tow bullets wounds in the chest. He said, “Ken I can’t breathe.” There was nothing I could do (Bagby, 637).” The author of “Dear Folks”, Kenneth is describing how his best friend died in his long arms, and he could not do anything to save him. “We were crossing………………………………………………….. During the short span of the Vietnamese war, 2.5 million people died, and millions more displaced. The American people wanted nothing to do with the Vietnam War. Having witnessed the unthinkable...

Words: 469 - Pages: 2

Vietnam

...American Foreign Policy Leading to the Vietnam War American involvement in the Vietnam War is one of the most controversial issues in our history. However, the United States foreign policies had been dictating our involvement in Vietnam long before the initial deployment of troops into Vietnam. The fear of communism and developments of the policy of containment and the domino theory set the stage for the eventual escalation of the Vietnam Conflict into a war which would claim the lives of thousands of Americans. United States' involvement in Vietnam began as early as World War II, when American forces of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the precursor of the CIA, parachuted into the mountains in the northern region of Vietnam. Led by Major Allison Thomas, their mission, "Deer," was to rendezvous with and train a small group of Vietnamese soldiers that were fighting Japanese occupation troops, and were rescuing downed pilots, this group of Vietnamese were known as the Vietminh. This group of Vietnamese soldiers would soon be the communist leaders of North Vietnam, however, at the time American forces were not concerned that Ho Chi Minh and Vo Nguyen Giap were communists because America was still allied with the Soviet Union, a communist state, at that point during World War II (Westheider 2). The Vietminh under leadership of Ho Chi Minh and with training from American OSS forces were simultaneously fighting the Japanese, while at the same time gaining more...

Words: 2511 - Pages: 11

Vietnam

... GDP would expand by 5.7% this year, a downward revision of its December 2011 forecast of 6.3%, before accelerating to 6.2% in 2013, when ADB economists expect inflation to re-emerge as a problem. The SBV has also lowered its forecast, predicting that the economy will expand by between 5.5% and 6% this year, compared with an earlier forecast of 6.5%. The Economist Intelligence Unit forecasts real GDP growth of 5.6% in 2012 and 6.9% in 2013. Further justification for a pro-growth and loosening stance is seen in the improvement in the country's levels of foreign reserves. This follows a long period in which reserves were drained amid a prolonged slide in the value of the dong, which lost around 18% of its value since 2008, adding to Vietnam's inflationary problems. Recently, however, the dong has stabilised, providing Vietnam with some additional leeway to loosen monetary policy without creating too much of an inflationary spike. Vietnam is trying to bolster the dong further by tightening up restrictions on the trading of gold. In part reflecting decades of conflict, many Vietnamese have adopted gold as a form of alternative currency. However, the penchant for gold has degraded the credibility of the dong, with many Vietnamese preferring the US dollar. The preference for gold has a negative impact on the trade balance, since most of it is imported, and this has contributed to depreciation of the dong. In recent months, the Vietnamese government has stepped up......

Words: 15386 - Pages: 62

Impact of Vietnam Conflict on American Society

...Abstract This paper discusses how the Vietnam Conflict impacted American society. The topics explored involve how the U.S. was affected socially, economically, and politically. Impact of Vietnam Conflict on American Society The enormity of the damage caused by the Vietnam Conflict is still felt in American society today. While public attitude toward Vietnam Veterans is changing, and faith in the military has returned, there is still a lot of skepticism toward the U.S. Federal Government. Americans don’t want to send their sons and daughters into another seemingly pointless war. One of the major consequences on U.S. society created by the Vietnam Conflict was the enormous strain on the American economy, due to the estimated $167 billion spent on the war. Inflation and increasing federal debt had a major negative effect on the US economy and seriously lowered living standards from the late 1960’s until the 1990’s. Another consequence on society was the public rejection of the war and the soldiers who fought in it. Vietnam vets were considered vicious killers, immoral human beings, drug addicts; they were treated like the lowest form of human existence ("Cold war in," 2011). The Vietnam conflict was a viewed as a devastating loss and resulted in a loss of pride and self- confidence in the American people. The U.S. experienced a reappraisal of American power and glory. At the beginning of the war the American public supported it, because they believed it was...

Words: 848 - Pages: 4

Vietnam

...Vietnam: A History By : Stanley Karnow | April 4 2012 | This paper is about Vietnam: A History a novel on America’s involvement on the war in Vietnam and the policies and feelings surrounding the war. | Book Report | Works Cited Karnow, Stanley. Vietnam: A History. New York: Penguin, 1997. Print. The Vietnam War was not just of interest to the government but the world took great interest as a whole. It was like trying to figure out a magician’s illusion. Before reading this book I only had vague general knowledge of the Vietnam War and how the conflict transpired. I knew about the communist insurgents, the Gulf of Tonkin, Saigon and Ho Chi Mihn. I knew about Presidents Johnson and Nixon, posttraumatic stress disorder and demonstrations. What I did not fully understand was why. Why were the North Vietnamese so resilient? Why did the US make such poor judgment? Why were we really there? What was Vietnam's history prior to our arrival? “History is an organic process, a continuity of related events, inexorable yet not inevitable.” (pg 11) The roots of America's involvement in Vietnam were nurtured by what Professor Daniel Bell has called America's concept of its own “exceptionalism.” George Berkeley, an Anglican bishop and philosopher stated in 1726 as he departed from England to America, “Westward the course of empire.” The phrase, “manifest destiny”, was...

Words: 2296 - Pages: 10

The Vietnam Conflict

...The Vietnam Conflict Introduction It is difficult to pinpoint the exact reasons why the U.S. became involved in the Vietnam Conflict. Perhaps one of the more convincing reasons can be attributed to the strong disdain most Americans had for Communism. The U.S. government feared that Communism, if not prevented, would spread throughout the nations. The federal government used President Eisenhower’s “domino theory,” which stated, “if one country in Southeast Asia collapsed to Communism then surrounding countries would soon fall” to rally support for their intentions to save Vietnam from Communism (Davidson, 2011, p. 839). The true reasons for U.S. involvement in the Vietnam Conflict is debatable, however one thing is clear, the war caused further division in a country already suffering from its own social issues. There had been conflict in the Vietnam long before the U.S. became involved in the conflict. Vietnam had been occupied by foreign countries for many years, and by 1940, Vietnam was under both French and Japanese rule. Ho Chi Minh, a Communist Vietnamese revolutionary leader, vowed to create a Vietnam that was independent of foreign rule (Davidson, 2011, p. 839). Ho Chi Minh established the Viet Minh whose main purpose was to liberate Vietnam from French and Japanese control. Northern Vietnam supported the Viet Minh efforts to create an independent Vietnam and joined forces with southern communist Vietcong to overthrow South Vietnam and unite Vietnam under...

Words: 1312 - Pages: 6

Vietnam

...Vietnam has a population of 2,000,000 the population is made up of mainly Vietnamese and Ethnic Chinese. Other minorities include Khmer and Cham descendants that lived in central and southern Vietnam before it was conquered by the Vietnamese. There are a few Tribal groups in Vietnam that make up 7 percent of the population. Their ancestors came from other Asian countries and have settled in in Vietnam. The different ethnic groups get along for the most part, but the Vietnamese have hostility towards the Ethnic Chinese for having dominance in the national economy. 700,000 Vietnamese have entered the United States since 1975. According to the census bureau, 2011, the population for Asians in the United States is estimated at 18.2 million; of that 1.9 million are Vietnamese. States with the largest population of Vietnamese are California, Texas, Florida, Washington, Virginia, New York, and Massachusetts. Together these seven states have 65.7 percent of all Vietnamese born immigrants. California and New York have the largest of the population of Vietnamese; California with 5.8 million and New York with 1.8 million Vietnamese ethnicities. Vietnamese immigrants make up 3 percent of all the immigrants in the United States in 2006 (Census Bureau, 2006). Vietnamese are the fifth largest immigrant group in the United States. Of foreign-born Vietnamese 72.8 percent were naturalized U.S citizens. About two thirds were limited English proficient and 1.4 percent was unauthorized...

Words: 1600 - Pages: 7

Conflict

...flcfReflection Paper #1 Inez Burrell March 19, 2013 The Experiential Learning Activity served as a significant tool to put the process of conflict mapping into perspective. Conflict mapping is a type of model that simplifies a complex social conflict such as the ones taking place in Voinjama, Liberia. It emphasizes the most important elements and systematically asks questions about issues, parties, strategies, and key components. When developing a conflict map, it is also important to focus on the parties’ grievances, trigger events, and root causes of the conflict. Although conflict mapping is used to facilitate the analysis of the conflict, it can actually make the process harder since there are so many possible answers. Each person analyzing the conflict may have different viewpoints for the components that make up that specific conflict as a whole. There are no right or wrong answers because each idea could be vital in solving the specific problems in that conflict. The reality of this became applicable during the Experiential Learning Activity because each group felt differently about the specific issues going on in Liberia. During the Experiential Learning Activity, the class was split into teams in order to analyze the conflict through the use of conflict mapping. As a group, it was decided that the parties involved in the conflict were the Mandingo and Loma. However, looking at the conflict in a broader sense it was...

Words: 622 - Pages: 3

Vietnam

...Final Exam Vietnam and America 1. Discuss the war under Johnson (1963-68). Why did the Johnson administration expand U.S. military in Vietnam in 1965? How did it do this? Were these actions effective? If not, why were they ineffective? In what ways did the Johnson administration deceive the U.S. Congress and the American people about the reasons for increasing American intervention in Vietnam and the tactics the administration employed to fight the war? Vietnam consumed Johnson’s energy and his presidency. Johnson, who believed in containment and the domino theory, saw Vietnam as a test. His foreign policy advisors, many who remained from the Kennedy administration, shared his views. Johnson had been in Congress when China became Communist, and he vividly recalled the domestic political turmoil that followed as Republicans attacked Democrats for “losing” China. He would not, he said, “be the president who saw Southeast Asia go the way China went.” The war was going poorly in South Vietnam and the political situation in Saigon became uncertain as one unstable government succeeded another. Also, the 1964 Tonkin Gulf crisis was a crucial event in the war’s escalation. Out of frustration, President Johnson, acting on the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, ordered bombings of military targets in North Vietnam. This was known as Operation Rolling Thunder. President Johnson also explained that the reason for being over in Vietnam was to help South...

Words: 1971 - Pages: 8

Vietnam

...Vietnam The Vietnam War or conflict as it was known was complex in its origins and followed France’s failure to suppress nationalist forces in Indochina, better known as Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, as it struggled to restore its colonial dominion after WWII. Led by Ho Chi Minh, a Communist-dominated revolutionary movement, the Viet Minh, waged a political and military struggle for Vietnamese independence that frustrated the efforts of the French and resulted ultimately in their leaving from the territory (Bowman, J. S.). Vietnam The U.S. Army’s first encounters with Ho Chi Minh were brief and generally sympathetic. During World War II, Ho Chi Minh’s anti-Japanese resistance fighters helped to rescue shoot down American pilots and supplied information on Japanese forces in Indochina. United States Army officers stood at Ho Chi Minh’s side in August of 1945 as he celebrated in the brief contentment of proclaiming Vietnam’s independence. Five years later, however, in a worldwide sense overwrought with ideological and military confrontation between Communist and non-Communist powers. Army advisers of the newly formed United States Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG), and Indochina, were assisting France against the Viet Minh. With combat rampant in mainland China and Korea experiencing a recent collapse to the Communists, the war in Indochina now became visible to Americans as...

Words: 1262 - Pages: 6

Conflict

...Introduction Conflict is inevitable in any work environment due to inherent differences in goals, needs, desires, responsibilities, perceptions, and ideas. According to Danna & Griffin (1999), persistent conflict at work is detrimental to the work climate and negatively affects individual’s physical and psychological well-being, resulting in increased turnover and absenteeism, reduced co-ordination and collaboration, and lower efficiency. However, the most common triggers of situations of conflict are: communication problems, organizational structure, role disputes, lack of resources, misunderstandings, and lack of professional commitment among others (Santiago et al. 2009). Conflict is commonly perceived as being a negative issue. However, the experience of dealing with conflict can lead to positive outcomes for nurses, their colleagues and patients. Conflict that is managed effectively by nurses can lead to personal and organizational growth. Therefore, well-managed conflict resolution, which may include the use of strategies such as clinical supervision and individual reflection, can be used to stimulate creativity and innovation in the team, in the medium to long term, which can positively impact on patient care (Hocking, 2006). Team members who are able to learn to resolve their differences and turn conflict into such a learning experience are helping to build a learning culture in their workplace. Success, in turn, further strengthens relationships and...

Words: 1909 - Pages: 8

Vietnam

... and only wanted to be left alone in peace. Instead they lost their families, homes, dignity, culture, and history of their own. Many foreigners escaped to the United States over time just to have peace and freedom. The people lost so much and you have to know that they were brought to their knees, but many rose up and continued to fight for their country even when they didn’t understand what they were fighting for. It is sad that these people gave up so much and yet never really accomplished what they were promised by their leaders. So what we have to know and understand is were all these Visiting Historians in Far Away Lands 4 wars necessary, therefore that is why we have history and need to understand history. To teach us these very important lessons and to go in the future and where not to go. History makes up the world, the whole world. From foreign countries to ours. It teaches us what we need to know about others and their thoughts. We must know all history so that we can continue forward and continue making history, both good and bad, so that all ancestors and future generations to come will know and understand what is needed in the future to continue history. Visiting Historians in Far Away Lands 5 References Crabtree, D., (2003) - Gutenberg College Great Books. msc.gutenberg.edu/authors/david-crabtree Moss, G. D. (2010). VIETNAM, An American Ordeal (6th ed.) Pearson Education Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ. The Importance of......

Words: 799 - Pages: 4

Vietnam

...Humanities Task Vietnam is a country in Southeast Asia and the labour force is cheap in this country, some companies opened factories and hire a lot of factories in Vietnam. For example: Nike is one of the well-known global brand in the world and this company didn’t produce their product by themselves. They employ many Vietnamese to produce their product. This company pay the salary to the factories and this company export the produce to other. The benefit is the Vietnamese factories accept those salary and they should pay the taxes to the government. The government accept those taxes and those taxes can help Vietnam develop, because those taxes can be use for build new school, develop the environment and it can also improve the skill of medical treatment . The other benefit is when some companies open the factories, there would be some advanced technology in those companies so some local companies can imitate those technology. The third benefit is the companies can provide many jobs to Vietnamese who didn’t have job before. ! There were also some negatives to the Vietnam, the factories maybe could not earn the higher salary and the company maybe use the resource in Vietnam. The most negative thing I think is some factories maybe polluted the environment in Vietnam, because produce some product, it also produce some rubbish, so if the factories just throw them in to the river or some area and didn’t clean them, it will be harm the environment.! If some companies......

Words: 304 - Pages: 2

Vietnam

...Vietnam War: U.S. Involvement increased to the brink of war with the Tonkin Gulf Incident Questions to ponder… 1. Was the growing conflict in South Vietnam an “armed attack” from the North, as the Administration (Johnson) contended? ANSWER: 2. Was it primarily a civil war, provoked by the brutal policies of the regime of Ngo Dinh Diem, which drove desperate peasants, minority tribesmen, and urban intellectuals into the ranks of the NLF? ANSWER: Yes, it was a civil war between the north and south for control of the country. Both sides were equally as brutal, however, the communists were more brutal when push came to shove. 3. Was the NLF itself a creature of Hanoi? ANSWER: I believe that it was. I think it was a direct creature from the north Vietmin. 4. Was the NLF an independent organization truly representative of the aspirations of the people in South Vietnam? ANSWER: No, it was an organization that represented Ho Chi Minh’s asperations to untie the north and the south under communist rule. 5. Had the United States, or the DRV, broken the Geneva Accords? No, in 1954, The United States responded by hastily putting together a humanitarian mission to assist those wishing to move south. A joint US-French naval task force was assembled near Haiphong harbour, while US personnel and aid workers organised refugee camps, food and medical supplies in South Vietnam. The operation – pointedly titled Passage to Freedom – was a successful...

Words: 474 - Pages: 2

Vietnam

... during the Missile Crisis. This last incident could have unleashed a war of incalculable proportions if a US—Soviet clash had occurred over the Cuban question. The focal point But, evidently, the focal point of all contradictions is at present the territory of the peninsula of Indo-China and the adjacent areas. Laos and Vietnam are torn by a civil war which has ceased being such by the entry into the conflict of US imperialism with all its might, thus transforming the whole zone into a dangerous detonator ready at any moment to explode. In Vietnam the confrontation has assumed extremely acute characteristics. It is not our intention, either, to chronicle this war. We shall simply recall and point out some milestones. 80 In 1954, after the annihilating defeat of Dien-Bien-Phu, an agreement was signed at Geneva dividing the country into two separate zones; elections were to be held within a term of 18 months to determine who should govern Vietnam and how the country should be reunified. The US did not sign this document and started manoeuvring to substitute the emperor, Bao-Dai, who was a French puppet, for a man more amenable to its purposes. This happened to be Ngo-Din-Diem, whose tragic end—that of an orange squeezed dry by imperialism—is well known by all. During the months following the agreement, optimism reigned supreme in the camp of the popular forces. The last pockets of the antiFrench resistance were dismantled in the South of the......

Words: 5547 - Pages: 23