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The Willowbrook Hepatitis Experiment

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“The Willowbrook Hepatitis Experiment"
CCase Study
[Author Name]

Upon doing this case study I’ve learned there are different ways to analyze this experiment. First, I will state the facts about this case. Then I will give my opinion as to weather or not I find this experiment ethical or unethical. Finally, I will give some ways that maybe this experiment could have been changed to meet ethical or unethical guidelines.

Facts: Willowbrook is a State School in Staten Island, New York. The facility was built in the 1930’s with the plan to house mentally retarded and disabled children. However, until the end of World War II it was used for injured and disabled war veterans. The building was originally built to house only a few thousand residents, but by the mid-60’s it was overcrowded with more than six thousand residents. In the late 50’s there was a research started there by S. Krugman and J. Giles to assess the outbreak of hepatitis.

However, this research spanned over a period of fourteen years and involved a host of healthy children. Krugman and Giles were only focused on finding out the natural cause of the disease not what they were doing to the children. Krugman and Giles decided that in order to get more accurate data about hepatitis, they needed to have children who didn’t have the disease to be infected with hepatitis. So this way they could follow the hepatitis step by step. In order for them to do this they approached the parents who had their children on the waitlist for Willowbrook.

Krugman and Giles led these parents to believe that giving them consent to inject hepatitis into their child it would prevent them from getting hepatitis. However, that’s not what happens. Krugman and Giles weren’t giving...

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