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Theoretical Matrix

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Theoretical Matrix
Patricia Brooks
HCS/587 Creating Change within Organizations
April 20, 2015
Doria Chege

University of Phoenix Material

Appendix A: Matrix of Theoretical Models

Theoretical Model | Description of Theoretical Model | Type of health care change situation where model best applies | Havelock’s Theory | One widely known and used theory of change is the one that Eric Havelock introduced to look at change differently. Change is a process that should focus on the plan, resistance to change, and how to maintain the change. Havelock created a 6 stage change process theory model that looks at the complexities of real life by taking into account evaluating and accepting the change. Relationship – Whatever system is changing the change agent should identify and build positive working relationships with the particular system whether the system is with clients or leaders. Diagnosis- Establish if there is a need or desire for change. This is an evaluation period. Acquire resources for change- Gathering information at this stage determines what the change is and is not. Selecting a pathway- The best option is decided and then implemented.Establish and accept change- Once change is put into place, acceptance is needed. Maintenance and Separation- To make sure the change is successful the change agent should monitor the affected system. Havelock’s theory shows how important it is for change to go through a planning process from beginning to end. To receive lasting positive change a desire is needed and hard work is required. | Havelock’s theory can be used in a health care situation where a nurse case manager is the agent for change and wants to use a change model to effect the environment within a hospital setting. So awareness and building a relationship with patients is the first step of the nurse case manager. She then diagnosis the problem which could be patient complaints. She then uses her resources to find a solution to the problem. Her resources could be consulting other nurse case managers, surveys from patients, or online blogs. A solution plan is decided. The plan is monitored and made permanent by the company. | Lewin’s Change Theory ModelSWOT Analysis | Lewin created a three-step process for implementing planned change. Lewin predicted that if change is going to be implemented the force for the change should be stronger than the opposing force. Unfreezing: This stage is about understanding the need for change and knowing the status quo is not working. When a change is felt within the system then the need for change becomes urgent. The pros of changing outweigh the cons. Change- This stage is a process and not an overnight success story. Training, coaching, and expecting mistakes is part of this process. This is a time for learning and adjusting to the change. Freezing or Refreezing- Once the changes have been implemented employees have to establish stability. SWOT Analysis is a structured planning method used to evaluate the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats involved in a project or in a business venture. The SWOT model is an analysis of the risks and rewards or a framework of what could potentially help a company. | The Lewin three-step change model can be used in a health care situation. A secretary in a physician’s office is used to the status quo of the filing system that has been in place since she was hired. However the system is not working. The company has a color coding system that is outdated. Files are getting lost in this old system. The company has been wanting to change to an alphabetized system which is easier and more efficient. Unfreezing, Change, and then Refreezing are key elements in redirecting this old system and changing it to the new system. Once change is perceived, then training, coaching, and learning from the mistakes will take place. Stable implementation is enforced and a reoccurring of the proven change is consistent. The SWOT analysis can be used in a health care situation. Patient prep time for surgery can take up to 4 hours. Doctors and nurses are trying to figure out a solution to lessen this time. Strengths- state of the art medical equipment.Weaknesses- Insufficient management training. Opportunities- Collaborations with other health care facilities. Development of new health care programs. Threats- Budget deficits. |

References
Borkowski, N. (2005). Organizational Behavior in Health Care. Jones and Bartlett Publishing Inc.
Connelly, M. (2015). The Kurt Lewin Change Model. Retrieved from www.changemanagement.com
How to Conduct SWOT Analysis in Healthcare Organizations (2014) Retrieved from www.pestleanalsis.com
Tyson, B. (2010) Havelock’s Theory of Change. Retrieved from www.brighthubpm.com

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