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Theories of Psychological Counselling

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| Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | | Vacancy Announcement No: FAO/31/2012 | Issued on: 2nd August 2012 | | Deadline For Application: 16th August 2012 | | | Position Title: | Data Analyst (1 Position) | Grade Level: | SC-4 | CONTRACT TYPE: | Service Contract | Duty Station: | Nairobi with possible travel to Somalia | Organizational Unit: | FAO-Somalia | Duration: | 3 Months with possible extension | Eligible Candidates: | KENYA & SOMALI NATIONALS ONLY | Anticipated start date: | September 2012 |

Under the overall guidance of the FAO Officer in Charge for Somalia, the direction of the Emergency and Rehabilitation Coordinator, and the direct supervision of the Monitoring and Evaluation Officer (designated leader for the monitoring team), the Data Analyst will be responsible for monitoring project outcomes against work plan and targets, including those of the Service Providers for the overall FAO Somalia Programmes. Specifically, he/she will:

* Assist in collecting data and information (namely statistical) on the activities of each component of the FAO emergency and programme components * Assist in compiling and analyzing the data for each components of the emergency and programmes * Design and develop questionnaires and data sets for the units * Follow FAO SO standards and formats for data and metadata storage (databases, tools, protocols) * Liaise with IM team as required * Using FAO Tools (FMT, IMMS, etc) develop form templates, clean data, analyze data, produce charts/tables * Liaise with Sectors/Units on a routine basis * Liaise with Somali counterparts (local NGOs, Associations, others) by request * Maintain files and data using FAO SO standards (on shared folders and databases) for staff to easily locate output maps to paste into reports * Perform other related duties as required

Minimum requirements:

* Education: University Degree in a related field or compensated by additional years of experience/ specialized training in data analysis or related field. *

* Knowledge and skills: At least three years of experience in data analysis using application software (MS Excel, SPSS, other). Demonstrated ability to effectively use standard MS Office software, especially experience with database and content management systems. * Systematic and efficient approach to work assignments, good judgment and analytical ability. Ability to manipulate large data sets, and Excellent attention to details. * Basic understanding of FAO Procedures. Ability to effectively use standard MS Office software, especially experience with database and content management systems. * Ability to work under minimum supervision. * Ability to work in a multicultural environment. * Languages: Working knowledge (level C) of English. Knowledge of Somali an added advantage

TO APPLY:

Send your application to: Candidates are requested to submit a covering letter quoting the Position Title and Vacancy Announcement No. FAO/031/2012 along with their current/detailed Curriculum Vitae and FAO Personal History (PH) form available at http://fmt.faoso.net/documents/PH_form-Blank.docx . E-mail is the preferred means of receipt and the application should be sent to HR-Somalia@fao.org. The subject line of the e-mail message should read CONFIDENTIAL – FAO/031/2012. If making a hard copy submission, the envelope should be clearly marked CONFIDENTIAL – FAO/031/2012 and sent to the following address:

FAO-Somalia
UN-Somalia Ngecha Road Complex
Corner Lower Kabete Road/Ngecha Road
P.O. Box 30470-00100
Nairobi, Kenya.

Applications may also be faxed, again clearly indicating CONFIDENTIAL - FAO/031/2012 in the subject line, to +254-20-4000333.

Applications must be received by the deadline. Late applications will not be considered.

Only short listed candidates meeting all essential qualifications will be contacted.

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