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Theory of Justice (Rawls

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By websterloeffler
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Equality is something that we try to depend we all strive for. In reality equality is, in most people’s opinions, an extremely unfair goal when it comes to financial equality. It may seem like a double standard to some but in fact it is not. This subject can be looked at from three different points of view the first being individuals who are hard workers and still can’t seem to thrive. It is this group who really suffer the most, fairness to them would them having the same opportunities to do as well as the upper classes. Sometimes it is due to their own decisions that they are in the position they are in but many times they are just recipients of bad luck. The next group of people are the people who are lazy and still think they deserve to have the same success as the next level of the monetary food chain. These individuals believe fairness is them being handed what others work very hard for. This is not that same idea of fairness that most of the rest of the country subscribes to . The third group is the individuals who thrives. These people are the upper-middle class and upper class who worked hard to get educations and/or build up their skills in a particular field which allows them to thrive (Lawhead 588)

Does Rawls have a point? Yes. It becomes apparent that those who work hard and have success should not be held back by those who do not have the same success. If everyone receives the same “equal” share the more successful people would have no reason to work hard and truly be successful because they will always have the same as everyone else. At the same time it cannot be forgotten that there is a group of hard workers that are still unable to truly be successful and society cannot allow these people to fall too far behind (Lawhead 588)

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