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Thyroid

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Thyroid Disease The thyroid gland is one of the largest endocrine glands. The thyroid gland is found in the neck, just below the voice box. It controls how quickly the body uses energy, makes proteins, and controls how sensitive the body is to other hormones. The thyroid plays an important role in regulating the body's metabolism and calcium balance. The T4 and T3 hormones stimulate every tissue in the body to produce proteins and increase the amount of oxygen used by cells. These hormones are essential for life and have many effects on body metabolism, growth, and development. Several different types of thyroid problems may develop including an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), and growths on the thyroid that may be nodules or cancer.
As mentioned in an article from Cleveland clinic, to control metabolism, the thyroid produces hormones, T4 and T3, which tell the body's cells how much energy to use. A properly functioning thyroid will maintain the right amount of hormones needed to keep the body's metabolism functioning at a satisfactory rate. As the hormones are used, the thyroid creates replacements. The quantity of thyroid hormones in the bloodstream is monitored and controlled by the pituitary gland. When the pituitary gland, which is located in the center of the skull below the brain, senses either a lack of thyroid hormones or a high level of thyroid hormones, it will adjust Thyroid- stimulating hormones (TSH) and send it to the thyroid to tell it what to do.
Thyroid disease is quite common. When the thyroid produces too much hormone, the body uses energy faster than it should. This condition is called hyperthyroidism. When the thyroid doesn't produce enough hormones, the body uses energy slower than it should. This condition is called hypothyroidism. There are many different reasons why either of these conditions...

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