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Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time by Tony Schwartz and Catherine McCarthy

The science of stamina has advanced to the point where individuals, teams, and whole organizations can, with some straightforward interventions, significantly increase their capacity to get things done.

Steve Wanner is a highly respected 37-year-old partner at Ernst & Young, married with four young children. When we met him a year ago, he was working 12- to 14-hour days, felt perpetually exhausted, and found it difficult to fully engage with his family in the evenings, which left him feeling guilty and dissatisfied. He slept poorly, made no time to exercise, and seldom ate healthy meals, instead grabbing a bite to eat on the run or while working at his desk. Wanner‟s experience is not uncommon. Most of us respond to rising demands in the workplace by putting in longer hours, which inevitably take a toll on us physically, mentally, and emotionally. That leads to declining levels of engagement, increasing levels of distraction, high turnover rates, and soaring medical costs among employees. We at the Energy Project have worked with thousands of leaders and managers in the course of doing consulting and coaching at large organizations during the past five years. With remarkable consistency, these executives tell us they‟re pushing themselves harder than ever to keep up and increasingly feel they are at a breaking point. The core problem with working longer hours is that time is a finite resource. Energy is a different story. Defined in physics as the capacity to work, energy comes from four main wellsprings in human beings: the body, emotions, mind, and spirit. In each, energy can be systematically expanded and regularly renewed by establishing specific rituals—behaviors that are intentionally practiced and precisely scheduled, with the goal of making them unconscious and automatic as quickly as possible. To effectively reenergize their workforces, organizations need to shift their emphasis from getting more out of people to investing more in them, so they are motivated—and able—to bring more of themselves to work every day. To recharge themselves, individuals need to recognize the costs of energy-depleting behaviors and then take responsibility for changing them, regardless of the circumstances they‟re facing. The rituals and behaviors Wanner established to better manage his energy transformed his life. He set an earlier bedtime and gave up drinking, which had disrupted his sleep. As a consequence, when he woke up he felt more rested and more motivated to exercise, which he now does almost every morning. In less than two months he lost 15 pounds. After working out he now sits down with his family for breakfast. Wanner still puts in long hours on the job, but he renews himself regularly along the way. He leaves his desk for lunch and usually takes a morning and an afternoon walk outside. When he arrives at home in the evening, he‟s more relaxed and better able to connect with his wife and children. Establishing simple rituals like these can lead to striking results across organizations. At Wachovia Bank, we took a group of employees through a pilot energy management program and then measured their performance against that of a control group. The participants outperformed the controls on a

series of financial metrics, such as the value of loans they generated. They also reported substantial improvements in their customer relationships, their engagement with work, and their personal satisfaction. In this article, we‟ll describe the Wachovia study in a little more detail. Then we‟ll explain what executives and managers can do to increase and regularly renew work capacity—the approach used by the Energy Project, which builds on, deepens, and extends several core concepts developed byTony‟s former partner Jim Loehr in his seminal work with athletes.

Linking Capacity and Performance at Wachovia
Most large organizations invest in developing employees‟ skills, knowledge, and competence. Very few help build and sustain their capacity—their energy—which is typically taken for granted. In fact, greater capacity makes it possible to get more done in less time at a higher level of engagement and with more sustainability. Our experience at Wachovia bore this out. In early 2006 we took 106 employees at 12 regional banks in southern New Jersey through a curriculum of four modules, each of which focused on specific strategies for strengthening one of the four main dimensions of energy. We delivered it at one-month intervals to groups of approximately 20 to 25, ranging from senior leaders to lower-level managers. We also assigned each attendee a fellow employee as a source of support between sessions. Using Wachovia‟s own key performance metrics, we evaluated how the participant group performed compared with a group of employees at similar levels at a nearby set of Wachovia banks who did not go through the training. To create a credible basis for comparison, we looked at year-over-year percentage changes in performance across several metrics. On a measure called the “Big 3”—revenues from three kinds of loans—the participants showed a yearover-year increase that was 13 percentage points greater than the control group‟s in the first three months of our study. On revenues from deposits, the participants exceeded the control group‟s yearover-year gain by 20 percentage points during that same period. The precise gains varied month by month, but with only a handful of exceptions, the participants continued to significantly outperform the control group for a full year after completing the program. Although other variables undoubtedly influenced these outcomes, the participants‟ superior performance was notable in its consistency. We also asked participants how the program influenced them personally. Sixty-eight percent reported that it had a positive impact on their relationships with clients and customers. Seventy-one percent said that it had a noticeable or substantial positive impact on their productivity and performance. These findings corroborated a raft of anecdotal evidence we‟ve gathered about the effectiveness of this approach among leaders at other large companies such as Ernst & Young, Sony, Deutsche Bank, Nokia, ING Direct, Ford, and MasterCard.

The Body: Physical Energy
Our program begins by focusing on physical energy. It is scarcely news that inadequate nutrition, exercise, sleep, and rest diminish people‟s basic energy levels, as well as their ability to manage their

emotions and focus their attention. Nonetheless, many executives don‟t find ways to practice consistently healthy behaviors, given all the other demands in their lives. Before participants in our program begin to explore ways to increase their physical energy, they take an energy audit, which includes four questions in each energy dimension—body, emotions, mind, and spirit. (See the exhibit “Are You Headed for an Energy Crisis?”) On average, participants get eight to ten of those 16 questions “wrong,” meaning they‟re doing things such as skipping breakfast, failing to express appreciation to others, struggling to focus on one thing at a time, or spending too little time on activities that give them a sense of purpose. While most participants aren‟t surprised to learn these behaviors are counterproductive, having them all listed in one place is often uncomfortable, sobering, and galvanizing. The audit highlights employees‟ greatest energy deficits. Participants also fill out charts designed to raise their awareness about how their exercise, diet, and sleep practices influence their energy levels. The next step is to identify rituals for building and renewing physical energy. When Gary Faro, a vice president at Wachovia, began the program, he was significantly overweight, ate poorly, lacked a regular exercise routine, worked long hours, and typically slept no more than five or six hours a night. That is not an unusual profile among the leaders and managers we see. Over the course of the program, Faro began regular cardiovascular and strength training. He started going to bed at a designated time and sleeping longer. He changed his eating habits from two big meals a day (“Where I usually gorged myself,” he says) to smaller meals and light snacks every three hours. The aim was to help him stabilize his glucose levels over the course of the day, avoiding peaks and valleys. He lost 50 pounds in the process, and his energy levels soared. “I used to schedule tough projects for the morning, when I knew that I would be more focused,” Faro says. “I don‟t have to do that anymore because I find that I‟m just as focused now at 5 pm as I am at 8 am.” Another key ritual Faro adopted was to take brief but regular breaks at specific intervals throughout the workday—always leaving his desk. The value of such breaks is grounded in our physiology. “Ultradian rhythms” refer to 90- to 120-minute cycles during which our bodies slowly move from a high-energy state into a physiological trough. Toward the end of each cycle, the body begins to crave a period of recovery. The signals include physical restlessness, yawning, hunger, and difficulty concentrating, but many of us ignore them and keep working. The consequence is that our energy reservoir—our remaining capacity—burns down as the day wears on. Intermittent breaks for renewal, we have found, result in higher and more sustainable performance. The length of renewal is less important than the quality. It is possible to get a great deal of recovery in a short time—as little as several minutes—if it involves a ritual that allows you to disengage from work and truly change channels. That could range from getting up to talk to a colleague about something other than work, to listening to music on an iPod, to walking up and down stairs in an office building. While breaks are countercultural in most organizations and counterintuitive for many high achievers, their value is multifaceted. Matthew Lang is a managing director for Sony in South Africa. He adopted some of the same rituals that Faro did, including a 20-minute walk in the afternoons. Lang‟s walk not only gives him a mental and emotional breather and some exercise but also has become the time when he gets his best creative

ideas. That‟s because when he walks he is not actively thinking, which allows the dominant left hemisphere of his brain to give way to the right hemisphere with its greater capacity to see the big picture and make imaginative leaps.

The Emotions: Quality of Energy
When people are able to take more control of their emotions, they can improve the quality of their energy, regardless of the external pressures they‟re facing. To do this, they first must become more aware of how they feel at various points during the workday and of the impact these emotions have on their effectiveness. Most people realize that they tend to perform best when they‟re feeling positive energy. What they find surprising is that they‟re not able to perform well or to lead effectively when they‟re feeling any other way. Unfortunately, without intermittent recovery, we‟re not physiologically capable of sustaining highly positive emotions for long periods. Confronted with relentless demands and unexpected challenges, people tend to slip into negative emotions—the fight-or-flight mode—often multiple times in a day. They become irritable and impatient, or anxious and insecure. Such states of mind drain people‟s energy and cause friction in their relationships. Fight-or-flight emotions also make it impossible to think clearly, logically, and reflectively. When executives learn to recognize what kinds of events trigger their negative emotions, they gain greater capacity to take control of their reactions. One simple but powerful ritual for defusing negative emotions is what we call “buying time.” Deep abdominal breathing is one way to do that. Exhaling slowly for five or six seconds induces relaxation and recovery, and turns off the fight-or-flight response. When we began working with Fujio Nishida, president of Sony Europe, he had a habit of lighting up a cigarette each time something especially stressful occurred—at least two or three times a day. Otherwise, he didn‟t smoke. We taught him the breathing exercise as an alternative, and it worked immediately: Nishida found he no longer had the desire for a cigarette. It wasn‟t the smoking that had given him relief from the stress, we concluded, but the relaxation prompted by the deep inhalation and exhalation. A powerful ritual that fuels positive emotions is expressing appreciation to others, a practice that seems to be as beneficial to the giver as to the receiver. It can take the form of a handwritten note, an e-mail, a call, or a conversation—and the more detailed and specific, the higher the impact. As with all rituals, setting aside a particular time to do it vastly increases the chances of success. Ben Jenkins, vice chairman and president of the General Bank at Wachovia in Charlotte, North Carolina, built his appreciation ritual into time set aside for mentoring. He began scheduling lunches or dinners regularly with people who worked for him. Previously, the only sit-downs he‟d had with his direct reports were to hear monthly reports on their numbers or to give them yearly performance reviews. Now, over meals, he makes it a priority to recognize their accomplishments and also to talk with them about their lives and their aspirations rather than their immediate work responsibilities. Finally, people can cultivate positive emotions by learning to change the stories they tell themselves about the events in their lives. Often, people in conflict cast themselves in the role of victim, blaming others or external circumstances for their problems. Becoming aware of the difference between the facts in a given situation and the way we interpret those facts can be powerful in itself. It‟s been a

revelation for many of the people we work with to discover they have a choice about how to view a given event and to recognize how powerfully the story they tell influences the emotions they feel. We teach them to tell the most hopeful and personally empowering story possible in any given situation, without denying or minimizing the facts. The most effective way people can change a story is to view it through any of three new lenses, which are all alternatives to seeing the world from the victim perspective. With the reverse lens, for example, people ask themselves, “What would the other person in this conflict say and in what ways might that be true?” With the long lens they ask, “How will I most likely view this situation in six months?” With the wide lens they ask themselves, “Regardless of the outcome of this issue, how can I grow and learn from it?” Each of these lenses can help people intentionally cultivate more positive emotions. Nicolas Babin, director of corporate communications for Sony Europe, was the point person for calls from reporters when Sony went through several recalls of its batteries in 2006. Over time he found his work increasingly exhausting and dispiriting. After practicing the lens exercises, he began finding ways to tell himself a more positive and empowering story about his role. “I realized,” he explains, “that this was an opportunity for me to build stronger relationships with journalists by being accessible to them and to increase Sony‟s credibility by being straightforward and honest.”

The Mind: Focus of Energy
Many executives view multitasking as a necessity in the face of all the demands they juggle, but it actually undermines productivity. Distractions are costly: A temporary shift in attention from one task to another—stopping to answer an e-mail or take a phone call, for instance—increases the amount of time necessary to finish the primary task by as much as 25%, a phenomenon known as “switching time.” It‟s far more efficient to fully focus for 90 to 120 minutes, take a true break, and then fully focus on the next activity. We refer to these work periods as “ultradian sprints.” Once people see how much they struggle to concentrate, they can create rituals to reduce the relentless interruptions that technology has introduced in their lives. We start out with an exercise that forces them to face the impact of daily distractions. They attempt to complete a complex task and are regularly interrupted—an experience that, people report, ends up feeling much like everyday life. Dan Cluna, a vice president at Wachovia, designed two rituals to better focus his attention. The first one is to leave his desk and go into a conference room, away from phones and e-mail, whenever he has a task that requires concentration. He now finishes reports in a third of the time they used to require. Cluna built his second ritual around meetings at branches with the financial specialists who report to him. Previously, he would answer his phone whenever it rang during these meetings. As a consequence, the meetings he scheduled for an hour often stretched to two, and he rarely gave anyone his full attention. Now Cluna lets his phone go to voice mail, so that he can focus completely on the person in front of him. He now answers the accumulated voice-mail messages when he has downtime between meetings. E&Y‟s hard-charging Wanner used to answer e-mail constantly throughout the day—whenever he heard a “ping.” Then he created a ritual of checking his e-mail just twice a day—at 10:15 am and 2:30

pm. Whereas previously he couldn‟t keep up with all his messages, he discovered he could clear his inbox each time he opened it—the reward of fully focusing his attention on e-mail for 45 minutes at a time. Wanner has also reset the expectations of all the people he regularly communicates with by email. “I‟ve told them if it‟s an emergency and they need an instant response, they can call me and I‟ll always pick up,” he says. Nine months later he has yet to receive such a call. Michael Henke, a senior manager at E&Y, sat his team down at the start of the busy season last winter and told them that at certain points during the day he was going to turn off his Sametime (an in-house instant-message system). The result, he said, was that he would be less available to them for questions. Like Wanner, he told his team to call him if any emergency arose, but they rarely did. He also encouraged the group to take regular breaks throughout the day and to eat more regularly. They finished the busy season under budget and more profitable than other teams that hadn‟t followed the energy renewal program. “We got the same amount of work done in less time,” says Henke. “It made for a win-win.” Another way to mobilize mental energy is to focus systematically on activities that have the most longterm leverage. Unless people intentionally schedule time for more challenging work, they tend not to get to it at all or rush through it at the last minute. Perhaps the most effective focus ritual the executives we work with have adopted is to identify each night the most important challenge for the next day and make it their very first priority when they arrive in the morning. Jean Luc Duquesne, a vice president for Sony Europe in Paris, used to answer his e-mail as soon as he got to the office, just as many people do. He now tries to concentrate the first hour of every day on the most important topic. He finds that he often emerges at 10 am feeling as if he‟s already had a productive day.

The Human Spirit: Energy of Meaning and Purpose
People tap into the energy of the human spirit when their everyday work and activities are consistent with what they value most and with what gives them a sense of meaning and purpose. If the work they‟re doing really matters to them, they typically feel more positive energy, focus better, and demonstrate greater perseverance. Regrettably, the high demands and fast pace of corporate life don‟t leave much time to pay attention to these issues, and many people don‟t even recognize meaning and purpose as potential sources of energy. Indeed, if we tried to begin our program by focusing on the human spirit, it would likely have minimal impact. Only when participants have experienced the value of the rituals they establish in the other dimensions do they start to see that being attentive to their own deeper needs dramatically influences their effectiveness and satisfaction at work. For E&Y partner Jonathan Anspacher, simply having the opportunity to ask himself a series of questions about what really mattered to him was both illuminating and energizing. “I think it‟s important to be a little introspective and say, „What do you want to be remembered for?‟” he told us. “You don‟t want to be remembered as the crazy partner who worked these long hours and had his people be miserable. When my kids call me and ask, „Can you come to my band concert?‟ I want to say, „Yes, I‟ll be there and I‟ll be in the front row.‟ I don‟t want to be the father that comes in and sits in the back and is on his Blackberry and has to step out to take a phone call.”

To access the energy of the human spirit, people need to clarify priorities and establish accompanying rituals in three categories: doing what they do best and enjoy most at work; consciously allocating time and energy to the areas of their lives—work, family, health, service to others—they deem most important; and living their core values in their daily behaviors. When you‟re attempting to discover what you do best and what you enjoy most, it‟s important to realize that these two things aren‟t necessarily mutually inclusive. You may get lots of positive feedback about something you‟re very good at but not truly enjoy it. Conversely, you can love doing something but have no gift for it, so that achieving success requires much more energy than it makes sense to invest. To help program participants discover their areas of strength, we ask them to recall at least two work experiences in the past several months during which they found themselves in their “sweet spot”— feeling effective, effortlessly absorbed, inspired, and fulfilled. Then we have them deconstruct those experiences to understand precisely what energized them so positively and what specific talents they were drawing on. If leading strategy feels like a sweet spot, for example, is it being in charge that‟s most invigorating or participating in a creative endeavor? Or is it using a skill that comes to you easily and so feels good to exercise? Finally, we have people establish a ritual that will encourage them to do more of exactly that kind of activity at work. A senior leader we worked with realized that one of the activities he least liked was reading and summarizing detailed sales reports, whereas one of his favorites was brainstorming new strategies. The leader found a direct report who loved immersing himself in numbers and delegated the sales report task to him—happily settling for brief oral summaries from him each day. The leader also began scheduling a free-form 90-minute strategy session every other week with the most creative people in his group. In the second category, devoting time and energy to what‟s important to you, there is often a similar divide between what people say is important and what they actually do. Rituals can help close this gap. When Jean Luc Duquesne, the Sony Europe vice president, thought hard about his personal priorities, he realized that spending time with his family was what mattered most to him, but it often got squeezed out of his day. So he instituted a ritual in which he switches off for at least three hours every evening when he gets home, so he can focus on his family. “I‟m still not an expert on PlayStation,” he told us, “but according to my youngest son, I‟m learning and I‟m a good student.” Steve Wanner, who used to talk on the cell phone all the way to his front door on his commute home, has chosen a specific spot 20 minutes from his house where he ends whatever call he‟s on and puts away the phone. He spends the rest of his commute relaxing so that when he does arrive home, he‟s less preoccupied with work and more available to his wife and children. The third category, practicing your core values in your everyday behavior, is a challenge for many as well. Most people are living at such a furious pace that they rarely stop to ask themselves what they stand for and who they want to be. As a consequence, they let external demands dictate their actions. We don‟t suggest that people explicitly define their values, because the results are usually too predictable. Instead, we seek to uncover them, in part by asking questions that are inadvertently

revealing, such as, “What are the qualities that you find most off-putting when you see them in others?” By describing what they can‟t stand, people unintentionally divulge what they stand for. If you are very offended by stinginess, for example, generosity is probably one of your key values. If you are especially put off by rudeness in others, it‟s likely that consideration is a high value for you. As in the other categories, establishing rituals can help bridge the gap between the values you aspire to and how you currently behave. If you discover that consideration is a key value, but you are perpetually late for meetings, the ritual might be to end the meetings you run five minutes earlier than usual and intentionally show up five minutes early for the meeting that follows. Addressing these three categories helps people go a long way toward achieving a greater sense of alignment, satisfaction, and well-being in their lives on and off the job. Those feelings are a source of positive energy in their own right and reinforce people‟s desire to persist at rituals in other energy dimensions as well. ••• This new way of working takes hold only to the degree that organizations support their people in adopting new behaviors. We have learned, sometimes painfully, that not all executives and companies are prepared to embrace the notion that personal renewal for employees will lead to better and more sustainable performance. To succeed, renewal efforts need solid support and commitment from senior management, beginning with the key decision maker. At Wachovia, Susanne Svizeny, the president of the region in which we conducted our study, was the primary cheerleader for the program. She embraced the principles in her own life and made a series of personal changes, including a visible commitment to building more regular renewal rituals into her work life. Next, she took it upon herself to foster the excitement and commitment of her leadership team. Finally, she regularly reached out by e-mail to all participants in the project to encourage them in their rituals and seek their feedback. It was clear to everyone that she took the work seriously. Her enthusiasm was infectious, and the results spoke for themselves. At Sony Europe, several hundred leaders have embraced the principles of energy management. Over the next year, more than 2,000 of their direct reports will go through the energy renewal program. From Fujio Nishida on down, it has become increasingly culturally acceptable at Sony to take intermittent breaks, work out at midday, answer e-mail only at designated times, and even ask colleagues who seem irritable or impatient what stories they‟re telling themselves. Organizational support also entails shifts in policies, practices, and cultural messages. A number of firms we worked with have built “renewal rooms” where people can regularly go to relax and refuel. Others offer subsidized gym memberships. In some cases, leaders themselves gather groups of employees for midday workouts. One company instituted a no-meeting zone between 8 and 9 am to ensure that people had at least one hour absolutely free of meetings. At several companies, including Sony, senior leaders collectively agreed to stop checking e-mail during meetings as a way to make the meetings more focused and efficient.

One factor that can get in the way of success is a crisis mentality. The optimal candidates for energy renewal programs are organizations that are feeling enough pain to be eager for new solutions but not so much that they‟re completely overwhelmed. At one organization where we had the active support of the CEO, the company was under intense pressure to grow rapidly, and the senior team couldn‟t tear themselves away from their focus on immediate survival—even though taking time out for renewal might have allowed them to be more productive at a more sustainable level. By contrast, the group at Ernst & Young successfully went through the process at the height of tax season. With the permission of their leaders, they practiced defusing negative emotions by breathing or telling themselves different stories, and alternated highly focused periods of work with renewal breaks. Most people in the group reported that this busy season was the least stressful they‟d ever experienced. The implicit contract between organizations and their employees today is that each will try to get as much from the other as they can, as quickly as possible, and then move on without looking back. We believe that is mutually self-defeating. Both individuals and the organizations they work for end up depleted rather than enriched. Employees feel increasingly beleaguered and burned out. Organizations are forced to settle for employees who are less than fully engaged and to constantly hire and train new people to replace those who choose to leave. We envision a new and explicit contract that benefits all parties: Organizations invest in their people across all dimensions of their lives to help them build and sustain their value. Individuals respond by bringing all their multidimensional energy wholeheartedly to work every day. Both grow in value as a result.

Copyright © 2007 Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved. Tony Schwartz (tony@theenergyproject.com) is the president and founder of the Energy Project in New York City, and a coauthor of The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal (Free Press, 2003). Catherine McCarthy (catherine@theenergyproject.com) is a senior vice president at the Energy Project.…...

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...Time Management "Things that mmost should never be at the mercy of thing that matter least". atter We, as human beings, let this happen much too often. Many of us waste our time on things that are neither important nor necessary, instead of using that time for thing of that are significannot . Time management is not only how to get more out of you're time, but really how to become a better person. Time is a very hard thing to manage, because we can neither see it or feel it until its has passed. Before we can manage our time we must know exactly what time is. The dictionary describes it as, the duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal. How we dispose of that time is time management. It's the way we spend our time to organize and execute around our priorities. Remember just because time is intangible doesn't mean that it is not valuable. I want to teach you about the background of time management, the different styles and how to use them, and how it will change your life. Background Time management today is not as it was in the past. It has grown with time. Stephen R. Covey places time management into four generations. He feels it has evolved the same way society has. Each generation grows on the one before it. For example, the agriculture revolution was followed by the industrial revolution, which was then followed by the informational revolution. The first wave or generation is basically notes and......

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...and I tell myself that whenever I get big and become a lady I want to be just like her, she is beautiful in every way I call her beauty with a purpose. My mother oh god! she is like the devil from the pit of hell, it seems she makes it her point of duty to tell me how ugly I am, that I am good for nothing and that I will never be nothing like Ms. Chin she said “gal being like miss Chin is just a figment of your imagination a dat mi a tell u”. I am just seven and she talks to me as if i am a 30 year old person she makes me do everything u can think of and this is the sad part sigh! her boyfriend is so unhealthy for me and she fail to see that, each time he comes by he looks at me and say “gwaan grow me wife” he would tell me occasionally that he loves me and wish I was older and he touch me as if am a woman, I cry each time he comes by my mom, because he is back and forth my mom would send me on Saturday’s to him for money at his house, I would pray and ask god to take away this forsaking day called Saturday. I would watch the television and pray asking god to send either the Minister of Youth Sports and Culture or Child Development Agency (CDA) to send someone to take me from this hell hole I call a home which houses me my mother’s boyfriend and her, they should be the protectors which I should trust with my life but they are the one that stole my childhood in a vilest and most terrifying way. I never thought he would touch me but he did and the pain in my heart is......

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...Time. Many people use their time differently, Some use there time inventing, inspiring. There is one thing that everyone can agree on is time is not something to waste. Steve Jobs once said, “Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone ease’s life. Don't be trapped by dogma which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.” .this quote explains time well because you don’t want to let other peoples options get in the way of your goal and cause someone to waste their time. One will never know when their time will be up, Good time management for a student requires three points. One step to make time management effective is to develop a time strategy. The time strategy should be based on a short list of time priorities. This short list forms the basis for a student's time planning for every week of the year. The dictionary definition of the word time is “the system of those sequential relations that any event has to any other, as past, present, or future; indefinite and continuous duration regarded as that in which events succeed one another.” My own personal definition of time is the opportunity you are give to succeed of or fail. The first of the three points that a student should keep in his or her mind is not taking on more than he or she can handle. If a student has scheduled to many classes to take in one......

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... |428 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Team Members/Contact Information |Name | |Phone | |Time zone and | |Email | | | | | |Availability During the Week | | | |Marcella | |(803)347-9611 | |(Evening) | |Marcy926@email.phoenix.edu | |Bouldrick | | | | | | | |Shamika Lewis | |(706)4218275 | |(Open) | |whoreg@email.phoenix.edu | | ...

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...Introduction cont.. * Poor time management can negatively affect the performance of the working students in several ways. First if they don’t structure their time for homework & projects, they may not able to complete them on time. Second is the cramming for examination which is the another common trait of disorganized or undisciplined college students that rather than setting aside time each evening for study, poor time managers try to absorb everything in a few late hours the day before the test. * Trying to manage all the demands of working and going to school is not an easy task, but it is possible. Time management is the key to their daily survival and success in reaching their goal. Introduction cont.. * Poor time management can negatively affect the performance of the working students in several ways. First if they don’t structure their time for homework & projects, they may not able to complete them on time. Second is the cramming for examination which is the another common trait of disorganized or undisciplined college students that rather than setting aside time each evening for study, poor time managers try to absorb everything in a few late hours the day before the test. * Trying to manage all the demands of working and going to school is not an easy task, but it is possible. Time management is the key to their daily survival and success in reaching their goal. Statement of the problem The study aims to answer the following......

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...understanding and compassionate. I also have very strong interpersonal skills and a couple of experience in customer service from my home country Tanzania. I believe that these skills acquired from my experiences can be applicable to my position as a waitress in a benefiting way.  My resume, which is attached to this letter, contains additional information on my education and skills. I look forward to hearing from you and will be glad if you could set me up for an interview. Your time taken to read this is highly appreciated.   Sincerely yours, 
 Angela Kundi. Angela Kundi #4-1520 1st Street South. Cranbrook BC. V1C 1B9 | angelkundi@yahoo.com| C+1-250-464-0099                        Objective  To find a full time job in Cranbrook Skills/Qualification Summary * Positive Team Player * Great Customer Service Skills * Ability to pay attention to details * Great interpersonal communication skills * Knowledge on Microsoft Word, Excel and Access Work Experience * Baraza resort and spa April 2012- June......

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...HOW TO SPEND YOUR 168 HOURS A WEEK WISELY Time or the lack of time is a major problem for many college students. The week won't expand to 200 hours, so it's up to you to make your activities fit the time you have. Follow these directions and use the calendar on the other side to analyze your time use and find some solutions. About 100 of the 168 hours are taken up with sleeping, eating, personal care, travel, chores, religious activities, and some leisure time.            TOTAL THE HOURS ALLOWED FOR CLASS, STUDY, WORK, AND OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES. EXAMINE YOUR SCHEDULE AS IT IS           FIRST, FILL IN MAJOR COMMITMENTS AND PERSONAL TIME: Pencil in all your class times, work hours, and other regular commitments such as meetings and practices. Allow for travel times. Allow time to shower, eat meals, do laundry, shop for groceries, etc. REMEMBER TO ALLOW ENOUGH TIME TO SLEEP! If you consistently try to get by on less then 7 hours of sleep per day, you may risk your physical health and undermine everything else. It's true-- you should allow about two hours of study time for every hour you spend in class. A 5-credit math or science class requires ten hours a week to read, study, and do homework problems. Schedule study and review times as soon after classes as possible. Allow study time every day for difficult subjects. Study specific subjects at specific times- math at 2 on Sunday. Try to study at the times of day that are best for you. If you are at your......

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...Running head: Time management in nursing 1 Time management in nursing Running Head: Time management in nursing 2 Nursing is a demanding career in and of itself. Without effective time management both at work and home a nurse be easily become affected by prolonged stress. Learning to manage your time effectively is highly rewarding. By managing time you become more effective and less hassled . At the end of the work day you go home with little more energy and better attitude. Time may be one of the the precious source to manage.There is an old saying that time is money. In health care time affects both money and quality. For each nurse there is a finite and identifiable limit to the hours to do work. With the same second in every minuites nurse need to find ways to stretch the time available to meet the needs that arise(Hurber,20006)Many nurses complain about needing more time. They are stressed and frustrated . At any point in time nurse guggle work and other roles such as student, partner, parent, child,or friend.As work places are restructures for efficiency and employ......

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...Once your files are backed up, shut down your MacBook Pro. Plug it into the AC adapter, and then boot it back up. Finally, press and hold “Command-R” (the “Command” and “R” keys at the same time) to start the restore process. Hold these keys until the Apple logo appears on the screen, and then release them. You will be taken to an alternative boot screen with a “Mac OS X Utilities” menu. Step 3 In order to complete a system restore, you will need to connect your computer to the Internet. Select “Wi-Fi” from the Utilities menu and find the router you will be using. Enter your Wi-Fi username and password to connect. Step 4 Depending on which version of OS X you are using, your Utilities menu will be slightly different. Look for either “Internet Recovery” or “OS X Recovery,” and select whichever one you find. This should present you with a “Reinstall OS X” option. Click on it, and then wait as your MacBook Pro connects to the Internet and gathers information on your laptop from Apple servers. You may be prompted to provide your Apple account information, including username and password. If so, provide it. In any case, this process will eventually reach the point where your MacBook downloads the latest version of OS X, as well as the standard programs that Apple includes pre-installed on every laptop. Your hard drive will then be automatically formatted, and the computer will restore itself to factory settings. Step 5 Once the reinstallation process is......

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...guys are all bundled up." Clearly animated and looking well, he said he didn't feel much different than he did after his five-month station mission five years ago. Kelly and Kornienko had checked out of the space station 3½ hours earlier. In total, they traveled 144 million miles through space, circled the world 5,440 times and experienced 10,880 orbital sunrises and sunsets during the longest single spaceflight by an American. Kelly posted one last batch of sunrise photos Tuesday on Twitter, before quipping, "I gotta go!" His final tweet from orbit came several hours later: "The journey isn't over. Follow me as I rediscover # Earth!" Piloting the Soyuz capsule home for Kelly, 52, and Kornienko, 55, was the much fresher and decade younger cosmonaut Sergey Volkov, whose space station stint lasted the typical six months. The two yearlong spacemen faced a series of medical tests following touchdown. Before committing to even longer Mars missions, NASA wants to know the limits of the human body for a year, minus gravity. As he relinquished command of the space station Monday, Kelly noted that he and Kornienko "have been up here for a really, really long time" and have been jokingly telling one another, "We did it!" and "We made it!"...

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