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Tinker vs Des Moines

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Tinker Vs Des moines

How would you feel if you were suspended just for wearing a hat? Well, imagine how the Tinker kids felt when they got suspended for wearing an armband in protest of the Vietnam war. It was john tinker, Mary-Beth Tinker and another friend who made the decision to protest against the Vietnamese war by wearing some armbands. The school allowed several political symbols to be worn, but banned anything against the Vietnamese war. When they were suspended, their father sued the school, but the district court said that what the school did was constitutional, and they took it to supreme court.

What the school did was completely unconstitutional. The Tinker kids have the freedom of expression (1st amendment) to support them. The school had no right to suspend anyone who was wearing an armband in protest of the Vietnam war.

The first amendment states ‘congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free practice thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances’. The Tinker kids expressed themselves through wearing an armband to school, therefore the Tinker kids were expressing themselves against a war, which is, according to the bill of rights, is perfectly legal.

The kids were also peacefully protesting against the war, which means that they weren’t being disruptive, and they didn’t harm anyone when they were protesting. Basically, all they did was wear an armband to school, to protest against a war that was, as we all know, pointless.

Therefore, what the school did was violating the kids of the 1st amendment. The school had absolutely no right to suspend the Tinker kids because they were peacefully protesting against the Vietnamese…...

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