To What Extent Did Indian Indentured Labour Help to Relieve the Post-Emancipation Labour Problems in Trinidad?

In: Social Issues

Submitted By hezronrougier
Words 3913
Pages 16
To What Extent Did Indian Indentured Labour Help To Relieve The Post-Emancipation Labour Problems In Trinidad?
Compiled by Mark Rougier

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction................................................................................................................................(1)

Defining the terms Indian indentured labour; and post-emancipation…………………….(1)

The Labour Problems.................................................................................................................(2)

Failure in the Systematic Convention Explanation…………………………………………..(2)

Labour Shortage......................................................................................................................... (3)
Cash Flow.................................................................................................................................... (4)
The Communication Problem................................................................................................. ..(5)
The Indian Arrival……………………………………………………………………………..(5)
The extent to which Indian indentured labour help to relieve the post-emancipation labour problems in Trinidad......................................................................................................... ……(6)
Laying The Basis ForProfitability......................................................................................... .(7)
The Effects Wages had on relieving the labour problems………………………………… (8)
Contributions made by Indian Indentured Women labourers…………………………….(10)
Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………. (11)
Bibliorgraphy.............................................................................................................................(13)

Introduction
“History is about organizing the past, (and) preserving in commonality the memory of shared experiences, many of…...

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