Torvald Helmer

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Torvald Helmer
Torvald Helmer is the only character that has not changed throughout the entire play. Torvald, in the beginning of the play, is a controlling narcissistic middle aged man who plays and controls with his wife, Nora, and his three children to conform to the ideals of him and the society. As Nora is pleading to Torvald for Krogstad to keep his job at the bank, Torvald tells Nora, “And just by pleading for him you make it impossible for me to keep him on. It’s already known at the bank that I’m firing Krogstad. What if it’s rumored around now that the new bank manager was vetoed by his wife.” This shows that Torvald makes a lot of his decisions based on the opinions of his peers. Also this is showing that he wants to make all the decisions and does not want Nora calling any of the shots.
Because Torvald is controlling, no matter what Nora told him he would not change his mind and let Nora control him. Towards the end of the play after Torvald gets the second letter from Krogstad, explaining that he is no longer going to blackmail the Helmers anymore. After Torvald reads this his is stricken with joy and tells Nora, “For a man there’s something indescribably sweet and satisfying in knowing he’s forgiven his wife- and forgiven her out of a full and open heart. It’s as if she belongs to him in two ways now: in a sense he’s given her fresh into the world again, and she’s become his wife and his child as well.” Even after everything that Nora has went through, all that matters to Torvald is how he feels and how he forgives Nora for almost getting his reputation slandered.
Torvald feels that he does not control Nora only as a wife, but now as a child also, a child that he has to take care of and tell what to do at all times. Also, still all that matters is that his reputation is still in good shape. At the end of the story, after Nora tells Torvald that…...

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