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GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF TOURISM & CULTURE DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION

FINAL REPORT ON 20 YEAR PERSPECTIVE PLAN FOR DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN MAHARASHTRA

MARCH 2003 ΑΒΧ DALAL MOTT MACDONALD
(FORMERLY DALAL CONSULTANTS & ENGINEERS LIMITED)

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Ministry of Tourism & Culture C-1, Hutments, Dalhousie Road New Delhi – 110 001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra
March 2003

Dalal Consultants & Engineers Limited Sarojini House 6 Bhagwan Dass Road New Delhi 110 001 India Tel: (011)-3389386, 3383521.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

ssue and Revision Record
Rev Date Originator Checker Approver Description

This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any other project without an independent check being carried out as to its suitability and prior written authority of Dalal Consultants and Engineers being obtained. Dalal Consultants and Engineers accepts no responsibility or liability for the consequence of this document being used for a purpose other than the purposes for which it was commissioned. Any person using or relying on the document for such other purpose agrees, and will by such use or reliance be taken to confirm his agreement to indemnify Dalal Consultants and Engineers for all loss or damage resulting therefrom. Dalal Consultants and Engineers accepts no responsibility or liability for this document to any party other than the person by whom it was commissioned.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 2 Tourism Scenario in India – An Overview Study Objective Scope of the Study Approach & Methodology Report Format Limitations of the Study 1-1 1-1 1-13 1-13 1-15 1-17 1-18 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-3 2-4 2-7 2-8 2-9 2-9 2-13 2-16 2-24 2-24 2-31 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-4 3-9 3-10 3-15 3-17

CURRENT STATUS OF TOURISM IN THE STATE 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 Introduction State Profile Significance of Tourism State Tourism Policy Development Regulations in Maharashtra State Plan Outlays on Tourism Trend in Tourist Arrivals Travel Circuits and Destinations / Attractions Current Status of Integrated Tourist Infrastructure / Facilities Current Status of Basic Infrastructure Current Status of Environment National River Action Plan Current Status of Institutional Framework for Tourism

3

FIELD SURVEY FINDINGS 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 Introduction Sampling Plan and Methodology Survey Findings: Foreign Tourists Analysis of Survey Findings: Foreign Tourists Survey Findings: Domestic Tourists Major items of interest during visit Analysis of Survey Findings: Domestic Tourists 1 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 4

Main areas of concern / Other observations Survey Findings: Tour Operators / Travel Agents Survey Findings: Tourism and Related Govt. Departments Analysis of Survey Findings: Tourism and Related Govt. Departments

3-17 3-17 3-22 3-27

Analysis of Survey Findings: Basic and Tourist Infrastructure at Visited Destinations 3-29 Summary of Infrastructure Gaps Identified By Field Survey 3-29 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-3 4-8 4-12 4-13 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-4 5-5 5-7 5-10 5-13

PROJECT IDENTIFICATION, SELECTION AND VIABILITY 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Introduction Prioritization of destinations for tourism development Project ideas / concept Project Selection / Prioritisation Project Viability of Selected / Short Listed Projects Environment Impact Analysis

5

PERSPECTIVE PLAN 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Introduction Tourism Policy (Vision) Environment Protection and Cultural Preservation Competitor Analysis Market Analysis Perspective Plan Investment Planning

5.8 Summary of 20 years Perspective plan for sustainable development of tourism in Maharashtra 5-20 6 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 Introduction Communicating and finalizing the plan Developing an Institutional framework Promotion/ Marketing Cell of MTDC Regional Execution Offices Destination marketing Financing tourism development 2 of 3 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-5 6-9

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.8 6.9

Human resource development Implementation agencies

6-13 6-14

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E
E.1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Introduction

Tourism industry in Maharashtra has a tremendous potential for growth, given the availability of basic infrastructure and the variety of tourist themes offered by various destinations in Maharashtra. Maharashtra has a rich historical and cultural heritage, which has been under-explored by the tourism industry and the government agencies. The strong basic infrastructure availability through out the state would provide a perfect platform for fresh private investments in development of tourism in the state, and in the process creating many direct and indirect employment opportunities to local residents. Till date, in the absence of proper MIS and long term planning, the development of tourism in Maharashtra, has suffered due to the fragmented approach of various government departments like forest, tourism, ASI, irrigation etc. DCEL has proposed a perspective plan for sustainable development of tourism in Maharashtra for the next 20 years, that not only stresses on more private participation but also gives importance to environmental and socio economic concerns. The plan also proposes an implementation strategy that involves all concerned departments for an integrated approach towards tourism development.

E.2

Year wise phasing of investment

The total investment envisaged for development of tourism in Maharashtra can be classified with respect to the sources of investment namely private sector and the public expenditure. The major investments expected under private sector investments are accommodation projects and revenue generating projects. Public expenditure is suggested for augmentation of basic and tourism infrastructure and promotional activities. The direction and magnitude of the flow of investments depends on the prioritisation of destination and the nature of projects proposed in that region. In the first 5-10 years, the western region of Maharashtra, specifically Konkan and the Aurangabad region would be on priority in terms of expenses incurred on tourism projects, tourism infrastructure and promotion. In the eastern region, which is comparatively less popular amongst tourists, higher tourist inflow is expected after the proposed Multimodal International airport at Nagpur becomes operational. The eastern region would be on the priority in the later years from the years 2011-12. The purpose of investments made at a particular region would also follow a logical sequence moving from investments to fill up infrastructure gaps to public expenditure on tourist infrastructure and finally private sector investments in revenue generating tourism projects starting from accommodation and restaurants to water sports, amusement parks and other retaining themes. The phasing of investments in the perspective plan considers the following characteristics of the plan.

1. Investments are phased based on the prioritization of destinations thereby minimizing the cost of basic infrastructure development exclusively for tourism purposes.
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2. More stress is laid on private sector participation. 3. Destination development is proposed through initial government spending on basic and tourism infrastructure and private spending on tourism projects. 4. Simultaneous development of other similar destinations (secondary destination) to act as substitutes to destinations reaching their carrying capacity, thus retaining the tourists in Maharashtra. 5. Promotion expenditure proposed to be channelised as per destination prioritization 6. Integrated approach towards development of tourism with co-ordination between various government departments and concerned sanctioning authorities. 7. Sustainable tourism development through projects feasible on the economic, socio-economic and environmental fronts.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The year wise investments envisaged by DCEL under various heads is given in table E-1 Table E.1: Investment Plan Head / Year Wise (Rs. Lacs)
Category
Accommodation

02-03
103.0 148.9 6.5 17.2 830.0 115.0 80.0 195.0 1495.7

03-04
149.8 1518.9 86.6 7.5 830.0 115.0 80.0 195.0 2982.7

04-05
209.1 1335.9 48.5 85.0 830.0 115.0 80.0 195.0 2898.4

05-06
588.8 2585.7 208.4 167.8 830.0 115.0 80.0 195.0 4770.8

06-07
445.1 2251.6 199.0 16.8 830.0 115.0 80.0 195.0 4132.5

07-08
669.4 1084.9 499.4 0.0 871.5 120.8 84.0 204.8 3534.7

08-09
565.3 1854.4 495.4 314.4 871.5 120.8 84.0 204.8 4510.6

09-10
642.9 1246.6 470.3 0.0 871.5 120.8 84.0 204.8 3640.8

10-11
617.8 1246.6 65.5 349.3 871.5 120.8 84.0 204.8 3560.2

11-12
1085.0 1000.0 24.9 349.3 871.5 120.8 84.0 204.8 3740.2

12-13
700.0 1238.4 170.5 349.3 915.1 126.8 88.2 215.0 3803.4

13-14
936.5 1454.8 470.0 0.0 915.1 126.8 88.2 215.0 4206.3

14-15
736.2 1454.8 470.0 0.0 915.1 126.8 88.2 215.0 4006.1

15-16
299.2 2120.1 28.5 0.0 915.1 126.8 88.2 215.0 3792.9

16-17
2160.1 1253.7 10.0 0.0 915.1 126.8 88.2 215.0 4768.9

17-18
2347.7 1224.5 170.0 0.0 960.8 133.1 92.6 225.7 5154.5

18-19
2462.7 1224.5 170.0 0.0 960.8 133.1 92.6 225.7 5269.5

19-20
1668.9 1224.5 170.0 0.0 960.8 133.1 133.1 225.7 4516.2

20-21
1434.8 1224.5 10.0 0.0 960.8 133.1 92.6 225.7 4081.7

21-22
3303.9 238.4 10.0 0.0 960.8 133.1 92.6 225.7 4964.7

Tourism Projects Tourism Infrastructure Basic Infrastructure Promotion HRM TM&A Others Total

6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 01-02 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18 18-19 19-20 20-21 21-22 Year

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Rs. Lakh

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E.3

Existing tourist traffic

International tourist arrivals to India in 2000 were estimated at 2.64 million, a growth of 6.4% over the previous year. India was estimated to have a share of 0.38% in world tourism traffic in 2000. Maharashtra had a total tourist arrivals of 9.37 million tourists of which 8.3 million were domestic and 1.07 million were foreign tourists. Maharashtra was ranked second for the foreign tourist arrivals in India accumulating a share of 17.72% close behind Delhi at 21.0%. In the domestic scenario Maharashtra accounted for only 3.95% of the arrivals in India and was ranked seventh. U.P and A.P were the leaders with a whopping share close to 23% each.

E.4

Inventory of existing tourist facilities (Hotels) and proposed facilities

According to the data compiled by the Federation of Hotel & Restaurant association of India (FHRAI) and the Ministry of tourism for the year 2000 the total number of approved hotels of various categories is 242 with total rooms amounting to 13,854. According to the planning department (Govt. of Maharashtra), the targeted tourism bed capacity for ninth five-year plan 1997-02 was 10000. The targeted bed capacity was 100 beds for each of the annual plans 2000-01 and 2001-02. E.5 Existing development / investment plans for tourism development Table E.2: Sub Sector Wise Outlays for the state of Maharashtra Sr.No Sub Sector Ninth Five Year Plan Annual Plan 1997-2002 Outlay 2002-2003 Outlay (Lacs) (Lacs) 600.00 45.00 Tenth Five Year Plan 2002-2007 Outlay (Lacs) 150.00

1

Share Capital contribution of State Govt. to M.T.D.C 2 Director of 9400.00 Tourism 3 External Aided 7200.00 Projects 4 Other district level schemes 5 Forest Tourism 334.00 Total (Rs. Lacs) 17534.00 Total (Rs. Crore) 175.34 Source: Planning Department, Govt. of Maharashtra

1927.00 288.21 163.72 2423.93 24.24

10671.00 531.00 379.00 11731.00 117.31

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E.6

Stakeholders

Various stakeholders are in the process of the development of different destinations. MSRDC has proposed development of New Mahabaleshwar hill station near Mahabaleshwar. Pre feasibility study of this area has been carried out by MSRDC. The Government of Maharashtra has approved the project in principle. In addition to the above projects, MSRDC has undertaken following road development projects that could help in strengthening basic infrastructure at various tourist destinations. • • • City integrated Road Development Projects for the cities of Aurangabad, Pune, Amravati, Solapur and Nagpur. Multi Modal International Hub Airport at Nagpur Four laning of Satara – Kolhapur – Kagal Section of NH4

Also, various tourism development plans have been drawn up at district level for some districts but have not materialized due to shortage of funds. The government of Maharashtra has declared entire Sindhudurg district as a “Tourism district” and a tourism development plan has been prepared and submitted to the government. The railways have also taken up new projects that involve electrification, doubling and quadrpauling of some existing routes and also setting up new routes. The addition of new lines between Ahmednagar – Parali Vaijanath via Beed and Putamba – Shirdi will benefit tourists travelling to Parali Vaijanath and Shirdi, which are among the major pilgrimage centres in Maharashtra.

E.7

Categorization of existing and potential tourism destinations

E.7.1

Tourist Circuits

Most of tourist destinations in Maharashtra form a part of a larger tourist circuit with other destinations in the vicinity. Major tourist circuits are located in the Western Ghats and some parts of central Maharashtra. Nagpur circuit and Ajantha-Ellora circuits are other important circuits in Northern and eastern Zone. Most of the established tourist circuits in Maharashtra are formed by grouping of important destinations in a particular region of Maharashtra like Konkan, Marathwada, Vidarbha etc. Such a grouping essentially encompasses a variety of tourist themes within a single circuit e.g. South Konkan circuit includes beaches of Malvan & Tarkarli, Amboli hill-station, sea forts of Sindhudurg and Vijaydurg and pilgrimage sites. It is due to this characteristic of tourist circuits of Maharashtra that makes it important to allocate resources towards integrated development based on prioritization of destinations rather than prioritization of tourism themes. A summary of the established tourist circuits in Maharashtra is given below in Table E.3.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table E.3: Established Tourist Circuits

Circuit Mahabaleshwar Ashtavinayak Aurangabad Nashik Central Konkan North Konkan South Konkan Entire Konkan Amravati Vidarbha Vidarbha E.7.2

Destinations Covered Mahabaleshwar, Panchgani, Pratapgad, Wai. 8 Ganesh Temples around Pune district Aurangabad, Paithan, Daulatabad, Ellora, Grishneshwar, Ajantha. Nashik, Wani, Trimbakeshwar, Shirdi. Kolhapur, Panhala, Ratnagiri, Pavas, Ganapatipule, Dervan, Chiplun. Alibag, Murud – Janjira, Harihareshwar, Srivardhan, Dapoli. Kolhapur, Amboli, Sawantwadi, Vengurla, Malvan, Sindhudurg, Vijaydurg Major attractions in Sindhudurg, Ratnagiri and Raigad districts Amravati, Chikhaldara, Semadoh, Muktagiri Vidarbha Ashtavinayak Nagpur, Ramtek, Khindsi and Totladoh

Themes Leisure, Eco, Fort Pilgrimage Heritage, Pilgrimage, Fort Pilgrimage, Eco Pilgrimage, Leisure Heritage, Beach Beach, Leisure, Heritage. Pilgrimage, Leisure, Heritage Pilgrimage, Heritage Eco, Leisure Pilgrimage Leisure, Eco

Potential Tourist Destinations

Many tourist destinations like virgin beaches on the western coast, Lonar in Buldhana district, Bhandardara, Bhimashankar etc can be developed as major tourist destinations. These destinations can easily be integrated in the established tourist circuits due to the availability of basic infrastructure at these destinations. These secondary destinations should be developed by strengthening the tourist infrastructure through provision of public amenities, signage and site development. Once the tourism infrastructure is provided, the secondary destinations would be in a position to graduate into primary destinations with the inflow of funds in revenue generating tourism projects.

E.7.3

Stand – Alone Destinations

Stand-alone destinations in Maharashtra are mostly day tour destinations located within a distance of 150-200 km from major cities like Mumbai, Pune, Aurangabad, Nagpur, Nashik, Kolhapur etc. Such destinations offer enough to retain tourists for a day or two. Destinations like Sinhagad fort, Panhala, Dapoli, Bhimashankar Lonavala-Khandala are a few stand-alone weekend destinations. Tourism projects targeted towards urban population from nearby cities should be encouraged at these stand-alone destinations. Projects like Amusement Parks, water parks and other entertainment projects at these destinations would increase the retaining theme of that destination and would convert day destinations into a camping destination. This would in turn increase the revenue generated through tourism for such destinations.

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E-6

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E.8

Evaluation of Existing and Potential destinations

In order to prioritise the destinations to be developed in Maharashtra over the next 20 years, 45 odd primary and secondary destinations were visited and evaluated on the basis of following criteria. 1. State Government Priority 2. Significance of destination 3. Number of tourist attractions 4. Volume of traffic flow 5. Tourist infrastructure and facilities 6. Tourism related basic infrastructure 7. Sustainability of Tourism development 8. Socio-Economic Development 9. Institutional Support mechanism The destinations visited were then ranked on the cumulative points tally for each destination. The zone wise ranking of destinations visited is given in Table E.4. Table E.4: Zone Wise Ranking of Tourist Destinations and Places District Aurangabad Ahmednagar Aurangabad Aurangabad Buldhana Nashik Nashik Nashik Aurangabad Aurangabad Nashik Aurangabad Nashik Buldhana Destination / Tourist Place Aurangabad City Shirdi Ellora Ajantha Shegaon Nashik City Trimbakeshwar Bhandardara Paithan Daulatabad Wani Khuldabad Chandvad Lonar Crater Theme Heritage Pilgrimage Heritage Heritage Pilgrimage Leisure Pilgrimage Ecotourism, Leisure Culture Heritage Pilgrimage Heritage Ecotourism Score 37.0 36.0 35.0 33.0 32.5 31.5 29.5 29.5 28.0 27.0 25.5 25.0 23.5 21.0

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NORTH ZONE

E-7

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

District Mumbai Pune Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Kolhapur Raigad Pune Sindhudurg Satara Raigad Sindhudurg Kolhapur Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Raigad Pune Raigad Raigad Pune Kolhapur Satara Sindhudurg Raigad Sindhudurg Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Raigad Satara Sindhudurg Satara Raigad Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Ratnagiri Kolhapur Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri

Destination / Tourist Place Mumbai City Pune City Ganapatipule Sawantwadi Kolhapur Alibag Bhimashankar Malvan Mahabaleshwar Janjira Kudal Panhala Ratnagiri City Vengurla Amboli Devgad Elephanta Ashtavinayak Srivardhan Harihareshwar Lonavala-Khandala Jotiba Panchgani Vijaydurg Pratapgad Tarkarli Diveagar Kunkeshwar Matheran Koyna Velneshwar Wai Karnala Mithbao Jaigad Dervan Dajipur Hedvi Karde Murud-Harne Pavas Anjarle

Theme Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Beach Leisure Pilgrimage Beach Hill Station Heritage, Beach Hill Station Heritage, Beach Leisure Heritage, Leisure Beach, Heritage Beach Leisure Mango, Beach Heritage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage, Beach Hill Station Pilgrimage Leisure Heritage Heritage Beach Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage/Beach Hill Station Leisure Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage/Leisure Eco Beach Heritage, Beach Culture Eco Beach Beach Heritage, Beach Pilgrimage Pilgrimage

Rank 40.0 35.5 35.0 35.0 34.0 33.0 33.0 33.0 32.0 31.5 31.5 31.5 31.0 31.0 30.5 30.5 29.5 29.0 29.0 28.5 28.5 28.0 28.0 28.0 27.5 27.5 27.0 27.0 26.5 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.5 25.5 25.0 24.5 23.5 23.0 21.0 21.0 20.0 18.5

WEST ZONE

District
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Destination / Tourist Place
E-8

Theme

Rank

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Nagpur Wardha Amravati Chandrapur Nagpur Amravati Nagpur Nagpur Wardha Chandrapur Wardha Nagpur Chandrapur Bhandara Gondia Amravati Gondia District Solapur Dharashiv Parbhani Beed Beed

Nagpur City Wardha City Chikhaldara Chandrapur City Ramtek Amravati City Pench Tiger Reserve Totladoh Sewagram Bhadravati Paunar Khindsi Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve Bhandara City Nawegaon N.P Melghat Tiger Reserve Nagzira Wildlife S. Destination / Tourist Place Pandharpur Tuljapur Aundha Nagnath Parali Vaijanath Ambejogai

Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Historical Hill Station, Heritage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Hub Eco Tourism Leisure Historical Pilgrimage Historical Leisure Eco Tourism Hub Eco Tourism Eco Tourism Eco Tourism Theme Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage

37.5 34.5 33.0 32.5 31.0 30.5 29.5 29.5 28.5 28.0 28.0 27.0 27.0 26.5 26.5 24.5 24.5 Rank 35.0 32.5 27.0 27.0 26.5

E.9

SOUTH ZONE

EAST ZONE

Traffic Flow Projections

Though the destination wise tourist traffic data for all the tourist destinations in Maharashtra is not recorded, the current tourist traffic estimates were collected through discussions with local tourism officials, planning authorities and other experts at various tourist locations. The forecasts for growth in tourist traffic at visited destinations were made after considering various factors such as • • • • • Destination Prioritisation Infrastructure development plans Carrying capacity of the destination Development of substitute destinations Promotion

The forecast of tourist inflow at various destinations over the next 20 years was carried out carefully after detailed analysis of factors that may influence the tourist behaviour. The tourist traffic forecast is
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

very critical as it directly determines the schedule of implementation of the proposed projects at respective destinations. Figure E.1: Projected Tourist Arrivals
350
Arrivals (Lakh)

300 250 200 150 100 50 0 01-02 06-07 11-12 Year 17-18 Domestic
Foreign

According to the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, the total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra in the year 2001 was 93,72,327 (say 94 Lakh nos). DCEL expects the tourist arrivals in Maharashtra to grow at an average growth rate of 6.72% per year to reach a figure of 344,05,702 (say 344 Lakh nos.) in the year 2021. The overall growth rate of 6.72 percent is an aggregate of estimated growth rates throughout the plan period, at all the visited destinations. The growth rates of individual destinations and major factors affecting the growth are given in Chapter 5, Appendix 5.

E.10

Investment Planning

DCEL has proposed investments in various destinations under different heads namely Accommodation, Tourism Projects, Basic Infrastructure, Tourism Infrastructure and Promotion, after detailed study of the infrastructure gaps and tourism potential of each destination. Project Type Road Condition Destinations Lonar, Paithan, Daulatabad, Wani, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Pratapgad, Panhala, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Dervan, MurudHarne, Anjarle, Karde, Harihareshwar, Diveagar, Wardha, Bhadravati Lonar, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Pratapgad, Amboli, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Ganapatipule, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Anjarle, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Bhandara, Nawegaon N.P, Nagzira Wildlife S, Pench, Melghat Lonar Crater, Dajipur, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Karde, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Nawegaon N.P, Nagzira Wildlife S., Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve, Melghat Tiger Reserve, Tuljapur Total 18

Means of Transport

20

Communication

14

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Eating Places

Ajantha, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Dajipur, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Karde, Diveagar, Janjira, Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve Paithan, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Koyna, Jotiba, Dajipur, Sawantwadi, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Vijaydurg, Dervan, MurudHarne, Anjarle, Karde, Diveagar, Janjira, Wardha, Bhadravati, TadobaAndhari Tiger Reserve, Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve, Totladoh, Melghat Tiger Reserve, Ambejogai Daulatabad, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Wai, Pratapgad, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Vijaydurg, Murud-Harne, Karde, Janjira, Karnala, Bhadravati, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Ramtek, Khindsi, Pench Tiger Reserve, Amravati, Chikhaldara, Melghat Tiger Reserve

13

Signage

25

Public Amenities

21

A total investment of Rs 798.30 Cr is envisaged in the next 20 years, almost 98% of which is directly related to tourism. 2% of the investment is envisaged for provision of basic infrastructure and includes only those projects, which are currently essential for development of tertiary destinations. The other infrastructure investments like investments for routine maintenance of roads, strengthening of water and power supply etc, come under the purview of other government departments and are not considered in the perspective plan for tourism development. Major tourist destinations visited already have the necessary basic infrastructure for tourism development in terms of accessibility, supply of utilities and power, waste management etc. The investment head wise cost configuration proposed for Maharashtra in the next 20 years is given in Table E.5. Table E.5: Head Wise Proposed Investment Investment Head Accommodation Tourism Projects Tourism Infrastructure Basic Infrastructure Promotion Human Resource Management Tourism Management / Administration Others (Incentives/ subsidies) Total Cumulative for 20 years timeframe Rs. Lakh % share 21126.41 26 % 26931.86 34 % 3783.45 5% 1656.70 2% 17887.02 22 % 2478.32 3% 1764.57 2% 4202.37 5% 79830.70 100%

The state government authority responsible for development of tourism in Maharashtra (MTDC) owns around 48 tourist complexes all over the state. MTDC now plans to restrict its activities as operator of tourism projects and act as a facilitator to augment private sector investments.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Higher budgetary outlays for promotion of Maharashtra as a tourist destination is envisaged instead of government investments in tourism projects. Public expenditure should only be restricted towards demonstration projects at developing destinations and provision of tourist infrastructure. Out of the total planned investment of Rs. 798.30 Cr in Maharashtra, as high as 54% would come from private participation. Table E.6 gives the percentage share of investments according to the source of funds. Table E.6: Share of Investment by Source of Funds Source Projects Type Investment 2002-2022 Rs Lakh 34291.88 % Share 43%

Public Sector

Private Sector Public + Private Total E.11

Promotion, Basic Infrastructure, Tourism Infrastructure, Revenue generating demo projects to attract private investors, projects in restricted zones like forts, forests, Human resource management, Tourism management and administration and incentives etc Revenue earning projects at primary and secondary destinations Joint projects where initial investment would be made by Government and operation would be private

43354.99 2183.85 79,830.72

54% 3% 100%

Identified Projects and implementation schedule

E.11.1 Accommodation Projects Accommodation facilities play a very important role in development of tourism at any destination. Almost 50% of the total expenditure of tourists per day goes for accommodation at tourist locations. Accommodation projects are amongst the first revenue-generating projects to come up at tourist destinations. The required additional accommodation facility at tourist destination is directly proportional to the number of tourist arrivals staying at that destination. Out of the total investment of Rs 433.54 Cr, for revenue generating projects, almost 48.21% would be in projects providing accommodation facilities tourists. The accommodation projects include Beach resorts, Budget Accommodation, Non Star Luxury Hotels and Star Hotels.

E.11.2 Other Revenue Generating Projects Revenue generating projects suggested at different locations depend on the target market of tourists expected to visit that destination. Projects like Amusement parks and convention centres would not be feasible at remote locations and hence should be located near major cities and business hubs. At exclusive tourist destinations away from major cities, less capital intensive, small-scale projects such as water sports, mall road and shopping centres etc are suggested.
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table E.7 shows the private investment envisaged in revenue generating projects and suggested locations Table E.7: Proposed Private Investment Heads Project Accommodation Convention Centre Water Sport Amusement Park Health Resort Ropeway Others Total Investment (Rs Lakh) 20903.27 254.05 143.71 14694.00 1430.58 2122.40 3806.98 Suggested Locations All destinations Bhandardara, Karde, Amboli, Paithan, Chikhaldara Ratnagiri, Pune, Harihareshwar, Janjira, Kunkeshwar, Harne Aurangabad, Pune, Karde, Nashik, Kolhapur, Nagpur Amboli, Ratnagiri, Bhandardara, Bhimashankar, Koyna, Chikhaldara Wani, Sinhagad, Ramtek Chikhaldara, Pune, Nashik, Ajantha, Wardha, Totladoh, Diveagar, Tarkarli, Mumbai, Panhala, Tarkarli, Paithan, Ratnagiri, Dervan, Ratnagiri, Dajipur, Karde, Malvan, Karde

E.12

Feasibility for Identified Projects

As a major share of investments in the revenue-generating projects would come from the private investors, it is essential that the suggested projects are economically feasible. At the same time, the projects should be sustainable in terms of socio-economic benefit to local community and environmental balance of the destination. The project identified at each destination during the survey, after discussions with experts and government authorities were checked for its sustainability on Technical, Financial, Environmental and Social aspects of the projects. Private sector investment projects viable on all four aspects are included in the perspective plan. Projects that are not revenue generating but essential for tourism development like providing of basic and tourism infrastructure are proposed for funding through budget outlays. Financial feasibility models were prepared for each type of revenue-generating project. These modules for financial feasibility would hold good at almost all suggested locations unless there is a major difference in land rates, in which case the project cost will increase. The financial models of suggested projects are so designed that the financial indicators of IRR, DSCR etc would not vary substantially, with the location. The key financial indicators for major project types suggested in the perspective plan are given in Table E.8.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table E.8: Key Financial Indicators for Major Projects Project Capacity Project Cost (Rs Lakh) IRR (%) DSCR Pay back Period (Yrs) 12 12 10.5 2 6.5 Direct Employment Potential (No.s/proj) 14 14 23 11 132 6 6 9 12 10 8

Budget Accommodation Beach Resort Non Star Luxury Accommodation Restaurant Amusement park

30 Room 20 Cottages 30 room 10 table 8000 per day -

Rs. 42.02 Rs. 60.85 Rs. 79.11 Rs. 6.76 Rs 2448

22 21.99 23.6 68.15 33.31

2.03 2.17 2.21 8.24 3

Water Sports – Rs. 22.04 25.41 2.3 9.75 Beach Water Sports – Rs. 33.36 40.86 3.6 4.5 Lake Mall road * Rs. 40.74 18.23 1.62 17 Health Resort 60 Rs. 238 22.95 2.05 12.75 Convention 60 Rs. 50.81 25.42 2.32 9.25 Centre Audio-Visual 150 Rs 29.79 16.97 1.63 Show * * Indicates projects suggested for government implementation with external aid. E.13 Action Plan for Implementation

The action plan for implementation of suggested projects would include 3 phases

E.13.1 Communication of Plan to stakeholders For an integrated approach towards development of tourism in Maharashtra, it is essential to communicate the perspective tourism development plan to all stakeholders. This perspective plan would act as a master plan for tourism development in the state and help various state departments, investors and other stakeholders to synchronize their plans with the master plan. The perspective plan would act as a road map for phased public and private investment in tourism related projects in the next 20 years. It is crucial to achieve goal congruence in the implementation of the perspective plan for development of tourism in Maharashtra. It is necessary for all concerned state departments to principally approve the perspective plan before initiation of the actual implementation process.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E.13.2 Institutional setup for project execution An apex body called TDCC (Tourism Development and Coordination Committee) having representations from all the concerned departments would be responsible for implementation of the perspective plan. MTDC, which would act as a facilitator to investors and an execution agency, would be under TDCC along with its two major divisions viz., • • Market Research and EIA cell Promotion cell

The promotion cell would market the destination to the tourists as well as investors, while the regional MTDC offices would interact with prospective investors with support from the market research and EIA cell for specific projects. The regional offices of MTDC would also provide a single window for all clearances for projects included in the perspective plan.

E.13.3 Actual project implementation Implementation of the perspective plan would not be a complex process involving sanctions from various departments and authorities. Before the finalisation of the plan, the identified and proposed projects should be scrutinized and agreed for implementation in principal by various departments. Any differences in opinion should be sorted out and the plan suitably modified before presenting it to the prospective investors. The MTDC regional office would interact with investors and government departments to get required clearances for tourism projects. MTDC would also provide project reports and feasibility studies for the proposed projects. It is important that the promotion of the tourism destinations should be in line with the destination prioritisation for integrated tourism development in the region. Promotion tools, alliances with transporters and tour operators, road shows etc should target the desired market segment and project the priority destinations to channelise the tourist flow in the desired direction. Since tourism is a multi-sector project, agencies need to be identified who will be responsible for the execution of each sub-project. Various stakeholders to whom this perspective plan would help in planning their investments in tourism related activities and decisions are given in Table E.9.

Table E.9: Utility of Perspective Plan Stake Holder Related information in the perspective plan
E-15

Decisions based on information

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

MTDC

MSRDC MSRTC PWD Forest

Destination priorities, Tourist projections, Volume of private participation, MTDC funded tourism projects, project profiles to attract private entrepreneurs, schedule for acquisition of land. Destination priorities Tourist projections, destination priorities Destination prioritization, basic infrastructure gaps Proposed Eco-tourism Projects, tourist projections Proposed Heritage projects

Detailed planning, feasibility study, promotion, attracting investors, resource allocation, acquisition and transfer of land

Road development schedule at tourist destinations. Adding new routes to tourist destinations. Resource allocation to development of roads, public amenities, signage etc Track identification, carrying capacity decisions, manpower planning, development of forest guesthouses, camping facilities etc. Resource allocation and prioritization of restoration sites. Issuing clearances for specific projects like sound and light show etc. Water supply, sewerage and solid waste management, clearances, NOCs, land acquisitions etc Funding decisions

ASI

Municipal Corporations Funding Agencies Tour Operators Investors/ Entrepreneurs Finance department

Proposed projects, projected tourist arrivals Selected Project profiles, feasibility of project, rate of return, socioeconomic impact Destination Prioritization, Tourist forecasts Project profiles, ROI, Incentive schemes, Destination priorities, project priorities Recommended incentive schemes and financial assistance schemes for selected projects

New tourist circuits, capacity expansion Investment decisions, available investment opportunities, etc Budgetary allocation for tourist infrastructure projects

E.14

Suggested Incentives for Private Participation

E.14.1 Fiscal Incentives Sales tax holiday for a period of 3 years for projects located in the districts of Ratnagiri, Raigad, Sindhudurg, Amravati, Chandrapur, Wardha, and Gadchiroli. Stamp duty exemption in respect to tourism projects suggested in the perspective plan.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

E.14.2 Marketing Incentives Permission for use of MTDC brand for marketing and promotion purposes by granting MTDC approvals to projects suggested in the perspective plan. Mention of projects suggested in the perspective plan in the promotion material and tourist information literature published by MTDC. Concessional rates of advertisements for proposed projects at MTDC tourist information centres (TICs).

E.14.3 Procedural and clearance related For all projects mentioned in the perspective plan, MTDC would act as a single window clearance point as explained in Chapter 6

E.15

Suggested Projects for External Assistance

Some of the projects proposed in the perspective plan directly result in the socio-economic development of the local community by giving them a platform to display local art and cuisine. These projects also create direct and indirect employment opportunities. Other types of projects that can be suggested for external assistance are projects related to conservation, up-gradation and promotion of heritage monuments and culture. Though projects falling under this category are revenue generating projects, the financial indicators like IRR and DSCR are lower than that expected by the local funding institutions. External assistance at international interest rates from funding agencies like OECD would make the projects more viable. The projects from the perspective plan suggested for external assistance are mentioned below. Project Mahagram Shopping Centre (Local handicrafts) Folk Show Know Gandhi Program/ Culture Workshop Mall Road/ Folk Village Audio Visual Show Mumbai Nagpur Dervan Wardha/ Nashik Panhala Pratapgad Panhala Sindhudurg Daulatabad Janjira Sinhagad Raigad Lonar Location Theme Culture Arts Arts & Culture Culture Arts Heritage Project Cost (Rs Lakh) 2000 32.25 29.24 25.48 40.74 29.79

Area Development Plans (ADP)

-

433.33

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Ministry of Tourism & Culture C-1, Hutments, Dalhousie Road New Delhi 110001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra
March 2003

Dalal Mott MacDonald (Formerly known as Dalal Consultants And Engineers Limited) A-20, Sector 2, Noida – 201 301.

1441/Maharashtra/A/

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any

other project without an independent check being carried out as to its suitability and prior written authority of Dalal Mott MacDonald being obtained. Dalal Mott MacDonald accepts no responsibility or liability for the consequence of this document being used for a purpose other than the purposes for which it was commissioned. Any person using or relying on the document for such other purpose agrees, and will by such use or reliance be taken to confirm his agreement to

indemnify Dalal Mott MacDonald for all loss or damage resulting therefrom.

Dalal Mott MacDonald accepts no

responsibility or liability for this document to any party other than the person by whom it was commissioned.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1
1.1 1.1.1

INTRODUCTION
Tourism Scenario in India – An Overview Contribution to the economy

In 2001, Travel &Tourism (T&T) in India was expected to generate Rs 1564 bn of economic activity (total demand) making India the 22nd largest tourism market in the world. Figure 1.1: Share of T&T economy and T&T industry (as % of GDP)
1 2% 1 0% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Eco no my Travel & To urism % in India % in Wo rld Industry 5.30%

10.70%

4.20%
2.50%

The T&T economy in India accounts for 5.3% of the GDP as against 10.7% of GDP worldwide. The T&T industry in India contributes 2.5% of GDP as compared to a world average of 4.2%. Figure 1.2: Projected growth of T&T economy and T&T industry as % of GDP
1 0% 1 0% 1 0% 1 0% 9% 9% 9% 9% 9% Eco no my Eco no my Industry Industry 9.1 0% 1 0%

The T&T economy is projected to grow at 9.1% annually and the T&T industry is projected to grow at 10% annually through 2011. (T&T industry produces products and services for visitor consumption while T&T economy produces products and services for visitor consumption as well as products and services for industry demand) (Source: World travel and tourism council)

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(i)

Employment generation Figure 1.3: Projected share of Employment
8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0% T&T Eco no my-2001 T&T Eco no my - 2011 (P ro jected) T&T Industry-2001 T&T Industry - 2011 (P ro jected)

7.00% 6.00%

3.70% 2.90%

India’s travel and tourism economy accounts for 25 million jobs or 6% of all employment. The department of tourism estimates of travel and tourism industry jobs are 4.2 million or 2.9% of all employment. The share of T&T economy is projected to rise to 7% and the share of T&T industry is projected to rise to 3.7% through 2011. The employment in T&T economy is projected to grow at 3.6% annually and the employment in the T&T industry is projected to grow at 2.8% annually through 2011. (ii) Capital investment in India on Travel & Tourism

Capital investment in India on travel and tourism infrastructure, equipment, plant and facilities were estimated to be US$ 7328.9 million in 1999 and are projected to grow at 7.6% annually till 2011. (iii) Government Expenditure in India on Travel & Tourism

The spending by government agencies to provide goods and services to visitors or travel companies was estimated to be US$ 599.6 million in 1999 and projected to grow at 4.9% annually through 2011. (iv) Share of India in world tourism traffic

The total number of international arrivals (world) reached a record 699 million, an estimated growth of 7.4% in 2000 according to results received by WTO (World tourism organization). International tourist arrivals to India in 2000 were estimated at 2.64 million, a growth of 6.4% over the previous year. India was estimated to have a share of 0.38% in world tourism traffic in 2000. WTO has classified the world into 6 regions viz., Africa, Americas, East Asia / Pacific, Europe, Middle East and South Asia. Europe and Americas are the main tourist receiving regions. Europe accounted for 58% of the world tourism traffic and Americas accounted for 18% of world tourism traffic in 2000. South Asia has a market share of 0.9% in the world tourism traffic. India is the leading destination in the South Asia region with a share of 41.2% of tourist arrivals to South Asia in 2000. (The South Asia region comprises India, Iran, Pakistan, Maldives, Nepal, Sri Lanka). (v) International Tourism receipts in India

World wide, International tourism receipts amounted to US$ 475.8 billion ($ 680 per person), an estimated growth of 4.5% in 2000 according to WTO. International tourism receipts in India were estimated to be US$ 3.3 billion ($ 1250 per person) in 2000, a growth of 9.5% over the previous year. India was estimated to have a share of 0.69% in international tourism receipts in 2000.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The United States is the leader with an estimated US$ 85.2 billion in international tourism receipts in 2000. South Asia is estimated to have a share of 1.1% in international tourism receipts of which 65.8% is accounted for by India. (vi) Trends in International tourist arrivals Figure 1.4: Trend in international tourist arrivals in India
7000 6000 In Number ('000) 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1996 1997 1998 Estimate 1 1999 Estimate 2 2000 2001 2288 2374 2359 2482 2649 2537 5030 5500 5540 5832 5894 5424

Table 1.1: Growth in International tourist arrivals Year 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
Annual report, Department of tourism, Govt. of India Note: Estimate refers to data on foreign tourist arrivals compiled from disembarkation cards at port of entry

Estimate (Nos.) 2287860 2374094 2358629 2481928 2649378 2537282

Growth (%) 3.77% -0.65% 5.23% 6.75% -4.23%

Source: 'Tourist Arrivals in India' , Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India

Table 1.2: The percentage share in total arrivals from different regions Regions Percentage share in total arrivals 2000 2001 North America 16.3 16.5 Central and South America 0.9 0.9 Western Europe 33.1 32.3 Eastern Europe 1.9 1.5 Africa 3.6 3.6 West Asia 3.6 3.8 South Asia 25.4 26.5 South East Asia 5.6 5.5 East Asia 5.6 5.1 Australasia 2.6 2.6 Others 1.4 1.7 Source: Ministry of Tourism, Government of India 1-3 of 18

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

A number of factors such as tourism brand image, global economic situation, political stability, tourism facilities contribute to the flow of foreign tourist arrivals to the country. Although, there are seasonal variations, the peak months are November to February while the lean months are May- June when the climate is hot. Figure 1.5: Share of different regions in International tourist arrivals
Year 2000

Nor t h Amer ica 16.3%

Sout h Asia 25.4%

West ern Europe 33.1% Cent r al & Sout h Amer ica, 90.0%

East er n Eur ope Ot her s 1.4% Aust r alasia 2.6% East Asia 5.6% 1.9% Sout h East Asia 5.6% West Asia 3.6% Af rica 3.6%

Year 2001

North America 16%

South Asia 26%

Western Europe 31%

Central & South America 1% Others 2% Eastern Europe Africa 2% 4%

Australasia 3%

East Asia 5%

South East Asia 6%

West Asia 4%

(vii)

Trends in Foreign exchange earnings Figure 1.6: Trend in foreign exchange earnings
7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2288 2374 2359 2482 2624 5030 5500 5540 5832

6069

Estimate 1(Rs. Cro re)

Estimate 2 (US$ millio n)

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table 1.3: Growth in foreign exchange earnings Year Forex earnings Growth Rs crores (%) 1996 9919.96 1997 10725.64 8.12% 1998 11950.78 11.42% 1999 13041.81 9.13% 2000 14238.00 9.17% 2001 14006.45 -1.63% Note: Based on RBI figures Source: Annual Report, Ministry of Tourism Tourist arrivals in India', Ministry of tourism (viii) Trends in domestic tourism Travel receipts in India US $ million 2832 2889 2948 3009 3168 2992 Growth (%) 2.01% 2.04% 2.07% 5.28% -5.55%

Domestic tourism has grown substantially during the last few years due to the increase in income levels and emergence of a dynamic middle class. Figure 1.7: Trends in domestic tourism
250 200 150 100 50 0 1996 1997 1998 Estimate 1 1999 Estimate 2 2000 2001

220 191 140 140 160 160 168 168 176

234

In Number ('000)

Table 1.4: Domestic arrivals - Estimates Year Estimate 1996 140119672 1997 159877008 1998 168196000 1999 190671014 2000 220106941 2001 234200935 Source: 'Tourist arrivals in India', Dept. of Tourism Note: Estimate refers to data compiled by state govts/ UT administration Growth (%) 14.10% 5.20% 13.36% 15.44% 6.40%

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(ix)

National tourism policy

Tourism policy was announced for the first time in Nov. 1982. The measures suggested in the policy included • • • Granting export industry status to tourism, adopting a selective approach for developing tourist circuits, Inviting private sector participation and Utilization of national heritage for attracting tourists.

The policy recognized the importance of international tourism in earning foreign exchange and accorded high priority to its development. The policy recognized that facilities provided are minimal for the large number of domestic tourists who travel on pilgrimage or as tourists for other motivations and the need to substantially improve and expand facilities for domestic tourists. A national action plan for tourism was drawn up in May 1992. The objectives of the action plan included • • • • • • • Socio economic development of areas, Increasing employment opportunities, Developing domestic tourism especially for the budget category, Preservation of national heritage and environment, Development of international tourism and optimization of foreign exchange earnings, Diversification of tourism product and Increase in India’s share in world tourism.

The strategies for achieving the objectives outlined • • • • Improvement of tourism infrastructure, Developing areas on a selective basis for integrated growth along with marketing of destinations to ensure optimal use of existing infrastructure, Restructuring and strengthening the institutions for development of human resources and Evolving a suitable policy for increasing foreign tourist arrivals and foreign exchange earnings.

Tourism was declared as a priority sector for foreign investment in July 1991. A new national tourism policy has been drafted to keep pace with the developments taking place around the world and under consideration of the Government of India. The national tourism policy 2002 includes provisions like facilitating the development of a dynamic private sector in tourism, promoting eco-tourism and rural tourism, facilitating domestic tourism by promoting amenities and facilities for budget tourist, giving greater stress to development of pilgrimage centres and integrated development of identified tourist destinations with the involvement of all the infrastructural departments, states and the private sector.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The salient features of the new tourism policy are as follows: (a) Position tourism as a major engine of economic growth (b) Harness the direct and multiplier effects of tourism for employment generation, economic development and providing impetus to rural tourism. (c) Focus on domestic tourism as a major driver of tourism growth (d) Position India as a global brand to take advantage of the burgeoning global travel and trade and the vast untapped potential of Indian destinations. (e) Private sector is acknowledged as a critical player in tourism growth with government acting as a pro-active facilitator and catalyst (f) Integrated development of identified tourist destinations with the involvement of all the infrastructural departments/State govts and the private sector. In relation to the development of products that are related to special interests of the target market, the product development strategy in the Tourism Policy 2002 suggests the following • • • • Expansion of cultural tourism leveraging on India’s 22 World Heritage sites. Development of beach and coastal tourism in the states of Goa, North Karnataka and Kerala. Development of Cochin and Andaman-Nicobar islands as international cruise destinations. Promote India’s unmatched variety of traditional cuisines internationally and encourage Indian entrepreneurs to establish Indian ethnic cuisine restaurants across the world. Active promotion of village tourism to reap socio-economic benefits in the regions of North East, Uttaranchal, Rajasthan, Ladakh, Kutch, Chattisgarh and the plantation regions. Integrate National parks and major wild life sanctuaries into the main tourism product through Interpretation centres, visitor management systems and promoting elephant and tiger as ‘brands’ of Indian Wildlife Tourism. Promote adventure tourism in the ‘Himalayas’ through products such as white water and great river rafting. Regulations and certification of tour operators in this field should be introduced. A world-class international convention centre should be constructed in Mumbai to promote business tourism. Promote dedicated shopping centres such as Dilli Haat and Shilpagram along with dissemination of information about shopping in India to tourists. Reintroduce “Festivals of India” program in top 12 future markets for India starting with annual programs in UK and USA. Promote eco and health tourism.















Six new circuits to be developed for tourism were announced in the 2002-03 budget by the finance minister. The selection is specially aimed at attracting tourists from Japan, Korea, Thailand, Indonesia and other far eastern countries. 1-7 of 18

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • • • •

The first is the Bihar circuit which includes the traditional Buddhist circuit covering Bodhgaya, Rajgir, Nalanda and Varanasi The second is the Buddhist monastic circuit between Himachal and Kashmir and includes Kulu, Manali, Lahaul, Spiti and Leh. The third is a heritage circuit covering Gujarat which includes Ahmedabad, Dhola Vira, Rajkot, Dwaraka, Porbunder, Somnath, Girnar and Palitana The fourth is the South Indian circuit that covers Chennai, Mahabalipuram, Kanchipuram, Thiruvannamalai, Ginjee and Pondicherry The fifth is the Kerala circuit which covers Palghat, Kochi, Kottayam, the backwaters in Kumarakom and Trivandrum The sixth circuit is the north-eastern circuit which includes Guwahati, Kaziranga, Shillong and Tawag

Special tourism areas: The State Governments of Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Orissa and Maharashtra and Union Territory Administration of Daman and Diu have declared Bekal Beach (Kerala), MuttukaduMamallapuram (Tamil Nadu), Puri (Orissa), Sindhudurg (Maharashtra) and Diu as special tourism areas for integrated development.

(x)

Plan outlays for tourism

The budget for tourism has been hovering around 0.15 – 0.20 % of the total central plan outlay. There has been a gradual increase in Central Plan outlay for tourism over the plan periods from Rs 1.58 crores in the second plan to Rs 272 Crore in the eighth plan. As against the eighth plan outlay of Rs 272 Crore (1991-92 prices), the expenditure during the period has been Rs 490.42 crores. The approved allocation for tourism for the ninth plan period (1997-2002) was Rs 485.75 crores.

Marketing and Publicity 50.3%

Infrastructure Development 21.6%

External aid through budget 0.3% Organisation 0.4% Research and Computerisation 0.6% Incentives 3.1% Manpower Development 12.4% Central & South America, 90.0%

Product Development 4.1% Mega Tourism 1.0%

Figure 1.8: Break up of 9th plan allocation

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table 1.5: Ninth plan outlay (1997-2002) Name of the scheme / Project programme Infrastructure Development Product Development Mega Tourism Paryatan Bhavan Marketing and Publicity Manpower Development Incentives Research and Computerisation Organisation External aid through budget Total Source: Annual Report, Department of Tourism The budgetary allocation for 2002-03 has gone up to Rs 225 Crore. (xi) Major tourist circuits and destinations Outlay (Rs crores) 105.00 20.00 5.00 30.00 244.43 60.00 15.00 3.00 2.00 1.32 485.75

India is accessible from all four directions – north, east, south and west. Each of the four gateways has its own history.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 1.9: MAJOR TOURIST CIRCUITS IN INDIA

Northern circuit: Delhi, the capital city, is steeped in history. It combines the grandeur of Mughal architecture of Old Delhi with the formal splendour of New Delhi, built in the early 20th century. Along with Jaipur and Agra, Delhi forms the ‘Golden Triangle’. Agra is home to the Taj Mahal, a world famous monument while Jaipur offers the visitor a chance to experience royalty at its luxury hotels which were palaces of the local rulers. Western circuit: Mumbai is the commercial capital of the country. It is also a major international airport and harbour. The British influence is evident from the architecture of the Gateway of India, Bombay high court, Old Secretariat, University buildings and Victoria Terminus. Pune, the capital of the Marathas during the reign of the warrior king Shivaji, is 163 kms from Mumbai. Aurangabad, the main stopover before visiting the world heritage sites, Ajantha and Ellora is 400 kms from Mumbai. The sculptures of Hindu, Buddhist and Jain faiths found in the 34 caves at Ellora date back to over a 1000 years while the ones at Ajantha date back to the fifth century. 1-10 of 18

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Southern circuit: The southern gateway to the country, Chennai, is the symbol of Dravidian culture. It is the starting point to the temple towns of Mahabalipuram, Kanchipuram, Chidambaram, Tanjore, Tiruchirapalli, and Madurai. The French style of coastal town of Pondicherry lies to the south of Chennai. Kerala, with its beautiful coconut beaches lies on the western coast. Kanyakumari, a popular pilgrimage town is the southern tip of country, where one can watch the sun set and moon rise at the same time. Eastern circuit: Kolkata, listed among the world’s largest cities, came into being as a British trading post and later capital of British empire in India during the 17th century. The Indian museum, the Victoria memorial, the botanical gardens and Dakshineshwar’s kali temple are famous landmarks in the city. Northwards of Kolkata, is the hill station of Darjeeling, which offers spectacular views of Kanchenjunga peak (8586 metres). The state of Orissa, on the eastern coast has a rich heritage of classical dance, music, silverware, handicrafts and sculpture and its own ‘Golden Triangle’ comprising the three temple towns of Bhubaneswar, Puri and Konark. Puri is counted among the four holiest cities in India and famous for the 12th century Jagannath temple. Konark features in the circuit for its Sun temple, an architectural masterpiece. Preferred destinations in India The most popular destinations in India for foreign tourists have been the golden triangle of DelhiJaipur-Agra, Goa, Rajasthan, and very recently, Kerala. The National Geographic has rated Kerala among the 50 must see destinations of a lifetime. As per the survey conducted by the Ministry of Tourism, the most visited destinations in India by foreign tourists include: • • • • • • • • • Delhi Mumbai, Maharashtra Agra, U.P Chennai, Tamil Nadu Kolkata, West Bengal Jaipur, Rajasthan Varanasi, U.P Bangalore, Karnataka Panjim, Goa • • • • • • • • • Udaipur, Rajasthan Pune, Maharashtra Mysore, Karnataka Ajmer, Rajasthan Goa Secunderabad, A.P Cochin, Kerala Shimla, Himachal Pradesh Ahmedabad, Gujarat

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The top 10 states in India which account for more than 90% of the foreign tourist arrivals are given in Table 1.6. Table 1.6: Top 10 States: Foreign Tourist Arrivals (2000) Foreign Tourist Arrival (% Of Total) 1 Delhi 21.00% 2 Maharashtra 17.72% 3 U.P 14.09% 4 Tamil Nadu 12.95% 5 Rajasthan 10.27% 6 Goa 4.81% 7 Kerala 3.46% 8 Karnataka 3.43% 9 West Bengal 3.25% 10 M.P 2.03% TOTAL 92.99% Source: Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India The top 10 states which account for around 90% of the domestic tourist arrivals is given in Table 1.7 Table 1.7: Top 10 States: Domestic Tourist Arrivals (2000) Sl.No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 State Domestic Tourist Arrival (% Of Total) U.P 23.94% A.P 22.86% Tamil Nadu 10.94% Karnataka 8.57% Gujarat 5.43% Bihar 4.68% Maharashtra 3.95% Rajasthan 3.51% J&K 2.57% Kerala 2.39% TOTAL 88.82% Source: Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India Sl.No State

(xii)

Bali declaration

India is signatory to the Bali declaration on barrier free tourism for people with disabilities. The declaration urges governments to develop action programs to promote barrier free tourism for people with disabilities, older persons and families with young children. The declaration also requests the governments to respect the rights of disabled persons to have equal access to tourist facilities, programs and services and strengthen craft production, entrepreneurial and marketing skills among them.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(xiii)

SWOT Analysis of India as a Tourist Destination Table 1.8: SWOT analysis

Strengths Weaknesses • Rich culture and heritage • Poor accessibility to many tourist • Variety of landscapes, lifestyles and destinations due to basic Infrastructure cuisines bottlenecks • Rich tradition in handicrafts • Lack of tourist infrastructure & basic • Colourful fairs and festivals amenities at many tourist destinations • Lack of information about tourist destinations • Unfavourable brand image as a tourist friendly destination. Opportunities Threats • Global trend towards exotic destinations • Aggressive marketing and promotion by like India competing destinations in Asia like • Tourism potential unexploited Malaysia

1.2

Study Objective

To prepare a 20 year perspective plan for development of sustainable tourism in Maharashtra.

1.3

Scope of the Study

The Ministry has provided guidelines to be followed for preparation of perspective plan which are listed as follows: • A perspective plan with a time frame of 20 years needs to be developed for developing sustainable tourism giving year wise phasing of investment having regard to the resources available. The plan should indicate short term and long term plans, targets and ground realities The plan should indicate all activities to be undertaken by different agencies clearly indicating the time frame for each activity. The plan should be able to assess the existing tourism scenario in the state with respect to existing traffic levels and inventory of : o o o Natural resources Heritage and other socio-cultural assets Quantitative / demographic factors like population, employment, occupation, income levels etc Services and infrastructure already available

• • •

o •

The plan should review the status of existing development / investment plans of schemes for the development of tourism in the region 1-13 of 18

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism



The plan should list and evaluate existing potential tourist destinations and centres and categorise them on the basis of inventory of attractions, infrastructure availability, degree of popularity, volume of traffic flow etc The plan should analyse and categorise existing / potential destinations and centres , as a stand alone destination, part of a circuit and /or as major attractions for special interest groups etc The plan should assess the existing infrastructure levels at identified destinations / centres in terms of quality of roads / transportation facilities, civic amenities, enroute transit facilities, boarding and lodging facilities etc The plan should be able to broadly assess traffic flow to identified destinations and centres for assessment of infrastructure requirements taking into account past growth trends, suggested linkages and integration, future expected developments including likely investments by the state and investment climate / incentive for private sector etc The plan should attempt and arrive at an indicative cost configuration of likely investment on infrastructure development under different heads and to prioritize investment needs by drawing up a phased investment plan covering the next 20 years The plan should identify the existing as well as new tourism projects for expansion / augmentation, upgradation of facilities and services, destinations and centres, which have potential for development The plan should undertake product conceptualization cum feasibility exercise inter alia for identified projects covering aspects like locational evaluation, schematic product planning and conceptualization including quantification of individual project parameters, assessment of overall investments levels and of project viability cum feasibility exercise etc. The plan should prepare an action plan for implementation of identified potential development scheme / projects / products and for development of infrastructure in conformity with the policy objectives and guidelines provided by the concerned state / central agencies / departments and the requirements of national development and funding agencies. The overall development plan to also take into account WTO’s Bali declaration on tourism development. The plan should include project wise potential for employment generation; a reasonable percentage of potential employment is to be reserved for women. The plan should indicate the actual and projected number of domestic and foreign tourist arrivals for each proposed tourist place. Prioratise the scheme on the basis of employment potential of the project and tourist arrivals at the proposed place. An inventory of existing infrastructural facilities (including paying guest facility) is to be made; after which, the proposed infrastructure needs to be split up into various segments concerning different state government departments , such as PWD, Forest, Culture, handicrafts etc and dovetailed with the tourism plans Since the perspective plan would be used for external assistance, it would be desirable to suggest state tourism projects to foreign funding agencies for financial assistance; each project has to be properly scrutinized and finalized accordingly















• • • •



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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism



Other sources of funding such as loans from the Financial Institutions, the Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI) etc needs to be explored. Besides, proper incentives need to be suggested for private sector participation Further the available institutional machinery in the state to oversee / coordinate the development of tourism infrastructure has to be specifically suggested Facilities for performance by local artists; cultural troupes should be built into the perspective plan Cultural complexes can be suggested with the financial help from the State Department of Culture and later made economically viable on the pattern of Dilli Haat Handicraft shops should be suggested at various tourist places; these could be run by women Perspective plan should include potential for developing health resorts at / near the tourist places. Yoga classes, nature cure facilities, ayurvedic system of medicines should be available at these places to attract tourists. Consultant preparing the perspective plan should be asked to give an executive summary of the plan along with the report The perspective plan should incorporate attractive packages / schemes to attract private sector investment It is necessary that the environmental issues are dealt with sufficient details and environmental impact assessment studies made in respect of all new projects The perspective plans should include carrying capacity studies, instruments of spatial and land use planning, instruments of architectural controls for restoration of old properties and construction of new ones in old towns and cities, strategy for local community participation and protection of cultural identity, awareness programmes for local participation and local commitment to the project. Measures necessary for mitigating the adverse environmental impacts and rehabilitation of the tourist places already environmentally damaged should be incorporated in the perspective plans The perspective plan should include strategy for privatization of tourism related properties owned by the state and the State tourism Corporations Approach & Methodology

• • • • •

• • • •





1.4

As indicated in our proposal, a two pronged methodology is being adopted to carry out the study. This will include: 1. Collection of information from the relevant secondary sources 2. Conducting field exercises, including site visits to select tourism destinations including potential destinations, and

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3. Interaction with all possible stakeholders to assess the present tourism scenario, infrastructure available and shortages therein, potential tourism destinations, likely tourist inflows, requisite infrastructure, investment requirements, prioritising the same and presenting the whole into a comprehensive perspective plan for development of sustainable tourism in the state over the next 20 years. Details of the methodology envisaged for the study is depicted below: Figure1.10: Methodology Adopted for the Study

Team mobilization, orientation with regard to study objectives and scope of work

Secondary data collection / Review of literature / Annual reports / policy related to tourism of Maharashtra, interaction with tourist information offices

Preparation of questionnaires and checklists for collecting information through interaction with various stakeholders

Interaction with State tourism dept. and tour operators to identify current tourist destinations and locations with cluster of tourist destinations

Primary data collection, Personal visits to tourist locations and interaction with tourists, tour operators, tourism related associations, entrepreneurs and govt. depts related to basic infrastructure to assess the current status / infrastructure bottlenecks and identify gaps

Collation of the secondary and primary data collected, data analysis and interpretation

Identification of potential tourism projects, short listing and carrying out prima facie feasibility studies

Preparation of 20 year Perspective Plan for development of sustainable tourism in the state

Submission of draft report

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.5

Report Format

The draft report is presented in two volumes: Volume 1: Main report Volume 2: Annexures The main report (Volume 1) is presented in 6 chapters and an Executive summary Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION

An overview of the tourism scenario in India as well the objective and scope of the study and the methodology adopted to carry out the study is presented. Chapter 2 CURRENT STATUS OF TOURISM IN THE STATE

The state tourism policy, state plan outlays on tourism, trend in tourist arrivals, travel circuits and destinations / attractions , status of tourism infrastructure and basic infrastructure in the state, environmental aspects and status of institutional framework are discussed in this chapter. Chapter 3 FIELD SURVEY FINDINGS

The chapter presents the findings of the sample field survey of domestic and foreign tourists, tour operators and travel agents and interactions with relevant associations and institutions. A first hand assessment of the tourism infrastructure and basic infrastructure at the destinations visited during the survey is presented. Chapter 4 PROJECT IDENTIFICATION, SELECTION AND VIABILITY

The tourism destinations in the state have been prioritized according to a set of parameters. At each destination, projects have been identified and prioritized according to a set of parameters. The viability of short listed projects has also been discussed in this chapter. Chapter 5 PERSPECTIVE PLAN

A perspective plan for tourism development in the state has been presented based on the State tourism policy, a review of the market trends and potential and examination of relevant issues. Chapter 6 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Promotional issues, financing issues, human resource development issues as well as identification of agencies to implement the plan are discussed in this chapter The annexures (Volume 2) contain • • • Profiles of the major destinations Profiles of projects Questionnaires and checklists used for the survey 1-17 of 18

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • 1.6 •

List of contacts made during the survey, Relevant enclosures Limitations of the Study There is limited published data available on the industry. Information about tourist arrivals and infrastructure availability at many destinations provided in the report are largely based on the limited available data and estimates of the local tourism department at these locations. Research studies to estimate the carrying capacity of the environment have rarely been carried out. Norms on the extent of development that can be allowed at various tourist destinations have yet to be developed by the state / local administration. Detailed destination specific studies will need to be carried out by the state tourism department in association with the Town planning department, environment department and other relevant govt. departments. Every effort has been made to meet the guidelines provided by the Ministry for preparation of perspective plan. Separate master plans (destination specific) will need to be prepared by the state governments for various tourist destinations.





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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2
2.1

CURRENT STATUS OF TOURISM IN THE STATE
Introduction

This chapter assesses the existing tourism scenario in the state with respect to the tourism policy, plan outlays for tourism, trend in tourist arrivals, travel circuits and destinations, status of tourist infrastructure as well as basic infrastructure, status of the environment and institutional framework. Destination profiles have been prepared for most of the existing and potential tourist destinations and these profiles capture the status of these destinations in terms of infrastructure availability and other parameters. (see Volume 2). An assessment of the tourist infrastructure availability and basic infrastructure availability has also been provided in Chapter III – Field Survey findings. 2.2 2.2.1 State Profile Position of State in India

Maharashtra with a geographical area of 3,07,713 Sq. Km is the 3rd largest state in India in terms of area and 2nd in terms of population (96.75 million). It occupies a substantial portion of the Deccan Plateau in the western peninsular part of the subcontinent. The word Maharashtra is a compound of two words, Maha-n (great) and rashtra (“nation”) i.e., the Great nation. Maharashtra displays a fascinating variety of brilliant achievement that is nowhere more evident than in its cave temples and Hindu shrines. All over Maharashtra are the relics of the glorious history the great Chatrapati Shivaji bequeathed the Maratha Empire. 2.2.2 Year of Establishment

The name Maharashtra first appeared in a 7th century inscription and in the account of a contemporary Chinese traveller, Hsuan Tsang. Historically, Maharashtra falls into three regions: Western Maharashtra, Vidarbha and Marathwada. Among these, Vidarbha has a hoary past and is mentioned many times in the Mahabharata. Maharashtra as a whole became prominent in the history of India from the Mauryan period. After the fall of the Mauryans, Maharashtra was ruled by many Hindu kings for nearly a thousand year. The Yadavas who were the last of these dynasties came to the end of its rule in 1294 when the Muslims overwhelmed the state ushering it to a period of successive Muslim rule. Maharashtra got a new leash of life when the venerable warrior, Shivaji came to the centre stage. He brought the Marathas into a unified force to build a powerful Maratha Empire. The Peshwas who followed the Shivaji rule extended the Empire from Gwalior to Tanjore in the South. The Maratha power received a setback at Panipat, in 1761, when the Afghan ruler Ahmed Shah Abdali routed the Maratha forces. They recovered only to confront the British power and to be decisively defeated in 1818. After the defeat of 1818 Maharashtra settled down as a part of the Bombay Presidency under the British administration. After Independence, Bombay continued as one state consisting of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Under the Bombay Re-organization Act, 1960 Maharashtra and Gujarat were formed into separate states on May 1, 1960, Maharashtra retaining the old capital Bombay (now renamed as Mumbai). 2-1 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.2.3

Geographical Coverage

Maharashtra is one of the few states in the country with an area as large as 307,713 square kilometres and a coastal line spreading more than 720 kms. The state is bounded by the Arabian Sea in the west, Gujarat in the northwest, Madhya Pradesh in the north, Chhattisgadh on the East, Andhra Pradesh in the southeast, and Karnataka and Goa in the south. The triangle of Maharashtra is divided into clearcut natural regions. The great divide, running north south, the Western Ghats is also known as the Sahyadri range. The narrow strip between the Arabian Sea and the Western Ghats is known as Konkan. The eastern portion is known as Vidarbha, the northern area is known as Khandesh and the central area as Marathwada. A map of the state is shown below:

Figure 2.1: Map of Maharashtra

Maharashtra is the second most populous state in the country (96.75 million according to population census 2001). The population density is 314 per sq km. & the Literacy rate is 77.27%. Marathi is the main language of the masses and is also the official language. The Marathi speaking population is multi-racial and multi-religious. 2.2.4 State Domestic Product

As per the Economic survey of Maharashtra (2001-02) advance estimates, Gross State Domestic Product (GSDP) of Maharashtra in 2000-01 at constant (1993-94) prices is estimated at Rs. 1,67,075 crores against Rs. 1,62,680 Crore in 1999-00. The state economy has registered a growth of 2.7% in 2000-01 compared to 10.2% in 1999-2000. At current prices, GSDP in 2000-01 is estimated at Rs. 2,58,272 crores as against Rs. 2,41,410 crores in the previous year showing an increase of 7% during the year. 2-2 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The preliminary estimate of state income (Net state domestic product) at current prices for the year 2000-01 was Rs. 2,27,893 crores and the per capita state income was Rs. 23,726. At constant (199394) prices, the State income in 2000-01 was estimated at Rs. 1,45,734 crores as against Rs. 1,42,217 crores in 1999-2000. The data on Gross State domestic product and Net State domestic product during the last few years is given in Appendix 2.1 (Table 2.1, Table 2.2). The trend is shown below: Figure 2.2: State Domestic Product
Rs. (Thousand Crore)
250 176 200 150 100 50 0 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 Year 1998-99
GSDP

193 171

209

240

158 185 156

212

141

1999-00
NSDP

2.2.5

Administrative Setup

The state of Maharashtra for the sake of administrative convenience has been divided in the following pattern: Table 2.1: Administrative Setup Description Number Divisions 6 Districts 35 Tehsils 353 Villages 43722 Zilla Parishads 33 Gram Panchayats 27738 Panchayat Samitis 321 Municipal Councils 228 Municipal Corporations 15 Cantonment Boards 7 2.3 Significance of Tourism

The industry – transport, storage & communication, trade, hotels and restaurants accounts for around 20-22% of the gross state domestic product and 3.5% of the employment in the state. No specific estimates are available on the employment in the travel and tourism industry. The economic census 1998 indicated an employment of 461000 persons (urban and rural) employed in restaurant and hotels and 387000 persons working in the transportation industry. 2-3 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

There exists immense scope for Tourism development in Maharashtra. It is one of the very few godgifted states in India with a unique combination of hills, plateau, sea beaches, historical forts and caves. It is reported that over 80% of the people of Maharashtra live in villages. Their chief occupation is agriculture. Tourism leads to employment generation as well as the generation of economic activities, which have a multiplier effect in improving the regional income and improving the standard of living. Research studies carried out in the tourism sector indicate a multiplier of around 2.5. It is suggested that visit of each foreign tourist provides employment to one person and 6.5 domestic tourists generate one job. Temples both Hindus and Jains richly adorn the cities of Maharashtra. Mumbai is a major arrival point for overseas visitors. Tourism is a major source of foreign exchange. 2.3.1 • • • • • • • • 2.3.2 • • • • • • 2.4 Benefits of tourism Increase in employment Stimulation of business activity Increase in business diversity Increase in taxes collected Increase in sale of goods and services Increase in community pride and concern for community history, culture, attractions and artefacts Conservation or restoration of historic sites or attractions Conservation of natural resources as a tourist attraction. Costs of tourism Increase in use of sewer and water systems, requiring further development of the community infrastructure Increase in costs of maintenance and repairs of the community infrastructure Increase in number of people and vehicles, resulting in congestion Shifts in the pace of community’s cultural and social life, as well as the community’s structure New or increased expenses related to promotions, advertising and marketing New or increased investment costs incurred by the community State Tourism Policy

The tourism policy of the state aims at achieving a planned growth in tourism, generating employment, protecting natural & cultural resources in an ecologically sustainable manner and promoting arts & handicrafts of different regions in the State. It has entrusted all commercial & promotional activities to Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation (MTDC), which has identified four thrust areas having highest tourism potential. These are Ajantha-Ellora, Elephanta, Sindhudurg district and Lonar crater. MTDC is also taking initiative in developing Forest tourism. The state has formulated and adopted a policy for tourism development (1993) in consultation with the representative of the travel trade, travel writers and Central govt. agencies. 2-4 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.4.1

Objectives of the tourism policy:

(a) Bring about planned tourism growth with the help of experts and local participation (b) Disseminate information on tourism attractions and provide visitors with an enriching experience (c) Upgrade existing tourism facilities (d) Provide tourism facilities of international standards in select areas (e) Provide facilities for youth and budget tourists (f) Provide recreational facilities near major business, industrial and urban centres (g) Earn more foreign exchange for the country (h) Generate employment, especially in the interior areas of the state (i) Protect its natural and cultural resources with integrated development in an ecologically sustainable manner (j) Promote its arts and crafts including handicrafts and handlooms and folk arts. 2.4.2 Role of state govt. in tourism development

The state government will function as a catalyst and confine its efforts to infrastructure development, dissemination of information and coordination of sectoral activities to create conditions for attracting substantial private sector investment in the tourism sector. It is not the job of state agencies to run hotels and tourist buses and gradually the state will withdraw from such operations and hand them over to the professionals in the tourism industry. The state will also provide fiscal incentives, assist in providing suitable sites and remove bottlenecks, especially those connected with infrastructure development. The state accords high priority to manpower development and protection of the interests of the tourists. It will set up or assist in setting up training institutions and suitable systems for ensuring quality control in tourism services. It will encourage more active participation of voluntary groups and the associations of hoteliers, the travel trade and tour operators in ensuring that tourists are provided a fair deal. The state will ensure that its natural and cultural resources will be enhanced with the help of tourism activities and nothing that disturbs the ecological balance will be permitted. Maharashtra tourism development corporation (MTDC) has been established under companies act for systematic development of tourism with an authorised capital of Rs. 25 crores. The paid up share capital as on 31st March 2001 is Rs. 1462.38 lakhs. The corporation receives from the state government financial assistance in the form of share capital contribution. The state government has entrusted all commercial and promotional tourism activities to this corporation. MTDC supplements its resources through institutional finance. Government gives grant in aid to the Directorate of tourism. In an effort to tap the tourism potential, Govt. of India has identified certain thrust areas as shown below: 1. Restoration and balanced development of National heritage projects of cultural, historical and tourist importance 2-5 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2. Attracting tourists both domestic as well as international; and 3. Development of selected tourist sports popular with tourists Four areas having the highest tourism potential in the state have been identified for infrastructure development on priority basis. These are known as ‘A’ category tourist places and consist of AjanthaEllora, Elephanta, Sindhudurg district and Lonar, which is one of the five meteorite craters in the world. These destinations are of national and international significance. There are 36 other identified destinations, which can be said to have state-wide significance. These are known as B category tourist places (enclosed in Appendix 2 Table 2.3). The rest of the state has been placed in C category and has local tourism potential. The commitment of efforts and resources for infrastructure development reflect the perception inherent in the categorisation. (i) Ajantha Ellora

A major conservation cum development project has been undertaken in the Ajantha Ellora area with the assistance of OECF, Japan. The first phase of the project (Rs. 87.30 crores) has already been completed. The project includes the following components: (a) Improvement of roads (b) Augmentation of water supply and electricity (c) Extensive afforestation (d) Conservation of heritage sites (e) Development of Aurangabad Airport The second phase of the project is pending sanction with donor agency and involves an expenditure of Rs. 327 crores. This includes above works plus tourist amenities. Almost 82% of the fund for this project comes from OECF Japan. Similarly, a project has been drawn up for conservation and providing basic tourist amenities at Elephanta. Financial assistance for this purpose is expected to come from UNESCO through the Government of India. (ii) Sindhudurg as a Tourism district

The government of Maharashtra has declared entire Sindhudurg district as a “Tourism district” and a tourism development plan has been prepared and submitted to the government. The concept of tourism district has also been endorsed by the Central government, Department of Tourism and it advised State govt. to prepare a phased programme for implementation of the project for external assistance. Tata Consultancy services have prepared an integrated tourism development plan for the entire district. (iii) Lonar

The meteorite crater at Lonar in Buldhana district has been receiving gradually increasing number of visitors. There is also a proliferation of local activities in and around the crater. Both these factors may have an adverse impact on the ecology of the area unless the visitors and local activities are adequately managed. In order to identify what needs to be done, M/s Econate consultants have been appointed to draw up conservation cum management plan for this crater. A new tourism policy has been drafted and is under the consideration of the govt.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.4.3

Investment policy

The government has declared its policy of encouraging private investments in the tourism sector. The main planks of this policy are: 1. To welcome private investment in creating both tourist facilities, as well as related infrastructure 2. To encourage transfer of technology in tourism related industry 3. To have a flexible policy on joint ventures and terms for Build Operate and own or transfer models. The government of India has liberalised its policy for investment in hotel and tourism related projects by foreign investors and non-resident Indians. This is permitted with or without repatriation rights depending on the extent of participation and nature of industry. Foreign tie-ups for marketing are freely considered for hotel projects. 2.4.4 Incentives

The govt. of Maharashtra announced a policy of incentives in 1999 for new tourism projects and expansion of the existing projects, which was withdrawn w.e.f 1st July 2000. The type of incentives included total tax exemption for a certain period (sales tax, luxury tax, entertainment tax/amusement tax, stamp duty) and supply of electricity at industrial rates. The special package for Sindhudurg district provided for 50% concession on available govt. land and no increase in water and electricity tariff for a period of 10 years. A copy of the incentive scheme is enclosed in Appendix 2, B. 2.5 Development Regulations in Maharashtra

All development and building activity is regulated under the Maharashtra Regional and Town planning Act, 1966. The government of Maharashtra has also issued Development control regulations under this act. The government has also laid guidelines for the conversion of No Development zone (NDZ) into Tourism Development zones (TDZ). Subject to certain restrictions, land currently designated as NDZ may be converted to TDZ with some floor space index (FSI) permitted for construction. For example, for plots currently designated NDZ, which are larger than 10 hectare, 2 hectare (i.e. one fifth) of the area can be converted to TDZ. On the TDZ area, 0.5 FSI (i.e. 1 hectare) will be permitted for development. Land not specifically designated as NDZ but reserved in the regional plans for parks, recreation etc., will also be allowed to be developed if they are particularly significant from the tourism point of view. Here, 15% of the total area will be allowed for development with 0.20 FSI. 2.5.1 Coastal regulation zone (CRZ)

Central government has declared the coastal stretches of the sea, bays, creeks, which are influenced by tidal action upto 500 metres from the high tide line (HTL) and the land between the low tide line (LTL) and HTL as coastal regulation zone, and put restrictions on setting up and expansion of industries, operations or processes in the coastal regulation zone.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

For regulating development activities etc, the coastal stretches within 500 metres of high tide line on the landward side are classified into four categories. CRZ III (third category) is more relevant for the tourism industry. The area upto 200 metres from high tide line is to be remarked as ‘No Development Zone’. No construction shall be permitted within this zone. The development of vacant plots between 200 and 500 metres of high tide line in designated areas of CRZ-III can be undertaken with the prior approval of Ministry of Environment and Forests for the construction of hotels/beach resorts. A copy of the CRZ notification is enclosed in Appendix 2, A. 2.5.2 Land policy

Government and MTDC land / properties can be leased to investors in the tourism industry for a period of 30 years. The lease can be further extended for a period of 30 years subject to financial negotiations. 2.6 State Plan Outlays on Tourism

The outlay for the ninth five-year plan (1997-2002) was Rs. 175.34 crores. The outlay for the annual plan 2002-03 is Rs. 24.24 Crore. The outlay for the tenth five-year plan (2002-07) is Rs. 117.31 crores. The sub sector wise outlays as well as the district wise plan outlays and assistance from Govt of India (centrally sponsored schemes) are given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.4, Table 2.5, and Table 2.6). MTDC proposes to take up certain projects, which will be partly assisted, by Government of India and the rest by MTDC’s own resources. Central assistance to the tune of Rs. 2.65 crores is expected from the Government of India. The scheme wise outlay for 2002-03 is given below: Table 2.2: Scheme Wise Outlay S.No. 1 2 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Items Share capital to MTDC Grant in aid Development of Ajantha and Ellora ‘B’ category projects Publicity Revised Konkan Development programme Revised Vidarbha Development programme Development of Lonar Development of water sports centre at Nawegaon Khairi Nature interpretation centre at Nagpur State share for GOI assisted scheme Light and sound show at Daulatabad Survey of lands at Manori and Gorai Bed and Breakfast scheme Guide and Training Scheme Other District Level Schemes Total Source: Planning Dept, Govt. Of Maharashtra Annual plan outlay (Rs. lakhs) 45 469.85 607.00 120.00 730.15 288.21 2260.21

Forest tourism: An outlay of Rs. 169.72 lakhs is being provided for 2002-03 towards facilities required for stay of tourists at places where forest tourism activities are to be promoted. 2-8 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.7

Trend in Tourist Arrivals

Total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra increased from 7.04 million in the year 1995 to 9.37 million during 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 5.88%. Foreign tourist arrivals increased from 0.88 million in 1995 to 1.07 million in 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 4.1%. While domestic tourist arrivals increased from 6.16 million in 1995 to 8.30 million in 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 6.14%. The trend in tourist arrivals is shown in Figure 2.2. Figure 2.3: Domestic - International Tourist Arrivals
Domestic 9000 8000
Rs. (Thousand Crore)

Foreign 6771 6974 7184 7543 8297

7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

6156

881

949

978

981

1034

1075

1995

1996

1997 Year

1998

1999

2000

Maharashtra accounted for 6.07% of the domestic tourist arrivals and ranked 7th among All India domestic tourist arrivals in the year 2000. Similarly, Maharashtra accounted for 23.17% of foreign tourist arrivals and ranked 2nd among All India foreign tourist arrivals in year 2000.

2.8

Travel Circuits and Destinations / Attractions

Maharashtra has to offer a large variety of tourist attractions to meet different category of tourists. The different type of tourist attractions spread all over the Maharashtra State can be grouped as under: (a) Hill Stations. (b) (c) (d) (e) 2.8.1 Pilgrimage. Heritage. Eco-tourism. Beach. Hill Stations

The Western Ghats in Maharashtra is home to several charming hill stations. Most of them belong to the colonial era the more favourite of them being Matheran and Mahabaleshwar. Chikhaldara is the only hill station in eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) and is of as much importance to Vidarbhaites as Matheran / Mahabaleshwar to western Maharashtra. A map indicating the major hill stations in Maharashtra is shown below. 2-9 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 2.4: Hill Stations

Chikhaldara

Bhandardara Matheran Khandala
Mahabaleshwar

Panhala Amboli
2.8.2 Pilgrimage

Maharashtra has a long tradition of tolerance and symbiotic interaction with different religious faiths. Nanded is the pilgrim centre for the Sikhs as it has the samadhi of Guru Gobind Singh. Besides this Haji Ali, Haji Malang; churches of Bassein and Mumbai, synagogues of Pen and Alibag; Jain and Buddhist Temples have a holiness of their own. Maharashtra alone has five of the twelve Jyotirlingas namely Trimbakeshwar, Aundha-Nagnath, Bhimashankar, Grishneshwar and Parali Vaijanath. The Ashtavinayak circuit is dedicated to lord Ganesh, which is perhaps the most popularly worshipped deities not only in Maharashtra but also in India. Shirdi, Mahalaxmi and Pandharpur are the most visited pilgrimage destinations in terms of numbers Figure 2.5: Pilgrimage Destinations

Trimbakeshwar Shirdi

Grishneshwar

Parali-Vaijanath Nanded Ambejogai

Pandharpur
Ashtavinayak circuit

Mahalaxmi

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.8.3

Heritage

Maharashtra perhaps has largest number of heritage sites to boast of. It has 350 forts, which have been battered by time and the harsh vagrancies of nature. These include Raigad, Pratapgad, the impregnable sea fortress Janjira, Sindhudurg, Vijaydurg and the hill station cum hill fort of Panhala. It has threeworld class heritage sites in the form of Ajantha, Ellora and the Elephanta caves. Figure 2.6: Heritage Destinations

Tansa Karnala Phansad

Jaikwadi

Koyna Dajipur Radhanagari

Tadoba Melghat Pench Nawegaon Nagzira

Malvan

2.8.4

Eco-Tourism

The state has immense scope for eco-tourism. There are approximately 24 wild life sanctuaries and National parks. These include three forest areas, which have been declared as Tiger reserves under the Project Tiger conservation scheme by the Ministry of Environment and Forest, Government of India. These are namely Melghat Tiger reserve in Amravati district, Pench Tiger reserve in Nagpur district and the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve in Chandrapur district. Incidentally all the three Tiger reserves lie on the Eastern part of Maharashtra.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 2.7: Eco Tourism Destinations

Ajantha
Ellora

Daulatabad

Elephanta Janjira Raigad Sinhagad Pratapgad

Vijaydurg Sindhudurg
2.8.5 Beach

The beaches dot the 720 Km long coastline of Maharashtra. The heart stealing beaches of Maharashtra have much more to offer than just the sea waves. The fabulous beach at Ganapatipule has the temple of swayambhu Ganapati along side it. The Vijaydurg & Devgad beaches have witnessed the history in the form of forts offshore. Tarkarli is one among the numerous virgin beaches one can find here. A map of the frequented beach places is shown here. Figure 2.8: Beach Destinations

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.9 2.9.1

Current Status of Integrated Tourist Infrastructure / Facilities Internal transport system

Maharashtra state is very well connected by different modes of internal transport services. These include railway network spread over 5459 Km, roads network of 2.6 Lakh kms (NH, SH & other roads). There is a regular network of State transport buses operated by MSRTC. Besides several routes are covered by private bus services and road transport services of other states neighbouring Maharashtra also. In the rural areas besides tongas and bullock-cart, Jeeps also provide a useful source of transportation for the farmers and their families. All large cities are well provided with intra-city bus services for local commuters. There are also large number of taxis, autos and cycle rickshaws, etc. The total numbers of motor vehicles on road as on 1.01.2002 was 71.94 Lakhs, which has shown an increase of 8.9% over the previous year. The details of different class as on 1.1.2002 are given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.7). 2.9.2 Accommodation facilities

Recognising the socio economic importance of tourism, the Government of India has accorded ‘Hotel’ the status of high priority industry to enable sustainable development of this sector. There are no reliable statistics showing a complete inventory of hotel rooms in the country. The only authentic estimates are those compiled by the Federation of Hotel & Restaurant association of India (FHRAI) and the Ministry of tourism. The statistics of approved hotels and rooms as on 31.3.2001 as per Ministry of tourism, Govt. of India is given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.8). The Indian hotel industry survey 2000-2001 has compiled the statistics in respect of 19 cities in the country. In Maharashtra, Mumbai, Nagpur and Pune have been covered. The trends with respect to these cities are summarized below: Mumbai: Notwithstanding the large increase in new room supply in Mumbai market, occupancy levels increased, indicating a large surge in demand. New room supply had a detrimental effect on average room rates, which declined by 7%. Domestic guests account for 50% of rooms occupied in five star and five star deluxe hotels and for 75% of the rooms occupied in two star and one star hotels, the remainder being foreign tourists. Average occupancy levels in 2000-01 were around 65%. Average stay of domestic guests is 4 days compared to 3 days for foreign guests. Pune: Occupancy levels in luxury hotels have remained steady, when compared to the mid market and budget hotels, which have experienced a decline in occupancy. Average rates have increased across the board. Domestic guests account for 65% of the rooms occupied in five star and five star deluxe hotels and the foreign guests account for the rest 35%. Average occupancy level in 2000-01 was around 55%. Average stay of foreign guests is 4-5 days compared to 2-4 days for domestic guests. Nagpur: Domestic guests account for 90% of the rooms occupied while foreign guests account for the rest 10%. Average stay of foreign guests is 3-4 days compared to 2-3 days for domestic guests. The average occupancy was around 70%. According to the planning department (Govt. of Maharashtra), the targeted tourism bed capacity for ninth five-year plan 1997-02 was 10000. The targeted bed capacity was 100 beds for each of the annual plans 2000-01 and 2001-02. 2-13 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.9.3

Maharashtra State Tourism Development Corporation Complexes

Maharashtra State Tourism Development Corporation (MTDC) has also set up several tourist complexes, which provide quality accommodation to the tourists at affordable rates. MTDC complexes are presently operational at the following locations: Ganapatipule, Mahabaleshwar, Matheran, Harihareshwar, Chikhaldara, Bordi, Tarkarli, Aurangabad, Ajantha, Fardapur, Bhandardara, Shirdi, Karla, Panhala, Raigad Fort, Ridhapur, Titwala, Tuljapur, Elephanta, Trimbakeshwar. It has privatised its accommodation facilities at the following locations: Akloli, Amboli, Bhimashankar, Chikhaldara, Dajipur, Ghodbunder, Jalgaon, Khopoli, Khindsi, Koyna, Kihim Beach, Lonavala, Murud-Harne, Malshej Ghat, Mahur, Murud Janjira, Panchgani, Panshet, Pandharpur, Panhala, Ramtek, Shegaon, Shikhar Shinganapur, Sindhkhedraja, Sinhagad, Toranmal & Wardha. These locations are indicated in Figure 2.9. Figure 2.9: MTDC Complexes

Further the PWD of Maharashtra Govt. also has a number of guesthouses at tourist places. However, barring one at Mahabaleshwar all others are not open for general public.

2.9.4

Profitability of MTDC assets

Though the financial data for the tourists resorts owned by MTDC is not available, discussions with MTDC officials revealed that MTDC owned properties at non-pilgrimage tourist places such as beaches and hill stations, show good profit whereas the properties at the pilgrimage locations do not seem to be viable except for a few locations like Shirdi. The main reasons for these properties not performing better are 2-14 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • 2.9.5

Lower willingness to pay by visitors on pilgrimage Lesser duration of stay Lower rates as compared to private hotels Restaurants

The saying 'Anna he poornabrahma' aptly summarises what Maharashtrians feel about the food they cook. They consider 'anna', or food, equal to 'Brahma', or the creator of the universe. Food is God, to be worshipped. Little wonders that Maharashtrian cuisine not only fills the stomach, but also fills the soul - with content! Major cities like state capital Mumbai, Pune, Nagpur, Thane, Amravati, Chandrapur, Nashik, and Aurangabad are known to have a number of hotels and Restaurants. Besides, to meet the needs of highway traffic, good number of “Dhabas” have come up at every few kms. distance all along the national highways and state highways. These dhabas serve vegetarian and non-vegetarian food and snacks to the people on a 24-hour routine basis. As per the NSSO survey of on unorganised services (excluding trade and finance), restaurants account for 24.7% of the enterprises in the rural areas of the state and 17.4% of the urban areas of the state. 43% of the restaurants in both the urban and rural areas do not have a bar. 2.9.6 Entertainment and recreational avenues

Recreational avenues in terms of gardens, amusement parks, golf course, Water Park, amusement parks are situated within or in the vicinity of some of the major cities/towns like Mumbai, Nagpur, Amravati, Chandrapur, and Pune and offer good entertainment/leisure values. 2.9.7 Shopping Centre, Emporia, Souvenir/Gifts Shops etc.

Due to the great influence of traditional handicrafts, woodworks, needlework and rich art and culture in the state, all major cities have a number of convenient shopping centres providing a wide choice of local gifts items and souvenir for the visiting tourists. These include handicrafts, bamboo furniture, paithani saris, decorative articles/toys made of wood from Sawantwadi, Kolhapuri footwear. 2.9.8 Tourism information centres

Maharashtra Tourism Department has also brought out a number of tourism related documents with its punch line “Maharashtra Unlimited”. Besides, other literature highlighting various historical and religious sites, MTDC complexes at different locations as well as information about festivals and fairs celebrations in the state are also available at the information centres. Details about Maharashtra Tourism are also available at various websites. The State Tourism Department, in addition to the Tourism Director Office in Mumbai has opened Tourism information centres at Pune, Mahabaleshwar, Aurangabad, Goa and MTDC holiday resorts.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.9.9

Intermediaries

According to the statistics available till December 2000, there were 24 Tourist transport operators, 78 Travel Agents and 24 Tour operators approved by the Ministry of Tourism in Maharashtra. Coolies / porters are available at almost all the major and intermediate railway stations throughout the state. 2.9.10 Basic amenities

Some of the major destinations are well equipped with basic amenities like drinking water, snack bars toilets. However, a lot of improvement is required at other destinations, the details of which are discussed in Chapter III. 2.9.11 Facilities for elderly / disabled / families

The facilities for elderly / disabled / families with young children are poorly or not at all developed at the destinations. However, a ropeway facility has been installed at Raigad hill fort, which is one of the most important forts in Maharashtra. The ropeway takes one to the top within 5 minutes which otherwise takes 3 hrs. 2.9.12 Others

According to the statistics available with the Ministry of Tourism, as on 31.3.98, there are 37 paying guest accommodation units (90 rooms) available in Maharashtra. Language is not a problem at most of the destinations. A large portion of the local people directly or indirectly related to the tourism industry are well conversant with Hindi, which is the most followed and the national language of India. Further, at destinations that are frequented by foreign tourists, the local people related to the Tourism industry have become familiar with English. The security and safety conditions are good at all the destinations barring places with Naxalite problem in Gadchiroli district of Vidarbha. 2.10 2.10.1 Current Status of Basic Infrastructure Airports

The Chatrapati Shivaji International Airport is the gateway for foreign visitors. The major airports are at Mumbai, Pune, Aurangabad, and Nagpur.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 2.10: Air Network

To Ahmedabad, Jamnagar,

Bhavnagar, Bhuj, Indore, Jodhpur, Rajkot, Baroda, Udaipur, Jaipur, Diu

To Delhi
To Delhi

To Kolkata

To Patna, Varanasi, Ranchi, Kolkata, Vizag, Bhopal, Raipur, Bhubaneshwar, Lucknow, Port Blair

22-25 Daily To Hyderabad 12-16 Daily

1-6 Daily
1-2 Daily Intra State

To Hyderabad, Bangalore, Chennai
To Goa, Coimbatore, Cochin,

2/3 per Week
To All Major International Airports Daily

Khozikode, Mangalore, Trivandram, Madurai,

However, there are airports also at Kolhapur and Ratnagiri. Almost all International airlines operate via Mumbai. Maharashtra is connected to all the major airports in India through operators like Indian Airlines, Alliance air, Jet Airways and Sahara.

2.10.2

Railways

The total length of railway routes in the state by the end of March 2001 was 5459 km. This was 8.7% of the total length in the country (63028 km). The railway routes are classified as broad gauge (1.676 m), meter gauge (1.000 m) and narrow gauge (0.762 m and 0.610 m) according to the distance between two rails in meters as given in parentheses. Out of the total railway route length in the state, 77% was covered under broad gauge, 9.2% under meter gauge and the remaining 13.8% under narrow gauge. Corresponding percentages for All India were 71%, 23.8% and 5.2% respectively. The railway route length per 1000 sq km of geographical area was 18 km in the state as against 19 km in the country at the end of March 2001. At the end of March 2001, the proportion of electrification of the railway route length in the state was 35.4 % as against 23.6% for the country as a whole. At the end of March 2001, the proportion of railway route length with double line in the state was 30.6% while it was 24.3% at the All India level. 2-17 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 2.11: Railway Network

A list of ongoing railway projects in Maharashtra is given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.9). The doubling of railway line between Diva-Vasai road and Sewagram-Chitoda has been completed. The works of railways in the state are progressing very slowly. The conversion work of narrow gauge into broad gauge in Miraj Latur section is being done in phases. In the first phase, gauge conversion work from Kurduwadi to Pandharpur (52 km) has been completed. Work on Kurduwadi Latur (152 km) has been taken up Miraj-Pandharpur (137 km) work will be taken up as last phase of the project. The conversion work of new broad gauge line from Amravati to Narkhed is in progress. The work of doubling of railway line in Daund Bhigwan section is in progress and expected to be completed during 2001-02. Final location survey for Ahmednagar Beed Parali Vaijanath has been completed for 15 km from Ahmednagar end. Construction of Beed station is in progress. To decongest Mumbai and to develop Navi Mumbai, following works are in progress: 1) Thane Turbhe Nerul Vashi railway line (22.6 km) costing Rs. 403.39 Crore) 5th and 6th line between Kurla and Bhandup (8.5 km) costing Rs. 95 Crore 3) 5th and 6th line between Bhandup and Thane (8 km) costing Rs. 56.79 Crore, 4) Borivali Virar quadrupling (25.81 km) costing Rs. 401.66 Crore 5) 5th line between Santacruz and Borivali (16.37 km) costing Rs. 82.42 Crore 6) Double line between Belapur/Nerul seawood and Uran(27 km) costing Rs. 495.44 Crore and 7)automatic block signalling of Virar Dahanu road costing Rs. 29.09 Crore. (Source: Economic Survey of Maharashtra, 2000-01) The addition of new lines between Ahmednagar – Parali Vaijanath via Beed and Putamba – Shirdi will benefit tourists travelling to Parali Vaijanath and Shirdi, which are among the major pilgrimage centres in Maharashtra. 2-18 of 34
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2.10.3

Roads Figure 2.12: Road Network

The total road length in the state by the end of March 2001 was 2.60 Lakh km. This total road length was maintained by various agencies such as Public Works Department (PWD), Zilla parishads (ZP), Municipal Corporations/councils etc. The PWD maintained 25.4% of the total road length while the ZPs maintained 57.9% of the road length. The remaining 16.7% of the total road length was maintained by other agencies viz., Municipal corporations/councils, Forest department, Irrigation department etc. The total road length maintained by PWD and ZPs together at the end of March 2001 was 2.17 Lakh km. The classification of this road length is presented in Appendix 2 (Table 2.10). Figure 2.13: Road Length by Type
National Highw ay 40%
Other district roads 20%

Major district roads 21%

State Highw ays 15%

Village roads 42%

The road length maintained by PWD and ZPs together registered an increase of 1.4% at the end of March, 2001 over the previous year. The proportion of surfaced and unsurfaced road length maintained by PWD and ZPs together was 82.5% and 17.5% respectively. 2-19 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

At the end of March 2001, the road length per 100 Sq. Km of geographical area in the state was 84 km and it was 269 km per Lakh of population. At the end of March 2001, out of the total 40412 inhabited villages (as per census 1991) in the state, 36275 villages were connected by all weather roads while 2654 villages were connected by fair weather roads. Maharashtra State Development Corporation Ltd (MSRDC) was established to overcome the inadequacy of funds for road development. The number of motor vehicles on road in the state as on 1st January 2001 was 66.07 Lakh, which showed an increase of 11.06% over the previous year. Of this, Brihanmumbai alone accounted for 15.35%. Of the total number of vehicles on road as on 1st January, 2001 in the state, two wheelers (motorcycles, scooters, mopeds) were 66.7%, light motor vehicles (motor cars, jeeps, station wagons) were 13.6%, public passenger vehicles (taxies, auto rickshaws, stage carriages, contract carriages, school buses, ambulances and private service vehicles) were 8.3%, goods vehicles (trucks, lorries, tankers, delivery vans and trailers) were 8.6%, tractors were 2.6% and other vehicles were 0.2%. The operational statistics of MSRTC (Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation) is given in Table 2.3. Table 2.3: Operational Statistics of MSRTC
Item Routes operated at the end of the year Route length at the end of the year Average effective kms operated per day Average number of passengers carried per day Average number of buses owned by the corporation Average number of buses on road per day Average fleet utilization Average seat capacity utilization of buses on road Unit Number Lakh km Lakh Lakh Number Number % % 2000-01 19679 13.57 49.16 65.11 16916 15920 94.11 59.75 1999-00 20170 13.50 47.51 69.94 16741 15389 91.92 63.55 % Increase -2.4 0.5 3.5 -6.9 1.1 3.5 2.2 -3.8

2.10.4

Water supply & Sewerage

By the end of the 8th five-year plan, 240 cities/towns in the state were provided with piped water supply facility. During 9th five-year plan, works of new water supply schemes for two towns, augmentation schemes for 243 towns and sewerage schemes for 14 towns were taken up. Out of these, 106 schemes are completed upto 2000-01. An outlay of Rs. 350.99 Crore is earmarked in annual plan 2001-02 for urban water supply and sanitation programme. The Government of India and state government have accorded high priority to the drinking water supply and have decided to provide drinking water to all citizens in the state by the year 2004 A.D. This program has been included in the 20 point programme and also in the ‘National minimum needs programme’. The rural drinking water schemes are implemented by providing piped water supply, bore wells and dug wells depending on source of water, terrain and population of the village. As on 1st April, 2001, there were 28,774 villages/wadis having problems of drinking water in the state. During the first four years of the ninth five year plan (1997-2001), 27137 villages / wadis were tackled. An outlay of Rs. 403.18 crores is earmarked for rural water supply and sanitation programme in the annual plan 2001-02. During 2001-02, upto end of Oct, 2001, 1024 villages/wadis were tackled for which an expenditure of Rs. 131.38 Crore was incurred. Due to inadequacy of rainfall, acute scarcity of drinking water arises in number of villages in the state every year. The state govt. has to take emergency water supply schemes in these villages. The district collectors have been given adequate powers for execution and monitoring of this program. The total expenditure on various water supply schemes since 1997-98 is enclosed in Appendix 2 (Table 2.11). 2-20 of 34
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2.10.5

Electricity

The installed capacity of electricity generation in Maharashtra as on 31st March 2001 was 12,959 MW. This has increased by 670 MW during 2000-01. This increase in installed capacity during 2000-01 was the result of addition of a) hydro projects Koyna stage IV-250 and thermal project at Khaparkheda unit 3 and 4 (210 MW each). Besides, the installed capacity of 12959 MW during 2000-01 in the state, the state’s share in the installed capacity of NTPC and the Nuclear Power Corporation was 1725 MW and 137 MW respectively. The total installed capacity of electricity generation in the state has increased annually at 7.5% annually during last 40 years. Of the total installed capacity of 12289 MW in the state as on 31st March, 2001, the thermal capacity accounted for 62.3%, followed by Hydro 22.2%, natural gas 14.0%, and nuclear (Maharashtra state share) 1.5%. The derated capacity of all electricity generation plants in the state as on 31st March, 2001 was 12900 MW. The details of the installed capacity are given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.12). Table 2.4: Installed Capacity of Electricity Generation
9000 8000 7000 6000
MW

8075 As on 31st March 2001

5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Thermal Hydro Natural Gas Nuclear Type of Generation NTPC Share NPC Share 190 137 2874 1820 2048

In Maharashtra, the main type of generation of electricity is thermal which accounts for about 75% of the total generation of electricity in the state. The total generation of electricity (including cogeneration) in the state during 2000-01 was 63317 million KWH. The details of electricity generated are given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.13).

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Figure 2.14: Electricity Generation by Type

Thermal 79.23%

Nuclear 1.76%

Other 0.02%

Hydro 7.85%

Natural Gas 11.14%

The total consumption of electricity in the state during 2000-01 decreased by 3.3% to 47289 million KWH compared to 48904 million KWh during 1999-00. The consumption of electricity is given in Appendix 2 (Table 2.14). Figure 2.15: Electricity Consumption by Load Type
Industrial 38% Co mmercial 9%

Do mestic 24% M iscellaneo us 1 % P ublic Water Wo rks 3% P ublic lighting 1 %

A griculture 21 %

Railways 3%

MSEB plays an important role in the generation and distribution of electricity in the state. Of the total installed capacity (12959 MW) as on 31st March, 2001 in the state, MSEB accounted for 74%. Maharashtra has achieved 100% village electrification by the end of March, 1989. All harijan bastis (33711) feasible for electrification of the state have been electrified by 31st March, 1998. During 200001, 85 wadis were electrified bringing the total number of wadis electrified to 37226. The state govt. has taken active lead to involve private sector participation in the power sector. The projects under private sector power participation include the Dabhol power project (Dist. Ratnagiri), Naphtha based 447 MW project at Patalganga (dist Raigad), coal based (2x541 MW) Bhadravati project (Dist. Chandrapur) and Bhandardara hydro electric project Phase I (Rehabilitation 12 MW) (dist Ahmednagar).

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The Ministry of Non conventional energy has declared 21 sites all over Maharashtra having wind speed above 18 Kmph for wind power generation. The total potential of wind energy from these sites will be around 2000 MW.

2.10.6

Communication

At the end of March 2001, the number of post offices in rural areas of the state was 11394 and in the urban areas it was 1394. Of these, 2778 post offices in the rural areas and 699 post offices in the urban areas were having telegraph facility. A public sector company ‘Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd (BSNL) has been formed from Oct 2000 to provide telecom services. There were 54.58 Lakh telephone connections in the state as on 31st March, 2001 showing an increase of 15% over that of previous year. Out of the total 54.58 Lakh connections, only 16.2% were in the rural areas and 83.8% were in the urban areas. The number of telephone connections per Lakh of population at the end of March 2001 in the state was 5639. Out of the 54.58 Lakh telephone connections, 24.8 Lakh (45.5%) were managed by MTNL, Mumbai alone. The number of PCOs under MTNL and BSNL were 87808 and 32017 respectively. PCOs with STD and ISD facility were 20538 and 49321 respectively. (Source: Economic survey of Maharashtra, 2001-02) 2.10.7 Medical facilities

The emphasis of the public health sector is on the consolidation of infrastructural facilities such as sub centres, primary health centres and community health centres so as to reach health services to all corners of the state. More, recently, the emphasis has been given to mental health care, AIDS control, cancer control and special health facilities in the tribal areas. The problems of malaria, gastroenteritis and other water borne diseases are prevalent during monsoon season particularly in tribal districts like Thane, Nashik, Dhule, Amravati and Gadchiroli. Various programmes are being implemented to control these and other diseases. By the end of 2001, there were Public and Government aided 1102 hospitals, 1544 dispensaries, 1768 primary health centres and 9725 sub centres in the state implementing these programs. 2.10.8 Banking facilities

The total number of banking offices of scheduled commercial banks in the state as on 30th June, 2001 was 6294, which accounted for 9.5% of the total scheduled commercial banking offices (66119) in the country. Of the total scheduled commercial banking offices in the state, 54% were in the rural and semi urban areas (population above 10000 and less than 1 Lakh) whereas 46% were in the urban areas. Brihanmumbai alone accounted for 50% of the banking offices in urban areas in the state. Of the total banking offices in India, the rural and semi urban areas accounted for 71% and urban areas accounted for 29%. The number of banking offices per Lakh population in the state as on 30th June, 2001 was 6.5, which was slightly more than that of All India (6.4).

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.11 2.11.1

Current Status of Environment Basic Environmental Parameters

Maharashtra experiences a tropical monsoon climate. The months of March, April and May are the months of maximum heat. On the coast the average minimum temperature in January is 16 °C, and the average maximum is 32 °C; in June the average minimum temperature is 26 °C and the average maximum is also 32 °C. Inland, the average temperatures range from 14 °C to 29 °C in January and from 25 °C to 40° C in May. Monsoon season accounts for about 80 % of its annual rainfall. The rainfall is over 400 cm, on the Sahyadrian crests, which diminishes to a meagre 70 cm in the western plateau districts. Usually, the first week of June is the time for onset of South West monsoon, which is preceded by days of very sultry weather, thundershowers and heavy gusts of wind. July is the wettest month followed by August. October marks the transition from rainy season to winter. From November to end of February, there is a cool dry spell with clear skies, gentle breezes and pleasant weather. In the Eastern Vidarbha region, the summers are hot and the winter cool. Copious rainfall and large number of rainy days have promoted the best forest cover in Maharashtra and an agricultural economy dominated by rice. The government of Maharashtra has created a separate department for Environment in 1985 to look after environmental problems in the state. The Maharashtra pollution control board has been in force since 1970. The board is regularly monitoring environmental water quality at 38 locations in the state. The board is also monitoring the overall environmental quality at 136 other locations of which at 64 locations the water quality has deteriorated since BOD was exceeding limits. The main reason is discharge of domestic effluent in the river without treatment. The ambient air quality in Mumbai is monitored by Municipal Corporation of Brihanmumbai at 6 locations. It has decided to monitor 26 stations under the project, National Ambient Air Quality Monitoring (NAAQM) in the state. The Maharashtra pollution control board is monitoring the ambient air quality at 5 locations in the state, the remaining monitored by educational institutions. During 2000-01, at one location, SO2 concentration was found above the standard and at 8 locations SPM (suspended particulate matter) level was found above standard. For proper and planned industrialization, work of zoning atlas is undertaken by Maharashtra Pollution control board in association with Central pollution control board. Zoning atlas work for Ratnagiri has been completed and in progress for Aurangabad and Pune district. (Source: Economic survey of Maharashtra, 2000-01) As per the Annual survey of industries 1997-98, nearly 50% of the factories in the state belong to the polluting category. These industries contributed to about 58% of the output and 50% of the value added in the manufacturing sector in the state. Nearly 50% of the factory workers in the state are employed in polluting industries. The economy cannot afford to shut down the industries due to environmental reasons.

2.12

National River Action Plan

The national river action plan has been launched in 1995 in Maharashtra state. This is a 100% centrally sponsored scheme whose main objective is to reduce river water pollution due to municipal sewage / domestic liquid waste. Under this scheme, Nashik and Nanded cities on the bank of Godavari 2-24 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

river and Karad & Sangli cities on the bank of Krishna river are covered. Sub schemes like sewage treatment plant, interception and diversion, river front development, low cost sanitation, crematoria development and afforestation are undertaken in this scheme.

2.12.1

Current Land Use Pattern

As per the land utilization statistics of 2000-01, the net area sown (176.4 Lakh hectares) accounted for a major portion i.e. 57.4% of the geographical area of the state, followed by forest land (17.3%), barren, uncultivable and culturable waste land (8.4%), current and other fallow land (7.6%) and permanent pastures, grazing land and land under miscellaneous tree crops and groves (5.1%). The remaining 4.2% was accounted by land put to non-agricultural uses. Figure 2.16: Land Use Pattern
Net sown area 57.50%

Fallow Land 7.60%

Other uncultiv ated land 8.00%

Land not av ailable f or cultiv ation 9.70%

Forests 17.20%

The area under forests in the state at the end of 2000-01 was 61.9 thousand Sq. Km. Of this, 55.9 thousand Sq. Km was managed by the forest department, 2.4 thousand Sq. Km by revenue department and 3.3 thousand Sq. Km by the forest development corporation of Maharashtra. 57% of the forest area was under dense forest cover, 42.8% was comparatively less dense due to degradation and 0.2% had mangrove forest cover. A detail break up of land use pattern is shown in Appendix 2 (Table 2.15).

2.12.2

Flora and Fauna

A rich and diverse flora and fauna exist in Maharashtra. Flowering plant species alone are about 3500 covering about 1200 genera and 150 families. Maharashtra has five forest types as per Champion and Seth's classification. Each Forest type represents a unique Eco-system. There are a large number of Sanctuary’s and National parks within the state. These are depicted in the following map. The Western Ghats has been classified as a biodiversity hotspot. Apart from these the state also has three forest areas, which have been declared as Tiger reserves under the Project Tiger conservation scheme by the Ministry of Environment and Forest, Government of India. These are namely Melghat Tiger reserve in Amravati district, Pench Tiger reserve in Nagpur district and the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve in Chandrapur district. Incidentally all the three Tiger reserves lie on the Eastern part of Maharashtra.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 2.17: Forest Cover

Melghat tiger reserve: The Melghat area was declared a tiger reserve in 1974. The reserve is a catchment area for five major rivers all of which are tributaries of the river Tapti. Melghat is the prime biodiversity repository of the state. More than 700 naturalised plant species have been enlisted in the flora of Melghat. Teak is the predominant tree species. Bamboo is also widespread. A 40 Sq. Km tourism zone has been established near Semadoh. Annually around 6000 tourists avail of the tourist facility here. The nature education and interpretation centre at Semadoh has four dormitories (64 beds), 10 huts (20 beds) and tent facility. Tent facility (6 tents) has been established at 11 different places to facilitate trekking in the reserve. Details of flora and fauna are given below: Flora Teak, Ain, Bamboo, Tiwas, Dhaoda, Kusum, Mahua, Fauna Tiger, Leopard, Sloth bear, Wild dog, Jackal, Sambar, Indian Bison, Barking Deer, Blue Bull, Spotted Deer, Chausingha, Ratel, Flying Squirrel, Wild Boar, Langur, Rhesus Monkey, Porcupine, Pangolin, Mouse deer.

Pench tiger reserve: Government of India declared the Pench tiger reserve in 1999. The reserve has a great ecological significance as it represents the floral and faunal wealth of Satpura Maikal hill range. Fishing is totally banned in the Pench reservoir. Proximity to a city like Nagpur has resulted in attracting tourists to this terrain. On an average, 100000 tourists visit the reserve every year. Wildlife tourism here is associated with the season – March to June when visibility is more and there is greater chance of viewing wild animals. A visitor centre is underway at Sillari on the boundary of Pench tiger reserve. 2-26 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Details of flora and fauna are given below: Flora Ain, Bamboo, Haldu, Karu, Arjun, Tendu, Char. Fauna Tiger, Leopard, Sloth bear, Wild dog, Jackal, Sambar, Indian Bison, Barking Deer, Blue Bull, Spotted Deer, Chausingha, Ratel, Flying Squirrel, Wild Boar, Langur, Rhesus Monkey, Porcupine, Pangolin, Mouse deer.

Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve: Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve is the pristine and unique ecosystem in the Chandrapur district of Maharashtra. Four forest rest houses with 11 suites and a youth hostel with 36 beds are available to visitors at Tadoba. A visitor centre cum museum is situated at Tadoba. Details of flora and fauna are given below: Flora Teak, Ain, Bija, Dhaoda, Bamboo, Haldu, Arjun, Tendu, Salai, Jamun, Mahua. Fauna Tiger, Leopard, Sloth bear, Wild dog, Jackal, Sambar, Indian Bison, Barking Deer, Blue Bull, Spotted Deer, Chausingha, Ratel, Flying Squirrel, Wild Boar, Langur.

Apart from the three Tiger reserves, the rich bio-diversity of Maharashtra is showcased through other wild life sanctuaries in Maharashtra. Chaprala Wildlife Sanctuary: This sanctuary is located in Chandrapur district in the Vidharba region of Maharashtra. Majority of the area is under thick forest that is wood land, with small patches of grass lands distributed over the entire protected area Flora Ain, Arjun, Behda, Bija Pterocarpus Bhera, Bel, Chichwa, Dhawada, Ghoti, Hiwar Kalam, Mahua, Mowai, Rohan, Salai, Semal Shisham, Sisoo, Shivan, Surya, Sirus, and Tendu Fauna Tiger, Leopard, Jungle cat, Sloth Bear, Wild dog, Indian Python, Common Indian Monitar, Black Buck, Wild Boar, Spotted Deer, Sambar, Barking Deer, Blue Bull, Common Langoor, Harep, Jackal, Mungoose, Peacock, Jungle Fowl, and Flying Squirrel.

Anerdam Wildlife Sanctuary: The sanctuary is situated on south-western range of Satpura range in Shirpur Tehsil of Dhule District. It shares boundaries with Yawal sanctuary other sanctuaries in Madhya Pradesh. Flora Khair, Hiwar, Babul, Bel, Dhawda, Palas, Salaia, and Terminenalia species, etc. Common shrubs include Vitex Nigundo, Zizphus Helicteres Isora, Solanium Giganteum, Casia Auriculata and Lantna etc. Known locally as Kusal, Bhuri, Rosa, Kunda, Sheda and Kusali Fauna Barking Deer's, Chikaras, Hares, Porcupines Jungle Cats and Monitor Lizard. Maigrant animals include Hyenas, Jackals, Wolves and Wild boars. Common resident birds include Peafs, Qualis, Partridges, Egrets, Herons, Cormorants, Corts, Spot Bills, Eagle Hamers, and Owls etc. Migrants birds like Brahming Ducks, Cranes, Stokes and many Waders.

Bhamragarh Wildlife Sanctuary: This sanctuary is located in Chandrapur district in the Vidharba region of Maharashtra. Majority of the area is under thick forest that is wood land, with small patches 2-27 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

of grass lands distributed over the entire protected area. One can even find wetlands in the protected area. Notable among them are Pamalgautam and Parlkota rivers, which runs through the protected area Flora The main tree species are Ain, Arjun, Behada, Bija, Bel, Shishamtendu, Hirda, Kusum, Jamun, Mango, Haldu, Kadam and bamboo. Kudgudi, Tarwad, Gokhru, Tarota, Neel & Kuda are aome of the main shrubs found over here. The common grasses are Chir, Mussam, Gawat, Khus and Kusal. Fauna Leopard, Jungle Fowl, Wild Boar, Sloth Bear, Barking Deer's, Blue Bulls, Hare, Mongoose, Peacock, and Flying Squirrel.

Bhimashankar Wildlife Sanctuary: The sanctuary is located in the northern part of the Western Ghats. It is spread over the three districts Pune, Thane and Raigad. There is a shrine in the forest with the Jyotirlinga, temple of Lord Shiva. Two major tributaries of river Krishna namely Bhima and Ghod originate from this area. The valley is a splendid combination of plant and animal life Flora Mango, Jamun, Hirda, Behda, Bamboo, Shrub, Herbs, Climber, Grass, and Fern. Fauna Leopards, Barking Deer, Sambar, Wild Boar, Langur, and Hyena. Among the birds Malabar Grey Hornbill, Quaker Babbler, Malabar Whistling Thrush, Green Pigeon, Black Eagle, Grey Jungle Fowl and Malabar Giant squirrel

Dajipur Wildlife Sanctuary: The Dajipur Bison Sanctuary is situated on the border of Kolhapur and Sindhudurg districts near the backwaters of the Radhanagari dam. Rugged mountains and thick forests abundant in wildlife surround this jungle resort. The sanctuary is completely cut-off from human habitat Flora Fauna Bison, Wild Deer, Chital and Gawa

Jayakwadi Bird Sanctuary: Jayakwadi Bird Sanctuary is situated in Aurngabad and Ahamadnagar district in Marathawara region. The presence of the Nathsagar Lake in the sanctuary, make the surrounding areas rich in aquatic flora and fauna Flora The aquatic vegetation includes mainly the species of Chara, Spyrogyra, Hydrilla, Potamogeton, Vallisneria etc. Argemone Maxicana and Ipomea Fistulosa are found in the surrounding area Fauna Nearly 200 species of birds are found in this area, which includes more than 70 species of migratory birds out of which 45 major species are of international migration. Notable amongst migratory birds are Cranes, Flamingos, Brahmany Duck, Pochards Teals, Pintails, Wigeon, Shovellar, God Wit, Shauces, Glossy Ibis, etc Kalsubai Wildlife Sanctuary: The sanctuary area spreads from Kalasubai to Harischandragad in Akole Tehsil of Ahmadnagar district. The area is part of Sahyadri hill ranges. The Kalsubai sanctuary is challenge to trekkers as it is most rugged, hilly area and difficult to get accessibility. Kalasubai is the highest (1646 m) peak of Western Ghats in the Maharashtra State.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Flora Hirda, Jambhul, Chandawa, Bahava, Kumbhal, Gulchavi, Kudal, Siras, Kharvel, Karap, Avali, Aashind, Lokhandi, Beheda, Mandar, Kadipatta, Ghaneri, Chilhar, Parjambhual, Karvi, Karwand, Ber, Dhaiti, Marvel, Dongari, Pawanya, Ber, Surad and Harali.

Fauna The mammals found here are Leopard, Jungle cat, Palm civet, Mongoose, Hyena, Wolf, Jackal, Fox, Wild Boar, Barking Deer, Sambar, Hare, and Bats etc. The reptiles found in this sanctuary are Monitor Lizard, Fan-Throated Lizard, Turtles and many species of snakes. Among the birds are the common hill and grass land birds. One can also spot water birds such as White Necked Storks, Black Ibis, Herons, Egrets, Cormorants, Water hen's, etc Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary: Sanctuary is located in Satara District in Western Maharashtra . Koyana wildlife sanctuary includes Eastern and Western catchments of Koyana dam. This dam is a major hydroelectric project centre in the Western Maharashtra. The sanctuary is well protected by the large extent of Shivasagar reservoir and steep Slopes of Western Ghats on both the sides. A vegetal cover corridor of Chandoli connects this protected area. It is bounded by Radhanagari wildlife sanctuary in south Flora Fauna The major tree species are Anjani, Jambul, Hirda, Animals such as Tigers, Panthers, Gaurs, Sloth Awala, Pisa, Ain, Kinjal, Amba, Kumbha, Bears, Sambars, Barking Deers, Mouse Deers, Bhoma, Chandala, Katak, Nana, Umbar, Jambha, Dholes, Gaint Squirrels, Otters, Common Gela, Bibba etc. Karvi is found almost all over Langoors, Pythons, and Cobras. Among the birds the area. Climbers like Shikekai, and Garambi; are Heart Spotted, Rufous and Brown Capped Medicinal plants such as Karvand, Vagati, Woodpeckers, Goshawk, Long Tailed Nightjar Ranmiri, Tamalpati, Toran, Dhayati, Kadipatta, and Fairy Bluebird. Narkya, Murudsheng, etc; bulbs of seasonal plants and quite a large number of ephemera's. The santuary also hosts threatened and rare tree species such as Garambi and RanJaiphal. Some other species, which are not found anywhere and highly threatened, are Dhup, Eupohoria Longan, and Elecoarpus Tectorium. Tree giants like Harpullia Arborea & Turpunita Malbarica are characteristic of western ghats. Karnala Bird Sanctuary: Karnala Bird Sanctuary is situated in Panvel Taluka of Raigad District of Konkan Region. This sanctuary is located at the bottom of the Karnala fort, which lies between Pen and Panvel. The sanctuary is around 25m high from the sea level, while the fort itself is 370m from the sea level Flora Fauna Koshimb, Mango, Nana, Kulu, Kalam, Asana, One can find around 150 species of birds of Umbar and Teak resident and 37 species of migratory birds that visit the sanctuary. Among the most prominent are Paradise Flycatcher, Shama or Magpie, Robin, Malabar Whistling Thrush, Racket-Tailed Drongo, Red Vented Bulbul, Horn Bill, Myna, Owl, Ashy Rain War Blur, and two rare birds Ashy Minimet and Spotted heart Woodpeckers. 2-29 of 34
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary: Nagzira Wildlife sanctuary lies in Tirora Range of Bhandara Forest Division, in Bhandara district of Vidarbha region. The sanctuary is enclosed in the arms of the nature and adorned with exquisite landscape. The sanctuary consists of a range of hills with small lakes within its boundary. These lakes not only guarantee a source of water to wildlife throughout the year, but also greatly heighten the beauty of the landscape Flora Ain, Dhavda, Bija, Garari, Tinsa, Tendu and Surya, Teak and Bamboo Fauna The animals commonly spotted are Tigers, Panthers, Leopards, Bison's, Sloth Bears, Sambar, Four-Headed Antelope, Blue Bull, Chital, Barking Deers, Mouse Deers, Civet Cats, Jackals, Jungle Cats, Spotted Hyena, and Hare. Among the birds that are prominent and commonly seen are Peafowl, the Grey Jungle Fowl and the Red Spur Fowlr Navegaon National Park: The Navegaon National Park located in Navegoan, Gondia is one of the most popular forest resorts in the Vidarbha region. A picturesque lake with crystal clear water, stretching over an area of 11 sq. kms is set in the midst of hill ranges and can be approached through a series of winding trails. Strategically located, watch towers enable the visitor to Navegaon to catch a glimpse of the region's varied wildlife. It consists of a deer park, an aviary and three beautifully landscaped gardens. Flora Fauna Teak, Haldu, Jamun, Kawat, Mahua, Ain, Bhel Though Navegaon is better known as a bird and Bhor sanctuary, a number of wild animals could also be sighted. Tigers, Panthers, Bisons, Sambars, Nilgais, Chitals, Wild boars, Sloth Bears, and Wild Dogs are main wild life species in this national park. 2.12.3 Availability of Water

Maharashtra has 720 kms long coast, which is about 11% of national coastline of India. The entire coastline is dotted with numerous beaches, which can be developed as tourist’s spots. Some of the major rivers flowing through Maharashtra are the Tapi, the Godavari, Pench, the Krishna, the Bhima, the Wardha, the Wainganga and the Koyna.

2.12.4

Tourist places already environmentally damaged

The two prime hill stations of Maharashtra namely Mahabaleshwar and Matheran have become ecologically damaged and have been declared as Eco-sensitive zones by the Government of Maharashtra.

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2.13 2.13.1

Current Status of Institutional Framework for Tourism Financing of Tourism projects

Facilities for financing tourism related projects are available through Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI) State Financial Corporation (MSFC) and / or State Infrastructure Development Corporation. Besides there are other financial institutions at the state level and national level like IDBI, ICICI which provide funds for infrastructure development to boost tourism development in the state The Maharashtra state finance corporation has various branch offices at Pune, Nagpur, Aurangabad, Kolhapur, Nashik, Thane, Daman & Diu, Amravati, Panjim (Goa) with the head office at Mumbai. The role of MSFC in general is • • • • • • Financing industrial units in Maharashtra, Goa and Daman & Diu. New SSI & medium units and existing units undertaking expansion, diversification, modernisation or renovation can avail of financial assistance. Operating schemes for financial assistance to doctors, women entrepreneurs and exservicemen. Offering finance to SSI units for obtaining ISO 9000 certification, marketing and sales promotion activities. Assistance schemes are available from MSFC for acquisition of following fixed assets and facilities depending upon the type of activities selected: Land, Building, Kitchen equipment, Office equipment including Telecommunication Network, Air-conditioners, Interior decoration, Furniture, Conference hall, Health club, Swimming pool, Indoor sports facilities, Shopping arcade, Garden equipment etc. In case of restaurants set-up in commercial premises, assistance is available to acquire premises on ownership basis. In case of tourism related activities, assistance is available for Cultural centres, Convention centres, Amusement parks, Water sports, Tourist service agencies (travel and transport including those at the airports).

• •

The ceiling value of the loan amount was raised from Rs. 2.4 Crore to Rs. 5 Crore in the budget for the current year. However, the loan interest subsidy of 3%, which was granted on 1, 2 & 3 star category hotels, has been withdrawn w.e.f April 2002. The amounts disbursed by MSFC for the Tourism industry are given in Table 2.5. Table 2.5: MSFC Loans for Tourism related Activities (Rs. Crore) Year Sanction No. Amount 1999-00 23 736.58 2000-01 50 1653.2 2-31 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.13.2

Human resources Development

The success of tourism industry depends as much on the availability of requisite infrastructure, as on availability of trained manpower to work as guides, interpreter, tour operators and above all to serve in Hotels and Restaurants, so as to ensure a comfortable and happy stay by the tourists. Hence trained persons in tourism related sub sectors are seen as a sinequa for the tourism industry. One of the main considerations in promotion of tourism is to draw advantage in terms of the employment multiplier effect resulting in creation of additional employment opportunities. It is believed that an investment of Rs. 10 Lakhs in tourism results in creation of 89 jobs compared to 45 in agriculture and 13 in manufacturing. Further, it is believed the visit of one foreign tourist provides employment to one person. Similarly 17 domestic tourists generate one job in the country. However, in the absence of adequate training facilities within the state the local youths may not be able to benefit despite generation of additional job opportunities. Hence, the need for the state government to consider setting up more – institutes and Training Centres to prepare the young boys and girls to be part of the manpower available for tourism sector. Though there are over 35 Hotel Management and Food Craft Institute in the country. The more important institutes in Maharashtra are mentioned below: Institute of Hotel Management, Catering Technology & Applied Nutrition Veer Savarkar Marg, Dadar (w), Mumbai-400028. Tel. (022)-4457241/2, 4469143 Fax: 4449779 E-Mail: mumcat@bom3.vsnl.net.in 2.13.3 Handicraft, arts and Handloom industries

The beautiful paintings at Ajantha show evidence of a tradition of painting in Maharashtra. Under the patronage of the rulers, there was development of glass, miniature, cloth and narrative paintings. The Warli paintings, traditionally executed on the mud walls of homes, are now being worked on paper and fabric. With the presence of the British Resident at the Peshwa’s court in Pune in 1790, the European style of painting was initiated and it was further developed with the establishment of the J-J School of Arts in Mumbai, which remains a premier, institute in the field. The major association of the handloom industry in Maharashtra with tourism is through Paithani and Himroo textiles, which are woven at Paithan and Aurangabad. The unique feature of the Paithani weaves is that in the silk motifs are woven gold background, unlike other brocades where gold motifs are woven on a silk background. Himroo is woven at Aurangabad with different combinations of cotton, wool, silk and gold silk threads. Lacquer work is a speciality of Sawantwadi, where it has been traditionally worked on ganjifas (playing cards), boxes and furniture. Some of the recommendations or suggestions for Developing Handicrafts in the State are presented as follows: • Invite investments from outside either from PSU's or big private concerns. People from Chambers of Commerce also can be motivated to invest by offering incentives and providing

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• • • • •

• • •

• • •

them all the required infrastructural facilities. NGO's need to be identified from outside the State who can invest in this State. In pursuance of the declared policy of developing the backward regions, the Government may consider a package of fiscal incentives to promote investment in this State. Information technology applications in local / regional languages needs to be promoted thoroughly. E-commerce, etc., can be used to the maximum advantage. The products can be shown in internet to attract foreign buyers, etc. There is a need to strengthen the existing craft centres by way of increasing the number of crafts persons and providing them with modern tools and equipment. Efforts should be made to reduce the incidence of dropouts from the training. They should also be motivated to start their own units after the training by providing them with all the requirements. Awards for trainees who exhibit noticeable talents can also be made to motivate them just as awards to master crafts persons. The services of the Institutes of Handloom Technology, NCTD, NIFT, NID etc can be utilized fully for the development of handloom sector. For marketing the products the National / Regional level marketing agencies can be utilized by adopting the Government of India's scheme, i.e., Market Development Assistance Scheme (MDA). Strengthening of Artisan Training, Production and Marketing Centre (ARTRAP). Artisans should be motivated to produce products for exports as the scope of exports in these two sectors is vast. The expertise of Export Promotion Councils can be utilized. Artisans should be motivated to form cooperative societies so that they have fewer problems and can increase their bargaining power thus yielding better results. Women’s participation

2.13.4

Tourism – the highest employer: Tourism sector is the highest employer of manpower in the country. As per the estimates of Department of Tourism this sector currently employs 4.2 million persons, 2.5 million directly and 1.7 million indirectly. The special feature of this employment is that it employs a large number of women and young persons and the network of hotels, restaurants and other tourism services are widely spread in the rural areas of the country. As per released estimate by the Department of Tourism, that every Rs.10 lakhs of new investment in hotels and restaurants creates 89 new jobs, compared to 12.6 for manufacturing & 44.6 for agriculture Employment generation for Women: As most of the major tourist destinations in the state are located in the rural and semi-urban places, there exists a great potential to involve local mass participation and help them generate more and more income from the tourism activities. Women participation can greatly be encouraged to many of these activities befitting the nature and style of the women folk. Hospitality and Service industry in particular (Hotels, Restaurants, Call centres, Reservations, Tour coordination, even Tour guides etc.) can encourage and provide ample opportunity for women employment. IT and Training segments also have high potential so far as women employment generation is concerned. As per a study on reviewing macro trends in the 1990s for women particularly with special reference to urban informal employment, it was found and suggested that there was greater reliance on subsidiary rather than primary activity and important concerns relating to the quality of employment 2-33 of 34
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

need to be recognised. There is also a need for policy interventions to consider / rationalise the extent and reasons behind gender wage gaps. To ensure and encourage healthy participation of women in various streams of activities in the tourism industry, certain things, as mentioned below need to be considered: 1. Necessary measures against commercial exploitation of women in tourist areas, stringent action for abuse against women as well as taking action against those who deliberately involve in illegal and unwarranted activities which are detrimental to the tourism any way. 2. A transparency (on the part of DOT) in providing information and data on employment of women in the tourism industry and state their position for further discussion. 3. Formation of a Specific Purposes Committee in tourism places (as provided in the Tamil Nadu Panchayat) to address the issues of tourism development like issuing and cancellation of licenses. 4. Empowerment of Panchayat in such a way that Panchayat have say in deciding new projects especially with respect to Special Tourism Area (STA). 5. The state should organise orientation training for ward members/ Panchayat leaders on issues of women and tourism. 6. State should train and involve local community as full time guides in all tourism places. 7. Create alternative, viable employment opportunities for local women in tourist places. 8. The Government and the Tourism Industry should refrain from stereotyping of women and their roles. 9. The state and local governments must allow for community participation particularly women in tourism policy formulation and implementation. 10. Prevention of migration of rural artisans to urban areas. While migration may assist the preservation of traditional craftsmanship, state and civil society alike need to look at fresh ways to nurture rural talent. 11. Continued economic/ financial support through various schemes / pensions for poor craftsmen based on certain criteria. These would encourage and help poor craftsmen to contribute to the sector in a sustained way. 12. An artisan welfare trust may also be created (if not in existence) 13. Besides implementing welfare schemes for artisans, the state government should also work to promote and develop handicrafts like organising exhibitions every year to popularise and market Maharashtra’s handicrafts.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3
3.1

FIELD SURVEY FINDINGS
Introduction

This chapter summarises the results of the primary survey of stakeholders – Foreign tourists, Domestic tourists, Tour operators & Travel agents, Industry associations, Tourism departments and other concerned government departments and academic experts. 3.2 Sampling Plan and Methodology

The basic purpose of the primary field survey was to obtain a first hand assessment of the ground realities at various tourist destinations. The major tourist destinations in Maharashtra were identified and plotted on a map. The major areas with a cluster of tourist destinations were segregated on the map and all these major clusters were covered during the field survey. These are shown in Figure 3.1. Table 3.1: Figure 3.18: Destinations Visited

The destinations and attractions visited during the survey are listed in Table 3.1.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table 3.1: Destinations Visited
Sr.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9. 10. 11. 12. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Destination visited Aurangabad Ajantha Paithan Lonar Nashik Bhandardara Mumbai Pune Pratapgad Wai Koyna Kolhapur Panhala Dajipur Amboli Sawantwadi Tarkarli Malvan Kunkeshwar Devgad Ratnagiri Dervan Harne Karde Harihareshwar Diveagar Janjira Wardha Bhadravati Tadoba Nawegaon N.P Nagpur Ramtek Totladoh Amravati Chikhaldara Semadoh Ambejogai Mithbao Vijaydurg Mahabaleshwar Ganapatipule Attractions visited Aurangabad city, Ellora and Daulatabad Caves, Grishneshwar Temple Sant Eknath Udyan Lonar Crater Nashik City Randha falls, other view points. City City, Theur, Ranjangaon, etc. Fort Ancient Ganapati Temple Dam site City, Mahalaxmi temple Fort, Hill station view points Forest View Points Lake Beach City, Sindhudurg Sea fort Ancient Shiv Temple Mango orchards City Shiv Charitragad Beach, Ancient Ganapati temple at Anjarle, Harne fort Beach, Dolphin sightings Beach, Ancient Vishnu Temple, Srivardhan Temple Sea Fort Magan Sangrahalay Museum, Sewagram Ashram, Paunar Ashram, Jamnalal Bajaj Museum, Buddhist Stupa Jain Temples Tiger Reserve Forest Forest Nagpur city Ancient Ram temple, Khindsi water sports nearby Pench Dam site, Pench tiger reserve Ambadevi temple Hill station, Gavilgad fort Melghat Tiger reserve Temple, view points in vicinity Beach, Lagoon formation Sea Fort Panchgani, view points Beach, temple

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The primary field survey envisaged interactions with major stakeholders at major tourist destinations in the state. The travel and tourism industry has a number of stakeholders:

(i) • • (ii) •

Tourists Foreign tourists Domestic tourists

State Tourism department Government departments like Planning department, Forest department, PWD, Electricity board, water supply and sewerage department, labour department etc Tour operators & Travel agents Hotel and Restaurant industry Entrepreneurs & Financial institutions

(iii) (iv) (v)

Separate questionnaires were prepared for documenting the feedback from foreign and domestic tourists, tour operators and check lists were prepared to document the feedback from government departments. These are enclosed as Volume 2, Annexure 2. The list of contacts made during the survey is enclosed as Volume 2, Annexure 1.

3.2.2

Sample Size

The sample size of the field survey was mutually agreed upon between the Ministry of Tourism and the consultants. Stakeholder Category Foreign tourists Domestic tourists Tour operator State Govt. departments Associations Hotel owners Guides Developers CII Total Sample size 25 50 5 36 4 30 8 6 1 165

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.3 3.3.1

Survey Findings: Foreign Tourists Country of Origin

Almost 57% of the foreign tourists contacted were from Europe followed by Asians with 31%. Europeans were mainly from Germany and UK whereas Asians mainly interested in Buddhist caves of Ajantha and Ellora were from Japan and Korea. Figure 3.19: Country of Origin
Others 12%

Asia 31%

Europe 57%

3.3.2

Port of Entry

Mumbai being a major business hub and the financial capital of India acts as a major port of entry. 3.3.3 (i) Demographic profile Gender

Out of the foreign tourists surveyed 30% were female tourists while 70% were male. (ii) Age

The age wise distribution of foreign tourists was analysed on the basis of the survey conducted at specific tourist destinations popular amongst foreign tourists such as Ajantha, Ellora Aurangabad etc. The survey revealed that the majority of foreign tourists were of the age group 25 – 34 years, followed by the age group 34-45 years. The age wise distribution of foreign tourists surveyed is shown below: Figure 3.20: Age Profile of Tourists

45-54 25-34 15-24 Others

10.64% 61.70% 17.02% 10.64%

Group

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(iii)

Occupation

Executives and professionals form around 72% of the total foreign tourists contacted during the survey. A substantial share (28%) of respondents was students visiting Ajantha – Ellora caves. Figure 3.21: Occupation
Professional 32% Executive 40% Student 28%

3.3.4

Purpose of visit

Majority of the foreign tourists coming into Maharashtra are either business tourists intending to stay in major metros for business purposes or tourists who use Mumbai as an entry and exit point in India. According to the Tourist statistics 1999 released by Ministry of tourism, the share of tourists visiting India for business purposes is 54.5. DMM conducted a small dipstick survey of foreign tourists at different tourist destinations in India. This survey revealed that almost 67 % of the tourists visit Maharashtra for heritage and cultural monuments. The most popular tourist destination amongst foreign tourists is Ellora caves near Aurangabad. An estimated 40000 – 50000 foreign tourists (majority being Japanese) visit Ellora caves per year. Figure 3.22: Purpose of Visit
Heritage/ Culture 67%

Leisure 33%

3.3.5

Travel pattern

Out of the foreign tourists surveyed, 56% were travelling alone followed by 33% travelling with a group and the remaining along with family. The reason for this trend is often linked with the purpose of the tour. Many foreign tourists with special interest visit Buddhist heritage monuments, since such a visit is more of a study tour rather than a leisure trip, they prefer to travel individually or in a group of 2-3. 3-5 of 30
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 3.23: Travel Pattern
Family 11%

Group 33%

Alone 56%

3.3.6

Tour package

Foreign tourists visiting for the first time generally prefer a package tour. More than 50% of the foreign tourists surveyed were travelling on a package tour. 3.3.7 Mode of transport

Unlike domestic tourists who prefer road transport, foreign tourists generally use a combination of two modes of transport to reach a destination. Railways is used to reach the base city like Mumbai, Aurangabad, etc and road is used to reach the actual destination. Figure 3.24: Mode of Transport
Combination 44% Road 56%

3.3.8

Average length of stay

Average duration of stay for foreign tourists in Mumbai is around 2 days, while in Maharashtra it is around 4-5 days. This is only 10-15 percent of the total stay in India, which is about 31.5 days according to the Ministry of tourism, GOI.

3.3.9

Frequency of visit

The survey displayed a good repeat tour probability to the destinations in Maharashtra. Around 25-30% of foreign tourists were repeat visitors to India and the average stay in Maharashtra was about 1 week or less. 3-6 of 30
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.3.10

Source of information about destination

Major sources of information about destinations in Maharashtra remain India travel guide and information from friends and relatives. Figure 3.25: Source of Information
Travel Guide 56% Friends and Relatives 22%

Advt in print media 22%

3.3.11

Average spending per day per person

The average spending per day per person of foreign tourists is around $ 58.33. Figure 3.26: Spending Pattern

Food 23%

Transport 21% Accom odation 49%
Entertainm ent / Shopping 7%

3.3.12

Type of accommodation

Most of the foreign tourists surveyed stayed at non-star hotels, mostly at the MTDC resorts in Aurangabad and Ajantha. 3.3.13 Satisfaction level with tourist facilities

Roads, sanitation and emergency medical facilities were the most inadequate components of tourism infrastructure in Maharashtra, according to the foreign tourists. On a scale of 1-5, emergency medical facilities get a poor ranking while roads get an average ranking. 3-7 of 30
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 3.27: Satisfaction level
Airlines Air Port Rail Banking Emergency Road Communication Safety Sanitation Guide Shopping Sight Seeing Accomodation
0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 2.67 2.33 4.00 1.67 3.00 3.00 1.60 2.17 3.33 2.50 2.50 2.67 2.75

Scale 1-2: 2–3: 3–4: 4–5:

Poor Average Good Very good

3

3.5

4

4.5

Other areas for improvement specifically at foreign tourist destinations are those falling in the Average category on the above scale. Better connectivity, accommodation, banking facility and shopping facility should be the priority areas of development at foreign tourist destinations. 3.3.14 Major items of interest during visit

Major tourist destinations for foreign tourists in Maharashtra are shown in Figure 3.11. Figure 3.28: International Tourist Destinations

Nagpur Ajanth Nashik
Ellora

Daulatabad

Elephanta

Mahabaleshwar

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Foreign tourists coming to Maharashtra visit the world heritage sites of Elephanta caves in Mumbai and Ajantha – Ellora in Aurangabad. Some foreign tourists are also found at comparatively well-known places like Mahabaleshwar and Ganapatipule. According to MTDC officials Nagpur and Nashik are popular hopping points amongst foreign tourists. Nagpur is used as base to visit Kanha Kesri tiger reserve in MP whereas tourists about on return to their home countries and awaiting their ticket confirmation etc halt at Nashik as it is cheaper as compared to Mumbai.

3.3.15

Problems faced during stay

Major problems faced by foreign tourists during the visit were • • • • 3.3.16 Lack of proper signage’s Lack of means of transport Lack of money changing facilities Cheating by Auto drivers, guides, touts etc.

Willingness to visit again and overall experience

All tourists contacted said that their overall experience in Maharashtra was satisfactory and that they would like to visit the state again.

3.3.17

Suggestions for improvement of tourist destination

Some of the suggestions made by foreign tourists for improvement of tourist destinations were 1. Improvement in hygiene and cleanliness. 2. Provision of proper signage’s in English. 3. Improving the availability of trained guides conversant with English. 3.4 Analysis of Survey Findings: Foreign Tourists Heritage sites, Beaches, Culture and business Average 2-4 days in Maharashtra Europe and Japan are major countries of origin $ 58.33 US Accommodation – 49 %, Food – 21%, Transport – 23% Sanitation, Emergency medical facility, Roads and transport

Needs of foreign tourists surveyed (experience sought) Length of stay Origin of visitors Total average expense per day per person Expenditure on various tourism products Main areas of concern

Most of the non-business foreign tourists coming into Maharashtra directly go to other states from Mumbai. Very few of the total tourists (8-10%) visiting Maharashtra visit tourist destinations in Maharashtra.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.5 3.5.1

Survey Findings: Domestic Tourists State of Origin

Domestic tourism in Maharashtra is highly localised within the state boundaries. Inter state tourism with tourist arrivals from other states is confined to a few popular destinations like Ajantha-Ellora, Mumbai, Kolhapur, Ganapatipule, Mahabaleshwar and Matheran. The other destinations depend upon local tourists from within the state. The interstate tourists at Kolhapur and Ganapatipule are mainly from the southern states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka, while those visiting Mahabaleshwar, Matheran and Mumbai are from Gujarat. Ajantha and Ellora get visitors from all over the country. 3.5.2 (i) Demographic profile Gender

The survey was conducted in the months of March and April, which is not the tourist season. As in all parts of Maharashtra, exams are scheduled in April, very few family visitors travel during this period. Out of the total domestic tourists surveyed, only 10% were female tourists. This finding may not be the true picture of the gender wise distribution of tourists in Maharashtra. Discussions with local officials and on site observations suggested that the share of female tourists in the total domestic tourist arrivals in Maharashtra is around 35 - 40%. (ii) Age

The age profile varies from destination to destination and also season wise. Family tours are common during the vacation period of April – May and November – December. The rainy season of JuneAugust is popular among young tourists of age groups 24 – 35 visiting hill stations like Chikhaldara, Bhandardara, Malshej, Amboli and Konkan region. The age profile of domestic tourists surveyed in Maharashtra is given below in Figure 3.12. Figure 3.29: Age Profile

45-54
Group

10.64% 61.70% 17.02% 10.64%

25-34 15-24 Others

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(iii)

Occupation

Out of the 48 respondents to this question, it was found that as high as 39% of tourists visiting destinations in Maharashtra are executives, followed by professionals (27%). This implies that majority of tourists in Maharashtra are from the medium to high income group. Figure 3.30: Occupation
Others 13% Enterpreneur 14%

Professional 30%

Executive 43%

3.5.3

Purpose of visit

Out of the 48 domestic tourists surveyed, as high as 27 tourists mentioned leisure as the primary objective of their tour. The next major objective was pilgrimage followed by business and adventure. However this classification of tourists is only on the basis of the survey conducted at different tourist destinations. If all the tourist centres and business centres are considered, the percentage of business tourists is likely to be more but leisure and pilgrimage individually or a combination of the two would be the largest shareholders in purpose of visit. It is estimated through discussions with experts that leisure and pilgrimage together contribute to around 75-80 percent of tourist themes. Figure 3.31: Purpose of Visit
Heritage/ Culture 40%

Leisure 56% Adventure 2% Business 2%

3.5.4

Travel pattern

Most of the popular tourist circuits in Maharashtra being a combination of Pilgrimage and Adventure tourism themes, most of the tourists travel with their family or in a group of 6-8 persons.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.5.5

Tour package

None of the domestic tourists contacted were travelling on a package tour as the survey was carried out during the off-season.

3.5.6

Mode of transport

Most of the domestic tourists (almost all) travelled by road to all the destinations visited. This is due to good road connectivity between places and popular tourist destinations being near to the major National Highways in Maharashtra. With a good connectivity provided by MSRTC buses, tourists prefer road as the mode of transport. Many tourists travelling with groups travel by their own or hired vehicle. The major national highways running through each zone are given in Table 3.2. Zone West Table 3.2: National Highways National Highway No Accessible destinations NH – 4, NH - 17 Entire west coast of Maharashtra Mahabaleshwar, Kolhapur, Amboli, Sawantwadi Mumbai – Pune Expressway Lonavala, Khandala, Mumbai – Goa Highway NH – 6 Amravati, Chandrapur, Wardha, Nagpur, Chikhaldara, Melghat, Tadoba etc. NH – 30, NH – 3, NH – 6 Nashik, Wani, Trimbakeshwar, Bhandardara etc. NH – 9 Pandharpur, Tuljapur, Parali, Ambejogai Average length of stay

East North South 3.5.7

Average length of stay at a single destination for domestic tourists is 1-2 days. This is because most destinations are part of existing tourist circuit covered in 5-6 days.

3.5.8

Frequency of visit

It is noteworthy that the probability of repeat visits to the same destination in Maharashtra is as high as 50 %. Out of the total number of 47 visitors surveyed at different destinations, 23 were on repeat visits.

3.5.9

Source of information about destination

The majority domestic tourists visiting Maharashtra being from within the state, they collect information from friends and relatives who have already visited that destination earlier. Other sources of information for domestic tourists are regional MTDC offices and advertisement in newspapers.

3.5.10

Average spending per day per person

It was observed from the survey that the tourists visit two distinct types of destinations. The destinations where majority of tourists halt or camp or make their base to visit satellite destinations are 3-12 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

called camping destinations and the destinations where majority of tourists visit en route to other destination or as a part of travel circuit but do not halt overnight are called en route or day tour destinations. The survey revealed that there is a significant difference between the average spending per day for these two destinations. The average spending at camping destinations was estimated to be Rs 679 per day per person and at en route destinations was estimated to be Rs 425 per day per person.

3.5.11

Spending Pattern Figure 3.32: Spending Pattern - Camping destinations
Food 23%

Accomodation 49%

Entertainment / Shopping 7%

Transport 21%

Average Spending: Rs. 679 per day per person

Figure 3.33: Spending Pattern – En Route / Day Tour destinations

Entertainment / Shopping 7%

Food 23%

Transport 21%

Average Spending: Rs. 425 per day per person

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.5.12

Type of accommodation

Budget accommodation and luxury-flatted accommodation are most popular amongst the tourists in Maharashtra. Beach cottages and tent resorts at beaches like Ganapatipule, Harihareshwar, and Tarkarli are currently popular amongst tourists. 3.5.13 Satisfaction level with tourist facilities

Respondents were asked to rate the destinations on different criteria. Each component was ranked on a scale of 1 to 5 (5 for very good and 1 for poor). Average rating for each component was found to reveal gaps in the infrastructure availability throughout the state. Since the requirements of tourists at en-route destinations and camping destinations vary, the composite rating for these two types of destination was found separately. Since the main mode of transport within Maharashtra is road, very few responses were received on these aspects of infrastructure. These were not considered while developing the composite index. The average rating for different components related to tourism found out from the survey is given in Figure 3.17. Figure 3.34: Satisfaction level – Camping destinations
Airlines Air Port Rail Banking Emergency Road Communication Safety Sanitation Guide Shopping Sight Seeing Accomodation 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 2.67 3 3.5 4 4.5 2.33 4.00 1.67 3.00 3.00 1.60 2.17 3.33 2.50 2.67 2.50 2.75

Scale 1 - 2 : Poor 2 – 3 : Average 3 – 4 : Good 4 – 5 : Very good

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 3.35: Satisfaction level – En Route / Day Tour destinations
Scale 1 - 2 : Poor 2 – 3 : Average 3 – 4 : Good 4 – 5 : Very good

Road

2.95

Communication

2.42

Safety

3.00 2.70

Sanitation Guide

2.75

Shopping

1.56

Sight Seeing

3.60 2.57 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4

Accomodation

3.5.14

Summary of Satisfaction Survey for tourism relatedDMM Survey infrastructure
En Route Destination Site Seeing Safety Road, Guide services, Sanitation, Accommodation and Communication Shopping Banking, Emergency Medical services. Camping Destination Accommodation Road, Safety, Site Seeing, Sanitation and Communication Banking, Emergency Medical services, Shopping facility and Guide services ---

Satisfaction Very Good Good Average Poor

It is clear from the above table that the camping destinations in Maharashtra offer good overall satisfaction to tourists. These destinations however get only average ranking in terms of Medical services, Banking, Shopping facility and guide services. These aspects need to be considered while defining the tourism development plan for this region. For en route and day tour destinations, factors such as accommodation, banking and emergency medical services are of less importance. These factors need to be developed only after development of that destination as a camping destination. Thus, a short term project with an ability to increase the duration of visits must be considered. Providing good shopping/ entertainment facility and providing guides may serve this purpose. 3.6 (i) Major items of interest during visit Western Maharashtra

Western Maharashtra has a long coastline of 725 km and is blessed with many clear and virgin beaches. It also has a number of hill stations and water bodies located in the Western Ghats. This geographic 3-15 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

profile makes up a great leisure destination. The primary objective of people visiting these destinations in western Maharashtra is leisure. At some destinations like Ganapatipule, pilgrimage is also coupled with leisure to double the potential to attract tourists. (ii) Northern Maharashtra

Northern Maharashtra receives a mixture of leisure, heritage and pilgrimage tourists at locations such as Bhandardara, Ajantha- Ellora and Shirdi respectively. However, pilgrims easily outnumber the tourists of other two categories. Shirdi, located in Ahmednagar district is reportedly the second most visited pilgrimage location after Tirupati Balaji.

(iii)

Eastern Maharashtra

Predominantly a forest area, the Eastern districts of Maharashtra attract many nature tourists, Mahatma Gandhi’s Sewagram and Paunar attract culture tourists while Chikhaldara is able to attract leisure tourists. Chikhaldara is incidentally called the Matheran of Vidarbha. 3-16 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(iv)

Southern Maharashtra

Southern Maharashtra has a few of the most important pilgrimage locations in India. Two of the 12 Jyotirlingas (Shiva temple) Parali Vaijanath and Aundha Nagnath, Famous goddess of Ambejogai, Pandharpur, Jejuri and Nanded to name a few, are some of the important pilgrimage locations in this region. The main and perhaps the only objective of people visiting this region is pilgrimage. Being primarily pilgrimage zone having no other retaining attractions, the revenue generating potential of this region is minimal inspite of having around 2.5 – 3 million non-local visitors per annum. Pilgrimage being the main objective and in the absence of other retaining attractions, the average spending per day is as low as Rs. 100 – 200 per person per day.

3.7

Analysis of Survey Findings: Domestic Tourists
Majority of tourist are from within the state of Maharashtra Every domestic tourist spends on an average 3 – 5 days for tourism, not necessarily in Maharashtra. The average duration of stay at one destination is 1-2 days. Average spending per day = Rs 679 per person 43% Accommodation, 23% Transport, 22% Food, 12% Entertainment Average spending per day = Rs 425 per person 44% Transport, 41% Food, 15% Entertainment

Origin of visitors Length of stay

Expenditure on various tourism products at camping destinations Expenditure on various tourism products at day tour destinations

3.8

Main areas of concern / Other observations


Domestic tourists (within the state) prefer to travel on their own within Maharashtra. They prefer a tour operator for tours of other states. Highest number of tourist arrivals is witnessed in the western region of Maharashtra. A single tour includes more than one theme such as pilgrimage as well as leisure. Major tourist season is between the months of April to August. Most of the tourists are of a mid-income group of Rs 1 – 2.5 Lacs per annum.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Basic infrastructure is available at all places where the duration of stay is more than 8-9 hours. There is a lack of basic infrastructure at stop over locations such as Khuldabad, Dervan, Pavas etc.

3.9 3.9.1

Survey Findings: Tour Operators / Travel Agents Approval by State department of tourism

Two of the major tour operators mentioned that there is no system of separate approval for tour operators by tourism department. However, MTDC has appointed authorised travel agents across Maharashtra for the booking of their hotels and resorts. The tour operators conducting guided tours operate under a tourist permit, given by the State Government for non-stage circular tours. 3-17 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.9.2

Range of services offered

There are three types of services offered by tour operators in Maharashtra. 1. Guided tour: This includes a guided tour of a particular circuit along with a group of around 40 tourists. The tour package included transport, accommodation and food expenses. Tours within Maharashtra start from major cities like Pune, Mumbai, Kolhapur, Nagpur, Aurangabad and Nashik. The mode of transport used by tour operators is luxury tourist bus (2x2) for local tours within Maharashtra. 2. Reservations and Booking: This service includes transport and lodging reservation at various destinations for tourists. The tour operators also advice on tour plan, schedule, halting places, likely expenses etc. 3. Package tour: The tour operators offer a tour package as per the tour of a certain circuit designed by tour operators. The package includes the tour plan and reservations for transport and accommodation. 3.9.3 Origin of tourist traffic

According to the tour operators contacted during the survey, majority of tourists availing their services are from within Maharashtra. 3.9.4 Tourist season

The vacation period plays an important role in the determination of season along with the climate at the individual destinations. Beaches are preferred in the post rainy season and winter whereas the hill stations are preferred at the beginning of monsoon and for a short period after the monsoon. April, May and December (being the vacation period) are also peak months for tourism inflow at all destinations. Foreign tourist arrivals are highest in the months of November to January. According to the Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India, the maximum number of foreign tourists in the year 2000 arrived in the month of May. Specific seasons for various category of destinations for the domestic tourists is given below April – June November – December March – August destinations December June – August Monsoon picnic destinations like Matheran, Bhimashankar etc. : Hill stations, weekend tour : Beach locations and Hill stations

like Mahabaleshwar, Bhandardara, Amboli and Malshej ghat.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.9.5

Composition of tourist traffic

The composition of tourist traffic travelling with tour operators depends upon the tourist circuit visited. For tours such as Ashtavinayak, Kolhapur, Jejuri, Nashik, Wani etc., the percentage share of pilgrims is as high as 90% whereas for tours like Konkan, Aurangabad etc, the percentage of Leisure and Heritage tourists is high. The average composition of tourists handled by tour operators based on discussions with them is as follows: Figure 3.36: Composition of Tourist Traffic

Heritage/Culture 15%

P ilgrimage 40%

Other 10% Leisure 35%

3.9.6

Number of tourists handled in a year

The average number of tourists handled by one tour operator based on the survey was around 2037 tourists per annum.

3.9.7

Preferred tourist circuits

The established travel circuits in Maharashtra can be classified on the basis of travel themes as well as on the basis of geographic location. As the state of Maharashtra is spread across 3,07,713 Sq. kms, it is impossible to cover all the pilgrimage destinations in one particular travel circuit with pilgrimage as its main theme. The travel circuits offered by tour operators in Maharashtra are thus governed by the geographical scope of the circuit and essentially are a mixture of a variety of tourist themes. Table 3.3: Major Conducted Tours Themes Duration Destinations Aurangabad Circuit (500 km Ex Aurangabad) Aurangabad, Paithan, Daulatabad, Ellora, Culture/ 4 Days Grishneshwar, Ajantha. Heritage 3 Nights Mahabaleshwar Circuit ( 300 Km Ex Pune/ Mumbai) Mahabaleshwar, Panchgani, Pratapgad, Leisure 2 Days – Wai. 1 Night Ashtavinayak Circuit ( 825 Km circular tour Ex Pune) 8 places of Lord Ganesh in and around Pilgrimage 3 Days – Pune district 2 Night 3-19 of 30
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Cost (Rs) 3500

Mode Road

1250

Road

1000

Road

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Destinations Themes Nashik Circuit (Ex Nashik/ Pune/ Mumbai) Nashik, Wani, Trimbakeshwar, Shirdi. Pilgrimage Central Konkan (Ex Pune ) Kolhapur, Panhala, Ratnagiri, Pavas, Ganapatipule, Dervan, Chiplun. North Konkan (Ex Mumbai/ Pune) Alibag, Murud – Janjira, Harihareshwar, Srivardhan, Dapoli South Konkan ( Ex Pune) Amboli, Sawantwadi, Vengurla, Malvan, Sindhudurg, Vijaydurg Entire Konkan (Ex Pune 2000 km) Major attractions in Sindhudurg, Ratnagiri, Raigad districts Amravati Chikhaldara, Semadoh

Duration 3 Days – 2 Nights 3 Days – 2 Nights 3 days – 2 Nights 4 Days 3 Nights 7 Days – 6 Nights 2 Days – 1 Nights

Cost (Rs) 1500

Mode Road

Leisure/ Pilgrimage Leisure

2500

Road

1750

Road

Leisure

2100

Road/ Train

Leisure

4500

Train/ Road

Leisure, Heritage, Eco Pilgrimage

1500

Road

Vidarbha (Ex Nagpur) Vidarbha Ashtavinayak

2 Days – 1 Nights

1200

Road

3.9.8

Potential tourist destinations

The survey identified some destinations that can be developed as major destinations. Such potential tourist destinations are as follows: 1. Dapoli region could be developed as a good weekend destination due to its vicinity from major cities of Pune and Mumbai and also the beaches of Karde and Murud-Harne. 2. Almost all tour operators were of the opinion that the 720 Km long coastline of Maharashtra is being under utilised as a tourist destination. There is a huge scope for development of this zone as a national and international tourist destination. 3. According to some tour operators, Lonar crater, which is unique in the world, can be promoted as a good tourist destination provided proper basic and tourism infrastructure is made available at Lonar. 3.9.9 (i) Demographic profile of tourist visiting the state Gender

Amongst the tourists who avail of services from the operators, 60% are male tourists whereas 40% are female tourists.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(ii)

Age group

The age distribution of tourists travelling with tour operators is as shown below. As the purpose of visit of majority of tourists travelling with tour operators is either pilgrimage or leisure, the tourists of age group from 35-64 constitute around 55% of the tourists handled by tour operators. Tourists prefer tour operators for multi-destination tours like Ashtavinayak, Konkan Darshan etc. Amongst the tourists handled by tour operators, more percentage is of tourists travelling with their families than those travelling alone or with friends. Figure 3.37: Age Profile

>64 10% 55-64 10%

3-14 10%

15-24 10% 25-34 15%

45-54 20%

35-44 25%

3.9.10

Average length of stay and spending per person

According to tour operators, the average length of stay varies according to the tour undertaken. For tours out of Maharashtra, the average duration of stay is around 10-15 days whereas for tours within Maharashtra, the average duration of tour is around 5-6 days and the average duration of stay at a particular destination is 2 days. The tour operators surveyed were of the opinion that barring Accommodation, Food and Communication, all other facilities like entertainment and shopping avenues, guide services, tour/ taxi operators Civic amenities, banking and facilities for elderly and disabled at most destinations need improvement. 3.9.11 Linkages with department of tourism

Only one tour operator out of the surveyed tour operators had official linkages with MTDC, FDCM (Forest department) for booking of resorts and guesthouses. 3.9.12 Problems faced during stay

The major problems faced by tourists (according to the tour operators) are: 1. Lack of availability of trained guides. 2. Lack of availability of public amenities at tourist destinations 3. Lack of good accommodation facilities at secondary destinations 4. Poor maintenance and upkeep of historic monuments and forts. 5. Poor cleanliness and hygiene at tourist attractions.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.9.13

Important fairs and festivals and tourist season

More than fairs and festivals, tour operators depend on vacations and holidays for their major business income. The tourist season as mentioned earlier is in the period of May-June (summer vacations) and November – January (Diwali and Christmas vacations).

3.9.14

Suggestions for development of tourism (including tourism projects) in the state at various locations

Some of the tourism projects suggested by tour operators during the survey were: 1. Development of Ashtavinayak circuit around Vidarbha. 2. Provision of tourism infrastructure at all primary and secondary destinations 3. Promotion of destination according to market segments like promotion of Konkan to youth, promotion of pilgrimage centres (temples) to senior citizens etc. 3.9.15 Other observations

Travel Agents and tour operators in Maharashtra are mainly based in Pune and Mumbai and offer conducted tours for the western and northern region. Few tour operators offer tours in eastern zone. Some tour operators based in Nagpur and Amravati offer conducted tours to Vidarbha Ashtavinayak and Chikhaldara / Semadoh respectively Most of the tour operators in Maharashtra concentrate on long duration interstate tours rather than domestic tours within Maharashtra.

3.10 3.10.1

Survey Findings: Tourism and Related Govt. Departments State Tourism department and MTDC

The following observations were made by Mr. Ashish Kumar Singh, M.D of MTDC and Director of State tourism department • Maharashtra has diversity in tourism products ranging from caves, forts to palaces and beaches. The slogan ‘Maharashtra Unlimited’ coined by the tourism department is intended to reflect the diversity in landscapes available. The department has a goal of achieving 1.5 million international tourist arrivals by 2005. The basic strategy to achieve this goal is promotion and product development. The entire coastline (Konkan region) and Sahyadri range offer product development opportunities. The department would like to focus on upper segment of the market (high spending) for foreign as well as domestic tourists. The sustainability of tourism would largely depend upon projects that can generate high revenues and high returns on investment.



• •

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism



Mahabaleshwar, Panchgani, Matheran have all been environmentally affected due to the development of tourism. Promoting these destinations will lead to minimizing the environmental impact as only a lower number of high end tourists will extend their length of stay. Although the state has categorized the tourist destinations into A, B & C categories, Mr. Ashish Kumar Singh believes that all the major destinations have to be simultaneously promoted as they have different target markets and may represent different themes. Integrated tourism is possible at destinations, which have historical or cultural attractions. In case of natural attractions (Western Ghats), one has to consider the whole area. Beach tourism has the highest potential in Maharashtra. Worldwide, beach tourism has the highest tourist arrivals.



• •

3.10.2

Forest department

DCEL contacted Mr. Shree Bhagwan, Conservator Forests, Nagpur division. The forests under him include Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Pench National Park & Tiger Reserve, Bor Wild life Sanctuary, Tipeshwar Sanctuary, Chaprala Wildlife Sanctuary, Bhamragad Sanctuary, Nawegaon National Park and Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary. According to Mr. Bhagwan, tourist facilities at Tadoba, Nawegaon and Nagzira are sufficient. A new tourist complex is coming up near Moharli gate at Tadoba. According to Mr. Bhagwan, the forest department is short of funds and the funds received are always late. It was also mentioned that the tourism in the Sanctuaries like Chaprala and Bhamragad has been somewhat affected due to the Naxalite problem. The survey team also contacted Mr. Ramanuj Choudhary, Conservator Forests & Field Director, Amravati division. The forests under his care are Melghat Tiger Reserve, Wan Wildlife Sanctuary, Narnala Wildlife Sanctuary and Ambabarva Sanctuary. A 40 Sq. Km Tourism zone has been established at Semadoh in Melghat for tourism purposes. Currently, private vehicles are not allowed in this area. It is learnt that buses currently used by the forest department for the tourist safari are not in a good condition. The forest department is planning to allow private vehicles in this new area. Also, the department is in the process of developing Harisal as a one of the nodal points for tourists (Harisal is currently a satellite town and serves as one of the entry points to the Tiger reserve). An Interpretation centre is being proposed at Gullarghat, which will focus on biodiversity & also on various plants of medicinal value found in the area. Mr. Choudhary indicated that the department was facing shortage of funds, lack of patrol vehicles & also staff who could serve as guides. Mr. Choudhary opined that there was a need to discriminate between the visitors to the forest. Forests, he felt, should not be looked upon as a place for picnicking & entertainment. A tourist should have a proper orientation about the ‘do’s and the don’ts’ prior to entering the reserve. Also, it was felt that there should be a special section in the department, which should cater to tourism purpose. Lastly, Mr. Choudhary opined that the promotion, orientation should be done by MTDC in consultation with the forest department and the work within the forest should be left to their department. 3-23 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

DCEL also met Mr. Chandekar, Dy. Conservator of Forests for Thane division. The areas under his charge are Tansa Sanctuary, Phansad Sanctuary and Karnala Bird sanctuary. According to Mr. Chandekar, Tansa sanctuary can be developed as a good tourist destination. The presence of the lakes of Tansa & Vaitarna, though not in the sanctuary are destinations on the itineraries of the tourists visiting the sanctuary. It was suggested that the Suryamal plateau can be developed as a Hill Station. The Mahuli fort in the vicinity can be further developed into a trekker’s paradise. The accommodation facility in the sanctuary is only meant for the officers of the forest department and made available to others on request. It was indicated that except for the BMC rest houses, there is a lack of lodging and boarding facilities and no private establishment exists to cater to the tourist needs. Trekking routes can be developed around the Tansa Lake. An information centre is shortly being constructed at Tansa. Developing tourist lodges is not in the interest of wildlife conservation. Hence, the lodging facilities can be managed by the Forest Department and the boarding or catering can be entrusted to private persons. It was learnt that the Phansad sanctuary located along the coastal stretch of the Arabian Sea has immense biological, ecological and recreational values. This area is a relatively unknown to the tourists. Other major attractions around the sanctuary are the Janjira Sea fort, the summer palace of the Nawab, beaches and the Birla Temple. The forest department have planned for a special tourism area and tourism staff. Accommodation with canteen facility, which is not available at present is planned to be set up at Mazgaon. A small library and an education centre equipped with audio-visual aids are also proposed. A new self guided nature trail is also planned from the Palace of Nawab to the Vihoor dam. It is learnt that the Karnala Bird Sanctuary has been a favourite spot for tourists over the years. The Karnala Fort is the main attraction for trekkers. However, the tourism in the area has developed on the line of pickining with no interest in nature observation and conservation. The carrying capacity of the area has been exceeded by the activity of tourism. A new tourist information centre has been proposed near the rest house. Also setting up a small cooperative selling artefacts for the locals has also been planned.

3.10.3

MSRDC

The survey team interacted with Mr. J T Nashikkar of Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC). MSRDC is responsible for development of roads in Maharashtra. MSRDC has proposed development of New Mahabaleshwar (near Mahabaleshwar) as a hill station. The proposed development of this region is considered while estimating the growth of tourist traffic and tourism projects are proposed and scheduled accordingly in the perspective plan. A brief profile of this project is given below Development of New Mahabaleshwar as a Hill Station Tourism has today emerged as one of the fastest growing industries in the world. The Honourable Prime Minister of India has recently announced a 14 point program to give boost to the economy. The tourism sector has also been identified as a core sector. The Maharashtra State has about 720 kms long seashore parallel to the Sahyadri ranges. The western ghat belt from Khandala to Koyna has the most genetic wealth. In these hill ranges, there is a thick tree cover containing many species of plants on a 3-24 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

large scale. The area provides many peaks, prominent hilltops, valleys, and water falls. The area also contains forest, lakes, dams, historic spots and tourist centres of natural importance. The area has a number of windmills generating electricity. After careful examination of the potential areas for a hill station, it has been found that hill ranges over looking Koyna valley stretching over 50 to 60 kms will be the appropriate location for developing a world - class hill station in this area. The region has all the features for development as an attractive hill station. It has plenty of land at an altitude of 3000 to 3600 feet, adequate water, power supply and accessible road from national highway and Konkan railway. Based on an initial survey, an area of about 372 sq kms has been identified for the development as a hill station called New Mahabaleshwar. Pre - feasibility study of this area has been carried out by MSRDC. The project has been approved in principle by the Government of Maharashtra. Area of about 5300 hectares of land (about 14% of the hill station area) is proposed to be developed in different nodes within the proposed hill station, leaving the balance as green / forest and nature made area. The developed land will be made available to various entrepreneurs for development of various related activities at an attractive price and terms of payment. The basic infrastructure like access road, water supply, and electricity will be developed by forming a Special Purpose Company, New Mahabaleshwar Development Company (NMDC) with the public - private sector participation. In addition to the above projects, MSRDC has undertaken following road development projects that could help in strengthening basic infrastructure at various tourist destinations. 1. Integrated city road development projects for the cities of Aurangabad, Pune, Amravati, Solapur and Nagpur. 2. Multi Modal International Hub Airport at Nagpur. 3. Four laning of Satara – Kolhapur – Kagal Section of NH4. 3.10.4 Water supply & sewerage

Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran is the implementing agency for completing the water supply schemes in the state. The state government has a goal of providing water supply to all by 2005. According to Mr. Kalyanpur, the water supply situation at the major tourist destinations in the state is as follows: • Nashik – Shirdi: The water supply to Nashik is more than adequate whereas improvement is required at Shirdi. A 15 Crore scheme is under preparation which is expected to be completed by 2004-05. Lonavala – Khandala: Improvement is required in the water supply and a scheme is under progress which will be completed by 2004-05. Matheran: The water supply situation is reported to be adequate. Pune: The water supply situation is reported to be comfortable Mahabaleshwar – Panchgani: A water supply scheme is under progress and expected to be completed by 2005. 3-25 of 30
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• • • •

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • • • 3.10.5

Aurangabad-Ajantha-Ellora: The water supply scheme at Ajantha Ellora is complete while a scheme at Aurangabad is under progress which will be completed by 2004-05. Murud-Janjira: A water supply scheme is in progress which will be completed by 2004-05. Ratnagiri-Sindhudurg: Water supply scheme is in progress Kolhapur: Water supply scheme is under progress Nagpur: Water supply scheme is under progress. Local bodies (Municipal Corporation/ Municipal Councils)

DCEL contacted local bodies and Municipal Corporations at various visited destinations to identify project ideas that can be implemented at that destination. The estimated number of tourist arrivals and expected growth in the next 20 years was also discussed at length with authorities of local bodies. 3.10.6 Financial Institutions

Maharashtra State Financial Corporation has been operating schemes of financial assistance to small and medium industries for hotels, restaurants and tourism related activities for acquisition of fixed assets like land, building, plant and machinery. In the case of tourism related activities, assistance is available for cultural centres, Convention centres, Amusement parks, Water sports, Tourist service agencies (travel and transport including those at airport) etc. To be eligible, the plans have to be approved by MTDC or ITDC and necessary clearances from the Government and Municipal authorities have to be obtained. Term loan is available upto a max of Rs 5 Crore. Debt equity ratio of 3:1 is applicable in case of loans upto Rs 10 Lakh and 2:1 in case of loans above Rs 10 lakhs. The rate of interest is 18% at present. The repayment period is a maximum of 10 years including a two year moratorium period for project cost upto Rs 45 Lakh. The repayment period is a maximum of 8 years including a two year moratorium period for project cost above Rs 45 Lakh. It is understood from Mr. S. A. Motani that the 3% interest subsidy to tourism projects has been withdrawn since April 2002. MSFC is keener on loan recovery than issuing new loans to tourism projects at present. 3.10.7 (i) Associations Federation of Hotel and Restaurant Association of India

Mr. Korde, the Secretary General of the Federation of Hotel and Restaurant Association of India (western region) made the following observations: • The most important component of tourism development is tourist needs and tourist perception. The central and State govt. have been giving the last priority to problems and harassment faced by tourists. There is no travel circuit in western India. About 10% of the foreign tourists go to Goa. 3-26 of 30



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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • •

Gujarat is getting a negative image due to the communal disturbances and media exposure. This has had a negative impact on tourist inflow to Gujarat Delhi, Hyderabad, Bangalore and Mumbai have become conference venues. There is potential for sports tourism in Maharashtra and other states The hotel industry and other stakeholders have to take interest to develop tourism. It is not enough to wait for the department of tourism to promote tourist destinations and encourage investment. A travel circuit (max 7 days) should have a mix of themes e.g. Pilgrimage and Eco tourism India is like Europe. Each state should be promoted separately. Each theme that the state offers should be promoted to different market segments. Each state should prepare an annual calendar of events. (fairs & festivals, sporting events during vacations). A ten day kite festival can be planned during a certain time of the year in all states. Nagpur has a 3 day orange festival in February. The potential tourists can plan their trip well in advance. Kolhapur has historical importance. A sound and light show can be considered. Except resorts, all hotels have business traffic of at least 60%. The incentives given by State Govt. for projects in backward area should be only for 5 years. Mr. Pandey, Asst. Secretary General, of FHRAI (India), spoke about the need to focus on soft issues such as hygiene, tourist friendly attitude among service providers, basic facilities such as drinking water and toilets at tourist destinations. Academic experts

• • •

• • • •

3.10.8

Academic experts at the Institute of Hotel management, Catering technology and Applied Nutrition (voted the best in Hotel management) were of the opinion that there is a lack of trained personnel in the travel and tourism industry. Not much research has been carried out in the area of determining carrying capacities of the environment at various tourist destinations. No indigenous norms have been established by the planning and development authorities. Not much information is available in tourism management in terms of correlation between expenditure on destination promotion versus growth in tourist traffic or impact of tourism development on the environment.

3.11 3.11.1 (i)

Analysis of Survey Findings: Tourism and Related Govt. Departments Major issues Economic Sustainability

MTDC official contacted during the survey felt that MTDC should change its role from being an operator in the field of hotels and resorts and competing with private players to being a mere facilitator for private sector investment at tourist destinations. It was suggested that with the exit of MTDC from 3-27 of 30
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

the hotel and resorts business, private players would get a level playing field and can then invest in economically viable projects. Currently, private players cannot compete with MTDC in terms of rates, as the project cost of MTDC is far lower than that of private players due to the various concessional rates offered to MTDC by the government.

(ii)

Environmental Sustainability

A few destinations in Maharashtra are fast reaching saturation in terms of the number of visitors per annum at that destination. Any further increase in the number of visitors will lead to further development in tourist facilities but at the cost of depletion in natural beauty and tourism potential of that destination. Mahabaleshwar and Matheran are currently identified as such destinations and declared as eco-sensitive zones where no further development is allowed. Official and experts feel that the tourist inflow to these destinations would continue to increase unless a substitute destination similar to the existing destination is developed in that region. E.g. the development of New Mahabaleshwar within 5 years would act as substitute for Mahabaleshwar which has reached its carrying capacity.

(iii)

Infrastructure bottlenecks and development plans

The infrastructure bottlenecks as expressed by the Tourism department and other local bodies are as follows 1. CRZ regulation does not allow construction within the distance of 200 m from the HTL in coastal areas. 2. No single window system exists for clearance of tourism projects. 3. Currently, no special incentives are offered to attract investment in tourism projects. The incentive scheme proposed in the tourism action plan of 1996- 2006 was also not implemented. 4. Lack of basic and tourism infrastructure at secondary and tertiary destinations 5. Lack of promotion of Maharashtra as a tourist destination. Various development plans proposed by the tourism department, which are also considered in the perspective plan, are as follows. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Tourism development plan for Sindhudurg district. Tourism development plan for Vidarbha. Tourism development plan for Panhala. Tourism development plan for Ratnagiri. Ajantha – Ellora development plan.

The investments proposed in the above-mentioned development plans are not added in the perspective plan suggested by DCEL.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.12

Analysis of Survey Findings: Basic and Tourist Infrastructure at Visited Destinations

The availability of basic and tourism infrastructure was assessed at visited destinations and the infrastructure gaps were identified after discussions with local authorities, tour operators and experts. Various heads evaluated under basic infrastructure are 1. Accessibility (Road/ rail/ Air) 2. Means of transport 3. Communication facility (STD/ ISD) Various heads evaluated under Tourism Infrastructure are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 3.13 Tourist Information Centre Eating Joints Hotels Public Amenities Way side amenities Signage View Point Development Banking and Shopping Retaining Themes Tour/ taxi Operators Summary of Infrastructure Gaps Identified By Field Survey

A summary of infrastructure projects required at various destinations visited is given below Table 3.4: Infrastructure Gaps Identified at survey destinations
Project Type Road Condition Destinations Lonar, Paithan, Daulatabad, Wani, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Pratapgad, Panhala, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Anjarle, Karde, Harihareshwar, Diveagar, Wardha, Bhadravati Lonar, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Pratapgad, Amboli, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Ganapatipule, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Anjarle, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Bhandara, Nawegaon N.P, Nagzira Wildlife S, Pench, Melghat Lonar Crater, Dajipur, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Karde, TadobaAndhari Tiger Reserve, Nawegaon N.P, Nagzira Wildlife S., Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve, Melghat Tiger Reserve, Tuljapur Ajantha, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Dajipur, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Karde, Diveagar, Janjira, Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve Total 18

Means of Transport

20

Communication

14

Eating Joints

13

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Project Type Signage

Destinations Paithan, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Ashtavinayak, Koyna, Jotiba, Dajipur, Sawantwadi, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Vijaydurg, Dervan, Murud-Harne, Anjarle, Karde, Diveagar, Janjira, Wardha, Bhadravati, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Ramtek, Pench Tiger Reserve, Totladoh, Melghat Tiger Reserve, Ambejogai Daulatabad, Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Wai, Pratapgad, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Vijaydurg, Murud-Harne, Karde, Janjira, Karnala, Bhadravati, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Ramtek, Khindsi, Pench Tiger Reserve, Amravati, Chikhaldara, Melghat Tiger Reserve Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Panhala, Tarkarli, Mithbao, Vijaydurg, Chikhaldara, Ambejogai Lonar Crater, Bhandardara, Pratapgad, Panhala, Dajipur, Amboli, Tarkarli, Vijaydurg, Malvan/ Sindhudurg, Murud-Harne, Karde, Sewagram, Chikhaldara. Panchgani, Panhala, Dajipur, Amboli, Sawantwadi, Tarkarli, Harihareshwar, Diveagar Matheran, Panhala, Amboli, Tarkarli, Ganapatipule, Wardha. Panchgani, Panhala, Sawantwadi, Malvan, Sindhudurg Nashik, Mumbai, Pune, Kolhapur, Sawantwadi, Ratnagiri, Ganapatipule, Chandrapur, Nagpur. Grand Total

Total 25

Public Amenities

21

View Point Development Retaining Themes Hotel Shopping Entertainment Tourist info. Centre (TIC)

8 13 8 6 4 9 163

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4
4.1

PROJECT IDENTIFICATION, SELECTION AND VIABILITY
Introduction

Investment planning for tourism entails an identification of investment opportunities at various destinations and prioritising them. Revenue producing opportunities have to be evaluated for their commercial feasibility so that they can be marketed to potential entrepreneurs. This chapter discusses the framework adopted for prioritising destinations and projects. A summary of the viable projects is presented at the end of the chapter. Project profiles are given in Volume 2Annexure 4.

4.2

Prioritization of destinations for tourism development

Maharashtra has numerous places of tourist interest, which have largely remained unexplored and have not been publicised. Through this study, we have made an effort to personally visit a large number of existing tourist places and potential places, which are not very well known to the general public. A total of 78 tourist destinations were studied and 45 places were visited. Out of the 78 destinations studied, 14 are in the north zone, 42 in the West Zone, 17 in south zone and 5 in the South Zone. As a part of this study, an exercise to prioritise the various destinations and tourist places by ranking them was carried out, based on our personal observations. The rankings were assigned to various parameters on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 was lowest and 5 was highest. The parameters are briefly described as under. (a) State Government Priority – Based on the interactions with the state tourism department, a list of destinations was obtained. As mentioned in Chapter 2, the destinations have been divided into A, B, C categories with category ‘A’ being the top most priority. These classifications have been considered to prioritise a destination. (b) Significance of the destination – The foremost factor for a prioritising a destination is its popularity, the extent to which the place is publicised, its significance and uniqueness, etc. (c) Number of tourist attractions – The number of tourist attractions in the vicinity of a destination also helps in prioritising the destination. (d) Volume of traffic flow – The existing and potential tourist traffic to a certain destination is also an important factor. (e) Tourist infrastructure and facilities – The availability of tourist facilities, Tourist Accommodation, internal transport, wayside amenities, entertainment avenues, souvenir / gift / shopping centre, tourism information centres, travel agent / tourist taxi operators, coolies, civic amenities like clean drinking water & toilets, facilities for elderly / disabled / families with young children etc. is an important parameter in prioritising a destination. (f) Tourism related basic infrastructure – The availability of basic infrastructure like Airport, rail, road, water, electricity, sewerage, communication, banking, and emergency medical plays a vital role in the prioritisation process.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(g) Sustainability of Tourism development – This factor is very important while planning for tourism development in a destination and would include environment related issues, carrying capacity of a place, etc. (h) Socio-Economic Development – Development of tourism in an area also has impacts on income and employment generation in a region, encourages local crafts and woman entrepreneurship, etc. (i) Institutional Support mechanism – An existing institutional support mechanism, like financial institutions, entrepreneurs, NGOs, involved in development of tourism also helps to prioritise destinations. (j) Other – There are other factors which have an influence on deciding about the priority of a place. These factors can be climate, tourist season, whether the destination is already part of an existing tourist circuit etc. Based on the parameters mentioned above, the existing and potential destinations visited by the DCEL team, were ranked and are illustrated in the following pages. In addition to the ranking, we have also classified the tourist places into various themes like Eco, Ethnic, Leisure, Religious, etc. Table 4.1: Zone Wise Ranking of Tourist Destinations and Places
Zones SOUTH ZONE District Solapur Dharashiv Parbhani Beed Beed Nagpur Wardha Amravati Chandrapur Nagpur Amravati Nagpur Nagpur Wardha Chandrapur Wardha Nagpur Chandrapur Bhandara Gondia Amravati Gondia Aurangabad Ahmednagar Aurangabad Aurangabad Buldhana Nashik Nashik Nashik Aurangabad Destination / Tourist Place Pandharpur Tuljapur Aundha Nagnath Parali Vaijanath Ambejogai Nagpur City Wardha City Chikhaldara Chandrapur City Ramtek Amravati City Pench Tiger Reserve Totladoh Sewagram Bhadravati Paunar Khindsi Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve Bhandara City Nawegaon N.P Melghat Tiger Reserve Nagzira Wildlife S. Aurangabad City Shirdi Ellora Ajantha Shegaon Nashik City Trimbakeshwar Bhandardara Paithan Theme Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Historical Hill Station, Heritage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Hub Eco Tourism Leisure Historical Pilgrimage Historical Leisure Eco Tourism Hub Eco Tourism Eco Tourism Eco Tourism Heritage Pilgrimage Heritage Heritage Pilgrimage Leisure Pilgrimage Ecotourism, Leisure Culture Rank 35.0 32.5 27.0 27.0 26.5 37.5 34.5 33.0 32.5 31.0 30.5 29.5 29.5 28.5 28.0 28.0 27.0 27.0 26.5 26.5 24.5 24.5 37.0 36.0 35.0 33.0 32.5 31.5 29.5 29.5 28.0

NORTH ZONE

EAST ZONE

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Zones

District Aurangabad Nashik Aurangabad Nashik Buldhana Mumbai Pune Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Kolhapur Raigad Pune Sindhudurg Satara Raigad Sindhudurg Kolhapur Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Raigad Pune Raigad Raigad Pune Kolhapur Satara Sindhudurg Raigad Sindhudurg Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Raigad Satara Sindhudurg Satara Raigad Sindhudurg Sindhudurg Ratnagiri Kolhapur Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri

Destination / Tourist Place Daulatabad Wani Khuldabad Chandvad Lonar Crater Mumbai City Pune City Ganapatipule Sawantwadi Kolhapur Alibag Bhimashankar Malvan Mahabaleshwar Janjira Kudal Panhala Ratnagiri City Vengurla Amboli Devgad Elephanta Ashtavinayak Srivardhan Harihareshwar Lonavala-Khandala Jotiba Panchgani Vijaydurg Pratapgad Tarkarli Diveagar Kunkeshwar Matheran Koyna Velneshwar Wai Karnala Mithbao Jaigad Dervan Dajipur Hedvi Karde Murud-Harne Pavas Anjarle

Theme Heritage Pilgrimage Heritage Heritage Ecotourism Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Leisure, Heritage, Culture, Historical, Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Beach Leisure Pilgrimage Beach Hill Station Heritage, Beach Hill Station Heritage, Beach Leisure Heritage, Leisure Beach, Heritage Beach Leisure Mango, Beach Heritage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage, Beach Hill Station Pilgrimage Leisure Heritage Heritage Beach Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage/Beach Hill Station Leisure Pilgrimage, Beach Pilgrimage/Leisure Eco Beach Heritage, Beach Culture Eco Beach Beach Heritage, Beach Pilgrimage Pilgrimage

Rank 27.0 25.5 25.0 23.5 21.0 40.0 35.5 35.0 35.0 34.0 33.0 33.0 33.0 32.0 31.5 31.5 31.5 31.0 31.0 30.5 30.5 29.5 29.0 29.0 28.5 28.5 28.0 28.0 28.0 27.5 27.5 27.0 27.0 26.5 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.5 25.5 25.0 24.5 23.5 23.0 21.0 21.0 20.0 18.5

4.3

WEST ZONE

Project ideas / concept

The DCEL team visited 45 tourist destinations and places of tourist interest across the state of Maharashtra and identified the need for tourism development. This included identifying tourism and related project ideas at various locations. 4-3 of 14
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Planning for Sustainable Tourism Development emphasizes on the concept of “Quality Tourism”. It refers to tourist attractions, facilities and services that offer ‘good value for money’, protect tourism resources, and attract tourists who will respect the local environment and society. Our planning approach for tourism development in Maharashtra highlights this concept. Maharashtra is a congregation of myriad tourist attractions- Forests, adventure Spots, Water falls, caves, Pilgrim centres, Monuments, Archaeological sites, Palaces, cultural festivals and others. An important component in plan formulation is understanding the ‘types of tourism’ and ‘tourism products’ that can be developed in the state. The concepts have evolved based on tourism potential of the destination / region, the personal visits of the DCEL team to various places of tourist interest and the gaps observed thereof, the requirements arising from these gaps, interactions with local people and experts, hotel owners and entrepreneurs, etc. The basic idea is to enhance the visitors’ experience to the place. The project concepts have been described theme wise which has been broadly classed as: • • • • • • • • • 4.3.1 (i) Nature Tourism Ethnic Tourism Leisure Tourism Corporate Tourism Health Tourism Religious Tourism Special Interest Tourism Mega Projects Development of Gateways

Nature Tourism Eco Tourism

Maharashtra has immense potential for developing nature-based tourism. Ecotourism has been universally recognised as a specific type of nature based tourism, which promotes responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and sustains the well being of the local people. "Ecotourism is environmentally responsible travel and visitation to relatively undisturbed natural areas, in order to enjoy and appreciate nature (and any accompanying cultural features - both past and present) that promotes conservation, has low negative visitor impact, and provides for beneficially active socio economic involvement of local populations." (Stated by IUCN (now called the World Conservation Union)) Trekking tours through shallow river, forest areas and hills, boating in natural areas, nature trails with guides to explain about the flora, fauna and ecology, educational camps, camping and other activities can be organised as part of the product. An improved travel condition to less visited tourist areas is also envisaged as part of Eco tourism development. 4-4 of 14
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Ecotourism Sites and proposed activities: • • • • • • Reserve forest trek from Ajantha viewpoint to Vetal Wadi at Ajantha and at Semadoh in Melghat Tiger Reserve. Nature Interpretation centre development at Jaikwadi bird sanctuary near Paithan. Ecotrail from Bhandardara to Kalsubai in Ahmednagar district. Jeep safari at Radhanagari Bison sanctuary. Elephant safari at Tadoba – Andhari Tiger Reserve and Nawegaon National Park. Melghat orientation centre at Amravati for interested visitors to Melghat Tiger Reserve.

There are other potential areas like sanctuaries, National parks, water bodies and other unexplored areas, which can be developed as ecotourism sites. Eco- tourism circuits have been identified linking the potential areas. Basic elements of ecotourism: • • • • • • • Contributes to conservation of biodiversity. Sustains the well being of local people. Includes an interpretation / learning experience. Involves responsible action on the part of tourists and the tourism industry. Is delivered primarily to small groups by small-scale businesses. Requires the lowest possible consumption of non-renewable resources. Stresses local participation, ownership and business opportunities, particularly for rural people.

(ii)

Adventure Tourism

It involves tourists engaging in physically and personally challenging and sometimes dangerous activities. These include safaris and trekking in remote areas, hiking, mountain climbing, river rafting, water surfing, etc. Adventure activities like Parasailing, Sailing/ Yachting, Motor Boating, water skiing, fun-rides, angling can be developed and promoted in the state. Projects have been suggested to promote adventure activities at the following sites: • • • • Water Sports activity at Wilson Dam (Bhandardara) Khadakvasla (Near Pune) and Koyna Lake. Sea based water sports at Tarkarli (Near Malvan), Murud-Harne and Karde (Near Dapoli), Harihareshwar, Ratnagiri and Alibag. Trekking, Rock climbing at Sinhagad. Trekking at Masai Pathar at Panhala.

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4.3.2 (i)

Ethnic Tourism Cultural and Heritage Tourism

Heritage places, famous for monuments, museums, fairs and festivals, handicrafts or archaeological sites are the potential spots for development of such kind of tourism. The projects have been based on the idea of conserving and maintaining the unique identity of the place and the people. The projects based on the above philosophy include: • • • • Heritage Night walk in Mumbai City. Cultural Workshop near Nashik at Panchavati / Trimbakeshwar. Mahagram which will include craft shops for all states, stage for folk shows, a museum on Maharashtra. Heritage site development, monument conservation projects at Gavilgad fort in Chikhaldara, Janjira fort in Ratnagiri, etc. This will include components like area beautification, monument restoration, lighting etc. Audiovisual shows at forts like Pratapgad, Panhala, Sinhagad, Daulatabad, Sindhudurg, Janjira and Raigad fort. Mall road at Panhala. Folk show on life history of Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj at Dervan near Chiplun in Ratnagiri district. Bamboo handicrafts / furniture emporium at Nagpur. Coffee bar at Chikhaldara selling locally grown coffee.

• • • • • (ii)

Village Tourism/ Participative tourism

This concept will be an approach to develop community-based tourism that directly benefits the villagers. It will help in developing cultural understanding among the tourists. It will also offer them the opportunity to experience the tribal / rural way of life. The project has been conceptualized as a model to develop further villages on similar pattern. The lodgings designed in the traditional style and built of local materials; provision of special meals offering local food products and traditional cuisine, local folk dance and music can become a part of the product. • • • 4.3.3 Villages at Bhimashankar in Ahmednagar District can be developed for village-based tourism. Development of folk village at Malvan. Know Gandhi Program at Wardha.

Leisure Tourism

It includes mainly all types of Leisure and entertainment activities. A detailed analysis of tourist infrastructure at the destinations shows that there is a lack of entertainment avenues at most of the places. Projects have been suggested for developing spot based entertainment facilities. These include: 4-6 of 14
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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • • • • • • • 4.3.4

Landscaping and Rock Garden at Randha Falls (Bhandardara). Amusement Parks in the vicinity of cities like Dapoli, Nagpur, Aurangabad, Nashik, Mulshi (Near Pune) and Kolhapur. Night Ferry cruise by the bay in Mumbai. Bollywood excursion tour in Mumbai. Hot Air Ballooning at Rajmachi near Pune. Baggi Rides for fort viewing at Panhala. Ropeway from base to Temple at Wani. Backwater cruises at Tarkarli. Boat ride in fisherman’s boat for Dolphin viewing at Karde near Dapoli in Ratnagiri district.

Corporate Tourism

There is an unprecedented rise in conference-business. This is an outcome of changes in corporate management style and growing competition. Intracompany brainstorming, corporate planning, marketing, training, dealer interaction, and special project work require executives / others to get away from the normal place of work and spend time together on a group basis. Scenic locations like Forest areas, Hill stations offer an excellent environment for such a project. The suggested locations and projects can include • 4.3.5 Convention centres at Bhandardara, Amboli, Paithan, Dapoli, and Chikhaldara.

Health Tourism

Maharashtra is rich in medicinal and herbal plants. There is availability of rare herbs. The age old therapy of Ayurveda can be used here for attracting tourists. Health resorts have been conceptualized offering Ayurvedic Treatments like the Panchkarma Therapy and other rejuvenative and therapeutic treatments. Yoga and meditation centres are also included in some resorts. These resorts have been planned at places with good natural surroundings so that complete “health holidays” can be planned by the tourists. Herbal health resorts/ Ayurvedic centres have been proposed at Amboli Hill Station (Near Sawantwadi), Bhandardara (Near Nashik), Bhimashankar (Near Ahmednagar), Chikhaldara (Near Amravati), Ganapatipule and Koyna (at proposed New Mahabaleshwar area in the lake city). Except for Ganapatipule, these resorts are mainly located around areas surrounded by forests with naturally growing herbal plants. At many places, locals having knowledge about the use of herbs are available.

4.3.6

Religious Tourism

The places of religious importance attract large crowds based on their significance. During fairs and festivals, the number of visitors/ tourists increases manifolds. These places require tourist infrastructure and services. Upgradation and provision for such services during peak periods is suggested at these places. 4-7 of 14
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4.3.7

Special Interest tourism

This concept emphasizes on learning and experiencing particular features of an area. These can be associated with tourists’ long- term vocational or professional interests. Educational tours are also a type of special interest tourism. Maharashtra offers wide options for promoting educational tours related to: • • National parks and Sanctuaries Silk production, processing & weaving - Organised visits to silk farms, handloom factories near Paithan.

Such types of educational tours will be generally organized in small groups. Other projects, which can be included, are • • Mango tourism in the form of Mango festival can be organized at Devgad in Sindhudurg district & Ratnagiri for its world famous Alphonso Mangoes. Motor bike hire facility at Ratnagiri with rides till Ganapatipule for enjoying the enroute Konkani villages and coast.

4.3.8

Mega Projects

Considering the tourist theme of the place and its tourist traffic, certain high value projects have been suggested at the locations below: • • • • • 4.3.9 IT museum at Pune. Air Taxi Service from Goa and Mumbai to Ratnagiri. Area development plan for places like Lonar Crater (in Buldhana District), Amboli (Near Sawantwadi), Ambejogai (in Beed District) and Chikhaldara. Marine sanctuary at Malvan. Dolphin show at Karde.

Tourist Gateways

These have been conceptualised as hubs acting as entry points to the state. They primarily serve as “base camps” providing tourist infrastructure like accommodation, dining, entertainment avenues, information and other services for the region. These include projects like • Tourist information centres / Kiosks at Sawantwadi, Ratnagiri, Nagpur, Solapur & Bijapur, Goa, Nashik, Mumbai, Pune and Kolhapur at airports, railway stations and bus stands

4.4

Project Selection / Prioritisation

An exercise to prioritise the various project ideas suggested in part 4.2 was undertaken. Three main parameters were analysed in order to prioritise the projects. These are as under:

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1. Destination Prioritisation – The rating of the destination at which the project has been suggested has been considered. The exercise of rating the destinations is carried out in section 4.1. 2. Project Rating – Based on DCEL observations and inputs received during field survey from Government officials and other field contacts, ratings were assigned to various projects. Various parameters were considered to arrive at ratings, which are briefly described as under. Parameters were ranked on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 was lowest and 5 was highest to arrive at individual project ratings. (a) State Government priority - The type of projects desired at various destinations and their priority was ascertained based on the interactions with the state tourism department and its offices. (b) Prima Facie potential – The foremost factor for a prioritising a project is its prima facie potential, which is based on DCEL team judgement. (c) Land Use regulation and other regulations – One of the major factors in project prioritisation was the ease of land acquisition and other regulations governing the same. The factor also includes travelling difficulties encountered by tourists in arriving at the destination. (d) Availability of relevant natural resources – One of the most important factors for prioritisation of projects is the availability of relevant natural resources for tourism development at a destination. These natural resources can be forests, waterfalls, picturesque surroundings, etc. (e) Present status of Infrastructure and its cost – The present status of infrastructure like land, water, power, local manpower, communication, etc. also helps in prioritising the project. (f) Planned investments in infrastructure – If the state Govt. has existing or future plans for area development, it aids the project prioritisation process. (g) Environmental Sustainability – This factor is very important while planning for tourism projects in a destination and would include environment constraints and related issues, protected area issues, eco sensitivity, etc. (h) Local Entrepreneurship / promoters – The availability and willingness of local entrepreneurs and promoters, to invest in tourism projects, support prioritising a project. (i) Socio-Economic Development – The potential for socio-economic development like income and employment generation in a region, encouragement to local crafts and woman entrepreneurship, etc. is a major factor for prioritisation of a project. (j) Other factors – There are factors, which have an influence on deciding about the priority of a project and can include risk and amenability to financing by financial institutions, etc. Based on the parameters mentioned above, the potential project ideas identified by the DCEL team were ranked and are illustrated in the following pages. In addition to the ranking, we have also classified the tourism projects into various themes like Eco, Ethnic, Leisure, Religious, etc.

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Table 4.2: Project Rating
Project Concept Know Gandhi Program Signage’s leading to various temples Elephant Safari Communication facility Elephant Safari Bamboo Handicrafts/ Furniture Shop Musical Fountain at Kalidas Smarak Communication facility near temple Restaurant Melghat Orientation Centre Repair of Approach roads to points View Point Development Coffee shop & outlet for coffee grown locally Restoration of Gavilgad fort Petrol / Diesel Supply facility Trekking Routes Electrical supply strengthening Renovation of Semadoh tourist complex Regular vehicular connection to Chikhaldara STD connection at Semadoh village Signage’s Budget Hotel Heritage Night walk in South Mumbai Mahagram (Food, crafts and folk village depicting Maharashtra Bollywood Excursion Tour Night by the bay (Ferry cruise) Village Tourism at Bhimashankar and surrounding villages Suburbs Water sports complex at Khadakvasla Dam Adventure sports at Sinhagad Hot air ballooning at Rajmachi Point Lonavala (localised) Amusement Park near Mulshi lake IT Museum at Pune Audio visual Show at Pratapgad Signage on NH 4 regarding Wai Water sports complex Tourist Information Centre Masai Pathar trek route Audio visual show Baggi/ Horse rides fort site seeing Mall road Signage Jeep Safari Restaurant outside sanctuary area at Dajipur Convention Centre Water supply Pipeline to Narendra Udyan forest Garden Medico Tourism - Health resort Tourist Information Centre Destination / Tourist Place Wardha Bhadravati Tadoba Tadoba Res. Nawegaon N.P Nagpur Ramtek Ramtek Totladoh Amravati Chikhaldara Chikhaldara Chikhaldara Chikhaldara Chikhaldara Semadoh Semadoh Semadoh Semadoh Semadoh Ambejogai Ambejogai Mumbai Mumbai Mumbai Mumbai Bhimashankar Pune Pune Pune Pune Pune Pratapgad Wai Koyna Kolhapur Panhala Panhala Panhala Panhala Panhala Dajipur Dajipur Amboli Amboli Amboli Sawantwadi Theme Special Interest Infrastructure Eco Tourism Infrastructure Eco Tourism Socio Economic Entertainment Infrastructure Amenity Eco Tourism Infrastructure Infrastructure Socio Economic Conservation Infrastructure Eco Tourism Infrastructure Restoration Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Accommodation Heritage Ethnic Leisure Leisure Ethnic Entertainment Adventure Adventure Entertainment Special Interest Heritage Infrastructure Entertainment Infra Eco Tourism Heritage Leisure Entertainment Infrastructure Eco Tourism Amenity Infrastructure Infrastructure Medico Infrastructure Rank 34.5 26.0 25.5 29.5 25.5 38.0 30.0 31.5 27.0 33.0 24.0 23.0 30.0 22.5 19.0 31.5 19.5 29.0 27.0 24.5 28.5 32.5 32.5 30.5 26.5 32.5 33.0 30.0 26.0 25.5 29.0 29.5 31.5 25.5 33.5 29.5 33.0 34.0 33.5 32.5 26.0 31.5 30.5 30.5 32.5 32.5 31.5

WEST ZONE

SOUTH ZONE

EAST ZONE

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Project Concept Back water cruise Beach Restaurant with bar Water sports facility Marine Sanctuary Folk village Budget Hotel & restaurant (40 beds) Mango Tourism Mango Tourism Air taxi Service from Goa & Mumbai Tourist Information Kiosk (railway station) Motor bike on Hire Service (Konkan beach road tour upto Ganapatipule and Back) Folk show on Shivaji Maharaj Hot water tanks site upgradation Para Sailing Boat Ride for Dolphin Viewing Hotel Landscaping at mandir Hotel Restaurant near mandir Fort Beautification & restoration Train Connectivity to Aurangabad Ajantha Reserve Forest Trek (Ajantha viewpoint to Vetal wadi) Accommodation facility at T-junction Restaurant at T junction Shuttle bus service from Caves to Fardapur Interpretation centre for bird sanctuary Meditation Centre at Paithan MSRTC buses from Ajantha/ Shegaon to Lonar Access tracks from crater edge to lake and periphery of Lake Tourist Interpretation centre Guide training programme Cultural Workshop Ropeway - base to Wani Temple Convention Centre Signage/ Information Boards Budget Accommodation Landscaping and rock garden at Randha falls Eco Trail (Bhandardara to Kalsubai) Water sports complex at Wilson dam (Arthur Lake)

Destination / Tourist Place Tarkarli Tarkarli Tarkarli Malvan Malvan Kunkeshwar Devgad Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Dervan Dervan Harne Karde Harihareshwar Diveagar Diveagar Diveagar Janjira Aurangabad Ajantha Ajantha Ajantha Ajantha Paithan Paithan Lonar Lonar Lonar Lonar Nashik Wani Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara

Theme Leisure Leisure Entertainment Adventure Ethnic Accommodation Special Interest Special Interest Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Ethnic Infrastructure Entertainment Special Interest Accommodation Infrastructure Accommodation Amenity Conservation Infrastructure Eco Tourism Leisure Amenity Infrastructure Entertainment Health Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Ethnic Infrastructure Infrastructure Infrastructure Leisure Leisure Eco Tourism Entertainment

Rank 34.0 32.5 31.0 30.0 30.0 32.0 33.0 33.0 26.5 29.5 27.5 31.0 26.0 30.0 29.5 32.5 30.0 34.5 34.0 25.0 26.0 34.5 31.0 34.0 29.5 32.0 33.5 30.0 27.0 28.0 27.5 32.5 30.5 32.0 23.0 31.0 28.0 26.0 31.5

Tourist Arrivals – The tourist arrivals for various destinations were projected on a time scale of 20 years based on the present arrival figures. Based on the interactions during the field survey, a CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth rate) has been applied at various destinations. This rate is taken considering the developments expected to come up at the destination itself and other locations in the vicinity, which would have considerable influence at the destination. The CAGR applied varies from destination to destination between specific years. The destination and the CAGR applied during a range of years is given in Appendix 4, Table 4.1.

NORTH ZONE

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4.5

Project Viability of Selected / Short Listed Projects

The short listed projects have been analysed for their feasibility. Project profiles have been prepared which are enclosed as Volume 2- Annexure 4. The following parameters have been explored: 1. Locations: – The possible locations for the project have been suggested 2. Socio Economic Impact – The projects have been assessed in terms of Employment generation, local community participation. 3. Environmental Impact – Here, the projects have been assessed for compliance with the environmental norms. e.g., creation of Beach resorts as per CRZ norms; suitable waste management system, etc. Hazards, if any, to the environment by the project have been considered. The impact on environment and measures to achieve sustainable tourism development in sensitive regions such as culture tourism, heritage monuments and eco tourism are discussed further 4. Financial feasibility – The project has been assessed in terms of financial indicators like ROI. The key financial indicators for major project types suggested in the perspective plan are given in Table 4.3. Table 4.3: Key Financial Indicators for Suggested Projects
Project Capacity Project Cost (Rs Lakh) Rs. 42.02 Rs. 60.85 Rs. 79.11 Rs. 6.76 Rs 2448 Rs. 22.04 Rs. 33.36 Rs. 40.74 Rs. 238 Rs. 50.81 Rs 29.79 IRR % 22 21.99 23.6 68.15 33.31 25.41 40.86 18.23 22.95 25.42 16.97 DSCR Pay back Period (Yrs) 12 12 10.5 2 6.5 9.75 4.5 17 12.75 9.25 Employment Potential 14 14 23 11 132 6 6 9 12 10 8

Budget Accommodation Beach Resort Non Star Luxury Accommodation Restaurant Amusement park Water Sports – Beach Water Sports – Lake Mall road Health Resort Convention Centre Audio-Visual Show

30 Room 20 Cottages 30 room 10 table 8000 per day 60 60 150

2.03 2.17 2.21 8.24 3 2.3 3.6 1.62 2.05 2.32 1.63

Table 4.4: Summary of Projects with possible locations
Themes Accommodation Destinations Ajantha, Ambejogai, Amboli, Amravati, Aurangabad, Bhadravati, Bhandardara, Bhimashankar, Chikhaldara, Dajipur, Dervan, Devgad, Diveagar, Ganapatipule, Harihareshwar, Harne, Janjira, Karde, Kolhapur, Koyna, Kunkeshwar, Lonar, Mahabaleshwar, Malvan, Mithbao, Mumbai, Nagpur, Nashik, Nawegaon N.P, Paithan, Panhala, Pratapgad, Pune, Ramtek, Ratnagiri, Sawantwadi, Semadoh, Solapur, Tadoba, Tarkarli, Totladoh, Vijaydurg, Wai, Wani, Wardha Ajantha, Ambejogai, Amboli, Amravati, Aurangabad, Bhadravati, Bhandardara, Bhimashankar, Chikhaldara, Dajipur, Dervan, Devgad, Diveagar, Ganapatipule, Harihareshwar, Harne, Janjira, Karde, Kolhapur, Koyna, Kunkeshwar, Lonar, Mahabaleshwar, Malvan, Mithbao, Mumbai, Nagpur, Nashik, Nawegaon N.P, Paithan, Panhala, Pratapgad, Pune, Ramtek, Ratnagiri, Sawantwadi, Semadoh, Solapur, Tadoba, Tarkarli, Totladoh, Vijaydurg, Wai, Wani, Wardha Nashik, Mumbai, Mahabaleshwar, Paithan, Lonar, Kolhapur, Amboli, Kunkeshwar, Ratnagiri, Nagpur, Vijaydurg, Ganapatipule, Aurangabad, Ajantha, Bhandardara, Dervan, Harne, Karde, Amravati, Chikhaldara, Amravati, Semadoh, Mithbao, Bhimashankar, Wai, Pune, Diveagar, Janjira, Bhadravati, Koyna, Tadoba, Nawegaon N.P, Ramtek, Solapur, Ambejogai

Tourism Projects

Tourism Infrastructure

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Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Basic Infrastructure

Bhadravati, Ramtek, Semadoh, Tadoba, Ajantha, Amboli, Aurangabad, Lonar, Panhala, Ambejogai, Bhandardara, Karde

All the costs considered for the have been on current price basis. For a particular type of project at its suggested location, the basic rate of land and building, plant & machinery and tourist availing the facility at the suggested time of implementation is approximately equal. Hence, the same project can be replicated at all those locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability. However, for projects suggested near or within major cities like Nagpur, Pune, Nashik, Aurangabad and Mumbai, the land as well as unit sale price will have to be reconsidered. A detailed year wise implementation of projects along with proposed investment has been presented in Chapter 5

4.6

Environment Impact Analysis

Tourism is one of the activities, which has caused concern because of increased human activity and traffic on fragile environments. On the other hand conscious and sustainable tourism development can be used very effectively to achieve conservation of environment and socio-economic upliftment of locals as recognised by the National Tourism Policy 2002. The policy states, “In the context of economic liberalisation and globalisation being pursued by the country, the development policies of no sector can remain static. The emergence of tourism is seen as an important instrument for sustainable human development including poverty alleviation, employment generation, employment regeneration and advancement of women. The policy further states “international tourists visiting interiors of the country for reasons of purity of environment and nature contributes to development of these areas particularly backward areas. Tourism in environmentally fragile areas such as forests, mountains, interior villages and heritage monuments and sites thus needs to achieve a trade off between the positive and negative impacts on the environment. The negative impact of development of tourism in such regions that needs to be considered before implementation of proposed projects are • • The tourism revenue may not be utilised in conservation and socio-economic needs. Increasing volume of visitors may result in degradation of natural resources and environmental balance through felling of trees for facilities and waste, loss of habitat for wildlife, hunting, poaching, viewing and photography leading to disturbance in feeding and breeding patterns of the fauna. Increased vehicular traffic, emission of greenhouse gases and sound pollution may hinder in the conservation efforts at the heritage sites. Building of tourist lodges of materials that do not integrate with the local ambience and the extra pressure they put on the land and water bodies is destructive. Tourism development in sensitive areas especially in interior village and forests may face stiff resistance from locals resisting encroachment on their resources and culture. 4-13 of 14
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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The positive aspects of tourism development in these regions are • • Generation of employment for local residents Conservation of natural resources and heritage monuments through tourism revenue to maintain destination attractiveness Opportunities for alternate employment for locals engaged in poaching and other illegal activities Social upliftment and education opportunities through participative village tourism Conservation of natural resources and heritage monuments through participative eco tourism and special interest tourism Orientation of tourists and community at large towards conservation.



• •



To achieve a trade off between the negative and positive impacts of tourism on environment and heritage monuments, it is essential to evaluate each project on area specific criteria rather than having a blanket plan for the entire state. This is necessary keeping in mind the unique character of the location and its economic and social environment. Some of the factors that should form a part of prerequisites for implementation of tourism projects in the environmentally fragile zones are suggested below • Benefits out of the proposed projects should accrue to all stakeholders namely environment, conservation, tourists, and local community, funding agency, government and society at large. Missing out on any of the above would lead to friction and hindrances in implementation. Project should create synergies between all government departments that would aid in delivering this composite tourism product. For example: A forest safari should safeguard interests of the tourism as well as the forest department along with those of the operator. The suggested project should have as an integral part, a sound visitor management system to limit degradation of environment due to saturation of tourists and increased interference Preference and incentives should be awarded to projects encouraging participation of visitors in the task of restoration and conservation. Projects proposed in off beat tourist destinations in areas in proximity to traditional tourist destinations such as Mahabaleshwar should be encouraged as a tool to canalise visitors and divert a fraction from traditional destination to non traditional destination. This would result in lower pressure on the resources of that destination and increase in the carrying capacity of that region.









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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5
5.1

PERSPECTIVE PLAN
Introduction

This chapter discusses in detail the perspective plan for development of sustainable tourism in Maharashtra for the next 20 years. It explains the methodology used to develop the plan and also explains the rationale behind the suggested investments in tourism sector. The chapter gives a year wise and destination wise plan for investments in tourism sector in accordance with the growth estimated for each destination visited during the survey. 5.2 5.2.1 Tourism Policy (Vision) Tourism vision

The state has yet to prepare a tourism vision document. The state has spelt out its tourism objectives and priorities through tourism policy documents. However, interactions with MTDC officials indicated that they have a target of 1.5 million foreign tourist arrivals by 2005. 5.2.2 Brand Image

Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation (MTDC) is currently engaged in promoting destination Maharashtra effectively using the punch line “Maharashtra Unlimited”. This brand image of Maharashtra builds upon the international corporate image of Maharashtra and particularly Mumbai and goes further to suggest that, in addition to the business and industry gamut, Maharashtra offers a variety of tourism themes for all kinds of tourists. Maharashtra as a destination hosts many an unexplored destination, offering everything that a tourist hopes but for the snow peaked mountains. In lines with the vision statement for tourism development in Maharashtra, emphasis should be laid on developing tourist themes ranging from beaches to hill stations, caves to forts, ethnic traditions to high tech attractions, adventure to leisure, meditation to entertainment and so on. Unlike other states, to build the suggested brand image of “Maharashtra Unlimited”, it is imperative to develop projects based on different themes and not concentrate on a particular tourism theme. Efforts should be made to maximize the variety of tourism projects in a single tourist circuit making it a unique selling point (USP) for destination Maharashtra. Promotion and a proper media mix would be a decisive factor to make “Maharashtra unlimited” a synonym for Maharashtra tourism. The marketing aspect of tourism development in Maharashtra is discussed in detail in Chapter 6. 5.2.3 Private sector participation

Promotion of Maharashtra as a destination will not be sufficient enough to achieve a sustainable rate of growth of tourist arrivals in Maharashtra. The high capital intensive tourism promotion campaign should necessarily be backed by an inventory of tourism projects and attractions at various destinations on the promotion list, which may vary from time to time according to the destination 5-1 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

priority. While the major part of the expenses on promotion and provision of basic infrastructure at destinations would be borne by the state, it is the private entrepreneurs who would contribute to development by investing in revenue generating tourism projects at priority destinations. The suggested projects at various destinations cover restaurants, hotels, water sports, amusement parks and so on. The total private sector investment (excluding joint Public-Private projects) proposed in the state for tourism related activities in the next 20 years is Rs 433.54 Cr. The proposed private sector investment in tourism projects over the next 20 years is given in Figure 5.1 below Figure 5.1: Proposed Private Sector Investments in Tourism Projects
4000 3500 3000 2500
Rs. (Lakh)

2000 1500 1000 500 0
2 -2 21 20 1 -2 20 20 0 -2 19 20 9 -1 18 20 8 -1 17 20 7 -1 16 20 6 -1 15 20 5 -1 14 20 4 -1 13 20 3 -1 12 20 2 -1 11 20 1 -1 10 20 0 -1 09 20 9 -0 08 20 8 -0 07 20 7 -0 06 20 6 -0 05 20 5 -0 04 20 4 -0 03 20 3 -0 02 20

Year

Figure 5.2: Private Investment Avenues
Accom odation 48.2%

Amusem ent Park 33.9%

Water Sports 0.3%

Ropew ay 4.9%

Others 8.8%

Health Resort 3.3%

Convention Centre 0.6%

The project profiles for revenue generating projects suggested for private participation are given in Volume 2, Annexure 4. In addition to the shelf of projects available for private sector investment in the state, an incentive package to attract private investors is also suggested in the chapter 6 of this report. Maharashtra government had announced an incentive package for the period 1995-96 to 2005-06. However this package has not been implemented till date.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.2.4

Local community involvement

Development of tourism industry has played an important role in the overall socio economic development of certain destinations in Maharashtra like Ganapatipule, Mahabaleshwar, Panhala, Panchgani etc. Augmentation of private participation in tourism projects and increase in tourist inflow creates various direct and related job opportunities dependent on tourism for local residents of that destination. It is thus suggested that local community participation is essential to sustain tourism development at a particular destination. It is estimated that Tourism creates 47.5 direct jobs against 13 direct jobs in the manufacturing sector for every million rupees spent. Each direct job has a multiplying factor of around 2.5 i.e., one direct job generates 2.5 indirect jobs. The perspective plan as envisaged by DCEL would generate an average investment of Rs. 39.91 Cr per year and create around 19,000 direct and 47,500 indirect jobs every year. Moreover, tourism projects that do not the benefit local community are likely to face resistance from the residents of that region. Therefore, care should be taken while implementing all projects in general and projects involving conservation, rehabilitation and acquisitions in particular. Tourism Projects such as Folk Village, Shopping cum exhibition centres for rural arts, craft and cuisine display are suggested to encourage community participation in tourism projects. The government would make the initial investment for such projects and various stalls/outlets at the centre would be given to local entrepreneurs on a contract basis. Tourism products dedicated to community participation can be developed in rural and tribal areas. Tourists get a chance to stay with the locals in villages and collectively undertake small development projects like construction of a mud road, small catchment areas on river streams (Mini Kolhapur pattern dams), temple restoration etc. Implementation of such projects can be entrusted to NGOs and also to local self-government bodies.

5.2.5

Entrepreneurship development

It is necessary to ensure the quality of service provided by all service providers, both government and private, while implementing the perspective plan for development of tourism in Maharashtra. It would be the responsibility of the executing agency to provide proper guidance and training to entrepreneurs to enable them to develop and maintain the desired quality of service. Socio economic benefit of tourism development at a particular destination would only accrue when the revenue generated through tourist activity goes to local entrepreneurs. To enable this, local entrepreneurs should be encouraged to put up small-scale private sector projects at a certain destination. DCEL envisages the following measures to encourage local entrepreneurship at various destinations: 1. Conducting programs for entrepreneurship development explaining the investment procedure from concept to commissioning of projects to aspiring investors. 2. Single window clearance for small projects at the regional level.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3. Licensing the use of MTDC brand name to local entrepreneurs so as to increase their reliability (as perceived by tourists). Currently, MTDC is practicing this policy under the Bed and breakfast schemes at a few destinations like Panhala, Ganapatipule etc. This scheme can be extended to more destinations and more products like small restaurants, eating-joints, souvenir shops and picture post cards. 4. Conducting guide-training programs for locals. 5. Setting up shopping plazas for sale of local handicrafts, folk show, cuisine and souvenirs. The initial investment for such a shopping plaza is envisaged to be made by the Government, which can be recovered through lease rentals for shops, tourist ticket and advertisements. 5.3 Environment Protection and Cultural Preservation

The tourism development perceived should ideally be sustainable. However, any development is bound to have a negative impact on the environment and cultural balance of a region. This impact should be minimized by 1. Constant monitoring of the impact of tourism development on the environment. 2. Selection of location for tourism activity such that it will not interfere with the life style, culture and occupation of locals. For example: A water sports complex should not be located at sites used for fishing. 3. Restricting a quantum growth to prolong depletion of resources. 4. Encouraging community participation. 5. Promoting local culture and heritage at all destinations. 5.3.1 (i) Main Factors Social factors

Social factors such as changing demographics and cultural behaviour have an impact on tourism development. Some of the trends observed are • • • • • Tourism in big cities like Mumbai, Pune, and Nashik is moving towards high spending projects like water parks, amusement parks, Go karting etc. Hill stations, water bodies and beaches are looked upon as avenues for a combination of leisure as well as adventure tourism. Executives and professionals are moving towards tourist destinations that offer meditation and healing centre facilities. More and more corporates are hosting their AGMs, seminars, conferences at popular tourist destinations. New funding schemes for a tourist holiday through financial institutions are being introduced which have the potential to translate the desire to visit to actual visit.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(ii) • •

Political Factors Development of infrastructure, which is primarily done by the state, may change priorities due to political pressures. Political initiative would augment special incentive packages for a priority zone for development of tourism projects. Economic Factors • • • No incentives are currently offered specially for tourism related projects. Cash flow position and budget allocation for tourism related projects like provision of basic infrastructure, communication, tourism infrastructure etc. Higher purchasing power of people. Legislative Factors • Legislations regarding tourism development/ No Development Zones (NDZ) at coastal areas, heritage sites, Forest and sanctuary areas etc should be considered before planning for development in such eco sensitive areas. Policies for employees relating to Leave Travel Allowance. Other legislations such as urban land ceiling, which directly affect tourism projects, should be considered. Geographic and climatic • • • Destinations located near established tourist destinations or circuits should be considered for development on priority. Geographic limitations of the destinations may be a factor for calculation of the carrying capacity of that destination. Seasonality of a particular destination governs the economic viability of a particular project located there. Competitor Analysis Tourist needs analysis

(iii)

(iv)

• •

(v)

5.4 5.4.1

Tourists seek some time off from their daily schedules to enjoy and relax. There are various avenues by way of which a tourist can fulfil his heart’s desire like mountains, beaches, entertainment, educational, archaeological, adventure, sports, etc. Tourists aspire for an “experience”, which they would like to remember for some time. A tourist experience comprises of physical characteristics i.e. the place and its unique attractions, hospitality extended to tourists, ease of finding a place of interest and its accessibility, feelings of security, comfort and relaxation to the tourist and how closely the experience matches with their expectations. 5-5 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Maharashtra offers tourists a wide range of avenues for discerning tourists, which range from exotic beaches to hill stations, archaeological sites to dams & lakes, dense forests to busy metros, village art to Bollywood. As mentioned earlier, the USP of Maharashtra as a destination lies in its ability to offer all tourist themes in one state. The domestic & foreign tourists visiting Maharashtra have different needs. Their motivations for an experience are different from each other. An average domestic tourist seeks leisurerelated activities in Maharashtra and prefers short duration tours to beaches and hill-stations. The major items of attractions, as mentioned by domestic tourists, were religion and temples, eco-tourism attractions like forests and waterfalls, leisure and adventure activities. An average foreign tourist in Maharashtra uses Mumbai as an entry point to India and prefers the famous heritage monuments of Ajantha and Ellora. Foreign tourists have locations spread across India to choose from for their need of a particular tourism experience. Foreign tourists have the choice to go to Goa for beaches, Himalayas for adventure and hill stations, Maharashtra for Heritage and Uttar Pradesh for culture.

5.4.2

Competing states

As Maharashtra offers a blend of all tourism experiences in one state, other states offering any one of these themes become competitors to Maharashtra. Outbound tourism (going to other states from Maharashtra) also acts as a competition to destinations in Maharashtra. The major competing states and their USP are given in the Table 5.5 below Table 5.5: Major competing states Competing State Goa Madhya Pradesh Chhattisgarh Gujarat Rajasthan Karnataka Uttaranchal 5.4.3 (i) • • • • Position of Maharashtra Strengths City of Mumbai – the commercial capital of India Three world heritage monuments of Ajantha, Ellora and Elephanta 80% of the cave temples of India 720 kms of coastline dotted with beautiful beaches and national parks 5-6 of 21 Competing themes Beaches Hill Stations/ Forest Forests Pilgrimage/ Hill stations Heritage Hill stations/ Pilgrimage Adventure/ Pilgrimage

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • • • •

Over 300 forts and rugged hill ranges Cool hill stations Pilgrimage centres for almost every religion and The state leads in the field of industrial development, cooperative movement, education and medical facilities All tourist destinations have good road connectivity and are connected by MSRTC buses from major cities in Maharashtra and gateway towns. Almost all destinations visited have basic infrastructure i.e. Availability of power, water and communication network except for reserve forest areas.

(ii) • •

Weakness There is lack of information about tourist attractions in Maharashtra as the state level publicity is inadequate. MTDC is the only agency involved in tourism promotion. MTDC has suffered due to inadequate financial support from central and state governments in the past. During the last few years, assistance has been stepped up. Destinations in Maharashtra except for a few major destinations are not popular among domestic as well as out of state tour operators. It is thus necessary to attract tour operators from other states to Maharashtra.



Several tourist destinations in Maharashtra lack in the availability of tourism related infrastructure such as wayside amenities, information kiosks, signage, site beautification and development of sites in terms of railings, view points etc. 5.5 5.5.1 (i) Market Analysis Market trends Tourist Trend

Total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra increased from 7.04 million in the year 1995 to 9.37 million during 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 5.88%. Foreign tourist arrivals increased from 0.88 million in 1995 to 1.07 million in 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 4.1% while domestic tourist arrivals increased from 6.16 million in 1995 to 8.30 million in 2000 indicating a compounded annual growth rate of 6.14%.

(ii)

Tourist Behaviour

As mentioned earlier, Maharashtra competes with different states in various tourism themes and thus outbound tourism (tourists going to other states for tourism experiences, also available in Maharashtra) 5-7 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

is a major competitor for tourism in Maharashtra. As tourists from within the state form a major share of total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra, retaining these tourists as well as attracting tourists from other states would play a pivotal role in development of tourism in Maharashtra. The selection of destination to be visited amongst the various choices available is done by the tourists using the following four factors 1. Availability of ample avenues for tourism development in terms of natural resources and geo-bio diversity 2. Availability of basic infrastructure, communication network and transportation facility to major states of India. 3. Availability of tourism infrastructure such as tour/ taxi operators, Way side amenities and development of view points and destinations 4. Awareness about the destination in the mind of tourists. 5.5.2 Market potential

The tourist arrivals in Maharashtra for the year 2000 are estimated to be around 9.38 million as per the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Maharashtra share in the total domestic tourist arrivals in India is 3.95% whereas its share in total international tourist arrivals in India is around 40.68%. Mumbai being a major international airport in India, it is widely used as entry and exit point by international tourists. However out of around 1.08 million tourists visiting Maharashtra only 5-6% of foreign tourists move on to tourist destinations in Maharashtra. Based on the market survey of 40 important tourist destinations in Maharashtra covering 75% of total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra, DCEL has targeted a CAGR of 6.72% over the next 20 years. The overall growth rate is arrived at by forecasting the growth for each destination visited, bearing in mind the proposed infrastructure development projects around these destinations and the State Government priorities for each destination. The proposed investments in tourism related projects specified in the perspective plan are also considered while arriving at estimated growth rates for respective destinations. The growth estimated in total tourist traffic over the next 20 years at the visited destinations is given in Appendix 5, Table 5.1. The Table 5.2 in Appendix 5 indicates the projections for total domestic and foreign tourists for the next 20 years. Figure 5.3 shows the above mentioned growth rates. Figure 5.3: Domestic & Foreign growth rates
350 300
Arrivals (Lakh)

250 200 150 100 50 0 01-02 06-07 11-12 Year 17-18 Domestic Foreign

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The overall growth rates for all visited destinations and the estimated CAGR for tourist arrivals in Maharashtra for domestic tourists are shown in Table 5.6. Table 5.6: Overall Tourist Arrival Growth Rates
Destination Tourist Inflow per year Current Estimated 2001-02 2021-22 600000 1670725 350000 1136489 75000 240535 3500 18168 115000 368821 400000 1282854 100000 369221 1000000 5590100 350000 1122497 500000 2007141 300000 1128660 200000 752440 30000 128565 350000 1405367 425000 1181981 20000 41327 35000 102986 50000 186352 75000 269079 200000 641427 35000 76689 35000 90237 200000 752440 50000 182885 25000 86219 15000 77782 100000 416792 20000 59437 50000 143038 150000 583943 75000 164334 75000 206537 100000 219112 400000 1664021 200000 832011 50000 130044 70000 251276 100000 358965 30000 107690 250000 547781 7208500 26465925 9372327 34405702 Overall CAGR 5.25% 6.07% 6.00% 8.58% 6.00% 6.00% 6.75% 8.99% 6.00% 7.20% 6.85% 6.85% 7.55% 7.20% 5.25% 3.70% 5.54% 6.80% 6.60% 6.00% 4.00% 4.85% 6.85% 6.70% 6.39% 8.58% 7.40% 5.60% 5.40% 7.03% 4.00% 5.20% 4.00% 7.39% 7.39% 4.90% 6.60% 6.60% 6.60% 4.00% 6.72% 6.72%

Aurangabad Ajantha Paithan Lonar Nashik Wani Bhandardara Mumbai Bhimashankar Pune Pratapgad Wai Koyna Kolhapur Panhala Dajipur Amboli Sawantwadi Tarkarli Malvan Kunkeshwar Devgad Ratnagiri Dervan Harne Karde Harihareshwar Diveagar Janjira Wardha Bhadravati Tadoba Nawegaon N.P Nagpur Ramtek Totladoh Amravati Chikhaldara Semadoh Ambejogai All destinations visited Estimate for State

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.5.3

Market Segments

Out of the total tourist visiting tourist destinations in Maharashtra, about 15-20 % tourists are from other states while only 10-12% tourists are of foreign origin. The majority of tourists in Maharashtra are domestic tourists from within the state. The revenue earned from the out of state and foreign tourists is almost twice the local tourists. However, only a few select destinations in Maharashtra are popular amongst the tourist from other states. This number is even smaller for foreign tourists. Other tourist destinations in Maharashtra exclusively depend upon domestic tourists for the revenue generated through tourism. Thus the total market for tourism in Maharashtra can be segmented on the basis of three independent parameters

(i)

State/ Country of Origin

Popular destinations having good basic and tourism infrastructure can be targeted towards tourists from out of Maharashtra and foreign tourists. Investments in tourism projects should be encouraged in these destinations to retain tourists for a longer duration and increase the number of spending avenues. Tourism projects such as amusement parks, health resorts, water sports are suggested in these destinations. (ii) Area of interest

Some destinations in Maharashtra offer tourism experience unique to those destinations only and cannot be replicated elsewhere. Tourists visit such destinations with a special interest in that particular theme. Destinations like Lonar, Ajantha, Ellora, Elephanta, reserved forest offer special experiences exclusive to those destinations. Such destinations have a limited but an assured market, as there is no substitute to these products.

(iii)

Spending power of tourists

Selection of a destination for various tourism projects should match with the spending power of the type of visitors visiting that destination. An amusement park situated at remote destinations would not fetch more revenue as compared to that situated in the vicinity of major towns. The target market for major tourism projects and possible locations are given in project profiles in Volume 2, Annexure 4.

5.6 5.6.1

Perspective Plan Methodology

A block diagram of the methodology used for preparation of the perspective plan for sustainable development of tourism in the state of Maharashtra is given in Figure 5.3. 5-10 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 5.4: Perspective Plan Methodology Govt. Departments Site Visits (Inventorisation)
Secondary Data

Baseline Survey

Entrepreneurs Tourist needs

Identification of infrastructure gaps

Growth Forecasts

Destination Prioritization

Project Ideas

Project Prioritization

Project Implementation

Technical Environmental

Feasibility/ Sustainability Study of all proposed projects.

Social Economic

Marketing Strategy for State (i) Baseline Survey

The baseline survey included short-listing of important tourist destinations in Maharashtra to be visited to collect primary and secondary data at these destinations. The destinations were selected in such a manner that the total tourist arrival at these destinations is almost 75% of the total tourist arrivals in Maharashtra. The destinations and tourism areas having state government priority (Category A destinations) were given more attention during visits. The site visit involved collection of primary and secondary data. (a) Primary data collection Discussions were held with local tourism officials, officers of concerned government departments like planning, forest, etc to collect valuable information such as current tourist inflow, peak and lean seasons, plans for development, if any, nature of tourists, communications network, availability of accommodation and other tourist infrastructure, etc. 5-11 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The primary data collection also included a limited tourist survey to identify profile of tourists, purpose of visit, problems faced at destinations, average spending per day etc. (b) Secondary data collection This included collection of secondary published data about various tourist destinations, proposals, development plans prepared for destinations, any information about the trend in tourist arrivals, etc. The baseline survey provided the base for the preparation of the perspective plan for development of tourism in Maharashtra in terms of destination prioritization, evolution of project ideas, growth forecasts, scheduling of tourism and infrastructure projects etc. Two major outputs of the baseline survey were identification of infrastructure gaps at various destinations as discussed in Chapter 3 and the estimated growth rates for various destinations as per the environmental factors discussed in Chapter 4. (ii) Accommodation requirement

Accommodation is an important factor in the tourism industry. According to the tourist survey, spending on accommodation constitutes around 50% of the total spending per day per person The number of additional beds required at all visited destinations was calculated based on the estimated tourist arrivals, existing bed capacity of that destination and average duration of stay at that destination. No of additional beds required = Estimated increase in arrival × % tourists halting No of room nights per bed in a year Where : No of room nights per bed = No of working days Average duration of stay

Adjustments in the proposed capacity addition of accommodation at various destinations were made so as to offset the seasonal variations in demand, average capacity utilisation etc. (iii) Tourist need analysis and project ideas

Two major components of private sector participation are accommodation and tourism projects. Identification of the investment required in accommodation projects was based on the annual requirement of additional beds as explained above, whereas the investment required on tourism projects was based on the purpose of visit of tourists and the spending power of tourists visiting particular destinations. The tourism projects where private investment is possible are classified into the following major heads like: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Amusement Parks Water parks Water Sports Complex Restaurants and food joints Folk village, mall road, Mahagram, etc Convention Centre

The above tourism projects are revenue-generating projects and cater to different market segments. E.g.: Amusement parks cater to medium and higher income group tourists on weekend/ day tour. Therefore amusement parks are suggested only near major cities like Pune, Nashik, Aurangabad and 5-12 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Nagpur. The various target groups for tourism projects and possible locations for such projects are discussed earlier. (iv) Development of destinations

Private sector investment in tourism is only possible at popular destinations where the minimum number of tourists per year is large enough to make the proposed project viable. A restaurant may come up at a destination before a water park/ entertainment facility, as the minimum economic size of a restaurant is less than that of a water park. Moreover to attract the minimum number of tourist required at a destination, the availability of basic and tourism infrastructure is essential. Thus, the life cycle of a location as a tourist destination begins with the place having the requisite tourist potential (wild life, hill station, beach, major city, etc.) and with augmentation of basic infrastructure at that destination. Such destination with potential for tourism but non-availability of basic infrastructure is termed a tertiary destination. With gradual increase in the number of tourists and promotion of that destination, fresh investments are made in necessary tourist infrastructure to attract and facilitate tourists. These investments are generally small in magnitude and are funded through the budgetary allocation of state tourism department and local self-governments. In this phase, government departments start investing in revenue generating projects like accommodation etc as demonstration projects to attract private investments. While these public sector investments are made at the destination, it is a secondary destination. The third phase begins when a destination has the basic and tourism infrastructure and has graduated to a primary destination. Private sector investments are done at this stage further increasing the tourist inflow exponentially. The increase in tourist inflow further attracts private investment and the cycle continues till a point where the destination reaches its carrying capacity. Carrying capacity is a point beyond which any further development would result in negative growth of tourist arrivals. This implies that any further development beyond the carrying capacity of a destination depletes the natural resources and the potential for tourism at that place resulting into it being less attractive for tourists. At such a point, where a destination reaches its carrying capacity, there should be another similar primary destination ready to substitute the destination in its maturity phase, so that the tourists are retained in Maharashtra and not move towards other states. The investment planning for such an arrangement is discussed below. 5.7 5.7.1 Investment Planning Destination development

A conventional demand supply-model suggests that the average spending per day for tourists visiting popular primary tourist destinations is more than that for secondary destinations. The perspective plan should offer a proper mix of primary and secondary destinations to cater to tourist with various spending levels. New tourism projects coming up at primary tourist destinations increase demand and consequently the average cost per day at that destination. Thus, when the plan provides for fresh investments in primary destinations in revenue generating tourism projects, it should also provide budgetary support for strengthening of tourism infrastructure in secondary and basic infrastructure in tertiary destinations. 5-13 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 5.4 indicates the approach to destination development through investment planning This type of an investment plan would help secondary destinations like Bhandardara and Chikhaldara to substitute for primary destinations like Mahabaleshwar that have reached or nearing their maximum carrying capacity. Looking at destinations as products, it means that when one product/ destination reaches its maturity phase, other product variants (similar secondary destinations) are in their growth phase, thus retaining the total market share

PRIMARY DESTINATION Private sector investment in Revenue Generating Tourism Projects

SECONDARY DESTINATION Tourism department Investments in Tourism Infrastructure Projects

TERTIARY DESTINATION Public Sector Investment on Basic Infrastructure

DESTINATION A o Accommodation o Restaurants o Other revenue generating tourism projects

DESTINATION A Way Side Amenities Public Amenities Signage Tourist Information Centre o Tour operators o o o o

DESTINATION B o Roads/ Rail/ Airports o Transportation/ Communication o Water & Power

DESTINATION A o Accommodation o Restaurants o Other revenue generating tourism projects

DESTINATION B Way Side Amenities Public Amenities Signage Tourist Information Centre o Tour operators o o o o

DESTINATION C o Roads/ Rail/ Airports Transportation/ Communication o Water & Power

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.7.2

Feasibility/ Sustainability Study

The project identified at each destination during the survey, and after discussions with experts and government authorities, is checked for its sustainability on Technical, Financial, Environmental and Social aspects of the projects. Private sector investment projects viable on all four aspects are included in the perspective plan. Projects that are not financially viable but are essential for tourism development like providing of basic and tourism infrastructure are proposed for funding through budget outlays. The various factors considered while accessing the sustainability of a particular project are already discussed in Chapter 4

5.7.3

Strategy/ Marketing

Promotion of a destination is addressed to both tourists and private sector entrepreneurs and thus most of the promotional expenses for a destination or state have to be borne by the state tourism department. The promotion campaign of the state should be planned in line with the destination prioritisation done earlier. The marketing strategy and the media mix suggested by DCEL are discussed at length in the next chapter. The budget allocation for promotion of tourism in Maharashtra for the tenth plan period (2002-2007) is Rs 4178.14 Lakh. The budget allocation for promotion for the year 2002-03 is Rs 469.85 Lakh. The total expenditure on Promotion envisaged upto 2021-22 is Rs 178.87 Cr with an average spending per annum of Rs 8.94 Cr.

5.7.4 • • •

Assumptions Current growth of tourist arrivals in Maharashtra based on discussions with experts, tourism officials and data from Ministry of Tourism is taken as 6%. Destinations visited form a share of almost 75% of the total number of visitors in Maharashtra. The current level of accommodation availability at visited destinations is sufficient for the present visitor turnover. This assumption is based on discussions with local tourism officials at respective destinations. Though the perspective plan takes into consideration, the major development plans by other government departments like MSRDC and Municipal Corporations etc, it does not include their proposed investment in the perspective plan.



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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.7.5 (i)

Targets Tourism product mix

The proposed tourism product offered by Maharashtra would be a mix of various projects in leisure and special interest tourism. Unlike other states, stress would not be laid on one particular theme. All tourism themes like beaches, hill stations, man-made entertainment centres, fort tourism, adventure tourism, eco-tourism and other forms of special interest tourism would be given equal weightage in terms of development. (ii) Investments

The perspective plan envisages a total investment of Rs. 798.30 Cr in next 20 years for the sustainable development of tourism in Maharashtra over the next 20 years. This investment can be segregated depending upon the source of funding. The three sources of investment and their total investment is given below in Table 5.7. Table 5.7: Investment Sources & distribution Source Projects Type Investment 2002-2022 Rs Lakh 34291.88 % Share 43%

Public Sector

Private Sector Public + Private Total

Promotion, Basic Infrastructure, Tourism Infrastructure, Revenue generating demo projects to attract private investors, projects in restricted zones like forts, forests, Human resource management, Tourism management and administration and incentives etc Revenue earning projects at primary and secondary destinations Joint projects where initial investment would be made by Government and operation would be private

43354.99 2183.85

54% 3%

79,830.72 100%

The total investment proposed in the perspective plan can also be classified into investments in major heads viz.: (a) Accommodation (b) Tourism Projects (c) Tourism Infrastructure (d) Basic Infrastructure (e) Promotion and Publicity (f) Human Resource development (g) Tourism management and Administration (h) Others (Incentives and subsidies etc) The year wise investment plan for all the above heads is given in Appendix 5, Table 5.3. A summary of investments in next 20 years is given in Table 5.8. 5-16 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table 5.8: Summary of Investments for 20 Years
Investment Head Investment 2002-03 to 2011-12 Rs Lakh % share 5280.18 14 % 14245.58 41 % 2104.45 6% 1307.37 4% 8507.50 24 % 115.00 3% 80.00 195.00 35266.55 2% 6% 100% Investment 2012-13 to 2021-22 Rs. Lakh % share 16341.79 36 % 12658.34 28 % 1679.00 4% 349.33 1% 9379.52 21 % 3% 1299.57 944.57 2203.62 44564.15 2% 5% 100% Cumulative for 20 years timeframe Rs. Lakh % share 26 % 21621.97 35 % 26903.92 5% 3783.45 2% 1656.70 22 % 17887.02 3% 2478.32 1764.57 4202.37 79830.70 2% 5% 100%

Accommodation Tourism Projects Tourism Infrastructure Basic Infrastructure Promotion Human Resource Management Tourism Management / Administration Others (Incentives/ subsidies) Total

It is assumed based on site visit observations that the current accommodation availability is sufficient and hence accommodation projects have a share of only 14% out of the total investments in the first 10 years. In the next 10 years, when new destinations are developed from secondary to primary destinations coupled with increased tourist traffic, the investment in accommodation projects increases to 36% of the total investment. Share of investments in basic and tourism infrastructure decreases in the latter half of the plan as the required tourism infrastructure would be provided in the first 10 years. 1. Accommodation Investments coming under this head are exclusively accommodation projects proposed at various destinations. Accommodation forms a very substantial part of the total tourism investment and hence treated as a separate head. The investments under this head would be mostly private sector investments except for a few destinations where demonstration projects are required to be funded by the government to attract private investors for further investments at that destination. 2. Tourism Projects This head includes revenue generating tourism projects that provide avenues for entertainment, leisure, shopping and food for tourists. The investment in these projects would be through private investors. At some destinations where private players are not allowed such as forests and forts, government departments would invest in the revenue earning projects proposed at those destinations Projects such as setting up of folk village, mall road, museums require heavy investments, which are not likely to come from private investors. These projects however would help the local community in terms of revenue through sale of handicrafts, local cuisine, folk art etc. 5-17 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Therefore it is suggested that the initial investment in such projects should be made by the government, which can be recovered later from private operators in form of lease rentals etc. 3. Basic Infrastructure Being an industrialized state, the basic infrastructure of Maharashtra is more developed as compared to other states in terms of minimum requirements of a tourism destination viz.: o o o o Accessibility (Road/ Rail/ Waterways/ Air) Means of communication Telephone network Supply of power and water

The total expenditure for strengthening of basic infrastructure at tertiary destinations without considering the maintenance cost is Rs. 16.56 Cr. This expenditure is phased out according to the destination prioritization upto the year 2012-13. Since there are very few tertiary destinations where public investment in provision of basic infrastructure is required, more stress has been laid on improvement in road condition to destinations, which are not on the priority list of either PWD or MSRDC. Improvement of basic infrastructure to primary and secondary destination is not considered, as theses destinations are covered by plans of other departments like PWD, MSRDC and respective local bodies. 4. Tourism Infrastructure These investments funded by government expenditure would be utilized to strengthen tourist facilities such as: o Public Amenities o o o o o o o Way Side Amenities Guide training View Point Development Area beautification and development Tourist Information Centres Information Kiosks Signage, etc

5. Promotion The expenses incurred on promotion of Maharashtra as a destination on national and international platform would be funded by the budget of tourism department. The perspective plan does not suggest a substantial increase in the budget for promotion. The provision of the Tenth 5 year plan for Promotion would be sufficient according to tourism 5-18 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

experts. An increment of 5 % for successive 5 year plans is suggested, making the total expenditure on promotion equal to Rs. 178.87 Cr at an average of Rs 8.94 Cr, per annum. 6. Human Resource Development Tourism falls into the service industry which essentially implies that people engaged in this trade deal with people and cater to their needs. Hence, the people in the tourism industry need to develop skills for dealing with tourists and to develop a knowledge base, which has to be constantly updated of the facilities available to the tourists. The need for training persons in this industry is felt due to the following reasons: o The impressions of a tourist during his visit is largely determined by two factors – the first is the impression of the tourist on the site visited and its history and the second, the hospitality, quality of service and knowledge and courtesy extended to the tourist during his stay. Therefore, a lot depends on the persons in the trade to make the tourists’ experience a pleasant one. The right selection, training and development are thus very important. Being a service industry, it offers tremendous scope for employment to a vast cross section of persons in various capacities like travel agents, guides, hotels (front office, waiters, cooks, stewards, housekeeping, etc.), private entrepreneurship in travel trade, restaurant, lodges and souvenir shops, artisans involved in production of handicrafts, support and ancillary services.

o

The two major activities in tourism are: 1. Accommodation and hospitality and 2. Travel trade. Training for both these activities has to be based on clearly identified skills and knowledge needed for their effective performance. 7. Tourism management and Administration A proper management framework for administering the tourism needs to be developed. This will call for o Develop MIS System o o Human Resource Development Plan Creation of EIA Cell & Project Development Company to assist Tourism Department in speeding up of development process. Others

o

To encourage investment by the private sector in the tourism sector suiable incentives and subsidies will have to be given to the private entrepreneur. This will ensure a uniform development of the destinations with fewer burdens on the government.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The destination wise phasing of investments under all above heads is given in Appendix 5, Table 5.4 and Table 5.5. 8. Privatisation strategy As suggested earlier, the MTDC has shown intentions to switch over from being an operator in the field of tourism towards becoming a catalyst and facilitator for tourism development in the state at large. As a first step towards this MTDC needs to privatise its properties at established tourist locations and pilgrim centres. Only those properties should be retained where very few private players currently operate. This would serve dual cause of facilitating and attracting visitors as well as avoiding exploitation by private players in a monopolistic business environment. Moreover, presence of MTDC may discourage private sector players due to the lower initial investment in land and buildings and lesser hassles in clearances. This gives a clear competitive edge to MTDC vis-à-vis private players.

5.8

Summary of 20 years Perspective plan for sustainable development of tourism in Maharashtra Scope

5.8.1

(a) Total number of destinations covered: 78 (b) % share of covered destinations in total tourist arrivals: 75% (approx) (c) Infrastructure investment for only proposed projects suggested.

5.8.2

Investments Rs. 798.30 Cr. Rs. 433.54 Cr (54%) Rs. 342.91 Cr. (43%) Rs. 21.83 (3%)

Total Investments: Private sector investments: Public Investments: Public + Private: 5.8.3

Employment Opportunities

Average direct employment generation per year: 19,000 Total direct employment generation in 20 years 3,80,000 5.8.4 • • • Key Characteristics Development phased on the basis of destination prioritization Suggested projects checked for sustainability considering economic, environmental and socioeconomic factors. Project profiles and feasibility study done for short term projects 5-20 of 21

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

• • • •

Year wise phasing of investment projects destination wise specific projects. Government expenditure kept limited to promotion and infrastructure projects. Destination prioritization based on government priority and tourist trends. Major infrastructure projects planned in Maharashtra considered while estimating the growth of tourist inflow to particular destinations.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6
6.1

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
Introduction

This chapter discusses the issues related to implementation of the tourism perspective plan – issues of promotion, financing, human resources development and agencies to undertake various activities. In the year 2000, 6 Lakh foreign tourists visited India, out of which about 17 % of tourists visited Maharashtra. In domestic tourists, Maharashtra ranks 6th with 80 Lakh tourist arrivals per annum, 16% of India’s total tourist arrivals. With such a high turnover of tourists in general and foreign tourists in particular, there exists an immense potential for tourism related industry in Maharashtra. Tourism industry in Maharashtra has been declared as one of the thrust areas in development by the state government of Maharashtra. A detailed action plan to promote investment in tourism industry and incentive schemes for private entrepreneurs is in its last stages of finalization.

6.2

Communicating and finalizing the plan

Clear understanding of the perspective plan is essential to achieve goal congruence amongst various government departments. This would enable the concerned departments to make amendments if possible in their policies and regulations related to tourism projects and also provide feedback on issues related to their subject in the proposed projects. Communication of the plan can be done through different channels depending upon the audience. Communication of plan to various state government bodies can be done through the TDCC (Tourism Development Co-ordination Committee), which is proposed to be set up for Maharashtra to implement the perspective plan.

6.2.1 (i)

Process of communication Communication with government departments

As mentioned earlier, it is crucial to achieve goal congruence in the implementation of the perspective plan for development of tourism in Maharashtra. It is necessary for all concerned state departments to principally approve the perspective plan before initiation of the actual implementation process. All deletions, additions, suggestions and amendments in the plan should be incorporated after receiving feedback from concerned government agencies on the perspective plan. This exercise would then provide a road map of activities for respective departments on a time scale, which would in turn give synergies in development of necessary infrastructure to sustain the planned growth in tourism.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Once the perspective plan is agreed upon principally by all concerned departments, at implementation stage, zonal implementation officers would interact with regional offices of concerned departments to get clearances for specific projects in that region. The communication process with various government bodies in shown below

Figure 6.1: Government to Government Interaction TDCC Perspective Plan Government Departments

NO

Deletions/ Additions/ Amendments
YES

Approval in Principal

Regional Offices

Guidelines/ Regulations

Clearances/ NOC

MTDC

(ii)

Communication with Investors/ Funding Agencies

The communication of the perspective plan for tourism development to the private entrepeneurs and funding agencies like MSFC (Maharashtra state finance corporation) IDBI, SIDBI etc is essential in terms of informing them about the thrust areas identified by the state government. The perspective plan also offers a project shelf giving project profiles of individual projects shortlisted in that area.These would be helpful to private investors to obtain a ballpark investment estimate for a particular project. A major impediment in setting up a tourism project is the number of clearances required to set up a tourism related project. The private investor should face minimal bureaucracy and procedural hassles to expedite the process of capital inflow into the tourism economy. As seen from the communication process suggested below, investors and funding agengies are insulated from the various state government departments. All clearances required are obtained on case to case basis by the MTDC project execution office.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Figure 6.2: Government to Private Interaction Concerned Government Departments

Clearances

MR wing
MTDC Regional Execution Office

Promotion Wing

Inquiry

Single Window Clearance

Private Investors/ Funding Agencies

6.3

Developing an Institutional framework

To communicate and co-ordinate with different government department to get required clearances from various departments, a high level co-coordinating committee is proposed to be set up with representation from all related state government departments mentioned above. This committee will be responsible for the implementation of the perspective plan and would be called as tourism development co-ordination committee. (TDCC) Figure 6.3: Institutional setup TDCC

Various Government Departments

MR and EIA Cell (MTDC)

Regional Offices (MTDC)

Promotion Cell (MTDC)

INVESTORS

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The TDCC would be chaired by the Chief Secretary (Maharashtra state) and the Secretary Tourism would be the convener of the TDCC. The convener will be given the responsibility to communicate the perspective plan for project development and receive feedback from the concerned with regards to implementation issues of the specific projects suggested in the plan. The members of TDCC would be secretaries/ heads from various concerned departments such as MTDC, Water Supply, Irrigation, Sewerage, Power, PWD, MSRDC, MSRTC, Forest, Art & Culture, ASI and State department of archaeology.

6.3.1

Functions of TDCC

1. Get approvals from various state government departments for the perspective plan. 2. Receive feedback from various departments regarding the issues, laws and regulations that can act as impediments in implementation of specific projects suggested in the plan. 3. Revision of perspective plan based on the feedback. 4. Getting clearances from various departments for the proposed projects. 5. Reviewing the implementation of the perspective plan and taking corrective actions where and whenever necessary.

6.4

Promotion/ Marketing Cell of MTDC

MTDC’s existing marketing department would handle promotion and publicity campaigns directed towards both tourists and investors. This department would work closely with other departments such as forests, ASI, arts and culture and promote tourist attractions related to all these departments.

6.4.1

Market Research, Planning and EIA Cell

The market research and planning department of MTDC would undertake feasibility study and detailed project reports for short-term projects. This cost can be recovered from the private investors taking up that project. This cell would also perform an essential function of continuous monitoring of the impact on environment of a particular destination due to increase in the tourist inflow and setting up of new tourism projects. This continuous monitoring would be essential to assess the carrying capacity of that particular destination in terms of tourist arrivals or tourism projects after which any increase in either would have a negative impact on the environment. When such a point in the development of any destination is reached, the EIA cell would, advice the TDCC and the regional MTDC office to prevent any further tourism development activity in that region.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.5

Regional Execution Offices

The regional tourism offices of MTDC would act as facilitators between investors and the government departments. These offices would be a single window clearance point for all projects proposed in that region. The regional offices would also assist investors and funding agencies in implementation stage for acquisition of land, augmentation of basic infrastructure, etc. The institutional setup for the implementation of the perspective plan is shown below

6.6 6.6.1

Destination marketing Marketing and Publicity

Marketing and Publicity plays a pivotal role in successful implementation of a perspective tourism development plan. It is often a point of debate whether the tourist inflow at a certain destination attracts related infrastructure or projects or is it the existing infrastructure and tourism amenities that attract tourist to a certain destination. Thus the marketing effort for tourism projects should be addressed to both tourists and investors for tourism projects. Tourist destinations also have to be promoted to tour operators and travel agents. A marketing strategy for implementation of a perspective plan for development of tourism in Maharashtra has to address all three categories of audience.

6.6.2

Defining marketing objectives

Before evolving a strategy for promotion of tourism industry in Maharashtra, it is essential to decide the target audience for each destination and theme of suggested projects in that destination. It is also important to set marketing objectives for each destination. The selection of appropriate marketing mix from the options suggested would also be governed by the marketing objectives and destination characteristics. The marketing strategy would thus involve (a) Destination Prioritization (Time of implementation) (b) Target customer – Location (Foreign/ Inter state/ Local/ Weekend) (c) Target Customer – Income Group (d) Target Customer – Purpose of travel (Pilgrimage/ Leisure/ Business/ Special Interest/ Nature) (e) Targeted Tourist inflow (f) Target investment inflow at each destination 6-5 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.6.3

Marketing strategy to attract investors

Marketing department of MTDC could target private entrepreneurs, funding agencies like TFCI, MSFC, World Bank, ADB etc for investments in different types of projects in Maharashtra. Several initiatives can be conceived to reach out to the potential investors to offer them opportunities to invest in tourism projects in Maharashtra. 1. Seminars, presentations and exhibitions showcasing investment opportunities in Maharashtra at national and international travel and tourism exhibitions 2. Presentation to various organizations in the tourism industry such as Indian Association of Amusement Parks and allied Industries (IAAPI), FHRAI etc and conveying to them the perspective plan proposed by the Government. 3. Distributing printed brochures to potential investors providing • • • • • 6.6.4 Information on tourist destinations Current and potential tourist inflow Projects identified and investments required Incentives and assistance given by the government Investment procedure

Media Publicity planning

Publicity in the print and audio-visual media could be used to promote individual destinations, circuits and even the entire state. Such promotion of destinations could serve a dual purpose of attracting tourists as well as investments to that destination. The promotion campaign could promote selected destinations depending upon the target audience and development priority of that destination. E.g. If development of tourism in the Lonar crater will become the priority in the next 3 years, promotion of Lonar should also be done at that stage. A combination of media tools should be used depending on the destination type and the target audience. This is necessary to achieve the exact degree of repeat exposure and acceptance so as to create a “desire to visit” in the minds of the target customer. It should be noted here that a good promotion campaign is only successful if a sound distribution network backs it. Similarly, in tourism industry, a good promotion campaign will attract tourists on a sustainable basis only if it is backed by good accessibility to destinations, tourist infrastructure and tourist retaining capability. Various media tools suggested for destination marketing (depending on the destination type and target audience) is shown in the table below:

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Table 6.1: Target Group: Foreign Tourists, Suggested Media Mix In-flight Magazine Existing Foreign destination Proposed foreign destination In addition to this, Maharashtra as a destination should be promoted amongst international tourism writers. Tours should be hosted for travel writers from East Asian and European countries. The two regions that should be targeted as the primary attractions for foreign tourists are the Buddhist caves of Ajantha - Ellora and the beaches. 6.6.5 Road shows and exhibitions Tourist Magazines Hoardings Television Airport

Maharashtra tourism department should take part in international tourism exhibitions to propagate and enhance the “Maharashtra Unlimited” brand image amongst international tourists and tour operators. Table 6.2: Target Group: Domestic Tourists, Suggested Media Mix
Tourist Magazines Camping Destinations En Route destinations Local weekend destination Travel Guide Hoardings Television Newspapers Other Magazines

6.6.6

Newspaper articles and interview

Interviews and articles on particular destinations or tourism policy on the whole can be used as a tool to invite private investors in the tourism sector. Such articles and interviews can appear in publications of associations related to tourism industry, travel magazines and other business magazines and newspapers. Such a publicity campaign can address the target audience of private entrepreneurs and other funding agencies. This can be particularly used in promoting medium and long-term destinations and projects such as Lonar, Lake District development project, and IT Museum in Pune. 6.6.7 FAM tours for tour operators

National and international tour operators should be called for a free visit to priority destinations of the state government and information regarding the destinations should be disseminated to them. Tour operators should be encouraged to visit the priority destinations more often through alliances between tour operators and MTDC. 6-7 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.6.8

Special efforts for promotion

Destinations in Maharashtra are primarily domestic destinations confined to tourists from within the state. Maharashtra needs to market its destinations throughout India to attract interstate visitors. More stress must be laid to address tourists from other states. Moreover, within Maharashtra, the “word of mouth” plays a big role in promoting the tourist destinations. Destinations in Maharashtra can be marketed in other states and throughout India through television game shows. Sponsoring all expenses paid tours to destinations in Maharashtra to winners of TV game shows could be one of the ways to market Maharashtra destinations to medium and high-income groups. Maharashtra tourism could also be marketed by holding road shows and exhibitions on Maharashtra tourism in states like Gujarat and West Bengal.

6.6.9

Alliances with transporters, international airways, and international tour operators

MTDC could go in for alliances with international and domestic transporters and tour operators outside Maharashtra for Joint destination promotion campaigns.

6.6.10

Tourist Information Centre and Kiosks

This tool potentially is the most effective tool in the marketing mix as it offers promotion as well as acts as a facilitator or service provider to tourists. Tourist information centres should be strategically located at national and international gateways and important tourist destinations. The facilities available at Tourist information centres are (a) Information Kiosks (b) Help desk providing related literature and brochures (c) Booking services for Conducted / Package Tours, Transport and Hotel accommodation. Full fledged TIC could be provided at important gateways and major destinations while interactive information kiosks could be provided at major railway stations, airports, bus terminals and high budget hotels. Destinations where setting up of TICs and Kiosks are envisaged are given below: Table 6.3: Destinations for setting up TIC / Kiosks TIC Mumbai international and domestic airport Kolhapur Sawantwadi Nagpur Kiosks Ratnagiri Pune Ganapatipule Star hotels in Mumbai Nashik 6-8 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.7 6.7.1

Financing tourism development Funding sources for projects

There are three basic types of funding needs for the suggested projects in the perspective plan according to the nature of project. Largely, the source for direct revenue generating projects will be private sector investment, but in newly developing areas, MTDC would be the pioneer developer until the private sector has confidence to make investments. Financing of schemes for basic infrastructure augmentation like power, water, public amenities, signages, etc would be the responsibility of the concerned government departments. The third category of projects/ activities such as marketing and publicity, human resource development (HRD), tourist information centres (TIC), planning and implementation of projects, MIS, feasibility analysis and Environment monitoring would be funded by MTDC. A cost sharing arrangement between MTDC and private players could be possible in some categories like TICs, Publicity and HRD. There is a fourth category of projects such as Mahagram (Concept Village) suggested in Mumbai and IT museum suggested in Pune, wherein the initial investment would be made by the government. However, the user fees can recover the investment over a period of time or at least pay for the operational expenses. Private investors desirous of investing in direct revenue generating projects like accommodation or Water Park have access to finance from various domestic funding agencies.

6.7.2

Domestic funding agencies

There are many avenues for domestic private entrepreneurs to take financial assistance for tourism projects. A few of those are listed below

(i)

Commercial banks : Any commercially viable project with minimum projected DSCR of 2. : Varies from bank to bank : Depends upon the bank (range 16-18 %)

PROJECT ELIGIBILITY INTEREST RATE (ii) TFCI

Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI) provides financial assistance to enterprises for setting up and/or development of tourism related projects, facilities and services which include hotels, restaurants, holiday resorts, amusement parks and complexes for entertainment, education and sports, safari parks, ropeways, cultural centres, convention halls, transport, travel and tour operating agencies, air service, tourist emporia, sports facilities etc. 6-9 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

TFCI provides loans for projects with capital cost of over Rs 3 Crore. ELIGIBILITY: • Plans with necessary sanctions from various departments • Tie-up for technical and operational arrangements completed.

COMMERCIAL VIABILITY: • Interest rate: 18% • • • (iii) Debt – Equity Ratio: 1.5: 1 can be relaxed to 2: 1 Moratorium Period: 1.5 to 2 years in hotel projects and 3-5 years in transportation Repayment Period: 8 years

MSFC

Maharashtra State Financial Corporation (MSFC) has been operating schemes of assistance for hotels, restaurants and tourism related projects in Maharashtra. The maximum amount of assistance available is to the tune of Rs 2.40 Crore depending upon the constitution of the unit. Operating profit-making units can also avail the lease finance assistance provided by MSFC for expansion projects. ELIGIBILITY: • Plans with necessary sanctions from various departments

COMMERCIAL VIABILITY: • • • • • • (iv) Collateral security of 133% of the value of loan Interest rate: 20 %

Debt – Equity Ratio: 2:1 for loans below Rs 10 Lakh 3:1 for loans above Rs 10 Lakh Moratorium Period: Repayment Period: 2 years 8-10 years

International funding agencies

Many international funding agencies fund tourism projects and projects related to provision of infrastructure at tourist destinations. Generally, international funding is available for project promotion, socio-economic development, environment and forest conservation, and heritage restoration. • World Bank Group: The group is not directly involved in funding tourism projects, but provides major funding for infrastructure, environmental and conservation projects that benefit tourism as well as serve general needs.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism



UNDP (United Nations Development Program): The UNDP is mainly a technical assistance agency. It is an important source agency for the funding of tourism planning and other tourism related projects through WTO (World tourism organization). Many of these projects include provision of equipments as well as technical assistance. The UNCDF provides small scale tourism assistance in form of grants and long term loans for social facilities, services and economic activities. Asian Development Bank (ADB): ADB also gives preference given to infrastructure projects.



6.7.3

Funding sources for Promotion activities

MTDC would be primarily responsible for destination marketing and publicity of destinations so as to attract both investors as well as tourists. Selecting and implementation of a promotion campaign with a proper media mix is highly capital intensive and this campaign has to be funded internally by MTDC. Activities suggested to raise funds towards publicity of various destinations are: (i) Budgetary Allocation

The budgetary allocation for publicity in the tenth five-year plan (2002-2007) is Rs 4178.14 Lakh. In the 2002-2003 annual plan, Rs 469.85 lakhs has been allocated for publicity. The anticipated expenses in publicity for the year 2001-2002 were only Rs 200 Lakh. Thus, the budgetary allocation for the tenth five-year plan would be a major source of funds for promotion of Maharashtra as a tourist destination. (ii) Advertising in brochures, information kiosks and other publicity material

MTDC can involve private participation through advertisements of private entrepreneurs to market various destinations. MTDC can also invite advertisements at various sites, view points, and signage’s developed by them. (iii) Organizing Events

MTDC could organize events such as entertainment shows, cultural events and festivals at various gateway destinations. These shows have high revenue generating potential through • • • (iv) Sponsors to the show (Corporate houses in hospitality industry, industry associations) Ticket sale Transmission rights

Pricing Publications and Detailed Project reports

The project wise detailed project reports (DPR) prepared by the MR cell of MTDC could be priced and made available to interested entrepreneurs.

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Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

MTDC can publish and sell postcards carrying pictures of selected priority destinations, especially targeted towards foreign tourists. This would also act as a promotion material in addition to being a revenue-earning commodity.

6.7.4

Funding for Market research, technical assistance and Tourism Administration Disinvestments of State tourism projects

(i)

There is no clear policy on disinvestments of tourism properties held by MTDC. MTDC in Maharashtra owns around 48 facilities for accommodation accompanied with other tourism projects like water sports at few places. Though MTDC has not sold these properties as yet, they have privatized 27 resorts and leased them out to private players. MTDC should identify resort and other accommodation facilities to be sold or leased out to private players to fund the development expenses in other areas. Leasing seems to be more feasible as complete disinvestments would require complex disinvestment procedures and time. (ii) Project development and administration expenses

These can be funded through the central government assistance wherever such assistance can be availed depending upon the nature of the project. Various central government assisted schemes in which assistance was received by Maharashtra in the ninth plan1997-2002 and the proposed assistance in 2002 – 2003 are as follows Table 6.4: Proposed Assistance in 2002-03 Ninth Plan 1997-2002 Central Assistance Received Actual Expenditure 820.25 NA 43.4 NA 24.45 0 820.25 NA NA 549.06 Rs Lakh 2002 – 2003 Proposed Central Assistance 730.15 200 25 955.15

Category Tourist resort Water Sports, Tents, Caravans, Catamarans Publicity / Festivals Sound and Light Show Total

The total tenth plan (2002-2007) outlay for tourism will be Rs. 6492 Lakh.

(iii)

Creation of a Project Administration Reserve

Apart from revenue generation projects that would be undertaken purely by government departments and in partnership with private players, a common reserve should be created to fund the administration activities related to implementation of the perspective plan. Developmental charges can be levied on private investors interested in setting up tourism projects in the region. This reserve will act as a funding source for HRD and incentive schemes. 6-12 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.8 6.8.1

Human resource development Guide training Program

MTDC already conducts guide-training programs at important destinations. More emphasis should be laid on training of guides especially at foreign tourist destinations. Such programs would be more important in destinations where no development has taken place so far, but which can become an important destinations in the short term. A guide-training program is also essential wherever non-conventional tourism projects such as eco-trail, trekking, community participation, and village tourism are suggested. Being comparatively new themes to Maharashtra tourism, the guides should be capable of creating interest and curiosity for such themes in the minds of tourists. In case of the implementing agency of the project being other government department such as ASI, Forest etc, the staff of respective department interacting with tourists should be oriented towards tourism industry functionalities. A summary of such non-conventional tourism projects where prior training of staff is necessary is given below Table 6.5: Proposed “Project staff training programs” Project Ajantha Reserve Forest Trek Interpretation centre for bird sanctuary Meditation Centre Guide training programme Cultural Workshop Eco Trail Heritage Night walk Bollywood Excursion Tour Village Tourism at Bhimashankar and surrounding village Suburbs Audio visual Show Medico Tourism - Health resort Marine Sanctuary Folk village Mango Tourism Know Gandhi Program Elephant Safari Melghat Orientation Centre 6.8.2 Destination Ajantha Jaikwadi Paithan Lonar Nashik Bhandardara Mumbai Mumbai Bhimashankar Pratapgad, Panhala Amboli Malvan Devgad, Ratnagiri Sewagram Tadoba, Nawegaon Amravati Implementing Agency Forest Forest Private MTDC Private Forest MTDC Private NGO MTDC Private + MTDC Forest Govt + Private MTDC organized Private sponsored Private Forest Forest

Tour Operator and Travel Agents orientation Programme

Tour operators and travel agents should be kept abreast with the development of all major tourist destinations in Maharashtra so as to enable them plan their tours taking into account the latest infrastructure availability scenario. The destination priorities of the state governments for development and the destinations incorporated by tour operators in their tour should coincide to achieve goal 6-13 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

congruence. This can be done by regular meets of tour operators and travel agents. Such meets can be conducted by MTDC on a periodic basis (twice a year).At these meets, MTDC could update the tour operators and travel agents about the current status of tourism infrastructure availability at various destinations. 6.8.3 Educational institutes offering courses in Tourism and related Industry

Formal education in hospitality and tourism industry is given in Maharashtra through various colleges located in the cities of Mumbai, Pune, Aurangabad and Nagpur. Such formal educational institutes should be encouraged at major cities near the popular tourist destinations and state government priority destinations such as Aurangabad, Sindhudurg and Ratnagiri. This would create employment opportunities for local students in upcoming tourism projects in that region. 6.8.4 Special training programs on needs of foreign tourists

MTDC should conduct training programs for practicing tour operators, taxi operators, hotel managers, travel agents, guides and other professionals related to tourism industry orienting them towards the needs of foreign visitors. Such training programs should be conducted at existing and proposed international tourist destinations in Maharashtra. The training program should include the following • • • • • 6.9 6.9.1 Expectations of foreign tourists in terms of quality of service, timeliness, payment modes, general areas of interest like heritage, culture, rural life, beaches etc Eating habits of various nationals Working knowledge of English (at less known destinations) Professionalism in service. Providing information about other places of interest in the vicinity Implementation agencies Integrated tourism development

Maharashtra offers everything, if not more, that is offered by any other tourist destination in India. Maharashtra boasts of its 3 World heritage sites, dense forest cover, 720 Kms of virgin coast line, more than 350 forts, hill stations, and an array of folk arts. Due to the variety of tourist themes, most tourist circuits in Maharashtra are a mixture of more than one theme. This diversity though sometimes acts as a constraint to development of tourism. Individual tourist destinations come under different government agencies responsible for development of that destination. Most of the forts are under ASI, forests under forest department etc. This results in conflict of objectives between various government departments at the cost of development. It is recommended that all state departments related to potential tourist destinations work in coordination under a common goal of tourism development. This common goal should be that of 6-14 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

integrated tourism development in the state implemented through coordinated effort between various state department and the private entrepreneurs. 6.9.2 Utility of perspective plan

It is essential to communicate the perspective tourism development plan to all stakeholders to achieve an integrated approach towards development of tourism in Maharashtra. This perspective plan would act as a reference point plan for tourism development in the state and help various state departments, investors and tourists to synchronize their plans with the master plan. For example: if the perspective plan suggests a sound and light show at a particular fort in the 4th year, it would be the ASI priority to restore and prepare the fort for such an activity by that time. The perspective plan would act as a road map for phased public and private investment in tourism related projects in the next 20 years. Various stakeholders to whom this perspective plan would help in planning their investments in tourism related activities and decisions are given in Table 6.6. Table 6.6: Utility of Perspective Plan
Stake Holder MTDC Related information in the perspective plan Destination priorities, Tourist projections, Volume of private participation, MTDC funded tourism projects, project profiles to attract private entrepreneurs, schedule for acquisition of land. Destination priorities Tourist projections, destination priorities Destination prioritization, basic infrastructure gaps Proposed Eco-tourism Projects, tourist projections Proposed Heritage projects Decisions based on information Detailed planning, feasibility study, promotion, attracting investors, resource allocation, acquisition and transfer of land

MSRDC MSRTC PWD Forest

Road development schedule at tourist destinations. Adding new routes to tourist destinations. Resource allocation to development of roads, public amenities, signage etc Track identification, carrying capacity decisions, manpower planning, development of forest guesthouses, camping facilities etc. Resource allocation and prioritization of restoration sites. Issuing clearances for specific projects like sound and light show etc. Water supply, sewerage and solid waste management, clearances, NOCs, land acquisitions etc Funding decisions

ASI

Municipal Corporations Funding Agencies Tour Operators Investors/ Entrepreneurs Finance department

Proposed projects, projected tourist arrivals Selected Project profiles, feasibility of project, rate of return, socio-economic impact Destination Prioritization, Tourist forecasts Project profiles, ROI, Incentive schemes, Destination priorities, project priorities Recommended incentive schemes and financial assistance schemes for selected projects

New tourist circuits, capacity expansion Investment decisions, available investment opportunities, etc Budgetary allocation for tourist infrastructure projects

To achieve sustainable development of tourism in Maharashtra, it is necessary to evolve synergies out of the various state departments acting together in a phased manner. 6-15 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The private sector will be responsible for commercial development and operation of accommodation and most other tourist facilities and services, along with marketing of these. In newly developed tourism areas, government may be initially involved in commercial development to get the tourism started. Tourism private sector enterprises (such as hotel, restaurant, tour and travel, special purpose association or a tourism enterprises association) can provide a forum for discussing common problems, make recommendations to government to improve tourism, provide representation to government committees, conduct research and training and maintain adequate service standards of their members.

6.9.3

Tourism related legislation

Tourism legislation sets forth the policy for developing tourism, functions , structure and sources of funding of state govt. tourism dept. Various specific regulations relate to standards, licensing requirements, inspection procedures for hotels, tourist restaurants, tour and travel agencies, tour guides and other tourism enterprises. Certain related laws and regulations include zoning regulations to designate tourism zones, control land use and apply development standards in specific tourism development areas. Public health, sanitation, safety and fire code, building codes, liabilities laws relating to guests and their belongings, labour and taxation legislation etc. are all important. Regulation on transportation facilities and services – control of fares, licensing of carriers, travel routes also affect tourism operations. Legislation on parks and conservation is important to protect these resources. Conservation areas need to be legally designated and planned. Tourist consumer protection is being adopted in many countries to protect tourists from unscrupulous and mismanaged tourist enterprises. The western ghats has been classified as a ‘biodiversity hot spot’. It is necessary to preserve its biodiversity. Legislation such as prohibiting the cutting of trees, or limiting visitor inflows need to be considered.

6-16 of 16

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Annex - 1

Annexure 1: LIST OF CONTACTS Category / Contact Name Designation Contact Details

Tour Operators:
Regional Sachin Tours & Travels Sachin Jakatdar Owner 5, Shivaji Park House, Near Sena Bhavan, Opp. Aswad Hotel, Dadar, Mumbai - 400016. Tel.: (022)-4323235 Fax: 4222047. E-mail: sachin@sachintravels.com, www.sachintravels.com 80-A, Handa Complex, Medical Square, Nagpur. Tel.: (0)-752175, 748254, 749936 Fax: 752175 Kolhapur Avtar Meher Baba Soc., Near Bole Petrol Pump, Dharampeth, Nagpur - 400 010. Tel.: (0712)550005/87. E-mail: pttpl@nagpur.dot.net.in L.J Road, Mahim, Mumbai - 400016 Tel. (022)4332222 Fax.: 4322020. E-mail: sudhir@kesaritours.com, www.kesaritours.com Chander Mukhi, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400021. Tel.: (022)-2021881, 2027120. Fax: 2029424. E-mail: ipatel@tci.co.in www.tcindia.com Chowpatty View Bldg., S.V.P Road, Opp. Sukh Sagar, Opera House, Mumbai - 400007. Tel.: (022)-3672424/3000/6266, 3639777 Fax: 3645001, 3694272. www.raj-travels.com Email:ravi@raj-travels.com, nilesh1@rajtravels.com Express Towers, 9th Floor, Nariman Point, Mumbai - 400021. Tel.: (022)-2024482 / 4522 / 4584 Fax: 2024521www.mtdcindia.com Sanskrutik Bachat Bhavan, Normal School Quarter Area, Sitabuldi, Nagpur - 440012. Tel.: (0712)-533325 Fax: 560680 C/o PWD Rest House, Maltekdi Road, Amravati - 444601. Tel/Fax: (0721)-674008 C Block, 1st Floor, New Admin. Bldg., Sindhudurgnagari, Dist. Sindhudurg. Tel.: (02362)-28785. C/o Zilla Parishad Office, Near Jaistambha, Ratnagiri - 415612. Tel.: (02352)-23847. At & Post-Mahabaleshwar, Dist. Satara 412806. Tel.: (02168)-60318. Fax: 60300. Panhala, Dist. Kolhapur. Tel.: (02328)-35048.

Handa Tourism Gagan Tours P Ltd. Prasanna Tours Pvt. Ltd Interstate Kesari Tours

Mahendra Sahane C.C.Handa Santosh Khupekar Anand Kale

Director Chaiman Branch Manager

Sudhir Patil

Director

TCI

Irshad Patel

Manager

International Shree Raj Travels & Tours Ltd.

Ravindra Toraskar Nilesh Goriwale

Manager Visa Domestic Tour Incharge

Tourism Corporation
MTDC Momeen Manager Planning

MTDC Nagpur

M.H.Zanzad

Regonal Manager

MTDC Amravati MTDC Oras

P.B.Bhoyar Kiran Sulakhe

Regonal Manager Project Manager

MTDC Ratnagiri MTDC Mahabaleshwar MTDC Panhala

Kulkarni J.Y.Phadtare V.S.Magadum

Regional Manager Resort Manager Resort Manager

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Annex - 1

Category / Contact MTDC Pune MTDC Bhandardara

Name T.K.Sunil Krishnan B.H.Galande

Designation Sr.Regional Manager Resort Manager

MTDC Aurangabad

R.S.Deshpande

Resort Manager

MTDC Aurangabad

Capt. Surendra Surve

Sr. Project Manager

MTDC Nashik

Rathod

Regional Manager Conservator Forests

Contact Details I' Block, Central Bldg., Pune - 411001.Tel. (022)-6126867/8169. Fax: 6119434. At & Post Bhandardara (Shendi), Tal. Akole. Dist. Ahmednagar. Tel.: (02424)-57032, 57171. Fax: 57170. Holiday Resort, Station Road, Aurangabad - 431 005. Tel.: (0240)-331513, 724175, 724176 Fax: 331198 E-mail: mtdchr@bom4.vsnl.net.in Regional Manager, Holiday Resort, Station Road, Aurangabad - 431 005. Tel.: (0240)331513, 724175, 724176 Fax: 331198 E-mail: mtdchr@bom4.vsnl.net.in T-1, Golf Club, Old Agra Road, Nashik 422022. Tel.: (0253)-70059. Near Govt. Printing Press, Civil Lines, Nagpur440001.Tel.: (0721)-528953, 552518. Fax: 552518. www.wildlife-vidarbha.org E-mail: cf@wildlife-vidarbha.org Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, Dist. Chandrapur. Naweogaon Bandh, Gondia. Tel.(07182)-28284. Sakoli Pench National Park Circuit House Road, Amravati Camp - 444602. Tel.: (0721)-662792 Fax: 662792 E-mail:atimeltiger@sancharnet.in Wan Bhavan, Opp. SSC Board, Osmanpura, Aurangabad. Tel.: (0240)-331027. Vanbhavan, Salai Wada, Sawantwadi - 416510. Tel.: (02363)-72005 E-mail: dcfswadi@goatelecom.com Bindu Chowk, Ganji Galli, Kolhapur-416002. Tel.: (0231)-651959. LBS Marg, Naupada, Thane (w)-400602. Tel. (022)-5402522. Zilla Parishad Office, Near Jaistambha, Ratnagiri - 415612. Sawantvadi Nagar Parishad, Sawantvadi. Tel.(0)72044 Panhala Nagar Palika. Tel.: (02328)-35027. Nagar Parishad Office, Mahabaleshwar

Forest
Tadoba, Nawegaon, Nagzira, Bhamragad, Chaprala, Bor, Tipeshwar, Pench Tadoba Nawegaon National Park Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary Pench National Park Melghat, Gugamal, Wan, Narnala Jaikawadi Shree Bhagwan

Deshmukh A.J.Shamborkar

RFO RFO Office Staff Forest Officer Conservator Forests & Field Director DCF ACF DCF

Ramanuj Choudhary Sameer Sahay Moyepokkim Vikas Gupta

Sawantwadi, Malvan Marine Park, Amboli Dajipur, Radhanagari, Koyna, Chandavli, Sagareshwar Karnala, Phansad,Tansa

Samant

Conservator Forest DCF

Chandekar

Planning
Zilla Parishad Municipal Council Nagar Palika Nagar Parishad Soman T.P.Palav Kiranraj Yadav Shinde Head Clerk Municipal Enginer Chief Officer Head Clerk

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Annex - 1

Category / Contact

Name Shreepad M. Korde

Designation Secretary General

Contact Details Candy House, 1st Floor, Mandlik Road, Colaba, Mumbai - 400 001. Tel.: (022)-2024076, 2831624, 2819773 Fax: 2023515. E-Mail: hrawi@vsnl.com www.hrawi.com B-103, Nirmal Tower, Near Gaurav Galaxy-I, Mira Road(E), Thane - 401107. Tel.: (022)6907426/27 Fax: 8131453 E-mail: info@iaapi.org, iaapindia@vsnl.net www.iaapi.org 2-D, Lawrence And Mayo House, 276 Dr.D.N. Road, Mumbai - 400001. Tel.: (022)-2074022, 2078184. Fax: 2074559 E-mail: travels@bom2.vsnl.net.in New Transport Complex, CSI Airport, Vile Parle (E), Mumbai - 400099. Tel.: (022)-6156681. Fax: 6156010 Govt. of Maharashtra, Mezzanine floor, (MHADA), Kalanagar, Bandra (E), Mumbai 400051. Napean Sea Road, Priyadarshini Park, Mumbai 400036. Tel.: (022)-3686112, 3693671/73/5614/6109 Ext 158 Fax: 3638433 Email: msrdc@bom3.vsnl.net.in Maharashtra Vahatuk Bhavan, Mumbai 400008. Tel: 3085965. New Excelsior Bldg., 5, 7, 7 & 9th Floor, Amrit Keshav Nayak Marg, Fort, Mumbai -400001. Tel.: (022)-2077711,12, 2077786,87 Fax: 2070113. E-mail: msfcho@bom7.vsnl.net.in Sawantvadi Nagar Parishad, Sawantvadi 416510.. Tel.(0)-72044, 72588, 72036. Zilla Parishad Office, Near Jaistambha, Ratnagiri - 415612. Veer Savarkar Marg, Dadar (w), Mumbai400028.Tel. (022)-4457241/2, 4469143 Fax: 4449779 E-Mail: mumcat@bom3.vsnl.net.in Suryakiran, 1st Floor, Opp. VRCE, Balaji Nagar, Nagpur - 44010. Tel.: (0712)-228411. Fax: 228401 E-mail: rajkamalaqua@satyam.net.in 247 E, Yashwant Villa, Tarabai Park, Kolhapur 416003. Tel.: (0231)-650483, 668807 E-mail: abhaskar@bom6.vsnl.net.in

Associations
Hotel & Restaurant (Western India)

Indian Association of Amusement Parks and Industries

Alkarani Agarwal

Senior Manager

The Travel Agents Association of India

Gladwyn A. Pinto

Executive Secretary

Airlines
Indian Airlines V. Chandrasekar Manager (Public Relations) Dy. Director

Directorate of Economics & Statistics MSRDC

R.R.Shinge

J.T.Nashikkar

Chief Engineer

MSRTC SFC
Maharashtra State finance corporation

G.G.Bharti

Chief Statistician

S.A. Motani

Dy. Manager (Tech)

Eminent Experts / Important Personalities in Hospitality
Nagar Parishad Zilla Parishad Institute of Hotel Management, Catering Technology & Applied Nutrition Rajkamal Resorts Deepak Kesarkar G.T.Bandri Ismay Gomes Sanjeev Kacker Nagaradhyaksha District Collector HOD F & B Service Sr. Instructor F &B Service Director Manager Director

Navin Chouksey Navin Chouksey Bhaskar Jadhav

Bhaskar Jadhav & Associates

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Annex - 1

Category / Contact Magan Sangrahalay, Sewagram Pavnar Ramtek Temple Shirdi Temple

Name Vibha Gupta Devi Ben Pande Shahane

Designation Chaiperson Ashram Committee Head Priest Public Relations Officer

Contact Details Kumarappa Road, Wardha - 442001. Tel.: (07152)-45082, 40956. Paunar, Wardha - 442111. Tel. (07152)-43518. Ramtek Temple, Ramtek. Shirdi Sansthan, Shirdi

Hotel Owners / Personalities
Hotel Shripad Continental Hotel Sushilka Front Desk Staff Opp. ITI College, Nagpur Road Camp, Amravati - 444602. Tel.: (0721)-660901/2-5. Fax: 660903 E-mail: hotsoft16@vsnl.com Patel Plaza, 40-Patel Nagar, Near Bus Stand, Civil Lines, Chandrapur - 442401. Tel. (07172)57991/2-4 Fax: 53213. Adarsh Market, Gandhi Chowk, Bhandara 441904. Tel.: (07184)-55333 Dr. Munje Marg, Sitabuldi, Nagpur - 440012. Tel.: (0712)-529116-18, 541019-22, 536518, 526137, 537340 Fax: 534885 E-mail: hardeo@nagpur.dot.net.in 119, Central Avenue, Nagpur-440018. Tel. (0712)-724654-8, 814922-33-44 Fax: 726193 113, Central Avenue, Dosar Square, nagpur 440018. Tel.: (0712)-727461 -9. www.hotelbluediamondnagpur.com 60, Central Avenue, Nagpur - 440018. Tel. (0712)-726845-51, 816845,6 Fax: 726878 Email: h_darshantowers@yahoo.com 25, Central Avenue, Nagpur - 440018. Tel. (0712)- 724725-6, 816644/444 Fax: 722337 Opp. S.T Stand, Paratwada - 444 805, Dist. Amravati. Tel. (0)-20716, 21633. Khindsi Road, Ramtek. Tel. (0)-55966, 55556. At. Post Murud, Tal. Dapoli,Dist. Ratnagiri. Tel. (02358)-34582 / 34709. Ramtek, Dist. Nagpur. Tel. (07114)-55620 / 55625. 962, Juna Malnaka, Shivaji Nagar, Ratnagiri 415612. Tel. (02352)-23413, 21034, 21965 Fax:25086. E-mail: saikripa@vsnl.net Suvarna Ganesh Pakhadi, At & Post Diveagar, Tal. Srivardhan, Dist. Raigad - 402404. 102/A, Rajdarshan, Opp. Rly. Platform No.1, Thane(w)-400602. Telefax: 5381675/78, 5971536/37. Mob: 9820153828. E-mail: yashgaonkar@rediffmail.com, www.vanlaxmigroup.com

Front Desk Staff

Hotel Adarsh Hotel Hardeo

Mr. Dalal Mr. Acharya

Owner G.M

Hotel Skylark Hotel Blue Diamond

Front Desk Staff Front Desk Staff

Hotel Darshan Towers

Front Desk Staff

Hotel Pal Palace Hotel Saket Hotel Shikara Kamat Murud Beach Resort Rajkamal Resorts Hotel Saikripa

Jeetendra K. Bharti Front Desk Staff Front Desk Staff Gautam Banarjee Front Desk Staff Front Desk Staff

Manager

G.M

Shree Suvarna Ganesh Khanaval Vanalaxmi Group

Anant Parkar Ganesh Ghodigaule

Owner Manager

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR DOMESTIC TOURIST

1. 2.

Name of the Respondent Demographic profile a) Sex Male 3-14 years b) Age 25-34 years 45-54 years Above 64 year c) Occupation Professional Entrepreneur Business / Conference Adventure Others please specify

State of Origin

Female 15-24 years 35-44 years 55-64 years

Executives Others (Students etc.) Culture/Heritage/ Monuments Leisure

3.

Purpose of visit to destination

4.

Travel pattern

Alone In a Group

With Family Group Size No

5.

Are you travelling on a package tour?

Yes

If yes, exclusively to the destination or to other destination also (please specify other destinations)

6.

Mode of transport to destination Average length of stay at the destination Frequency of visit

Air Road Less than 1 Week > 2 Weeks First visit Indicate no. of previous visits

Sea Train 1-2 Weeks

7.

8.

Repeat visit

9.

Source of information about destination

Television Advt(travel journal) Friends/Relatives Govt. tourism office

Advt.(newspaper) Travel guide Travel agent/Tour operator Others Rs.501 – Rs.1000 Rs.2001 – Rs.3000 > Rs.4000

10.

Average spending per day per person

< Rs.500 Rs.1001 – Rs.2000 Rs.3001 –Rs. 4000

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

11.

% contribution of major items (%) in daily expenses Type of accommodation

Accommodation Transportation Shopping

Food Entertainment

12.

Four &Five star category 1, 2, 3 star category Others (Please specify)

Heritage category Govt. Approved & Budget

13.

Rating of destination/tourist facilities (Scale of 1to 5 with 1 being the poor and 5 being excellent)

Accommodation Sight seeing Shopping facilities Airports Railways Safety of tourist Communication facilities Facilities for elderly/disabled

Tourist attractions Guide services Domestic airlines Road transport Cleanliness/Sanitation Emergency health facilities Banking facilities Any other (Please specify)

14.

Attractions/Major items of interests during your visit Problems faced during the stay Would you visit the state again Overall Experience Suggestions for improvement of the tourist destination Name of interviewer (CAPITALS) Yes Satisfactory No Un-satisfactory

15. 16. 17. 18.

Date:

Name and Signature of the investigator

Date:

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FOREIGN TOURIST

1. 2. 3.

Name of the Respondent Port of Entry Demographic profile a) Sex Male 3-14 years b) Age 25-34 years 45-54 years Above 64 year c) Occupation Professional Entrepreneur Business / Conference Adventure Others please specify

Nationality

Female 15-24 years 35-44 years 55-64 years

Executives Others (Students etc.) Culture/Heritage/ Monuments Leisure

4.

Purpose of visit to destination

5.

Travel pattern

Alone In a Group

With Family Group Size No

6.

Are you travelling on a package tour?

Yes

If yes, exclusively to the destination or to other destination also (please specify other destinations)

7.

Mode of transport to destination Average length of stay at the destination Frequency of visit

Air Road Less than 1 Week > 2 Weeks First visit Indicate no. of previous visits

Sea Train 1-2 Weeks

8.

9.

Repeat visit

10.

Source of information about destination

Television Advt(travel journal) Friends/Relatives Govt. tourism office

Advt.(newspaper) Travel guide Travel agent/Tour operator Others

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

11.

Average spending per day per person

< U.S. $ 50 U.S. $ 101 – U.S. $ 150 > U.S. $ 200

U.S. $ 51 – U.S. $ 100 U.S. $ 151 – U.S. $ 200

12.

% contribution of major items (%) in daily expenses Type of accommodation

Accommodation Transportation Shopping

Food Entertainment

13.

Four &Five star category 1, 2, 3 star category Others (Please specify)

Heritage category Govt. Approved & Budget

14.

Rating of destination/tourist facilities (Scale of 1to 5 with 1 being the poor and 5 being excellent)

Accommodation Sight seeing Shopping facilities Airports Railways Safety of tourist Communication facilities Facilities for elderly/disabled

Tourist attractions Guide services Domestic airlines Road transport Cleanliness/Sanitation Emergency health facilities Banking facilities Any other (Please specify)

15.

Attractions/Major items of interests during your visit Problems faced during the stay Would you visit the state again Overall Experience Suggestions for improvement of the tourist destination Name of interviewer (CAPITALS) Yes Satisfactory No Un-satisfactory

16. 17. 18. 19.

Date:

Name and Signature of the investigator

Date:

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR TOUR OPERATORS 1. Name and address of Respondent (attach business card, if available) Are you approved by the Dept. of Tourism, State Government Range of services offered

2.

Yes

No

3.

4.

Origin of the tourist traffic (specify city/ town/ State/ country)

Hotel Booking Air/Railway ticket booking Tour guides Package tour Entertainment Transport facility Any other (Please specify) _________________________ _______________________________________________ (Collect details of package tours and group discounts offered by the operator) Domestic tourist: Foreign tourist: Peak Season: Off Season: Spl. Occasion:

5. 6.

Tourist season (specify months)

Composition of tourist traffic in Percentage handled – 2000 - 2001 Foreign

Domestic 7. 8.

Total number of tourists handled in a year (approx.) Preferred Tourist Circuits (Please list them in the order of popularity)

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

9. Sl. No.

Preferred Tourist Destinations. (Please list them in the order of popularity) Tourist destination Tourist attraction

(Please collect brochures) 10. Potential Tourist Destinations (List them in order based on potential) Sl. Tourist destination Tourist attraction Prospects Constraints No.

(collect details about location, accessibility, etc) 11. Composition of tourist traffic to the state ( 2000 – 01) Sl. No. A B C D E F Type of tourist Business / Conference Adventure Leisure Pilgrimage Culture / Heritage Others (please specify) (% of the total traffic)

Total

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

12. Demographic profile of tourist visiting the state a) Gender (Estimated % of total) Description Domestic Sl. No. Male I. Female II. Total b) Age group (Estimated % of total) Description Domestic Sl. No. 3 – 14 years I. 15 to 24 years II. 25 to 34 years III. 35 to 44 years IV. 45 to 54 years V. 55 to 64 years VI. Above 64 years VII. Total

Foreign

Foreign

13. Average length of stay and spending per person % of average expenditure on Avg. Avg. Sl. Type stay Exp./Person Accom. Food Transp Enter. No. (days) (Rs./U.S. $) Domestic I Tourists Foreign II Tourists

Shopp

14. Evaluation of tourist facilities (on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being poor and 5 being excellent) Sr. Tourist Facility Destinations / Tourist Spot No. A Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment Shopping Tourist Attractions Tour Operators / Guides Communication (STD / ISD) Civic Amenities Safety and Security Health Facilities Banking / Forex Facilities Facility for elderly / disabled / families with young children Any other (please specify) B C D E F

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited

15. Linkages with Department of Tourism/Expectations from Government.

16. Problems faced by tourists

17. Any linkages with communities residing/controlling any destinations

18. Important fairs and festivals which attracts tourist/Season

19. Availability of trained manpower

20. Availability of facilities like camping equipments

21. Suggestions for development of tourism (including tourism projects) in the state at various locations.

Date

Name of the interviewer

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Ministry of Tourism & Culture C-1, Hutments, Dalhousie Road New Delhi 110001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra
June 2002

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited Sarojini House 6 Bhagwan Dass Road New Delhi 110 001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Issue and Revision Record
Rev Date Originator Checker Approver Description

This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any other project without an independent check being carried out as to its suitability and prior written authority of Mott MacDonald being obtained. Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited accepts no responsibility or liability for the consequence of this document being used for a purpose other than the purposes for which it was commissioned. Any person using or relying on the document for such other purpose agrees, and will by such use or reliance be taken to confirm his agreement to indemnify Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited for all loss or damage resulting therefrom. Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited accepts no responsibility or liability for this document to any party other than the person by whom it was commissioned.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1

NAGPUR – RAMTEK - PENCH

Totladoh

Khindsi

1.1

Introduction

NAGPUR with its distinction of being the geographical centre of India & second capital of Maharashtra has a rare blending of antiquity and modernity. This 2nd greenest city of India, also popularly known as ''Orange City" of India, is spread over an area of 220 Sq. Kms. The city was made the capital of the Central Provinces in 1861 and in the year 1960 it got designated as the second capital of Maharashtra. The charm of Nagpur is also elusive, because Nagpur is a state of mind. Unlike so many other cities, which can be categorised, classified and defined, Nagpur is too ordinary for words. Yet, it has extraordinary hold on those born here or those who adopt the place. There is a feeling of continuity, an unchanging quality amidst change, which is reassuring. The best thing about Nagpur is that it is not a nervous hive. While the whole world seems to be leaping pell-mell towards economical, technological, space age and what have you, Nagpur seems to go on its own merry pace of existence. Location (Nagpur) : Eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) Latitude 21.11 ° N Longitude 79.11 ° E Altitude 312.42 m

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Area Population 1.2

: :

9931 Sq. km 40,51,444 (2001 Census)

Accessibility

1.2.1

Road

Nagpur is well connected with all major cities of Maharashtra and other states. Nagpur is located at the crossroads of Mumbai - Kolkata NH-6 & Allahabad – Tiruvananthpuram NH-7.
Nagpur Nagpur Nagpur Distances (Kms) Mumbai Pune Wardha 913 730 76

1.2.2

Railway

Nagpur is well connected to Mumbai, Nagpur, Kolkata by rail. There are a good many number of trains plying on these routes. It is located at main rail junction of Mumbai-Kolkata broad-gauge railway line and Jammutawi – Tiruvananthpuram rail route.

1.2.3

Air

The domestic airport of Nagpur is located at Sonegaon. Nagpur is well linked to all the major cities of India. More than 350 domestic and international flights carrying passengers and cargo flying towards destinations in SE Asia, Middle East Countries, Japan, Australia, Netherlands, Germany use the airspace over Nagpur city daily. 1.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 23º C max temp 43º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 12º C max temp 29º C)4 1.4 Tourist Inflow : : approx 5,00,000 per year approx 18,000 per year

Domestic International

Average duration of stay in Nagpur is 2-3 days.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.5

Origin of tourists

International tourists are from Australia, Canada & Europe. More than 60 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from M.P and Gujarat.

1.5.1

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 50 % 20 % 20 % 10 %

1.5.2

Nature of Tourist Business/ Study tourists 40% Leisure Tourists 60%

1.5.3

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) Corporate meetings/ seminars are also held. 1.5.4 Peak Lean 1.5.5 Seasonal Flow November to January, April - May. Feb- Mar, June – October. Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 5% 15 % 25 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 5% %age 15 % 25 % 10 %

1.5.6

Spending Pattern : : : Rs. 2000 – 3000 per day (approx) Rs. 800 -1000 per day Repeat tourists are only certain pilgrims who make it to Ramtek, Deekshabhoomi in Nagpur.

International tourists Domestic tourists Repeat Tourists

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.6

Major Attractions

The following are the places of interest in and around Nagpur:
Attraction Ramtek Temple, Kalidas Memorial Khindsi Adasa Khekrenala Raman Science Centre Zero Mile Stone Tekdi Ganapati Sitabuldi Fort Pench Dam / National Park Location (From Nagpur) 57 Kms Off NH 7 7 Km from Ramtek 45 Km on Saoner Rd 55 Km off Nagpur-Saoner Rd. Nagpur City Nagpur City Nagpur City Nagpur City 67 Km on Jabalpur Rd. Theme Heritage/Pilgrimage Leisure Pilgrimage Leisure Entertainment Historic Pilgrimage Heritage Leisure / Eco Tour Tourist type

Family

Family Special Interest Family Special Interest

1.7

Infrastructure details

1.7.1

Accommodation
Type 5 Star hotels – 02 3 Star hotels – 04 2 Star hotels – 01 High budget – 09 Budget category –100 Capacity (Rooms) 354 334 80 932 2000

1.7.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Nagpur City Ramtek Khindsi Pench

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.8

Other entertainment facility

Good at Nagpur City, Khindsi. Nil at Ramtek. Pench: Pench National Park is situated in the dense tropical forests of central India in Maharashtra on the border of Madhya Pradesh. It has been declared as 25th Tiger reserve of India in the silver jubilee year of the Project Tiger. It was declared Pench National Park by Government of Maharashtra in 1975. The fauna found over here includes the Tiger, Leopard, Wild Dogs, Sambar, Cheetal, Chausingha, Barking Deer etc. Besides this Pench Dam site at Totladoh is a popular picnic site. 1.9 Special Events / Festivals

1.9.1

Kalidas Festival

Kalidas the renowned Sanskrit poet & scholar spent his time at Nagpur and was inspired to write his poem of love and longing ‘Meghdootam’ at Ramtek. In order to mark this historical event, the Maharashtra Government began to organize Kalidas samaroh at Ramtek w.e.f 1987. Gradually the venue for this samaroh was shifted from Ramtek to Nagpur. Since then every year during the month of November a week long cultural festival devoted to classical Sanskrit plays, dance, drama and music is held at Nagpur. The festival is sponsored by MTDC in association with District Administration of Nagpur. Each year to mark this occasion, eminent contemporary artists from India give spellbinding performances enchanting the crowds.

1.9.2

Ramnavami, Kartik Poornima

On the eve of Ram Navami & Kartik Poornima thousands of devotees throng to Ramtek Temple. According to the Chief Priest Mr. Pande Ramtek Temple, 10,000 people visit Ramtek on these days. Other wise daily there is a flow of 2000-3000 visitors to Ramtek. Approximately 50 foreigners visit Ramtek per month. 1.10 Environment Status and Regulations

There are no restrictions to development in these locations. 1.11 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment in Nagpur is less as compared to other tourist destinations. There are many large, small & medium industries in and around Nagpur. Occupations varying from removing seeds of cotton, textile industry, wood cutting manufacturing of paper and strawboard, chemicals and its product ferromanganese, tobacco, medicinal, machinery tools, plastic etc. Cereals are produced on a large scale. Nagpur is considered as the generator of handlooms. Nagpur, Kamptee, Umrer, Savner, Khapa, Kalmeshwar are the areas responsible for the large scale production.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Not less than ¾th area produces oranges. Nagpur is considered as the first ranking market thus known as Orange City and India. 1.12 1.13 (i) • • • (ii) General condition of attraction: Good Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction Good road linkages and availability of basic infrastructure at all locations. Identified as the second capital of Maharashtra an under consideration as an alternative capital of India by Union Home Ministry. Unique centrality in the Indian Sub Continent. Weakness

Tourist destinations are not being marketed properly. 1.14 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 1.15 Project Approved Tourist information centre. Beautification of Sonegaon Lake. Beautification of flyover junction. Illumination of Heritage Buildings. Development of Mahal area in city. Relocation of Maharajbag Zoo Starkey Point & Telenkhedi Tank Water sports at lakes around Nagpur Telenkhedi Garden. Artificial Rock wall climbing. Floating Restaurant at Jumma Talao. Wayside amenities at Butibori. Khindsi Jungle Resort. Approach road to Nagardhan. Theme cafeteria at Nagardhan. Kalidas festival. Project Ideas

1. A circuit for Ashtavinayak yatra in Vidarbha can be developed. This will comprise of: Shami Ganesh (Adasa), 18 Bhuja Ganesh (Shaivalya Parvat near Ramtek), Bhrushund Vinayak (Mendha Village, Near Tumsar, Bhandara), Vighnaraj Panchanan (Pavani, Bhandara), Varadvinayak (Bhadravati, Chandrapur), Chintamani (Kalamb, Yavatmal), Ekchakra Ganesh (Kelzar,) and Tekdi Ganesh (Nagpur City). 2. Motor Trail development (Mud Roads) within Pench National Park by connecting various points. 3. Boating in catchment area of Pench Dam.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2

Wardha – Sewagram - Paunar

Sewagram

2.1

Introduction

Wardha, an important district, is placed at a distance of 67 Kms from Nagpur and houses a museum at Maganwadi. Wardha has a uniqueness of its own due to its historical, social and political importance. Mahatma Gandhi, Vinoba Bhave & Jamnalal Bajaj stayed here. Location (Wardha): (Vidarbha) Eastern Maharashtra Latitude Longitude Altitude Area Population : : 6310 Sq. km 1,230,640 (2001 Census) 20.45 ° N 78.39 ° E 234 m

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.2

Accessibility

2.2.1

Road

Wardha is well connected with all major cities of Maharashtra and other states. Though no national highway passes through Wardha City, State Highways connect Amravati, Nagpur, Chandrapur, Yavatmal to Wardha City.
Nagpur Mumbai Chandrapur Distances (Kms) Wardha Wardha Wardha 76 822 152

2.2.2

Railway

Wardha is well connected to Mumbai, Nagpur, Kolkata by rail. There are a good many number of trains plying on these routes.

2.2.3

Air

The nearest airport is Nagpur airport, which is well linked to all the major cities of India. 2.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 24 º C max temp 40º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – winter (Min temp 5 º C max temp 25º C) 2.4 Tourist Inflow : : approx 1,50,000 per year approx 400 per year

Domestic International

Average duration of stay in Wardha is 2 days. However, some of the foreign nationals do stay for 4-5 days or even 6-8 months odd.

2.4.1

Origin of tourists

International tourists are from Australia, Canada & Europe. Also NRI’s from the US visit here. More than 50 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from M.P, Karnataka and Gujarat.

2.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation 50 % 25 % 25 %

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Business/ Study tourists 30% Leisure Tourists 70%

2.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) Corporate meetings/ seminars are also held.

2.4.5 Peak Lean

Seasonal Flow November to January. Evenly distributed for the balance months.

2.4.6

Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 10 % 25 % 20 % 2% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 15 % 25 % 3%

2.4.7

Spending Pattern

International tourists : Rs. 1000 per day (approx) Domestic tourists : Rs. 500 -800 per day Repeat Tourists : Only special interest tourists especially foreigners pay repeat visits every year. 2.5 Major Attractions

Wardha city came into existence 100 years back. This city is of historic significance as Gandhiji, after his departure from Sabarmati in Gujarat came and settled here in 1930. Since then Wardha became his headquarters of operation for the freedom struggle. The following are the places of interest in Wardha:
Attraction Magan Sangrahalay Gitai Mandir Jamnalal, Vinoba Bhave Museum Shanti Stupa Sewagram Ashram Paunar Ashram Kelzar Temple Bor Wildlife Sanctuary Location (From A’bad) Wardha City Wardha City Wardha City Wardha City 5 Kms 12 Kms on Nagpur Rd. 27 Km on Nagpur Rd. 35 Km off Nagpur Rd. Theme Historic Heritage Historic Leisure Historic Historic Pilgrimage Eco-Tour Tourist type

Individual/Family

Special Interest

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.6

Infrastructure details

2.6.1

Accommodation
Type 5 Star hotels – 00 4 Star hotels – 00 2 Star hotels – 00 High budget – 00 Budget category – 6 Capacity (Rooms) 0 0 0 0 120

2.6.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Wardha City Sewagram Paunar

2.7 Nil. 2.8

Other entertainment facility

Environment Status and Regulations

There are no restrictions to development in these locations. However, the Ashram authorities at Paunar have opposition to development near the Ashram area. One of the Tata group of companies was planning for a resort near the Ashram but wasn’t granted permission due resistance from the Ashram authorities. The basic reason of opposition to the development is that too much commercialization would hamper the peace of the area. 2.9 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment in Wardha, Sewagram & Paunar is less as compared to other tourist destinations. There are many small & medium industries in and around Wardha. Local people at Wardha are also involved in Handlooms, Khadi fabrics production, organic farming. Many training programs are held by Magan Sangrahalay for Rural development.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.10

Bottlenecks/ Constraints

Poor connectivity by roads within the circuit. Poor condition of roads within Wardha city. Connectivity between Ajantha to Lonar Crater, which is an upcoming and priority tourist location is poor and needs to be improved. 2.11 Fair 2.12 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction General condition of attraction

Wardha being the headquarters of Mahatma Gandhi for the freedom struggle is of great historic significance. These destinations attract tourists almost round the year and there is less difference in peak and lean tourist traffic. Good road linkages and availability of basic infrastructure at all locations. Being well-known tourist destinations, these destinations require comparatively less promotional effort. (ii) Weakness

Attract mainly special interest tourists. Not popular among young tourists as a destination for group tours because it does not offer circuits involving adventure or leisure tourism. 2.13 Projects Approved

1. Tourist complex at Bor. 2. Kelzar Temple Complex. 3. Both of these are under Central assistance scheme. 2.14 Project Ideas

1. ‘Know Gandhi Programme’: Visitors will stay in small hutments. They will spin Khadi & wear the same. Also they will do some farming. No electricity will be used. Solar power will be used wherever possible. The next batch takes over from the point where the earlier batch left. The results of the efforts put in by the people can be sent over by post/mail. 2. Non star luxury & budget accommodation at Wardha.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3

Chandrapur -Bhadravati-Tadoba

3.1

Introduction

Chandrapur City, formerly known as Chanda, is located in the south central region of India and lies along a tributary of the Wardha River. It is 150-km away from Nagpur City. Chandrapur is also the district headquarters of the Chandrapur district and it is the largest town in the district with ancient history. Chandrapur means "settlement of the Moon". The city is surrounded with four historical fort gates and lies particularly in the angle formed by the junction of the Erai and Jharpat rivers and is surrounded by a battlement of over 7 miles in length, which constitutes the most striking example of Gond methods of fortifications that has come down to the present age. Location (Wardha): Eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) Latitude 19.95 ° N Longitude 79.30 ° E Altitude 188 m 10,489 sq. km 20,77,909 (2001 Census)

Area Population

: :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.2

Accessibility

Chandrapur is well connected with all major cities of Maharashtra and other states by rail and road.

3.2.1

Road

Though no national highway passes through Chandrapur City, State Highways connect Amravati, Nagpur, Wardha, Yavatmal to Chandrapur City. Chandrapur Chandrapur Chandrapur 3.2.2 Railway Distances (Kms) Nagpur Wardha Amravati 158 152 230

Chandrapur lies on the Wardha – Hyderabad railway line and Chindwada – Chandrapur railway line. It is well connected to Wardha, Delhi, Hyderabad, Chennai.

3.2.3

Air

The nearest airport is Nagpur airport 155 Kms, which is well linked to all the major cities of India. 3.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to May – Summer (Min temp 24 º C max temp 40º C) June to September – Monsoon October to November – Post Monsoon December to February – winter (Min temp 5 º C max temp 25º C) 3.4 Tourist Inflow
Chandrapur 3,00,000 p.a 200 p.a Bhadravati 3,00,000 p.a 24 p.a Tadoba 50,000 p.a 150 p.a

Domestic (approx.) International (approx.)

Average duration of stay in Chandrapur is 2 days. Chandrapur is often made as a base to visit places like Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve, Bhadravati, Markanda Temple & city itself. Some study groups stay at Tadoba for anywhere between 1 to 7 years.

3.4.1

Origin of tourists

International tourists are from Australia, Canada & Europe. Also NRI’s from the US visit here

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

More than 80 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from M.P, Karnataka and Gujarat.

3.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 40 % 25 % 30 % 05 %

3.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Business/ Study tourists Leisure Tourists Religious Tourists 20% 50% 30%

3.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (3-6) Corporate meetings/ seminars are also held at Chandrapur.

3.4.5 Peak Lean

Seasonal Flow November to January, April – May. Evenly distributed for the balance months.

3.4.6

Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 5% 20 % 5% 15% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 20 % 30 % 5%

3.4.7

Spending Pattern : : : Rs. 1000 per day (approx) Rs. 500 -800 per day Repeat tourists are generally local people.

International tourists Domestic tourists Repeat Tourists

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.5

Major Attractions

The Mahakali mandir in Chandrapur city, Jain temples of Bhadravati and Markanda are the major attractions. Tadoba, which is one of the major Tiger reserves also is one of the major tourist attractions.
Attraction Mahakali Temple Bhadravati Jain Mandir Tadoba Tiger Reserve Location (From C_pur) Chandrapur City 26 Kms on Wardha rd. 45 Kms on Tadoba rd. Theme Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Eco-Tour Tourist type Family Family Family

3.6

Infrastructure details

3.6.1

Accommodation
Type 5 Star hotels – 00 4 Star hotels – 00 2 Star hotels – 04 High budget – 00 Budget category – 2 Capacity (Rooms) 0 0 60 0 40

3.6.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Chandrapur Bhadravati Tadoba

3.7

Other entertainment facility

There are cinema houses in Chandrapur city with a Water park by the name S.S. Kingdom situated at Lohara (8 Kms) on Mul Rd. 3.8 Environment Status and Regulations

There are no restrictions to development at Chandrapur and Bhadravati. But the complete area within the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve is a NDZ. A new MTDC tourist complex is coming up at Moharli gate of Tadoba-Andhari Tiger reserve. The work of which is approx. 70% complete.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.9

Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment in Chandrapur & Bhadravati is less as compared to other tourist destinations. There are many small & medium and large industries in and around Chandrapur. Ballarshah being the highly industrialised centre is 16 Km from Chandrapur. People from surrounding villages in Tadoba can be involved in Forest staff & can be trained as guides, forest guards. 3.10 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

1. Poor connectivity to Tadoba from the Northern side i.e., Bhandara, Gondia. 2. Naxalite problem in the south eastern area of the district extending to portions of Gadchiroli district as well as Chhattisgadh state. 3.11 Fair 3.12 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction General condition of attraction

Tadoba – Andhari Tiger reserve is one of the few places in India, where the Tiger can be seen. Good road linkages and availability of basic infrastructure at all locations. (ii) Weakness

Attracts mainly special interest tourists; Not popular among young tourists as a destination for group tours because it does not offer circuits involving adventure or leisure tourism. 3.13 Projects Approved

1. Tourist complex near Moharli gate at Tadoba. 3.14 Project Ideas

1. Signage at Bhadravati. 2. Road resurfacing at Bhadravati. 3. Public amenities at Bhadravati.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4

Wai – Panchgani – Mahabaleshwar

Pratapgad

4.1

Introduction

Satara district is the gateway of the tourism rich Konkan region of Maharashtra. Satara district welcomes you to the Western Ghats with the well-known tourist destinations of Mahabaleshwar and Panchgani. It also gives a preview of the fort heritage of Maharashtra by showcasing Pratapgad fort. Location (Satara Dist) 16˚ N Longitude 74˚ E Altitude 567 m Area Population : : 10484 sq. km 2,796,906 : Western Maharashtra Latitude

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4.2 4.2.1

Accessibility Road

Satara is an important destination on the Mumbai – Bangalore national highway (NH 4). Satara also has a wide network of roads connecting it to Mumbai (via Mahabaleshwar), Ratnagiri, Pune and Solapur. All tourist destinations in Satara are connected by good motorable roads.
Pune Mumbai Kolhapur Solapur Ratnagiri Distances (Kms) Satara Satara Satara Satara Satara 110 260 120 200 150

4.2.2

Railway

Nearest railway head is Satara Road, 20 km away from Satara city. 4.3 Climate

Pleasant Climate March to July – Summer (Min temp 24º C max temp 35º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 12º C max temp 30º C) Though the tourist destinations of Mahabaleshwar, Panchgani and Wai are in the Satara district, tourists do not generally visit or make base at Satara city. All the three destinations mentioned above have exclusive approach roads from Mumbai and Pune. 4.4 Tourist Inflow (per year approx)
Mahabaleshwar 10,00,000 Panchgani 4,00,000 Wai 1,50,000 Pratapgad 2,50,000

4.4.1

Origin of tourists

Mumbai, Pune, Kolhapur 4.4.2 Season

April – December and on weekends International : approx 3-4% Average duration of stay is 2 days, 1 night. 4.4.3 Spending pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 50 % 25 % 13 % 12 %

4.4.4

Nature of tourist Adventure Tourists 5%

Leisure Tourists 95%

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4.4.5

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) 4.4.6 Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 15% 25 % 15 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 25 % 15 % 5%

4.4.7

Spending Pattern : : Rs 700 - 1000 per day High, every 2-3 years.

Domestic tourists Repeat tourists 4.5

Major Attractions
Attraction Mahabaleshwar Panchgani Wai Pratapgad Location Mahabaleshwar 20 Km from M’baleshwar 40 Km from M’baleshwar 20 Km from M’baleshwar Theme Leisure Leisure Pilgrimage Heritage Tourist type Family Group

4.6

Infrastructure details

4.6.1

Accommodation

Over 50 hotels providing a wide range of accommodation from 5 star category to dormitories are available at Mahabaleshwar; over 25 hotels are available at Panchgani.

4.6.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Mahabaleshwar Panchgani Wai Pratapgad

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4.7

Environment Status and Regulations

Mahabaleshwar and Panchgani have been declared as an eco-sensitive zone and under the notification issued by the central government, no new tourist activity can be started in Mahabaleshwar unless the state government comes up with a tourism development plan for Mahabaleshwar and Panchgani based on the carrying capacity of these destinations. 4.8 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

80 % tourism related employment in Mahabaleshwar and Panchgani and Pratapgad. 4.9 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

According to experts, the number of tourist arrivals in Mahabaleshwar has almost reached the carrying capacity and any increase in tourist arrivals would be un-sustainable. A necessity is felt to develop satellite locations to shift or divert the tourist flow. 4.10 4.11 General condition of attraction Good

Strength and weakness analysis of the destination

(i)

Strength of attraction

Popular hill station, close to major cities of Pune and Mumbai makes Mahabaleshwar a perfect weekend getaway.

(ii)

Weakness

Eco-sensitive zone. 4.12 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

1. MSRDC has proposed the development of new Mahabaleshwar, a satellite township near Mahabaleshwar. 2. Mahabaleshwar Municipal Corporation is in the process of making an integrated tourism development plan for Mahabaleshwar. 4.13 Project Ideas

1. Mini train-ride at the table-land in Panchgani. 2. Audio – visual show at Pratapgad fort 3. Kiosk at Mahabaleshwar. 4. Budget accommodation at Wai. 5. Way side amenities to Wai. 6. Heritage cottage at Pratapgad.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5

Panhala – Kolhapur – Radhanagari

To Mumbai To

To Rajapur

To Amboli

5.1

Introduction

Kolhapur is famous for its Mahalaxmi temple, goddess Mahalaxmi is better known as Kulswamini i.e. the goddess of Maharashtra. Kolhapur district also has the famous bison sanctuary at Dajipur and Panhala fort which also is a hill station. The Jotiba temple near Panhala also attracts many a pilgrim. Location (Kolhapur Dist): Western Maharashtra Latitude 16 º N Longitude 74 º E Altitude 544 m 7685 sq. km 3,515,413 (2001 Census)

Area Population 5.2

Accessibility

5.2.1

Road

Kolhapur is an important destination on the Mumbai – Bangalore national highway (NH 4) on the Maharashtra – Kolhapur border. Kolhapur also has two major state highways connecting NH4 to NH17 on the west coast at Ratnagiri and Rajapur. Kolhapur is also a gateway to the tourism district “Sindhudurg” via Amboli.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Pune Mumbai Satara Ratnagiri Amboli

Distances Kolhapur Kolhapur Kolhapur Kolhapur Kolhapur

238 435 123 150 90

5.2.2

Railway

Kolhapur railway station is well connected to Mumbai, Pune and Goa. 5.3 Climate

Tropical Climate March to July – Summer (Min temp 24º C max temp 35º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 20º C max temp 27º C) 5.4 Tourist Inflow (per year approx)
Kolhapur 20,00,000 Panhala 5,50,000 Jotiba 10,00,000

5.4.1

Season

April – December and on weekends International Tourist: aprox 3-4% Average duration of stay in Kolhapur is 2 days 1 night. 5.4.2 Origin of tourists

Mumbai, Pune, Kolhapur 5.4.3 Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 50 % 25 % 13 % 12 %

5.4.4

Nature of Tourist
Pilgrimage 60% Leisure & Adventure Tourists 25%

5.4.5

Size of Groups

Family/ Group (6 - 8)

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.4.6

Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 05% 20 % 25 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 15 % 20 % 15 %

5.4.7

Spending Pattern

Domestic tourists Rs 400 - 600 per day Repeat Tourists High for Kolhapur 5.5 Major Attractions
Location Kolhapur 20 Km from M’baleshwar 40 Km from M’baleshwar 24 Km from Kolhapur 80 Km from Satara Theme Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Heritage/ Leisure Adventure Eco-tourism Family Group Tourist type

Attraction Kolhapur Jotiba Panhala Dajipur Koyna

5.6 5.6.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation

All types of accommodation available

5.6.2

Infrastructure
Kolhapur Jotiba Koyna Panhala Dajipur

Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious

5.7

Environment Status and Regulations

Dajipur is a notified Wildlife Sanctuary and under the purview of the Forest department. Koyna Dam has the largest power station in Maharashtra and under Irrigation department. Access to the power station is limited but tourists can see the dam. Koyna is also a wild life sanctuary and thus only sustainable tourism projects can be thought of with the consent of the concerned department.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.8

Employment Opportunities and Avenues

Main occupation in this region is agriculture followed by industry. Employment related to tourism is limited to specific destinations like Panhala, Mahalaxmi temple area and Jotiba. 5.9 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

1. Panhala is less known as a hill station and thus leisure tourists are not attracted to this destination. Panhala needs to be promoted more as a hill station rather than a fort site. 2. Koyna, being a strategic location any tourism development activity in this region will require prior permission and indepth EIA. 5.10 Good 5.11 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction General condition of attraction

Popular pilgrimage centre in Maharashtra. Located on major National highway (NH4), connecting Mumbai and Bangalore. Located en-route to popular tourist destinations of Konkan. Kolhapur acts as a node leading to South Indian and Konkan tours. South India bound tourist continue on the NH4 whereas there are three main entry points to Konkan leading to Sindhudurg, Rajapur and Ratnagiri (ii) Weakness

Kolhapur is currently established as a stop over destination in the existing tourist circuits. Average time spent in Kolhapur by such tourists is 5-6 hours. Kolhapur acts as a node leading to South Indian and Konkan tours. South India bound tourist continue on the NH4 whereas there are two main entry points to Konkan 5.12 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development 1. A development plan for Eco-tourism is prepared for Panhala. It has not been sanctioned yet. 2. Construction of a MTDC rest house is in progress at Jotiba temple. 5.13 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Project Ideas Development of table-land at Panhala. Water sports at Koyna. Audio-Visual show at Panhala (Total tourist flow at Panhala – 5,50,000 per year) Baggi ride for site seeing in Panhala. (Approx 8 km ride) Beautification of Someshwar lake at Panhala Tourist information centre at Kolhapur near Mahalaxmi temple.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6

Amboli – Sindhudurg Fort – Tarkarli – Sawantwadi – Devgad – Vijaydurg

6.1

Introduction

Sindhudurg district has been declared as a tourism district and is a priority destination for tourism development in Maharashtra. Sindhudurg district offers 82 km long coastline with numerous virgin and established beach locations. It also has a great potential for back-water cruises on lines of Kerala. . Sindhudurg also flaunts its famous sea forts of Sindhudurg and Vijaydurg, which are popular among tourists. Sindhudurg district gives the tourists a glimpse of typical Konkani village lifestyle. Famous Devgad Alphonso mangoes are also from Sindhudurg. Location (Sindhudurg Dist): Western Maharashtra Latitude Longitude Altitude Area Population : : 5087.5 sq. km 8,67,862 (2001 Census) 15.9º N 73.19º E 0m

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.2 6.2.1

Accessibility Road

National Highway (NH4) passes through Sindhudurg district parallel to the coast line. Feeder roads of approximately 30 – 40 km connect the important tourist destinations and towns on the coast to the national highway. There is also a parallel coastal road connecting the towns on the coast line. This is a single track road 3.5 m in width.
Pune Mumbai Kolhapur Ratnagiri Goa Distances (Kms) Sawantwadi Sawantwadi Sawantwadi Sawantwadi Sawantwadi 355 515 160 178 70

6.2.2

Railway

Sawantwadi is an important railway station on the Konkan Railway. 6.3 Climate

Warm and humid March to July – Summer (Min temp 24º C max temp 34º C) June to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 17º C max temp 30º C) The distances are given from Sawantwadi as Sawantwadi acts as the entry node to visit the upcoming hill station of Amboli and tourists heading Goa. The tourists that do not visit Amboli, Vengurla or Goa and begin their Konkan tour from Sindhudurg fort upwards reach Malvan via Kudal or Kasal on the NH17. 6.4 Tourist Inflow (per year approx)
Sawantwadi 80,000 Sindhudurg Fort 1,97,000

6.4.1

Season approx 3-4%

October - February International : 6.4.2

Origin of tourists

Mumbai, Pune, Goa, Kolhapur 6.4.3 Spending pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Shopping 50 % 25 % 13 % 12 %

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.5

Nature of tourist
Adventure Tourists 5% Leisure Tourists 95%

6.5.1

Size of Groups

Family/ Group (6 - 8)

6.5.2

Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 15% 25 % 15 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 25 % 15 % 5%

6.5.3

Spending Pattern

Domestic tourists Rs 500 -800 per day Repeat tourists Not so high 6.6 Major Attractions
Location 30 km from Sawantwadi Sawantwadi 25 km from Sawantwadi 40 Km from Sawantwadi 28 Km from Kudal 6 Km from Malvan 40 Km from Malvan 3 km from Mithbao 14 Km from Kunkeshwar 15 Km from Devgad Theme Hill station Heritage Town/ Entry Point Beach Entry node to Sindhudurg fort Heritage Beach Lagoon Beach Pilgrimage + Beach Fort + Mango + Beach Heritage Fort Tourist type

Attraction Amboli (426 m alt) Sawantwadi Vengurla Beach Kudal Sindhudurg Fort Tarkarli Beach Mithbao Beach Kunkeshwar Devgad Vijaydurg

Family Group

6.7

Infrastructure details

6.7.1

Accommodation

Good accommodation facilities are available at major towns of Amboli, Kasal, Sawantwadi, Malvan and Tarkarli. No 5 star accommodation is available in the entire district. No accommodation facility at less known places like Mithbao, Kunkeshwar, Vijaydurg etc.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.7.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Kudal Sawantwadi Malvan Others

6.8

Environment Status and Regulations

CRZ 3 (200 m NDZ from HTL) norms are applicable at less know beaches mentioned above while CRZ 2 (500m NDZ from HTL) applicable in major towns. 6.9 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

90% of the population is engaged in either agriculture or fishing related employment. 6.10 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

The access roads to the coastal destinations from NH17 are only single laned roads. There are no signages or promotional hoardings on NH17 to attract tourist. At less known destinations like Mithbao, Devgad beach etc there is a lack of basic infrastructure and accommodation facilities. 6.11 General condition of attraction

Very Good (Virgin locations) 6.12 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction

A variety of tourist destinations (topographically) can be visited in a short tour of 2 nights and three days viz., Hill station of Amboli, ocean fort at Sindhudurg, virgin beaches at Tarkarli and Mithbao, beach pilgrimage at Kunkeshwar and heritage village at Sawantwadi. (ii) Weakness

Lack of promotional activities.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.13

Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

1. Heritage town development plan under implementation at Sawantwadi. Almost nearing completion except for a proposed “Shilpgram” - a handicrafts village. 2. Proposed pilgrimage accommodation at Kunkeshwar. 3. Sindhudurg district tourism development plan under implementation on lines of the report submitted by TCS in 1999 – 2000. 4. The proposed royal train “Deccan Odyssey " scheduled to be in Sindhudurg for 2 days and 1 night. The tourists would enjoy backwater cruises and other activities in the course. 6.14 Project Ideas

1. Signage’s and information centres at nodes on NH17. 2. Medico tourism centre at Amboli reserved forest. 3. Village tourism at Amboli. 4. Beach resort at Mithbao beach. 5. Water sports at Mithbao. 6. Water sports complex at Dhamapur Lake, Tarkarli. 7. Audio-visual show at Sindhudurg fort 8. Mango tourism at Devgad/ Vijaydurg. 9. Backwater cruise/ houseboats at Nerur par, Achra and Valaval. 10. Helicopter service from Goa to Sindhudurg fort to Ratnagiri/ Ganapatipule. 11. Beach restaurant and bar at Tarkarli. 12. Cruise by the sea on nights at Tarkarli. 13. Development of Marine wild sanctuary at Malvan.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7

Pavas – Ratnagiri – Ganapatipule – Jaigad – Velneshwar – Hedvi – Chiplun – Dervan

Dervan

7.1

Introduction

Ratnagiri district is famous for its Alphonso mangoes worldwide. Ratnagiri is also the birthplace of the great freedom fighter Lokmanya Bal Gangadhgar Tilak. Ratnagiri offers picturesque beaches with different contours at each beach location. Ganapatipule is a perfect combination of a pilgrimage destination and a perfect leisure setting. Location (Ratnagiri Dist) Maharashtra : Western Latitude Longitude Altitude 5087.5 sq. km 15,44,057 (2001 Census) 17º N 73.3º E 0m

Area Population

: :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7.2

Accessibility

7.2.1

Road

National Highway (NH4) passes through Ratnagiri district parallel to the coast line. Feeder roads of approximately 30 – 40 km connect the important tourist destinations and towns on the coast to the national highway. There is also a parallel coastal road connecting the towns on the coast-line. This is a single-track road 3.5 m in width.
Pune Mumbai Kolhapur Sawantwadi Distances Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri Ratnagiri 331 400 129 178

7.2.2

Railway

Ratnagiri railway station is 7 km away from the city of Ratnagiri. It is an important railway station on the Konkan Railway line. The proposed Deccan Odyssey has a stop over at Ratnagiri. 7.3 Climate

Warm and humid March to July – Summer (Min temp 24º C max temp 34º C) June to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 17º C max temp 30º C) 7.4 Tourist Inflow (per year approx)
Ratnagiri 1,25,000 Ganapatipule 2,50,000 Other 60,000

7.4.1

Season

May – June and November - December International : approx 2%

7.4.2

Origin of tourists

Mumbai, Pune, Goa, Kolhapur

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7.4.3

Spending pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation 55 % 20 % 25 %

7.4.4

Nature of tourist
Adventure Tourists Leisure & Pilgrimage Tourists 5% 95%

7.4.5

Size of Groups

Family/ Group (6 - 8)

7.4.6

Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 15% 25 % 15 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 25 % 15 % 5%

7.4.7

Spending Pattern : : Rs 500 -800 per day Not so high

Domestic tourists Repeat tourists

7.4.8

Major Attractions Location 10 km from Ratnagiri 50 km from Ratnagiri 50 km from Ganapatipule 170 km from Velneshwar 15 km from Velneshwar 20 km from Chiplun 75 km from Ratnagiri Theme Pilgrimage Beach/ Port Pilgrimage/ Beach Heritage Beach/ Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Heritage Pilgrimage/ Nature Tourist type

Attraction Pavas Ratnagiri Ganapatipule Jaigad Velneshwar Hedvi Dervan Chiplun 7.5

Family Group

Infrastructure details

7.5.1

Accommodation

Except for established centres of Ratnagiri, Chiplun and Ganapatipule there are inadequate accommodation facilities at Velneshwar, Hedvi, Pavas etc.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7.5.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Ganapatipule Ratnagiri Chiplun Others

7.6

Environment Status and Regulations

CRZ 3 (200 m NDZ from HTL) norms are applicable at less know beaches mentioned above while CRZ 2 (500m NDZ from HTL) applicable in major towns. 7.7 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

90% population is engaged in either agriculture or fishing related employment in Ratnagiri. In Ganapatipule though, most of the people are engaged in tourism related activity. The population of Ganapatipule is 700 whereas the number of tourists in peak period visiting Ganapatipule is around 2000. 7.8 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

The access roads to the coastal destinations from NH17 are only single laned roads. There are no signages or promotional hoardings on NH17 to attract tourist. At less known destinations like Velneshwar, Hedvi, Jaigad, Pavas, Dervan etc. there is a lack of basic infrastructure and accommodation facilities. 7.9 General condition of attraction

Very Good 7.10 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction

A variety of tourist destinations (topographically) can be visited in a short tour of 2 nights and three days viz. Hill station of Amboli, ocean fort at Sindhudurg, virgin beaches at Tarkarli and Mithbao, beach pilgrimage at Kunkeshwar and heritage village at Sawantwadi.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(ii)

Weakness

Lack of promotional activities, basic infrastructure and access roads. 7.11 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

1. Ratnagiri district collectorate has drafted a plan for development of tourism in Ratnagiri. Four of the proposed projects have been sanctioned and funds raised by the state government. 2. Renovation and landscaping at MTDC Ganapatipule resort underway. 7.12 Project Ideas

1. Signage’s at nodes on NH17. 2. Tourist information centre at Ratnagiri. 3. Basic amenities at Pavas, Chiplun, Dervan, Velneshwar, Marleshwar 4. Beach restaurant at Ganapatipule 5. Parasailing, water skiing at Ganapatipule. 6. Way side amenities on Ratnagiri – Ganapatipule road. 7. Folk show at Dervan on Life of Shivaji. 8. Helicopter service from Goa to Sindhudurg fort to Ratnagiri/ Ganapatipule. 9. Air service from Pune/ Mumbai / Goa to Ratnagiri. 10. Walk paths at Marleshwar near Devrukh.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8

Harne – Karde – Anjarle – Dapoli – Harihareshwar – Srivardhan

Harihareshwar Anjarle

8.1

Introduction

The northern part of Ratnagiri and southern part of Raigad form a rather less known but an interesting tourist circuit on the west coast of Maharashtra. The proximity to Mumbai and Pune gives this zone a great potential for tourism development in near future. This circuit offers the pleasures of virgin beaches of Karde and Harihareshwar, memoirs of the sea fort Janjira and the experience of rural fishing village at Harne. Location (Raigad District):
Latitude Longitude Altitude

Western Maharashtra (Raigad & Ratnagiri districts)
Harne 17° N 73° E 4m Srivardhan- Sarihareshwar 18° N 73° E 0m

Area

:

Raigad: 7,152 sq. km Ratnagiri: 8,208 sq. km

Population

:

Raigad: 18,25,000 Ratnagiri: 15,88,000

8.2

Accessibility

8.2.1

Road

National Highway (NH17) passes through Raigad & Ratnagiri district parallel to the coast lone. Feeder roads of approximately 30 – 40 km connect the important tourist destinations and towns on the coast to the national highway. There is also a parallel coastal road connecting the towns on the coast line.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Pune Mumbai Kolhapur Goa

Distances (Kms) Dapoli Dapoli Dapoli Dapoli

195 218 295 379

8.2.2

Railway

Khed is an important railway station near Dapoli on the Konkan railway route. 8.3 Climate

Warm and humid March to July – Summer (Min temp 24º C max temp 34º C) June to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 17º C max temp 30º C) 8.4 Tourist Inflow (per year approx)
Harne – Anjarle 25,000 Srivardhan - Harihareshwar 1,00,000

8.4.1

Season

Around the year at Harihareshwar & Srivardhan and peaking in Jan - May. October to Jan and April to May for Harne – Anjarle. International : approx 1%

8.4.2

Origin of tourists:

Mumbai, Pune, Goa, Kolhapur

8.4.3

Spending pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Shopping 50 % 25 % 15 % 10 %

8.4.4

Nature of tourist
Leisure Tourists 50% Pilgrimage Tourists 40%

Adventure Tourists 10%

8.4.5

Size of Groups

Family/ Group (6 - 8)

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8.4.6

Profile of Tourists Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 10% 25 % 15 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 25 % 10 % 5%

8.4.7

Spending Pattern : : Rs 400 -600 per day Repeat tourists high for Srivardhan Harihareshwar. Not so high for Harne.

Domestic tourists Repeat tourists

8.5

Major Attractions
Location 11 km from Dapoli 11 km from Dapoli Srivardhan Town Srivardhan Town 7 km from Srivardhan 7 km from Srivardhan Theme Beach Heritage Pilgrimage Beach Pilgrimage Beach Tourist type

Attraction Harne Beach Harne Fort Srivardhan Temple Srivardhan Beach Harihareshwar Temple Harihareshwar Beach

Family/ Group

8.6

Infrastructure details

8.6.1

Accommodation

Good accommodation facilities at Srivardhan, Harihareshwar and Murud-Harne. Alternatively, one can also stay at Dapoli.

8.6.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Murud-Harne Srivardhan Harihareshwar Dapoli

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8.7

Environment Status and Regulations

CRZ 3 (200 m NDZ from HTL) norms are applicable at less know beaches mentioned above while CRZ 2 (500m NDZ from HTL) applicable in major towns. 8.8 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

Approximately 70% population is engaged in either agriculture or fishing related employment. 8.9 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

The access roads to the coastal destinations from NH17 are only single laned roads. There are no signages or promotional hoardings on NH17 to attract tourist. At less known destinations like Murud-Harne, Anjarle there is a lack of basic infrastructure and accommodation facilities. Murud Harne is often confused with Murud-Janjira due to lack of promotion. 8.10 General condition of attraction

Very Good (Murud Harne is Virgin locations) 8.11 Strength and weakness analysis of the destination

(i)

Strength of attraction

A variety of tourist destinations (topographically) can be visited in a short tour of 1 night and two days viz., beaches at Srivardhan, Harihareshwar & Murud Harne, ancient temple at Anjarle and Harihareshwar, Suvarnadurg fort at Harne.

(ii)

Weakness

Lack of promotional activities. 8.12 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

8.12.1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Project Ideas Budget accommodation at Harihareshwar. Water sports complex at Harihareshwar. Beach cottage at Harihareshwar. Way side amenities to Harne. Water sports complex at Harne. Budget, Non star luxury accommodation at Harne. Amusement park at Dapoli. Major district road resurfacing work for the circuit.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9

Aurangabad – Daulatabad – Ellora - Ajantha

9.1

Introduction

Aurangabad district offers a variety of tourist attractions varying from pilgrimage centres, forts, dam-sites, eco-tourism areas to world heritage sites. The famous world heritage sites of Ajantha and Ellora are located in this region. Aurangabad is also the gateway to other tourist destinations such as Daulatabad, Paithan and Lonar crater which are popular amongst tourists. The world heritage sites of Ajantha & Ellora caves attract as many as 50000 international tourists per year. A project worth Rs 1000 Cr is underway for upgradation and conservation of Ajantha – Ellora region with financial assistance from Japan. With the completion of this project it is expected that the tourist inflow would increase 3 times in the next 5 years. Location (Aurangabad Dist) : Central Maharashtra (Marathwada) Latitude 19.53º N Longitude 75.23º E Altitude 513 m 16,200 Sq. km 29,20,548 (2001 Census)

Area Population

: :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.2

Accessibility

9.2.1

Road

Aurangabad is well connected with all major cities of Maharashtra and other states. Though no national highway passes through Aurangabad, State Highways connect Ahmednagar, Nashik, Jalna and Parbhani to Aurangabad.
Pune Mumbai Delhi Distances (Kms) Aurangabad Aurangabad Aurangabad 235 388 1323

9.2.2

Railway

Aurangabad is connected to Mumbai by railway linkage, but only one direct train runs from Mumbai to Aurangabad.

9.2.3

Air

Aurangabad airport is connected to cities of New Delhi and Mumbai. 9.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 24 º C max temp 40º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 12 º C max temp 30º C) 9.4 Tourist Inflow : approx 6,50,000 per year approx 50,000 per year

Domestic

International :

Tourist inflow expected to increase to 25 Lakhs in next 5 years after completion and publicity of Ajantha – Ellora development scheme. Average duration of stay in Aurangabad is 2 days.

9.4.1

Origin of tourists

29% of the international tourists are from Japan. Other countries of tourist origin Europe, Korea and China More than 30 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from West Bengal, Karnataka and Gujarat.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 40 % 30 % 20 % 10 %

9.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Business/ Study tourists 5% Leisure Tourists 95%

9.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) 9.4.5 Peak Lean 9.4.6 Seasonal Flow September to May June to August (40% decrease in arrivals as compared to peak) Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 5% 30 % 10 % 2% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 20 % 30 % 3%

9.4.7

Spending Pattern : : : Rs 3000 per day (approx) Rs 700 - 1000 per day Only special interest tourists i.e. researchers/ students etc are likely to pay repeat visits even twice to thrice a year.

International tourists Domestic tourists Repeat Tourists

9.5

Major Attractions

Aurangabad is a major industrial and agricultural city in Maharashtra. It is the fourth major city in Maharashtra after Mumbai, Nagpur and Pune. From the tourism point of view Aurangabad is host to many heritage structures and historical buildings. In addition, it also offers gardens and eco-tourism cites. The major attractions are listed below.
Attraction Panchakki Bibi-Ka-Maqbara Aurangabad caves Paithan Daulatabad Khuldabad Ellora Ajantha Location (From A’bad) Aurangabad City Aurangabad City Aurangabad City 56 Kms south 13 Kms on Kannad Rd. 26 Kms on Kannad Rd. 29 Kms 110 Kms on Jalgaon Rd Theme Heritage Heritage Heritage Leisure Heritage Heritage Heritage Heritage Tourist type Family Special Interest

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.6

Infrastructure details

9.6.1

Accommodation
Type 5 Star hotels – 03 4 Star hotels – 02 2 Star hotels – 01 High budget – 05 Budget category – 125 Capacity (Rooms) 485 200 125 330 3000

9.6.2
Facility

Infrastructure
Aurangabad Paithan Ajantha (Fardapur) Ellora Daulatabad

Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious

9.7 Good 9.8

Other entertainment facility

Environment Status and Regulations

Being World Heritage sites, the Ajantha and Ellora caves are under ASI and there is a complete no development zone (NDZ) within 500 m perimeter of the sites of Ajantha, Ellora, Daulatabad and other heritage sites in Aurangabad city. The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act of 1958, declares buildings that are 100 years old and above as monuments and provides for their protection. Monuments are frozen or mummified; at times, later additions are removed and the structure is restored to its original/ authentic state of existence. All monuments mentioned above come under purview of this Act. Under the Ajantha Ellora Development (AEDP), an area of 5 Kms perimeter has been acquired by the government of India and will be declared as NDZ. There would be no commercial activity like eating joints, restaurants, hotels, small shops etc inside this area. A large shopping complex and parking space would be provided at the entry point near Fardapur and tourist would be taken inside upto the caves by CNG and battery operated buses.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.9

Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment in Aurangabad is less as compared to other tourist destinations. Being one of the important cities of Maharashtra and the biggest in Marathwada region, Aurangabad has many industries including auto giant Bajaj Auto and Videocon. Agriculture and engineering industry remain the primary occupations in Aurangabad. In Ajantha though, tourism related employment is considerable. Almost 50 – 60 stalls selling artefacts, food items, etc are located near Ajantha caves. Many Taxi operators operate on Fardapur – Ajantha Caves route. 9.10 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

1. Poor connectivity by rail and air to major cities of Mumbai and Delhi. 2. Tourists visiting Ajantha, stay at Fardapur which is about 8 Kms away from Ajantha. Fardapur would be the entry point for Ajantha after completion of AEDP project. Fardapur has only 3 tourist hotels and has an accommodation capacity of around 60 beds. After the completion of AEDP it is likely to attract more overnight tourists and would call for an increase in the bed capacity. 3. Connectivity between Ajantha to Lonar Crater, which is an upcoming and priority tourist location needs to be improved. 9.11 General condition of attraction

Very good 9.12 Strength and weakness analysis of the destination

(i)

Strength of attraction

Being world heritage sites and popular attraction for international tourists, these destinations get preference in fund allocation for development purposes. These destinations attract tourists almost round the year and there is less difference in peak and lean tourist traffic. Good road linkages and availability of basic infrastructure at all locations. Being well-known tourist destinations, these destinations require comparatively less promotional effort.

(ii)

Weakness

Attract mainly special interest and family tourists. Not popular among young tourists as a destination for group tours because it does not offer circuits involving adventure or leisure tourism. 9.13 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

(b) Phase II implementation in next 2 years. 9.14 Project Ideas

1. Budget Accommodation at Ellora caves Presently there is only one hotel at Ellora caves and 2 hotels in Khuldabad near Ellora. Generally, tourists visit Aurangabad city, Daulatabad fort and Ellora on the first day and halt at Aurangabad to visit Ajantha (110 Kms) on the next day. According to estimates given by MTDC sources, 5.25 Lakh visitors visit Ellora caves per year with average flow of 1400 tourists per day. The current bed capacity available at Ellora and Khuldabad is around 40 beds. Even a modest 5% conversion rate from halt at Aurangabad to halt at Ellora would attract 70 tourists per day. A budget accommodation hotel with a capacity of 50 beds (20 Rooms) would be financially viable and sustainable. 2. Transport linkages from Ajantha to other tourist destinations like Ellora, Shegaon, and Lonar need to be improved. 3. Restaurant at T-junction (Entry Point), for Ajantha caves near Fardapur. 4. Ajantha Reserved Forest trek. 5. Paithan Sari village. Paithan is famous for its Paithani sarees all over Maharashtra and even globally. There are many sales outlets for Paithani sarees in Paithan, but there is no single location where all artisans and weavers of Paithani sarees display their art as well as sell their products to visiting tourists and other agents. The location of this proposed Sari village (“Kalagram”), can be near Sant Dnyaneshwar Udyan which is a popular tourist destination

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10

Aurangabad – Lonar Crater

To Ajantha

To Aurangabad

10.1

Introduction

Lonar crater is the only natural impact crater formed in basaltic rock. The crater was formed due to the impact of a huge meteoroid that hit the earth, some 52,000 years ago. The crater is one of the five largest craters in the world and measures 1830 m in diameter and 150 m deep. Lonar crater has water in it. The water in the crater is 10 times saltier than drinking water (pH = 10.5). In such conditions one cannot think of any living organisms, but micro organisms like Arthorospira and algae are found in abundance. Algae’s are found in abundance near the sides of the lake. Distinct layers of dried Algae, Green Algae and newly forming Algae can be seen. Lonar Lake is surrounded by a dense forest. Amidst the forest there are about 14 temples situated within the slope of Lonar. The oldest temple is some 1300 yrs old and many of them have fallen before. Birds such as Peacock, Black Drongo, Little Green Bee Eater, Shrike, Pipit, Crane, Hoopoe, etc. are found in the forest. Rabbit, Deer, Snake are also seen here. Trees of Custard Apple, Eucalyptus, Lemon grass, Bamboo,

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Farming is done near the crater over 52 acres of land causing considerable damage to the soil. The government is facing non-co-operation from local villagers engaged in cultivation in the lake who offer resistance to development of Lonar as a tourist destination. Location : Central Maharashtra Latitude Longitude Altitude 20,082 (Dist: Buldhana) 20.32º N 76.14º E

Population 10.2 10.2.1 Accessibility Road

:

Lonar is about 171 kms from Aurangabad via Jalna and Mantha. Another road connects Lonar Ajantha via Buldhana. It is convenient to go to Lonar from Ajantha as a Shegaon which is an important pilgrimage destination can also be visited. Shegaon is located about 60 kms away from Buldhana. Lonar can be reached from Shegaon via Khamgaon and Mehekar.
Lonar Ajantha Shegaon Distances (Kms) Aurangabad Lonar (via Buldhana) Lonar 171 110 120

10.2.2

Railway

Nearest Railway head is Jalna, which is 60 kms away from Lonar. 10.2.3 Air

Aurangabad is the nearest airport. 10.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions, heavy wind currents are common. 10.4 Tourist Inflow : : approx 8,000-9,000 per year approx 500 per year

Domestic International

Tourist inflow is expected to increase as Lonar has been declared as a priority destination for development by MTDC. Generally, Lonar is visited in a day trip with Aurangabad or Shegaon as a base.

10.4.1

Origin of tourists

Study tours and school picnics are common.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation NA 77 % 23 %

10.4.3

Nature of Tourist

Largely Business/ Study tourists 10.4.4 Peak Seasonal Flow Same throughout the year

10.4.5

Spending Pattern : : : : Rs 500 for day trip (one time meal) Rs 80 for day trip Rs 350 per room (2 persons) Only special interest tourists i.e. researchers/ students etc are likely to pay repeat visits.

International tourists Domestic tourists Accommodation Repeat Tourists

10.5

Major Attraction

Crater, forest surrounding the crater 10.6 10.6.1 Infrastructure details Accommodation
Type MTDC Resort – 01 Capacity (Rooms) 40

10.6.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Lonar

10.7 Nil

Other entertainment facility

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10.8

Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment is limited to employees working in the MTDC resort located near the Crater. Rickshaw drivers also get a part of their income from tourists as rickshaws are the only mode to reach Lonar crater from Lonar bus stand 10.8.1 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

1. Poor connectivity by road from Aurangabad, Khamgaon, Buldhana and Ajantha. 2. This destination does not attract many tourists due to the lack of promotional activities as well as due to poor accessibility the location. 10.9 Good 10.10 (i) • • • (ii) • • • 10.11 • • 10.12 Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction 5,200 years old and the second largest meteoric crater in the world. Evolution of new eco-system in the acidic water of the lake. Surrounded by dense forest, the crater offers ample scope for eco-tourism. Weakness Poor accessibility Far away from major cities. Nearest major city is Aurangabad 171 kms away. Does not form a part of any of the existing tourist circuits. Proposed Plans for Tourism Development Sustainable development of Lonar crater based on the report submitted by ECONET to Maharashtra Government. Improvement of approach roads to Lonar. Project Ideas General condition of attraction

1. Access route from edge of the crater to the lake : The current access road is only on one side of the crater that goes to the temple near the lake. There is no access road from the edge of crater to other parts of the lake, particularly to the densely forested areas. A stone track leading to the banks of the lake from the edge of crater in front of MTDC rest house would add to the convenience of tourists. 2. Signage: Information hoardings/ kiosks need to be installed near Ajantha and Ellora caves to create awareness about Lonar amongst tourists. A tourist information centre needs to be installed near the crater to facilitate tourists to understand the geographical importance of the crater.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

11

Nashik – Wani – Trimbakeshwar

Chandvad

To Mumbai

To Shirdi

To Bhandardara

To Pune

11.1

Introduction

Nashik is one of the most important cities of Northern Maharashtra. Nashik, in Maharashtra, is situated at a distance of 200 km from Mumbai as well as Pune. The city has become the centre of attraction because of its beautiful surroundings and cool and pleasant climate. Nashik has a personality of its own due to its mythological, historical, social and cultural importance. The city, vibrant and active on the industrial, political, social and cultural fronts, has influenced the lives of many great personalities. The river Godavari flows through the city. Temples and ghats on the banks of Godavari have made Nashik one of the holiest places for Hindus all over the World. Nashik is one of the five places in India where the famous Kumbh Mela is held once in 12 years. Location (Nashik Dist) : North Maharashtra (Khandesh) Latitude Longitude Altitude : 15,530 Sq. km 20.02º N 73.50º E 646 m

Area

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

11.2

Accessibility

11.2.1

Road

Nashik is well connected by two National highways; Pune – Nashik (NH-60) and Mumbai – Agra (NH-3) to major cities of Maharashtra like Mumbai, Pune and Ahmednagar. State highway connects Nashik to Aurangabad.
Pune Mumbai Aurangabad Distances (Kms) Nashik Nashik Nashik 202 185 218

11.2.2

Railway

Nearest railhead is Nashik road. Nashik Road is well connected to Mumbai and Ahmedabad by railway. 11.3 Climate

Tropical climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 29º C max temp 45º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 6º C max temp 29º C) 11.4 Tourist Inflow : : approx 7,15,000 per year approx 5-6 %

Domestic International

Tourist inflow is expected to be around 50 lakh during the period of Simhasta Kumbh mela to be held in August – September 2003 at Trimbakeshwar. Average duration of stay in Nashik is 2 days and 1 night.

11.4.1

Origin of tourists

Currently, tourists are from Maharashtra and Gujarat. Tourists from all over the country and even international tourists are expected during the Kumbha Mela.

11.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 40 % 30 % 20 % 10 %

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

11.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Pilgrim Tourists Leisure Tourists Business/ Study tourists Other 50 % 30 % 10 % 10 %

11.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8)

11.4.5

Profile of Tourists
%age 5% 10 % 25% 10% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 10 % 15 % 25 %

Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above

11.4.6

Spending Pattern : : Rs 2000 per day (approx) Rs 500 - 700 per day

International tourists Domestic tourists 11.5 Major Attractions

Major attractions in Nashik are essentially bases on the Pilgrimage theme. Major tourist destinations in and around Nashik are Trimbakeshwar, Wani (Saptashrungi gad), Chandvad (Ahilyabai holkar’s palace) and pilgrim spots in Nashik city. Nashik being situated on the banks of river Godavari, which is also called the Ganga, is host to an array of temples. Located in and around Nashik each of these temples has tales of its origin from mythology to recent Indian history. Some of the important pilgrim destinations in Nashik and around Nashik city are: Attraction Trimbakeshwar Panchvati Kailash math Guru Gangeshwar Veda Mandir Pandav Leni Wani Chandvad Anjaneri Location (From Nashik) 20 Kms Nashik City Nashik City Nashik City 10 Kms South of Nashik 52 kms 65 kms on Agra Rd. 25 kms Theme Tourist type Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Culture Family Culture Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Pilgrimage Heritage Heritage

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

11.6 11.6.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation Type 2 Star hotels – 02 Budget category – 50 (approx) Capacity 103 2000

11.6.2

Infrastructure Nashik Wani Trimbakeshwar Chandvad

Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious

11.7 Good 11.8 11.8.1

Other entertainment facility

Special Events & Festivals Simhastha Kumbha Mela

By far the most spectacular of all the events, the Kumbh Mela is a religious festival that occurs once every 12 years, and is celebrated in four major pilgrim centres around the country. In Maharashtra, the festival is held in Trimbakeshwar, Nashik. The Nashik Kumbh Mela is generally acknowledged to be the most sacred of all the festivals. Kumbha Mela is a mammoth fair where saints and devotees gather. Kumbha Mela is celebrated at the four centres in India depending on the positions of planets and stars. • • • • When Jupiter (Guru) and Sun are in zodiac sign Leo (Simha Rashi) it is celebrated in Trimbakeshwar, Nashik. When Sun is in zodiac sign Aries (Mesha Rashi) it is celebrated at Haridwar When Jupiter is in zodiac sign Taurus (Vrishabha Rashi ) and Sun is in zodiac sign Capricorn (Makar Rashi) Kumbha Mela is celebrated at Prayag When Guru and Sun are in zodiac sign Scorpio (Vrishchik Rashi) the Mela is celebrated at Ujjain.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

The next Sinhastha Kumbha Mela will be held at Trimbakeshwar in 2003-2004
Kumbha mela Dhwaja Rohan Kumbha mela Samapti Start of the Kumbh mela End of the Kumbh mela July 30th, 2003 Aug 27th, 2003

Main Events are known as Shahi snan. The dates for Shahi snan are as follows :
Pratham (First) Snan Dwitiya (Second) Snan Tritiya (Third) Snan Shravan Poornima ( Full moon ) Maha Parva - Shravan Amavasya ( New moon ) Bhadrapad Amavasya ( new moon ) Aug.12th, 2003 Aug.27th, 2003 Sept.10th, 2003

Around 25,000 tourists are expected to visit Trimbakeshwar, daily on the three auspicious days. A total number of 5,00,000 tourists are expected to come during the entire period of Sinhastha from August to September. 11.9 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

Nashik city like other major cities of Maharashtra, hosts many industrial giants like Mico, Gabriel, M&M, Ceat etc. Nashik is also a good education centre with engineering, medical and management institutions. Moreover, Nashik is also famous for its grape and onion produce. Thus, the dependency on tourism for employment is not much, especially in Nashik city. 11.10 Good 11.11 (i) • • • Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction There is little risk of decrease in tourist inflow less by virtue of Nashik being a pilgrimage destination. Nashik is equidistant from major cities like Pune, Mumbai and Aurangabad. Good road linkages and basic infrastructure are available at all locations except for Anjaneri fort. These destinations attract tourists almost round the year and there is less difference in peak and lean tourist traffic. Weakness General condition of attraction

(ii)

Nashik attracts mainly pilgrims and family tourists. Nashik is not popular among young tourists as a destination for group tours. Hence, the revenue generated per tourist is lesser as compared to leisure destinations. 11.12 Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

1. Proposed resort at Saptashrungi Gad (Wani) over 6 acres of land 2. On going development and beautification of Trimbakeshwar and approach roads to Trimbakeshwar under high level committee headed by the District Collector. 3. Water sports complex planned by Nashik Municipal Corporation

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

11.13

Project Ideas 1. Short duration culture workshop in Nashik. Nashik being a pilgrim destination on the banks of river Godavari, it has rich cultural linkages with mythology and ancient Indian history. It is thus apt to commence a short duration workshop or a training course which would impart to the participants, the teachings of Vedas and the Indian culture. The course could also involve introduction to Vedas, yoga and meditation. The target market for such courses should also include common pilgrims, international tourists, managers and high level corporate executives. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Amusement park at Nashik. 3 Star, Non star luxury and Budget accommodation at Nashik. Tourist information centre at Nashik. Budget accommodation at Wani. Ropeway at Wani from base to temple.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

12

Bhandardara

To Mumbai

To Pune

12.1

Introduction

Bhandardara dam (Wilson dam), built on the river Pravara in 1910 offers a wide variety of enchanting locations for nature lovers and leisure tourist. Apart from being a dam-site with a beautiful lake (Arthur lake), Bhandardara possesses all the characteristics of a hill station with its waterfalls, mountain peaks and dense forests. Bhandardara is at its prime beauty during and just after monsoon. Moreover Bhandardara is very conveniently located close to Pune, Mumbai and Nashik cities and only 40 kms off the Mumbai – Shirdi route. Location : North Maharashtra (Ahmednagar District) Latitude 19.35º N Longitude 73.50º E Altitude 750 m 121.59 sq. km 15.36 sq. km

Catchment Area Submerged Area

: :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

12.2

Accessibility

12.2.1

Road

Bhandardara is connected to Igatpuri (NH-3) from where one can go to Nashik and Mumbai and to Sangamner (NH-50) from where one can go to Pune and Ahmednagar. The road connecting Bhandardara to Igatpuri and Sangamner is a single lane road, which also is not in a good condition. There are no way side amenities on this road once you leave Sangamner or Ghoti near Igatpuri.
Pune Mumbai Ahmednagar Nashik Distances (Kms) Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara Bhandardara 191 185 125 99

12.2.2

Railway

Nearest railhead is Igatpuri. Many tourists arrive at Bhandardara by taking the train upto Kasara and proceeding by bus from Kasara. 12.3 Climate

Pleasant climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 20º C max temp 40º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 5º C max temp 25º C) 12.4 Tourist Inflow : : : approx 1,80,000 per year approx 100 per year 85 – 90 % are day tourists

Domestic International Day tourists 12.4.1

Origin of tourists

Being a popular weekend and monsoon day tour destination, most of the tourists (75%) are from the three cities of Pune, Mumbai and Nashik, which are within 5 hours drive from Bhandardara.

12.4.2

Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation 50 % 25 % 25 %

12.4.3

Nature of Tourist

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

12.4.4

Size of Groups

Family / Youth groups (6 - 8) Picnics (Large groups) (30 – 40)

12.4.5 Peak Lean 12.4.6

Seasonal Flow July to September January to June (25% decrease as compared to peak) Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 5% 30 % 10 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 30 % 20 % 5%

12.4.7

Spending Pattern : : : Rs 700 - 1000 per day Rs 300 – 500 per day Once in five years.

Overnight Day tourists Repeat tourists 12.5

Major Attractions
Location (From Bhandardara) 0 km 2 km 2 km 12 km 22 km 5 km 8 km 3 km 8 km 12 km Theme Nature Nature Nature Nature Adventure Nature Pilgrim/ Adventure Heritage/ Culture Heritage Adventure Tourist type

Attraction Arthur Lake Wilson Dam Umbrella Falls Randha Falls Konkan Kada Pemgiri Amruteshwar Mandir Agasti Rishi Ashram Ratnagadh Kalsubai

Youth/ Trekkers

12.6 12.6.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation
Type MTDC resort Other hotels 3 Capacity 90 50

12.6.2

Infrastructure

Except for STD/ ISD facility and a post office, there are no other basic infrastructure facilities at Bhandardara and other destinations near Bhandardara. There are no way side amenities on roads connecting from Bhandardara to other locations mentioned above. Even at Randha falls, which is a

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

There are no signages, information centres, information boards etc at any of these locations, though 810 guides are available in the Shendi village of Bhandardara to assist seasonal tourists. 12.7 Good 12.8 Environment Status and Regulations Other entertainment facility

The Arthur Lake, Wilson dam and Randha falls are under agriculture department and any activity at these locations would require approval from the irrigation department. 12.9 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The major occupation of the people in Shendi village is agriculture, others are government employees working at Wilson dam and the power station situated at the dam. There are about 10-15 Jeep operators who ply between Shendi and places like Igatpuri, Ghoti, Sangamner, Akola etc. There are 3 hotels in Shendi village, two of them offering restaurant facility. All three hotels together employ about 20 local residents. 12.10 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

Poor road condition and connectivity by road is a major constraint. Even frequent tourists visiting Bhandardara and Randha falls are unaware of other close by destinations such as Pemgirir table land, Agasti Muni ashram etc. This is due to the absence of tourist information centre at Bhandardara. There is only one bus each operating direct between Bhandardara and the cities of Mumbai, Pune and Nashik, from where most of the tourists come. 12.11 General condition of attraction

Very good 12.12 (i) Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction

Not being so popular destination, Bhandardara has managed to maintain a clean environment. Biggest strength of Bhandardara is the variety of natural beauty it offers to tourists, from lakes and waterfalls to mountain peaks and forests (ii) Weakness

It is away from the important roads connecting major cities of Maharashtra. Geographically Bhandardara cannot form a part of any other established tourist circuit.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

12.13

Proposed Plans for Tourism Development

Proposed MTDC resort at Pemgiri table-land, 5 km away from Shendi village. 12.14 Project Ideas

1. Water Sports complex at Arthur Lake Currently, there are no such activity centres to retain the tourists at Bhandardara. Retention of day tourists for an overnight halt at Bhandardara would increase the employment and the revenue generated through tourism substantially. One such retention activity would be water sports at the Arthur Lake. Arthur Lake has a submerged area of around 15 sq. m and offers ample scope for manual and motorized boating facility. 2. Restaurant at Bhandardara and Randha falls 3. Eco - Trail from Bhandardara to Kalsubai. 4. Rock - garden with musical fountain and landscaping at Randha falls. 5. Tourist information centre at Randha falls, which is gateway to Bhandardara and other destinations.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

13

SHIRDI

13.1

Introduction

Shirdi is the second largest pilgrim centre in India after Tirupati in terms of number of visitors. Shirdi’s main attraction is the mausoleum of Shri Sai Baba, who lived most of his life in Shirdi. Location : North Maharashtra (Ahmednagar District) Latitude 19º N Longitude 74º E Altitude 504 m : : 1.3 sq. km 26,169 (2001 Census)

Area Population 13.2 13.2.1

Accessibility Road

Shirdi is well connected to major cities of Maharashtra by roadways.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Distance Pune Mumbai Ahmednagar Nashik Aurangabad Shirdi Shirdi Shirdi Shirdi Shirdi 205 302 100 123 144

13.2.2

Railway

Nearest railhead is Manmad, which is 60 km away from Shirdi. 13.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 25º C max temp 40º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 15º C max temp 30º C) 13.4 Tourist Inflow

Approx 12,000 per day 40,000 on Thursdays 1,20,000 to 1,50,000 on Ramnavami, Dassera and Gurupoornima Day tourists : 85 – 90 % are day tourists 13.4.1 Origin of tourists

All over the country, especially Maharashtra and Gujarat. 13.4.2 Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation 50 % 25 % 25 %

13.4.3

Nature of Tourist

Pilgrimage Tourists 13.4.4 Profile of Tourists Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 13.4.5 Spending Pattern : : : Rs 400 – 600 per day Rs 200 - 300 per day High, many tourists visit every year %age 5% 15 % 20 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 15 % 20 % 25%

Overnight Day tourists Repeat tourists

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

13.5 13.5.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation
Type MTDC resort Other hotels Capacity (Rooms) 90 (More than 60)

13.5.2

Infrastructure

Very good basic infrastructure facility at Shirdi to sustain 1.25 to 1.5 lakh visitors that visit the place on festival days of Ramnavami, Dassera and Gurupoornima. 13.6 Good 13.7 Environment Status and Regulations Other entertainment facility

Not applicable 13.8 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The major occupation of the people in Shirdi is agriculture, but tourism and tourism related employment plays a vital role in the employment scenario of Shirdi. There are over 60 hotels and restaurants in Shirdi town of size as small as 1.6 sq. km. There are many tour/ taxi operators plying between Shirdi and big cities like Pune, Mumbai, Aurangabad, Nagpur, Kolhapur, Nashik, Jalgaon, Surat, Vadodara etc. The population of Shirdi being 26,000, odd around 30% of the total employment is estimated to be related to tourism 13.9 Bottlenecks/ Constraints 1. Shirdi does not offer any other theme of tourism such as Leisure, adventure etc. 2. A major part of tourist are day tourist and thus revenue generated through tourism is comparatively less 3. Pilgrimage being the main objective of tourist, money spent on leisure activities such as entertainment etc is less. 13.10 General condition of attraction

Very good 13.11 (i) Strength and weakness analysis if the destination Strength of attraction

Very popular and well known destination. (ii) Weakness

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

14

Nawegaon - Nagzira

14.1

Introduction

Nagzira Wildlife Sanctuary is locked in the arms of nature and adorned with picturesque landscape, luxuriant vegetation and serves as a living outdoor museum to explore and appreciate nature. It has got immense potential from biodiversity conservation. The forests of Nagzira in Gondia district, which are fairly well-preserved have the advantage of two perennial tanks, one at Nagzira and the other at Thadezari and are an ideal habitat for wild life. The natural vegetation typifies the "Southern dry deciduous mixed forests". The animals commonly found are the tiger, panther, bison, sloth bear, Sambar, four-headed antelope, blue bull, chital barking deer, and mouse deer. Location (Nagpur) : Eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) Latitude 21.23° N Longitude 79.65° E Altitude 243 m 152.81 Sq. km

Area

:

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

14.2 14.2.1

Accessibility Road

Nagzira sanctuary can be visited either from Gondia or Bhandara. (via Sakoli).
Bhandara Gondia Nagpur Distances (Kms) Nagzira Nagzira Nagzira 66 45 122

14.2.2

Railway

The nearest rail head is Gondia at 45 Kms. Gondia lies on the Mumbai – Kolkata Railway route. The next nearest railhead is Bhandara Road at 75 Kms.

14.2.3

Air

The domestic airport of Nagpur located at Sonegaon is the nearest airport at a distance of 122 Kms. 14.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 23° C max temp 43° C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 12° C max temp 29° C) 14.4 Tourist Inflow

Domestic : approx 15,000 – 20,000 per year International : approx 100-150 per year Average duration of stay at Nagzira is 2 days (i.e., 2 days 1 night). 14.4.1 Origin of tourists

International tourists are from Australia, Canada & Europe. Approximately, 70 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from M.P, Chhattisgadh and Gujarat. 14.4.2 Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 30 % 30 % 25 % 15 %

14.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Business/ Study tourists 40% Leisure Tourists 60%

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

14.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) Corporate meetings/ seminars are also held. 14.4.5 Peak Lean 14.4.6 Seasonal Flow November to January, April - May. Feb- Mar, June – October. Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 5% 15 % 25 % 5% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 15 % 25 % 10 %

14.4.7

Spending Pattern Rs. 900 – 1300 per day (approx) Rs. 500 -800 per day Repeat tourists are only special interest study tourists who come once in a year.

International tourists : Domestic tourists : Repeat Tourists :

14.5

Infrastructure details

14.5.1

Accommodation
Type Capacity (Rooms) Forest Rest House Tents 6 nos. Dormitory 32 Budget Category 18 Ordinary Category 20

Alternatively one can stay at Bhandara or Gondia.
Capacity (Rooms) Bhandara 5 Star hotels – 00 0 3 Star hotels – 00 0 2 Star hotels – 00 0 High budget – 00 0 Budget category –5 113 Type

14.6 Nil. 14.7

Other entertainment facility

Environment Status and Regulations

There is a NDZ within the Park area.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

15
15.1

Nawegaon National Park
Introduction

Nawegaon National Park is located in Nawegaon, Gondia. Nawegaon National Park has great importance from nature conservation point of view. The forest is typical "Southern mixed dry deciduous forest". The main species are Teak, Haldu, Jamun, Kawat, Mahua, Ain, Bhel and Bhor etc. This National Park forms the catchment of the Nawegaon Lake and Itiadoh Lake. Both these lakes are important from agricultural point of view. These lakes are also important for fishing purposes. Wild animals spotted are – Tiger, Panther, Bison, Sambar, Nilgai, Chital, Wild boar, Sloth bear, and Wild dog. Location (Nagpur): Eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) Latitude 20.36° N Longitude 79.58° E Altitude 219 m 133.881 Sq. km

Area 15.2 15.2.1

:

Accessibility Road

Nawegaon National Park can be visited either from Gondia or Bhandara. (via Sakoli).
Bhandara Gondia Sakoli Distances (Kms) Sakoli Nawegaon Nawegaon 56 72 30

15.2.2

Railway

The nearest rail head is Deulgaon on Chandrapur-Gondia Railway line (2 Km.) and Gondia at a distance of 72Kms. Gondia lies on the Mumbai-Kolkata Railway route. The next nearest railhead is Bhandara Road at 86Kms. 15.2.3 Air

The domestic airport of Nagpur located at Sonegaon is the nearest airport at 150 Kms. 15.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 23 °C max temp 43 °C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 6 °C max temp 29 °C)

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

15.4

Tourist Inflow : : approx 1.5 Lac per year approx 100-150 per year

Domestic International

Average duration of stay at Nawegaon is 2 days (i.e., 2 days 1 night). 15.4.1 Origin of tourists

International tourists are from Australia, Canada & Europe. Approximately 70 % of domestic tourists are from Maharashtra while others are mainly from M.P, Chhattisgadh and Gujarat. 15.4.2 Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation Entertainment 30 % 30 % 25 % 15 %

15.4.3

Nature of Tourist
Business/ Study tourists 40% Leisure Tourists 60%

15.4.4

Size of Groups

International Tourists – Single or Couple Domestic tourists – Family/ Group (6 - 8) Corporate meetings/ seminars are also held. 15.4.5 Peak Lean 15.4.6 Seasonal Flow November to January, April - May. Feb- Mar, June – October. Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 64 and above %age 5% 15 % 25 % 5% Age Group 15-24 34-44 55-64 %age 15 % 25 % 10 %

15.4.7

Spending Pattern Rs. 900 – 1300 per day (approx) Rs. 500 -800 per day Repeat tourists are only special interest study tourists coming once in year.

International tourists : Domestic tourists : Repeat Tourists :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

15.5 15.5.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation
Capacity (Rooms) Forest Rest House Tents 15 nos. Dormitory 28 Budget Category 8 Ordinary Category 16 Type

Alternatively one can stay at Bhandara or Gondia.
Type Gondia 5 Star hotels – 00 3 Star hotels – 00 2 Star hotels – 00 Budget category –15 0 0 0 300 Capacity (Rooms)

15.5.2

Infrastructure
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Bhandara City Nagzira Nawegaon Gondia

15.6 Nil. 15.7

Other entertainment facility

Environment Status and Regulations

There is a NDZ within the Park area. 15.8 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

The dependency on tourism for employment in Bhandara & Gondia is less as compared to other tourist destinations. There are many large, small & medium industries in and around Bhandara at places like Bhandara Rod., Tumsar, Jawaharnagar, Lakhni, Madgi, Goregaon, and Amgaon. Occupations vary from Beedi rolling, artefacts from animal horns, farming, and industries like Rice Mills, Paper industries, Tiles, Manganese refineries, Ordnance factory, Motor assembly and Hand weaving. 15.9 General condition of attraction

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

15.10 (i) • • (ii) • • 15.11 • • • • 15.12 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Strength and weakness analysis of the destination Strength of attraction (Nawegaon/Nagzira) One of the few forests in India where the Tiger can be seen. Variety of flora & fauna. Weakness Tourist destinations are not being marketed properly. No proper means of commutation. Project Approved Satellite Conference Centre and Tourist Complex at Nawegaon. Non-motorized boating at Nawegaon Lake. Way side amenities at Sakoli. Tourist orientation at Nagzira. Project Ideas Bus Safari at Nagzira, Nawegaon. Elephant safari at Nagzira, Nawegaon. Bus service from Sakoli to Nagzira / Nawegaon. Nature trail at Nagzira/ Nawegaon. Beautification at Pratapgad fort near Nawegaon. Promotion boards at Nawegaon for Pratapgad, Itiadoh Dam.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

16

Amravati - Chikhaldara – Melghat

16.1

Introduction

Also called Amraoti, Amravati is located in north-eastern Maharashtra state, western India. It lies 85 miles (137 km) west of Nagpur. The town occupies an important position near passes through the hills that separate the cottongrowing regions of the Purna River basin (west) and the Wardha River basin (east). A growing industrial centre, it is expanding toward nearby Badnera; its cotton mills supply Bombay, Calcutta, and Ahmedabad. The nearby attractions are Melghat tiger reserve and Chikhaldara which is the famous Hill station of Vidarbha. Location (Amravati): Eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha) Latitude 20° N Longitude 77° E Altitude 343 m 12,212 Sq. km 2,606,063 (2001 Census)

Area Population

: :

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

16.2 16.2.1

Accessibility Road

Amravati is well connected to major cities of Maharashtra by roadways. It lies on the Dhule - Nagpur
Nagpur Mumbai Semadoh Amravati Shirdi Amravati 137 868 100

16.2.2

Railway

The closest railhead is Amravati or Badnera. The trains going to Nagpur from Mumbai will halt at Badnera. 16.3 Climate

Extreme climatic conditions March to July – Summer (Min temp 25º C max temp 40º C) August to October – Monsoon November to February – Winter (Min temp 15º C max temp 30º C) 16.4 Tourist Inflow
Chikhaldara 1,00,000 p.a Semadoh 30,000 p.a

16.4.1

Origin of tourists

Tourists come from all over the country, especially Maharashtra and Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh. A large portion of visitors to Chikhaldara are from neighbouring cities like Amravati, Akola and Nagpur. 16.4.2 Spending Pattern
Accommodation Food Transportation 50 % 25 % 25 %

16.4.3

Nature of Tourist

Leisure Tourists 16.4.4 Profile of Tourists
Age Group 3-14 25-34 45-54 %age 5% 30 % 20 % Age Group 15-24 34-44 55 and above %age 20 % 20 % 5%

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

16.4.5

Spending Pattern : : : Rs 500 – 700 per day Rs 300 - 400 per day High for Chikhaldara, many tourists visit here even twice a year. Trekkers are sure visitors every Monsoon.

Overnight Day tourists Repeat tourists

16.5

Major Attractions
Location 5-6 km radius in Chikhaldara 5-6 km radius in Chikhaldara 2 km Amravati City Theme Nature Heritage Nature Pilgrimage Tourist type Family Youth/ Trekkers Pilgrimage

Attraction Chikhaldara View Points Gavilgad Fort Semadoh Ambadevi Temple

16.6 16.6.1

Infrastructure details Accommodation

At Chikhaldara Type 5 Star hotels – 0 3 Star hotels – 0 2 Star hotels – 0 High budget – 5 Budget category – 6 16.6.2 Infrastructure Capacity (Rooms) 0 0 0 100 120

Good basic infrastructure facility is available at Chikhaldara. There is sometimes scarcity of water supply during summers. Semadoh forest tourist complex is in a very shabby state.
Facility Entertainment Telephone Internet Post Office Civic Amenities Eating Joints Medical Travel Agents Taxi Operator Forex ATM Religious Amravati City Chikhaldara Semadoh

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

16.7 Poor. 16.8

Other entertainment facility

Environment Status and Regulations

Whole of Semadoh and a certain portion of Chikhaldara has been demarked as NDZ. 16.9 Employment Opportunities and Avenues

Majority of the population of Chikhaldara is engaged in tourism activity. A part of the local tribes in the surrounding villages is engaged in farming activity. 16.10 Bottlenecks/ Constraints

Chikhaldara and Semadoh being a NDZ limited development is possible. 16.11 General condition of attraction

Very good. 16.12 Strength and weakness analysis if the destination

(i)

Strength of attraction

Chikhaldara is very popular and well known destination. It is the only Hill Station in the whole Vidarbha region. Semadoh being a Tiger reserve is a unique destination in itself. Incidentally, it also has the highest number of Tigers than any other reserve in Maharashtra.

(ii)

Weakness

Melghat Tiger reserve has a poor system of showing the Tiger to the visitor. Also the sighting possibility of a Tiger is very low due to hilly terrain. 16.13 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Proposed projects Coffee bar at Chikhaldara Public amenities at Chikhaldara. Budget and Non star luxury accommodation at Chikhaldara. Area development plan for Chikhaldara. Garden wit Musical fountain at Chikhaldara. Convention centre at Chikhaldara. Health resort at Chikhaldara. Trekking route development at Semadoh. Cottage accommodation at Semadoh village. Melghat orientation centre at Amravati.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism Ministry of Tourism & Culture C-1, Hutments, Dalhousie Road New Delhi 110001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra
June 2002

Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited Sarojini House 6 Bhagwan Dass Road New Delhi 110 001 India

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Issue and Revision Record
Rev Date Originator Checker Approver Description

This document has been prepared for the titled project or named part thereof and should not be relied upon or used for any other project without an independent check being carried out as to its suitability and prior written authority of Mott MacDonald being obtained. Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited accepts no responsibility or liability for the consequence of this document being used for a purpose other than the purposes for which it was commissioned. Any person using or relying on the document for such other purpose agrees, and will by such use or reliance be taken to confirm his agreement to indemnify Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited for all loss or damage resulting therefrom. Dalal Consultants and Engineers Limited accepts no responsibility or liability for this document to any party other than the person by whom it was commissioned.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1
1.1

Amusement Park
Project concept

The project will involve setting up of an entertainment park in a sprawling landscaped location. It will offer not-so-expensive rides and contain ancillary commercial outlets like restaurant, ice-cream parlour, toyshop and souvenir shop. The shops will be given on lease basis. The project will involve installation of different rides. The visitors will pay an entry charge to the park. Also, they will pay charges towards the ride availed. Other source of income to the park will be from the rentals of the shops and car park charges. Some of the rides that can be included are given below.

1.2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 1.3

Rides Trooper Bumper Car Tea Cup. Water Merry go Round Water Kiddie Ride Baby Train Bounce About Tora Tora Go Cart Loop Coaster Dragon Train Other Facilities

Other facilities, which will be included for visitor convenience, are Entrance Plaza, Ticket counter, public toilets, Kiosks. 1.4 Possible Locations

The park location is very crucial. It is suggested in the best commercial interest of the project to acquire land on commercial terms rather than wait for subsidized land. It is suggested that the park be located in the vicinity of major cities on the nearby outskirts. The cities near which such a project can be implemented are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Aurangabad Nashik Mulshi (Near Pune) Kolhapur Dapoli Nagpur

Since the basic rates of land and building & plant & machinery and the tourist availing the facility at the suggested time of implementation is approximately equal at all the above locations the same project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.5

Target market

Tourist theme – The changing lifestyle, exposure to roving amusement rides and dearth of meaningful recreational facilities combine to create a ready demand for amusement park. Tourist expecting a leisure holiday experience would be attracted towards such an activity. A customizable path approach is essential here as the customer capacity to pay is limited; large volume of business is essential. The target market for such a project would comprise middle class and above people from the city and surrounding satellite townships. As the suggested locations are wellestablished tourist attractions, a part of the tourists visiting these destinations can also be tapped as potential visitors. 1.6 Environmental implication

No major environmental impact is envisaged because of the project provided that appropriate arrangement for disposal of solid & liquid waster generated by the amusement park is made. 1.7 Socio-Economic impact

The ride operators, unskilled labour and the clerical staff, required for the park operation, can be locally employed. The project would create at least 132 direct new job opportunities for local residents. Moreover the project would increase day visitors to the destination as well act as a means of a retaining theme generating opportunities for other related tourism. 1.8 Highlights of the Project Details 2448 Rs. Lacs 1632 Rs. Lacs 816 Rs. Lacs 24 months 6 years 5 months 33.31% 3

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR)

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.9

Assumptions 30 10 360 2200 4000 8000 200 25 12000

No of Rides Hours of operation per day Working Days per Year Land and site development Building and civil works Capacity Per day Avg. Spending per person .On entry & Rides No of food stalls/ shops on contract basis Avg. Rent per stall per month Parking No of vehicles / No of Visitors Avg. collection per vehicle Built Up Area Area per restaurant/ shops Area for entrance complex Store room & other Diesel Cost Per Litre (Rs.) Power Cost per unit 1.10 Manpower Detail

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre visitors Rs Rs

5% 15 Rs 100 300 200 20 4 sq m sq m sq m Rs Rs

Category Managerial and Maintenance Ticket Clerk & Other clerks Ride operators Unskilled Labour Security Staff Total 1.11 Project cost

No 8 4 30 70 20 132

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 1.12 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 816.10 1632.21 2448.31
Debt 2.00 67%

Rs. Lacs 1100.00 120.00 700.00 200.00 100.00 222.00 6.31 2448.31

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

Ratio Equity 1.00 33%

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

1.13

Sales Item 1 20% 1600 1152 36 4 1192 2 20% 1600 1152 36 4 1192 3 25% 2000 1440 36 5 1481 Financial Year of Operation 4 5 6 7 30% 30% 40% 40% 2400 2400 3200 3200 1728 1728 2304 2304 36 36 36 36 6 6 9 9 1770 1770 2349 2349 8 40% 3200 2304 36 9 2349 9 50% 4000 2880 36 11 2927 10 50% 4000 2880 36 11 2927

% Utilisation Visitors per day Direct Revenue (Rs. Lacs) Other Revenue Parking Income Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs) 1.14

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs.) Lacs
Financial Year Of Operation I II III IV V 1152 40 1192 293 95 10 269 524 159 365 1152 40 1192 287 95 10 252 547 186 362 1440 41 1481 319 95 10 219 839 312 527 1728 42 1770 350 95 10 185 1130 434 695 1728 42 1770 353 95 10 151 1160 454 706 VI 2304 45 2349 414 95 10 118 1711 672 1039 VII 2304 45 2349 417 95 10 84 1742 689 1053 VIII 2304 45 2349 421 95 10 50 1772 704 1068 IX 2880 47 2927 482 95 10 17 2322 919 1404 X 2880 47 2927 486 72 10 0 2359 926 1433

Account Head Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2
2.1

Audio visual show
Project concept

The project will involve beautification and lighting of site, operation of audio visual show giving information of the site especially on forts narrating the history of the fort, major attractions on the fort and significant events from the Maratha history witnessed by the fort. 2.2 Components of the Project 1. Amphitheatre: A main stage and a seating arrangement would be constructed to host the Audio-Visual show. The seating arrangement would have a capacity of 150 people. The stage would be the complete with high quality acoustic system and control panel for light effects. 2. Light Effects: Lighting arrangement on the fort should be designed to light adequately the major attractions/ points on the fort. The light effects should be synchronized to the show commentary. 3. Sound effects: A pre recorded show commentary should anchor the show assisted by light effects on the fort. 4. Folk Show: The audio- visual show would be followed by folk show (called Powada) that narrates stories of significant events witnessed by the fort. The ‘powada’ was used as a motivator in the times of Raje Shivaji. 5. Language: Two shows in Marathi and Hindi each are proposed to begin with. An additional English show would be added later if necessary. 2.3 Possible Locations

Ideal locations for such shows would be monuments of historical importance especially fort of Shivaji and other heritage sites. For light effects to be effective, the show would essentially be held in the evenings. It is thus necessary that the location selected should be accessible and secure during nights, the location should have electric supply and should be close to camping destinations where accommodation is available. Particular locations identified by DCEL for such projects are 1. 2. 3. 4. Pratapgad Fort Panhala Fort Sinhagad Fort Daulatabad Fort 5. Sindhudurg Fort 6. Janjira Fort 7. Raigad Fort

2-1 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.4

Replicability

Since the basic rates of land and building & plant & machinery and tourist availing the facility at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability 2.5 Target market

Tourist theme – Tourist expecting a mix of leisure and adventure experience would be attracted towards such an activity. The target market for such a project would comprise middle class domestic tourists for Marathi show and out of state tourists for Hindi show. The show would also act as retaining theme for the destination converting it from a day tour destination to a camping destination. 2.6 Environmental implication

Such shows held in places like Golconda fort in Hyderabad and Shaniwar Wada in Pune have proved to be friendly to the environment. The revenue earned from the show can also be utilised in restoration activities of the historic monuments. 2.7 Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 8 new direct job opportunities for local residents of that destination and other indirect opportunities for other related tourism activities such as restaurants, eating joints, shops selling tourist commodities, local crafts and eatables etc, These would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community. 2.8 Implementation Agency

It is seen that though the project shows an IRR of only 16%. The operating profit margin is as high as 31% from the first year of operation. It is thus suggested that the government would make the initial investment and private entrepreneurs would operate the show on a yearly contract basis. Being a project related to development of heritage sites, international bodies like OECD, ADB, etc can be approached for initial funding. 2.9 Highlights of the Project Details 29.79 Rs. Lacs 19.86 Rs. Lacs 9.93 Rs. Lacs 12 months 16.97 1.63

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR)

2-2 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.10

Assumptions 150 300 100 Rs per sq. metre 2000 Rs per sq. metre 35 2 2 2 shows of 1 hour duration 4 Rs

Capacity Working Days per Year Site development Building and civil works Ticket per head No of shows per day Total hours of working Power Cost per unit 2.11 Manpower Detail

Category Managerial Operators Ticket Clerk Unskilled Labour Total 2.12 Project cost

No 1 4 1 2 8

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 2.13 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 9.93 19.86 29.79 Debt 2.00 67%

Rs. Lacs 0.50 4.00 20.00 1.00 1.00 2.65 0.64 29.79

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total 2.14 Sales Item

Ratio Equity 1.00 33%

Financial Year Of Operation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 % Utilisation 40% 40% 40% 50% 50% 50% 60% 60% 60% 60% Visitors Per Day 120 120 120 150 150 150 180 180 180 180 Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs) 12.60 12.60 12.60 15.75 15.75 15.75 18.90 18.90 18.90 18.90

2-3 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

2.15

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs) Account Head I II 12.6 0.0 12.6 6.4 2.3 0.1 3.1 0.7 0.1 0.6 Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 12.6 0.0 12.6 6.6 2.3 0.1 2.7 0.9 0.1 0.8 15.8 0.0 15.8 7.1 2.3 0.1 2.3 4.0 0.3 3.6 15.8 0.0 15.8 7.4 2.3 0.1 1.8 4.1 1.7 2.4 15.8 0.0 15.8 7.6 2.3 0.1 1.4 4.3 2.0 2.3 18.9 0.0 18.9 8.1 2.3 0.1 1.0 7.3 3.3 4.1 18.9 0.0 18.9 8.4 2.3 0.1 0.6 7.5 3.4 4.1 IX 18.9 0.0 18.9 8.7 2.3 0.1 0.2 7.6 3.5 4.1 X 18.9 0.0 18.9 9.0 1.6 0.1 0.0 8.2 3.6 4.7

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

12.6 0.0 12.6 6.2 2.3 0.1 3.3 0.7 0.1 0.6

2-4 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3
3.1

Beach Cottage Resort with Bar and Restaurant
Project concept

The suggested product would basically provide accommodation with restaurant and bar for 40 tourists per day. The project would comprise of following components 3.2 Cottage Accommodation 1. 20 Beach side cottages facing the beach at an appropriate distance from the High Tide Line as specified in the CRZ regulations (usually 200 m). 2. The cottages would be designed on lines of a traditional Konkani hut with sloping Mangalore tile roof. 3. The reception centre, restaurant and the overall ambience should be able to deliver an experience of being in a typical lazy Konkani village to tourists. 4. Each cottage would be a 2-bedded self-contained accommodation with provision for 1 extra bed. 3.3 Restaurant and Bar 1. Restaurant should include in its menu typical Konkani cuisine, complete with tempting and fresh seafood. 2. Restaurant should also offer specialties from the Konkan area like Kokam Sharbat, Amba wadi, Fanas poli and other delicacies peculiar to this region. 3.4 Possible Locations

Any tourist destination on the 720 Kms coast line of Maharashtra having approximately more than 50,000 tourists per year. Such a project in terms of lake view cottages where cottages would be built alongside a lake can also be undertaken. Depending upon the location of lake side cottages the theme used for designing the ambience would change, but still a rural touch must be given to attract tourists. Particular locations, Capacity and year of implementation identified by DCEL for such projects are Beach Resorts 1. Tarkarli 2. Malvan 3. Kunkeshwar 4. Devgad 5. Ratnagiri 6. Dervan 7. Harne 8. Karde 9. Harihareshwar 10. Diveagar Lake View Resorts 1. Koyna Reservoir 2. Bhandardara Lake 3. Randha Falls 4. Mulshi Lake

3-1 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

Since the basic rates of land and building & plant & machinery and tourist availing the facility at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability. 3.5 Target market

Tourist theme – Tourist expecting a mix of leisure and a cultural experience would be attracted towards such theme resort built on lines of a Konkani village. The target market for such a project would be middle class and higher tourists with annual income of over Rs 1.5 lac per annum. Such a theme related resort would also attract foreign tourists. 3.6 Environmental implication

Proximity of an accommodation project to the beach may degrade the beauty of the beach in terms of cleanliness and virginity. Care should be taken to minimize by creating a no plastic zone within the resort premises and proper solid waste management system. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. Discharge of solid waste and sewerage in the sea from points near the beach front should be discouraged right from the initial phase of planning. 3.7 Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 16 new job opportunities for local residents of that destination. Moreover the project would retain, on an average 8000-9000 tourists per year at that destination generating opportunities for other related tourism activities such as restaurants, eating joints, boat rides, shops selling tourist commodities, local crafts and eatables etc, which would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community. 3.8 Highlights of the Project Details Rs. 60.85 Lacs Rs. 40.57 Lacs Rs. 20.28 18 - 20 months 11 Year 11 months 21.99% 2.17

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR)

3-2 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.9

Assumptions 20 360 400 3000 9000 1000 650 120 240 767 250

No of Rooms Working Days per Year Land and site development Building and civil works Capacity Per day Room Tariff at peak (Rs.) @ Room Tariff at lean @ Peak No. of days Lean No. of Days Room Tariff Weighted Avg. vg Spending per room on food 3.10 Manpower Detail

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre visitors

Rs Rs

Category Managerial Receptionist cum tel. operator Chef Asst. Cook Waiters & Helpers Unskilled Labour TOTAL 3.11 Project cost

No 1 1 1 2 8 3 16

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 3.12 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 20.28 40.57 60.85
Debt 2.00 67%

Rs. Lacs 8.00 18.00 20.00 3.00 5.00 5.40 1.45 60.85

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

Ratio Equity 1.00 33%

3-3 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

3.13

Sales
Item 1 40% 2880 22.1 7.2 29.3 2 40% 2880 22.1 7.2 29.3 Financial Year Of Operation 3 4 5 6 7 8 50% 60% 60% 70% 70% 70% 3600 4320 4320 5040 5040 5040 27.6 9.0 36.6 33.1 10.8 43.9 33.1 10.8 43.9 38.6 12.6 51.2 38.6 12.6 51.2 38.6 12.6 51.2 9 70% 5040 38.6 12.6 51.2 10 70% 5040 38.6 12.6 51.2

Capacity Utilisation At Weighted Avg. Total Room Nights Sold Lodging Revenue Room Revenue Boarding Revenue Restaurant Revenue Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

3.14

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs) Account Head I II Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 51.2 0.0 51.2 22.8 3.0 0.5 2.9 22.0 8.7 12.9 51.2 0.0 51.2 24.1 3.0 0.5 2.1 21.6 8.6 12.5 51.2 0.0 51.2 25.4 3.0 0.5 1.3 21.1 8.5 12.0 IX 51.2 0.0 51.2 26.9 3.0 0.5 0.4 20.4 8.1 11.8 X 51.2 0.0 51.2 28.6 2.3 0.5 0.0 19.9 0.8 3.9

Revenue From Operation 29.3 29.3 36.6 43.9 43.9 Other 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Total Revenue 29.3 29.3 36.6 43.9 43.9 14.1 14.8 17.0 19.3 20.3 Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Interest On L.T. Loan 6.7 6.3 5.4 4.6 3.8 Profit Before Tax 5.1 4.7 10.7 16.6 16.4 Tax 0.8 3.5 6.1 6.3 8.7 Profit After Tax 3.9 7.2 10.4 10.1 13.4

3-4 of 4

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4
4.1

Budget Accommodation
Project concept

The suggested product would basically provide a budget grade accommodation facility to the tourists. The project would comprise of following components 4.2 Accommodation 1. The hotel will have rooms with basic facilities. 2. A restaurant will take care of boarding needs of the tourists 3. . 4.3 Possible Locations

Particular locations identified by DCEL for such projects are 4.4 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Locations Aurangabad Ajantha Paithan Nashik Wani Bhandardara Mumbai Bhimashankar Pune Pratapgad Wai Koyna Kolhapur Panhala Amboli Sawantwadi Tarkarli 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. Malvan Kunkeshwar Devgad Ratnagiri Dervan Harne Karde Harihareshwar Diveagar Wardha Tadoba Nagpur Ramtek Amravati Chikhaldara Semadoh Ambejogai

Since the basic rates of land and building and minimum tourist arrivals tourist arrivals expected at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations (with an exception for cities like Mumbai, Nagpur, Pune) is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability 4.5 Target market

Tourists expecting a low expenditure on accommodation would be attracted to such a project.

4-1 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

4.6

Environmental implication

There will be no significant environmental impact to the location due to implementation of the project. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. 4.7 Socio-Economic impact

A 30-room hotel project would create at least 16 direct new job opportunities for local residents of that destination. This would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community. 4.8 Highlights of the Project

The financial indicators will vary depending on the size of the project. The following are the indicators for a 30-room hotel
Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) Details Rs. 42.02 Lacs Rs. 28.02 Lacs Rs. 14.01 Lacs 10 – 12 months 11 Years 9 months 22.01% 2.03

4.9

Assumptions
30 360 400 3000 400 250 300 120 240 200 4

No of Rooms Working Days per Year Land and site development Building and civil works Room Tariff at peak (Rs.) @ Room Tariff at lean @ Room Tariff Weighted Avg. Peak No. of days Lean No. of Days Avg. Spending per room on food Power Cost per unit

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre

Rs Rs

4.10

Manpower Detail
No 1 1 1 1 10 2 16

Category Managerial Receptionist cum tel. operator Chef Asst. Cook Waiters & Helpers Unskilled Labour TOTAL

4.11

Project cost
Rs. Lacs 1.80 13.50 16.60 3.00

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets

4-2 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost

2.00 3.69 1.43 42.02

4.12

Means of finance
Rs. Lakhs 14.01 28.02 42.02 Debt 2.00 67% Ratio Equity 1.00 33%

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

4.13

Sales
Item 1 50% 5400 300 16.2 10.8 27.0 2 50% 5400 3 50% 5400 Financial Year Of Operation 4 5 6 7 60% 60% 70% 70% 6480 6480 7560 7560 8 75% 8100 9 75% 8100 10 75% 8100

Capacity Utilisation At Weighted Avg. Total Room Nights Sold Lodging Revenue Room Tariff Weighted Avg. Room Revenue Boarding Revenue Restaurant Revenue Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

16.2 10.8 27.0

16.2 10.8 27.0

19.4 13.0 32.4

19.4 13.0 32.4

22.7 15.1 37.8

22.7 15.1 37.8

24.3 16.2 40.5

24.3 16.2 40.5

24.3 16.2 40.5

4.14

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I 27.0 0.0 27.0 14.9 2.5 0.2 4.6 4.9 0.6 4.3 II 27.0 0.0 27.0 15.2 2.5 0.2 4.3 4.8 1.0 3.8 Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 27.0 0.0 27.0 15.6 2.5 0.2 3.8 4.9 1.4 3.5 32.4 0.0 32.4 17.4 2.5 0.2 3.2 9.2 3.4 5.9 32.4 0.0 32.4 17.8 2.5 0.2 2.6 9.3 3.6 5.7 37.8 0.0 37.8 19.6 2.5 0.2 2.0 13.6 5.4 8.2 37.8 0.0 37.8 20.0 2.5 0.2 1.4 13.7 5.6 8.1 40.5 0.0 40.5 21.2 2.5 0.2 0.9 15.8 6.5 9.3 IX 40.5 0.0 40.5 21.7 2.5 0.2 0.3 15.8 6.6 9.2 X 40.5 0.0 40.5 22.3 1.9 0.2 0.0 16.1 6.6 9.5

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

4-3 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5
5.1

Convention Centre
Project concept

The suggested project would provide a place for corporate meetings, training programs with required media equipment & IT support. The project would comprise of following components 5.2 Centre 1. A conference hall designed to seat 60 persons. 2. A cafeteria cum restaurant to take care of lunch, dinner & snacks requirements. 3. The interior work of architecture can be moulded to blend with the tourism theme of the location giving it an ethnic touch. 5.3 Possible Locations

There is an unprecedented rise in conference-business. This is an outcome of changes in corporate management style and growing competition. Intracompany brainstorming, corporate planning, marketing, training, dealer interaction, special project work all these require executives / others to get away from the normal place of work and spend time together on a group basis. Hill stations offer an excellent environment for such a project. Particular locations, Capacity and year of implementation identified by DCEL for such projects are 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Amboli Bhandardara Dapoli Chikhaldara Paithan

Since the basic rates of land and building and tourist arrivals tourist arrivals expected at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability 5.4 Target market

Tourist theme – With the rise on conferences / corporate meets the Theme will be oriented to Corporate Tourism. The target market for such a project would be mainly for corporates and training institutes.

5-1 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.5

Environmental implication

There will be no significant environmental impact to the location due to implementation of the project. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. 5.6 Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 12 new direct job opportunities for local residents of that destination. Moreover the project would retain, corporate tourists at that destination generating opportunities for other related tourism activities such as restaurants, eating joints, boat rides, shops selling tourist commodities, local crafts and eatables etc, which would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community. 5.7 Highlights of the Project Details Rs. 50.81 Lacs Rs. 33.87 Lacs Rs. 16.94 Lacs 8 – 12 months 9 Years 3 months 25.42% 2.32

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) 5.8 Assumptions 60 300 350 4000 35000 300 150 4

Capacity Working Days per Year Site development Building and civil works Rent Per Day Max no of days rentals per year Avg. cost on food per person per day Power Cost per unit 5.9 Manpower Detail

persons Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre

Rs

Category Managerial Receptionist Chef Other Restaurant Staff Unskilled Labour TOTAL

No 1 1 1 5 4 12

5-2 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

5.10

Project cost Rs. Lacs 4.90 28.00 7.25 4.00 1.00 4.52 1.15 50.81

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 5.11 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 16.94 33.87 50.81
Debt 2.00 67% Ratio

Source of fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total 5.12 Sales
Item Capacity Utilisation Per Year Rental days per in a year Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs) 1 30% 90 31.50 2 30% 90 31.50 3 30% 90 31.50

Equity 1.00 33%

Financial year of operation 4 5 6 7 40% 40% 50% 50% 120 120 150 150 42.00 42.00 52.50 52.50

8 60% 180 63.00

9 60% 180 63.00

10 60% 180 63.00

5.13

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I II 31.5 0.0 31.5 16.8 2.1 0.1 5.2 7.3 2.0 5.3 Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 31.5 0.0 31.5 17.1 2.1 0.1 4.5 7.7 2.4 5.4 42.0 0.0 42.0 21.0 2.1 0.1 3.8 15.0 5.4 9.6 42.0 0.0 42.0 21.3 2.1 0.1 3.1 15.4 5.7 9.7 52.5 0.0 52.5 25.3 2.1 0.1 2.4 22.6 8.6 14.0 52.5 0.0 52.5 25.6 2.1 0.1 1.7 23.0 8.9 14.1 63.0 0.0 63.0 29.6 2.1 0.1 1.0 30.2 11.7 18.5 IX 63.0 0.0 63.0 29.9 2.1 0.1 0.3 30.6 12.0 18.6 X 63.0 0.0 63.0 30.3 1.8 0.1 0.0 30.8 12.0 18.8

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

31.5 0.0 31.5 16.6 2.1 0.1 5.6 7.2 1.6 5.5

5-3 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6
6.1

Health Resort
Project concept

The suggested project would provide a place for those who are interested in physical, spiritual wellbeing. And also, for those who just want to relax. Various packages will be offered with certain duration for each. The resort will combine the best of both the systems – western and Indian. Health club & allied facilities will be modern, while there will be excellent Ayurvedic and nature therapy facilities. The project would comprise of following components and facilities: 6.2 Health Resort 1. A non-star luxury accommodation comprising of 30 rooms. 2. A restaurant cum dining hall to take care of lunch, dinner & snacks requirements. The food served will emphasize on health, wholesomeness and nutrition. 3. Steam / Sauna bath facilities. 4. Ayurveda / herbal treatment. 5. Nature therapy. 6. Yoga / meditation center. 7. Sophisticated health club / gymnasium. 8. Walkways / jogging facilities. 9. Library. 6.3 Possible Locations

The location of such a project plays an important role in its success. The environment should be quiet, peaceful and conductive to a health-promoting, stress – relieving experience. Hill stations offer an excellent environment for such a project. The locations selected for such a project are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Amboli Bhandardara Bhimashankar Chikhaldara Ganapatipule Koyna

Since the basic rates of land and building and tourist arrivals tourist arrivals expected at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability. 6-1 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.4

Target market

Tourist theme – There is a growing awareness regarding health in a larger sense – remaining fit and active, body weight, control over aging process, stress –management. The project would harp upon the theme of Health Tourism. The demand for these activities normally stems from the prosperous sections such as businessmen, professionals politicians, and government officials. Also, there is a heavy demand from women. Hence, the focus should revolve around these sections of the society. 6.5 Environmental implication

There will be no significant environmental impact to the location due to implementation of the project. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. 6.6 Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 26 new direct job opportunities for local residents of that destination in the general category. Also, 6 new job opportunities at the instructor level are envisaged. However, all the personnel for this category will have to be trained properly. Moreover, the herbs that would be required for nature cure / Ayurvedic treatment will be bought from the local residents who will collect these from the surrounding forests. This would also contribute to the general socio-economic development of the local community. 6.7 Highlights of the Project Details Rs. 238 Lacs Rs. 158 Lacs Rs. 79 Lacs 8 – 12 months 12 Years 8 months 22.95% 2.05

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) 6.8 Assumptions 30 360 400 3000 1500 1000 120 240 1167 4 150

No of Rooms Working Days per Year Land and site development Building and civil works Average cost of health course per day per person at peak rate Average cost of health course per day per person at lean rate No of peak days No of lean days Weighted avg. Cost per day per person Power Cost per unit Raw material cost for food per person per day 6-2 of 3

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre Rs Rs

Rs Rs Rs

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

6.9

Manpower Detail No 1 6 1 1 2 5 26

Category Managerial Instructors/ Trainers Receptionist cum tel. operator Chef Asst. Cook Waiters & Helpers TOTAL 6.10 Project cost

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 6.11 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 79.48 158.96 238.43
Debt 2.00 67% Ratio

Rs. Lacs 60.00 60.00 85.73 3.00 5.00 21.37 3.33 238.43

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total 6.12 Sales
Item Capacity Utilisation Per Year No Of Visitor Days Sold Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs) 1 40% 8640 100.8 2 50% 10800 126.0 3 50% 10800 126.0

Equity 1.00 33%

Financial Year Of Operation 4 5 6 7 60% 60% 70% 70% 12960 12960 15120 15120 151.2 151.2 176.4 176.4

8 70% 15120 176.4

9 70% 15120 176.4

10 70% 15120 176.4

6.13

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I II 126.0 0.0 126.0 49.3 11.2 0.5 24.6 40.5 11.5 29.0 III 126.0 0.0 126.0 51.0 11.2 0.5 21.3 42.0 13.9 28.1 Financial Year Of Operation IV V VI VII 151.2 0.0 151.2 58.6 11.2 0.5 18.0 62.9 23.3 39.7 151.2 0.0 151.2 60.7 11.2 0.5 14.8 64.1 24.8 39.3 176.4 0.0 176.4 68.7 11.2 0.5 11.5 84.6 33.5 51.1 176.4 0.0 176.4 71.3 11.2 0.5 8.2 85.3 34.4 50.9 VIII 176.4 0.0 176.4 74.1 11.2 0.5 4.9 85.7 35.0 50.7 IX 176.4 0.0 176.4 77.3 11.2 0.5 1.6 85.8 35.5 50.3 X 176.4 0.0 176.4 80.8 8.2 0.5 0.0 86.9 35.1 51.8

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

100.8 0.0 100.8 42.0 11.2 0.5 26.2 20.9 1.7 19.1

6-3 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7
7.1

Mall Road
Project concept

The suggested project would provide a shopping place selling various local handicrafts and artefacts. Also the stalls would sell local cuisine. The stalls would be made available by the government to local private entrepreneurs and in return a monthly rent would be charged. The project would comprise of following components 7.2 Mall Road 1. 40 stalls with traditional architectural features. 2. Some of the stalls would sell local cuisine and delicacies. 7.3 Possible Locations

The unique identity of Panhala as a fort cum hill station with its proximity to Kolhapur which itself is famous for its handicrafts more so ever its leather footwear makes it an appropriate location. The land provision support is desired from the local municipal corporation and the tourism department. 7.4 Target market

Tourist theme – The project will harp upon the concept of ethnic tourism. Handicrafts and handloom are rapidly growing markets. Further, the foreign buyers have made India rediscover the value of crafts. The ethnic has become fashionable. It creates an environment, which brings together commercial/creative elements of craft. 7.5 Environmental implication

There will be no significant environmental impact to the location due to implementation of the project. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. 7.6 Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 9 new direct job opportunities in the administrative cadre who would supervise the overall functionality of the Mall road. The leasing of the stalls would create additional direct employment to the local artisans and craft persons.

7-1 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7.7

Highlights of the Project Details Rs. 40.74 Lacs Rs. 27.16 Lacs Rs. 13.58 Lacs 8 – 10 months 16 Years 11 months 18.23% 1.2

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) 7.8 Assumptions

Capacity (Stalls) 40 Working Days per Year 300 Site development 400 Rs per sq. metre Building and civil works 3000 Rs per sq. metre Rent per stall per month 7000 Rs Power Cost per unit 4 Rs Land is free as implementation agency is Municipal Corporation, Tourism Dept. (Initial Investment + Private player for operation) 7.9 Manpower Detail No 1 4 4 9

Category Managerial Security Administrative & Housekeeping Staff TOTAL 7.10 Project cost

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 7.11 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 13.58 27.16 40.74
Debt 2.00 67% Ratio

Rs. Lacs 2.40 12.00 20.00 1.00 1.00 3.64 0.70 40.74

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

Equity 1.00 33%

7-2 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

7.12

Sales
Item 1 50% 16.8 2 50% 16.8 3 50% 16.8 Financial Year Of Operation 4 5 6 7 60% 60% 60% 70% 20.2 20.2 20.2 23.5 8 70% 23.5 9 80% 26.9 10 80% 26.9

Stall Capacity Utilisation Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

7.13

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I 16.8 16.8 7.3 2.6 0.1 4.5 2.4 0.2 2.2 II 16.8 16.8 7.5 2.6 0.1 4.2 2.4 0.2 2.2 Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 16.8 16.8 7.8 2.6 0.1 3.6 2.7 0.2 2.5 20.2 20.2 8.4 2.6 0.1 3.1 6.0 2.1 3.9 20.2 20.2 8.7 2.6 0.1 2.5 6.3 2.5 3.8 20.2 20.2 9.0 2.6 0.1 2.0 6.6 2.8 3.8 23.5 23.5 9.6 2.6 0.1 1.4 9.9 4.2 5.7 23.5 23.5 9.9 2.6 0.1 0.8 10.1 4.4 5.7 IX 26.9 26.9 10.6 2.6 0.1 0.3 13.4 5.7 7.6 X 26.9 26.9 10.9 1.9 0.1 0.0 14.0 5.8 8.2

Revenue From Operation Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

7-3 of 3

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8
8.1

Non Star Luxury Accommodation
Project concept

The suggested product would basically provide a non -star grade accommodation facility to the tourists. The project would comprise of following components 8.2 Accommodation 1. The hotel will have well furnished rooms. 2. It will offer different categories of rooms to suit different pocket sizes. 3. Air-conditioned rooms will also be available. 4. All the rooms will have a Television and intercom facility. 5. A restaurant will take care of boarding needs of the tourists. 8.3 Possible Locations

Particular locations identified by DCEL for such projects are 8.4 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Locations Aurangabad Ajantha Paithan Lonar Nashik Bhandardara Mumbai Bhimashankar Pune Koyna Kolhapur Panhala 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Amboli Sawantwadi Tarkarli Malvan Ratnagiri Harne Harihareshwar Wardha Nagpur Amravati Chikhaldara

Since the basic rates of land and building and minimum tourist arrivals tourist arrivals expected at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations (with an exception for cities like Mumbai, Nagpur, Pune) is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability 8.5 Target market

Tourists expecting a good cadre of accommodation above the general budget type but below the star categories would be attracted to such a project.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8.6

Environmental implication

There will be no significant environmental impact to the location due to implementation of the project. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project. 8.7 Socio-Economic impact

A 30-room hotel project would create at least 23 direct new job opportunities for local residents of that destination. The hotel / restaurant in future can employ local performing artists, which would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community. 8.8 Highlights of the Project

The financial indicators will vary depending on the size of the project. The following are the indicators for a 30 room hotel Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) 8.9 Assumptions
30 360 400 3000 850 650 120 240 717 250 4

Details Rs. 79.11 Lacs Rs. 52.74 Lacs Rs. 26.37 Lacs 10 – 12 months 10 Years 6 months 23.6% 2.21

No of Rooms Working Days per Year Land and site development Building and civil works Room Tariff at peak (Rs.) @ Room Tariff at lean @ Peak No. of days Lean No. of Days Room Tariff Weighted Avg. Avg. Spending per room on food Power Cost per unit

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre

Rs Rs Rs

8.10

Manpower Detail No 1 1 1 2 15 5 25

Category Managerial Receptionist cum tel. operator Chef Asst. Cook Waiters & Helpers Unskilled Labour Total

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

8.11

Project cost Rs. Lacs 20.00 21.00 21.10 3.00 5.00 7.01 2.00 79.11

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost 8.12 Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 26.37 52.74 79.11
Debt 2.00 67% Ratio

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total 8.13 Sales
Item Capacity Utilisation Total Room Nights Sold Lodging Revenue Room Revenue Boarding Revenue Restaurant Revenue Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs) 1 40% 4320 31.0 10.8 41.8 2 40% 4320 31.0 10.8 41.8 3 50% 5400 38.7 13.5 52.2

Equity 1.00 33%

Financial Year Of Operation 4 5 6 7 60% 60% 70% 70% 6480 6480 7560 7560 46.4 16.2 62.6 46.4 16.2 62.6 54.2 18.9 73.1 54.2 18.9 73.1

8 70% 7560 54.2 18.9 73.1

9 70% 7560 54.2 18.9 73.1

10 70% 7560 54.2 18.9 73.1

8.14

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I 41.8 41.8 19.9 3.2 0.5 8.7 9.5 1.9 7.6 II 41.8 41.8 21.0 3.2 0.5 8.2 9.0 2.3 6.7 III 52.2 52.2 24.1 3.2 0.5 7.1 17.3 6.0 11.3 Financial Year Of Operation IV V VI VII VIII 62.6 62.6 27.4 3.2 0.5 6.0 25.6 9.5 16.0 62.6 62.6 28.9 3.2 0.5 4.9 25.2 9.7 15.5 73.1 73.1 32.5 3.2 0.5 3.8 33.1 12.9 20.2 73.1 73.1 34.2 3.2 0.5 2.7 32.5 12.9 19.6 73.1 73.1 36.2 3.2 0.5 1.6 31.6 12.7 18.9 IX 73.1 73.1 38.3 3.2 0.5 0.5 30.6 12.4 18.2 X 73.1 73.1 40.7 2.5 0.5 0.0 29.5 11.8 17.7

Revenue From Operation Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9
9.1

Restaurant
Project concept

The suggested product would basically provide eating facility to the tourists. The project would comprise of following components 9.2 1. 2. 3. Restaurant 10 Tables, which will be able to accommodate 40 tourists at a time. The restaurant would be given a touch of the tourist theme of the location. The restaurant will serve local cuisine along with other Indian foodstuffs. Possible Locations

9.3

Particular locations identified by DCEL for such projects are 9.4 1. 2. 3. 4. Locations Dajipur Diveagar Totladoh Ajantha

Since the basic rates of land and building and minimum tourist arrivals tourist arrivals expected at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability 9.5 Target market

Tourist theme – Tourist expecting a food joint with a cultural experience would be attracted to such a project. The target market for such a project would be all class of tourists. Giving an Ethnic touch would also attract foreign tourists. 9.6 Environmental implication

The restaurant will have no significant environmental impact at the location. Care should be taken to minimize though by creating a no plastic zone at locations near to the Reserve forests in case of Dajipur & Totladoh. A self-contained system for solid waste management would be desirable for the project.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.7

Socio-Economic impact

The project would create at least 12 direct new job opportunities for local residents of that destination. The restaurant in future can employ local performing artists, which would contribute to general socioeconomic development of the local community. 9.8 Highlights of the Project Details Rs. 6.76 Lacs Rs. 4.51 Lacs Rs. 2.25 Lacs 5 – 6 months 1 Years 11 months 68.15% 8.24

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) 9.9 Assumptions

No of Tables Working Days per Year Hours of working per day Land and site development Building and civil works Capacity Per day Avg. Spending per person food Raw Material Cost as percentage of sales Diesel Cost Per Litre (Rs.) Power Cost per unit Cost of LPG per cylinder 9.10 Manpower Detail

10 360 12 350 3000 900 30 35 20 4 300

Rs per sq. metre Rs per sq. metre visitors
Rs

% Rs Rs Rs

Category Managerial Chef Asst. Cook Waiters & Helpers Unskilled Labour Total 9.11 Project cost

No 1 1 2 4 4 12

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost

Rs. Lacs 0.70 3.00 1.25 0.30 0.10 0.54 0.88 6.76

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

9.12

Means of finance Rs. Lakhs 2.25 4.51 6.76
Debt 2.00 67% Ratio Equity 1.00 33%

Source of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

9.13

Sales
Item 1 20% 19.4 2 25% 24.3 3 25% 24.3 Financial Year of Operation 4 5 6 7 30% 30% 35% 35% 29.2 29.2 34.0 34.0 8 40% 38.9 9 40% 38.9 10 40% 38.9

Capacity Utilisation Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

9.14

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs)
Account Head I 19.4 0.0 19.4 13.4 0.3 0.0 0.7 5.0 1.8 3.2 II 24.3 0.0 24.3 16.0 0.3 0.0 0.7 7.4 2.7 4.6 III 24.3 0.0 24.3 16.5 0.3 0.0 0.5 7.0 2.6 4.4 Financial Year of Operation IV V VI VII VIII 29.2 0.0 29.2 19.3 0.3 0.0 0.3 9.4 3.6 5.8 29.2 0.0 29.2 19.9 0.3 0.0 0.1 8.9 3.4 5.5 34.0 0.0 34.0 22.7 0.3 0.0 0.0 11.0 4.2 6.8 34.0 0.0 34.0 23.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 10.3 4.0 6.3 38.9 0.0 38.9 26.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 12.2 4.7 7.5 IX 38.9 0.0 38.9 27.4 0.3 0.0 0.0 11.2 4.4 6.9 X 38.9 0.0 38.9 28.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 10.3 4.0 6.3

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10
10.1

Beach / Lake Water Sports
Project concept

The project will involve installation of sea-based water sports activities. A list of these activities / facilities is given below. The users will pay a ride charge. 10.2 Beach Rides and Facilities 1. Parasailing (1 nos – Speed boat + Parasail assembly): Under this activity a Para sailor is connected to a sea-bound speedboat. The Para sailor remains on the shore. The speedboat is normally 150 m away from the sailor. The speedboat moves just as the helpers open up the parachute. The pull given by the boat lifts the Para sailor from the sand. The sailor can achieve a height of maximum 375 m. the sailor lands on sand or in shallow water. 2. Water Scooter (2 nos): The scooter will be a 2-seater boat & run on petrol. This can be handed over to the tourist to drive or a driver will be provided by the operator. 3. Water Skiing (1 nos – Speed boat + Skiing assembly): The skier will hold on to a string attached to a speedboat. As the boat gains speed the skier will balance on the surface of water by means of two flat boards or ski’s. This needs some skill & training, which can be imparted quickly. 4. Surf Boards (20 nos): The surfer will ride the board on the inbound waves while balancing himself. 5. Life Jackets (40 nos): The tourist will have to wear a life jacket to undertake any of the above-mentioned activities to ensure safety. 10.3 Lake Rides and Facilities 1. Row Boat (5 nos): These will be 4 seater boats which will be operated by the tourist themselves or a row person will be provided by the operators. 2. Water Scooter (4 nos): The scooter will be a 2-seater boat & run on petrol. This can be handed over to the tourist to drive or a driver will be provided by the operator. 3. Water Skiing (1 nos – Speed boat + Skiing assembly): The skier will hold on to a string attached to a speedboat. As the boat gains speed the skier will balance on the surface of water by means of two flat boards or ski’s. This needs some skill & training, which can be imparted quickly. 4. Mini Pirate Boat (1 nos): This will be 12-seater motorboat, which will be operated by a driver for a group of people & driven around the lake. 5. Pedal Boat (5 nos): This will be a 2-seater boat, which will be operated by 2 people.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10.4

Possible Locations

Any tourist destination on the 720 Kms coast line of Maharashtra having approximately 15,000 tourists per year. Lake water sports can be implemented at lake with sufficient water availability throughout the year with tourist flow approximately same as above. Such projects can clubbed together with beach resorts or lakeside cottages. Particular locations identified by DCEL for such projects are Beach Water Sports 1. Murud - Harne 2. Karde 3. Harihareshwar 4. Mithbao 5. Ratnagiri 6. Alibag 1. 2. 3. Lake Water Sports Khadakvasla (Pune) Bhandardara (Wilson Dam Backwaters) Koyna Dam

Since the basic rates of land and building & plant & machinery and tourist availing the facility at the suggested time of implementation is the approximately equal at all the above locations is same the project can be replicated at all these locations without major changes in capital outlay and profitability. 10.5 Target market

Tourist theme – Tourist expecting a mix of leisure and adventure experience would be attracted towards such an activity. The target market for such a project would comprise middle class and higher tourists with annual income of over Rs 1.5 lac per annum. Such a theme related resort would also attract foreign tourists. 10.6 Environmental implication

Being a small-scale operation the project will not have any significant adverse effect on the environment. Moreover, the suggested locations do not have any commercial activity such as fishing by local fishermen, market for marine products on the beach / lakefronts.

10.7

Socio-Economic impact

The boat operators & clerks can be locally employed with minor training. The project would create at least 7 direct new job opportunities for local residents of that destination for beach sports & 13 direct new job opportunities in case of lake water sports. Moreover the project would increase day visitors at that destination generating opportunities for other related tourism activities such as restaurants, eating joints, shops selling tourist commodities, local crafts and eatables etc, which would contribute to general socio-economic development of the local community.

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10.8

Highlights of the Project
Beach Water Sports 22.04 Rs. Lacs 14.69 Rs. Lacs 7.35 Rs. Lacs 6 months 9 years 8 months 25.41 2.3 Lake Water Sports 33.36 Rs. Lacs 22.24 Rs. Lacs 11.12 Rs. Lacs 6 months 4 years 7 months 40.86 3.6

Description Total Project Cost Expected Financial assistance Promoters equity Implementation Period Payback Period Internal rate of Return (IRR) Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR)

10.9 (i)

Assumptions Beach
Nos 1 4 20 1 Trips / Veh per day 16 16 8 16 Total Trips 16 64 160 16 Capacity 100% 100% 100% 100% Rate / ride 100 50 20 75

Ride Para Sailing Water Scooter Surf Boards Water Skiing

(ii)

Lake
Nos Trips / Veh per day 16 16 16 16 16 Total Trips 80 64 128 16 80 Capacity 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Rate / ride 20 50 120 50 20 Total 1600 3200 15360 800 1600

Row Boat (4 seater) Water scooter (2 seater) Mini Pirate Boat (12 seater) Water Skiing (Speed boat+ Skiing assly) Pedal Boat (2 seater)

5 4 1 1 5

10.10
Category

Manpower Detail
Beach No. 1 4 2 7 Lake No. 1 1 8 3 13

Manager Ticket Clerk Boat Operators Unskilled Labour TOTAL

10.11

Project cost
Beach Rs. Lacs 1.00 4.00 12.88 1.00 1.00 1.99 21.87 22.04 Lake Rs. Lacs 1.00 4.00 23.03 1.00 1.00 3.00 0.33 33.36

Item 1. Land & Site Development 2. Building & Civil Works 3. Plant & Machinery 4. Miscellaneous Fixed Assets 5. Preliminary & Preoperative Expenses 6. Provision For Contingencies 7. Margin For Working Total Project Cost

Study Report on Preparation of 20 Years Perspective Plan for Development of Sustainable Tourism in Maharashtra

Dalal Mott MacDonald Joint Director General (MR), Department of Tourism

10.12

Means of finance
Beach Rs. Lacs 7.35 14.69 22.04 Lake Rs. Lacs 11.12 22.14 33.36 Ratio Debt Equity 2.00 1.00 67% 33%

Source Of Fund 1. Equity Capital 2. Rupee Term Loan Total

10.13 (i)

Sales Beach
Item 1 40% 8.8 2 40% 8.8 Financial Year Of Operation 3 4 5 6 7 8 50% 60% 60% 70% 70% 70% 11.0 13.2 13.2 15.5 15.5 15.5 9 70% 15.5 10 70% 15.5

Capacity Utilisation At Weighted Avg. Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

(ii)

Lake
Item 1 40% 21.7 2 40% 21.7 3 50% 27.1 Financial Year Of Operation 4 5 6 7 8 60% 60% 70% 70% 70% 32.5 32.5 37.9 37.9 37.9 9 70% 37.9 10 70% 37.9

Capacity Utilisation At Weighted Avg. Total Revenue (Rs. Lacs)

10.14 (i)

Projected profitability statement and computation of tax (Rs. Lacs) Beach
Account Head I II 8.8 0.0 8.8 3.1 1.6 0.1 2.3 1.8 0.2 1.7 III 11.0 0.0 11.0 3.4 1.6 0.1 2.0 4.0 1.3 2.7 Financial Year Of Operation IV V VI VII VIII 13.2 0.0 13.2 3.7 1.6 0.1 1.7 6.3 2.3 3.9 13.2 0.0 13.2 3.8 1.6 0.1 1.4 6.5 2.6 3.9 15.5 0.0 15.5 4.1 1.6 0.1 1.1 8.7 3.5 5.1 15.5 0.0 15.5 4.2 1.6 0.1 0.8 8.9 3.7 5.2 15.5 0.0 15.5 4.3 1.6 0.1 0.5 9.1 3.8 5.2 IX 15.5 0.0 15.5 4.4 1.6 0.1 0.2 9.2 3.9 5.3 X 15.5 0.0 15.5 4.5 1.1 0.1 0.0 9.7 4.0 5.7

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

8.8 0.0 8.8 3.0 1.6 0.1 2.4 1.8 0.1 1.6

(ii)

Lake
Account Head I II 21.7 0.0 21.7 6.3 2.6 0.1 3.4 9.2 2.7 6.5 Financial Year Of Operation III IV V VI VII VIII 27.1 0.0 27.1 7.0 2.6 0.1 3.0 14.4 5.1 9.3 32.5 0.0 32.5 7.6 2.6 0.1 2.5 19.6 7.5 12.1 32.5 0.0 32.5 7.8 2.6 0.1 2.1 19.9 7.8 12.0 37.9 0.0 37.9 8.5 2.6 0.1 1.6 25.0 10.0 15.0 37.9 0.0 37.9 8.8 2.6 0.1 1.1 25.3 10.2 15.0 37.9 0.0 37.9 9.0 2.6 0.1 0.7 25.5 10.4 15.1 IX 37.9 0.0 37.9 9.2 2.6 0.1 0.2 25.7 10.6 15.1 X 37.9 0.0 37.9 9.5 1.8 0.1 0.0 26.5 10.7 15.8

Revenue From Operation Other Total Revenue Cost Of Sales Depreciation (St. Line) Amortisation Of Pre-Op Expenses Interest On L.T. Loan Profit Before Tax Tax Profit After Tax

21.7 0.0 21.7 6.1 2.6 0.1 3.7 9.1 2.1 7.0

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...~ UTTERWORTH E I N E M A N N 0261-5177(95)00082--8 Tourism Management, Vol. 16, No. 8, pp. 593-61)4, 1995 Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved 11261-5177/95 $10.0(1 + 0.00 Alternative tourism in Montserrat David B Weaver Luther College, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada $4S 0.42 Small island states or dependencies have increasingly turned to international mass tourism as a strategy for overcoming their underdeveloped status. However, mounting criticism of this sector has increased the interest in alternative tourism. The Caribbean island of Montserrat is well positioned to implement an ecotourism strategy based on the island's scenic beauty, biodiversity and historical/cultural attributes. This would augment an already unconventional tourism product emphasizing low-density residential tourism. The fact that few tangible initiatives have so far been taken in the direction of ecotourism is not problematic, since careful planning is advisable given the risks inherent in any form of tourism, and given existing and potential problems which could threaten its viability. A Montserrat Heritage Trail network is proposed as the centrepiece of this ecotourism product, while various marketing and institutional initiatives are recommended. Keywords: Montserrat, alternative tourism, ecotourism, small islands Peripheral regions are continuously struggling to identify activities which will contribute to the......

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Tourism

...Negative Impact Of Tourism On ( Language ) , ( Religion ) And ( Customs And Tradition ) | | | | <Name> | | <Date> | | Introduction Tourism is unarguably one of the most dynamic and developing sectors earning a myriad of countries across the globe millions of dollars in different forms. A number of countries have benefited from infrastructural development, currency inflows, educational and management skills associated with tourism. Citizens from these countries have as well gained from various employment opportunities resulting from economic development of the regions visited by tourists. Some of the highly developed Western nations such as Switzerland, Italy, and Austria have attributed most of its economic and social welfare development to tourism. (Smith, 2006) Currently, it is approximated that tourism contributes to 10% of global income with at least 10% of the world workforce earning their daily bread from the sector. Viewed as ‘manna from heaven’ most analysts perceive tourisms as a way of balancing foreign trade and as a source of foreign exchange with minimal discussion on the negative challenges it’s associated with. The discussion in this paper will mainly focus on the negative challenges of tourism with deep analysis on language, religion, customs and tradition, drawing examples from various countries known as tourist destinations across the globe. P.62 Discussion One of the strongest signs of negative impacts to tourism is on language......

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...Surigao del sur state university Main-campus A Requirement For Tourism 1 Five tourism supply components Submitted by: Roselyn Q. Timkang 4:00-5:00 (MWF) Submitted to: Mr. Rudyard Ryann T. Verano, MBA instr Natural resources Discussion: Natural resources is significant in the development of the tourism, because it can attract tourist especially in terms of those beautiful spots such as water falls, lakes, islands and many beautiful spots that can there feel enjoyed and relax. A Philippines have the most number of beautiful sites and spots, so we must have to improve and develop our natural resources, we should maintain its beauty so that we can benefit from it. Surigao del sur state university Main-campus A Requirement For Tourism 1 Five tourism supply components Submitted by: Roselyn Q. Timkang 4:00-5:00 (MWF) Submitted to: Mr. Rudyard Ryann T. Verano, MBA instructor Hospitality Resources Discussion: Philippines are best known for our hospitality, Filipino are hospitable, it is important for the country to have those kind of manner so that tourist will feel at home, relax and enjoyed. This is the best asset of every Filipino that tourist and......

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Tourism

...Tourism industry has turn into a consequential sector in both developed and developing countries including Malaysia (Pazim,Rosli,2011). Tourism sector in Malaysia has shown positive achievements and contributes significantly to the country's economy and it has become a focus area for investment. Norsiah and Zaini (2012) stressed out that tourism is one of the most expeditious growing industries in the accommodations sector and the second most astronomically immense gross domestic product (GDP) contributing industry for Malaysia. Malaysian government plays an important role in developing the tourism industry in order to promote Malaysia as a tourism destination for both leisure and business related purposes and drive the growth of international arrivals to Malaysia include initiatives such as Visit Malaysia Year 2014 and Year of Festivals 2015. As pointed out in the Ninth Malaysia Plan (2006-2010), a magnification in tourism is optically discerned to have a positive relationship to the expansion of other sub-sectors, especially the homestay industry as well as in others that carry ecotourism related products and accommodations (Intan,Hazlina,et al,2010). Growth in tourism makes a positively impact towards homestay industry for the past few years. According to Anis (2009), homestay makes an awesome occasion alternative which has tremendously increased over the last five years with budget-friendly option. Homestay is one of the accommodation options for tourist who wants to......

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