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Treaties and Tribunals

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Treaties and Tribunals

Judges and authorized persons investigate and make decisions on a certain affairs given to them using the same standards (Tribunals). A good example of this is when special international criminal tribunals that were established in Yugoslavia and Rwanda by the United Nations to prosecute the ones responsible for the atrocities which happen at war and genocide time. Another example to see what tribunal means is the trials of Saddam Hussein and the other Baath Party officials (Tribunals).

Tribunals which are important part in the justice system make contributions in peoples’ lives. They deal with more than 500,000 cases a year. Some of the vulnerable cases are victims of crime, discrimination, treated unfair, persecution, and disputes about tax, employment, and benefit entitlement and they are managed by tribunals.

Tribunals help the people recuperate the confidence that they can achieve justice when dealing with the federal, state and international levels. They need institutions that can empower them to work out their disagreements fairly, proportionately, and quickly. Tribunals help problems to be more manageable for the people. Tribunals are also important because two countries are so far away from each other and it helps make the relationship between two countries stronger because they are the checks and balances in the relationship between the two countries.

Tribunals are also important to two are more countries because will hold people accountable for committing crimes in which their own country may not have the laws in place to do so, they dismantle the tradition of impunity for war crimes and other violations of international laws (Will Savive, 2011). Tribunals are not only affected by cultural and political differences of nations, they are also formed because of them. The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), was spawned by...

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