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Truth and Reality

In: Social Issues

Submitted By korilin10
Words 585
Pages 3
The text asserts that "reality is a product of the cultural and historical period in which it exists." Examine this position either cross-culturally (comparing societies in two different countries) or historically (comparing one country, probably the U.S., in two different time periods). For example, you could discuss accepted "truth" about the Earth's position in the universe today compared to that of the 1600s.

After reading the text it truly seems like “truth” and “reality” are always changing. What seems to be 100% true right now may seem silly one hundred years from now, or even in a few years. I agree that “reality is a product of the cultural and historical period in which it exists." An example that came to mind is the Salem witch trials. The witch hunt occurred in Massachusetts between the years 1692 and 1693. During this time people believed that the Devil could give give others special powers. The Salem which trials came about shortly after thousands of accused witches in Europe were executed in their own witch hunt. Throughout the entire Salem witch trials over 200 people (mostly women) were accused of being witches influenced by the Devil, and around 20 were executed.

The event that sparked the Salem witch trials was when the Reverend’s daughter and niece began to act in very strange manners. They would make strange noises, scream, throw objects, and have shaking episodes where their bodies would contort. The town’s doctor believed these episodes were the result of magic or the supernatural. A month later, three women were blamed for the attacks. The women charged with the crimes were a female slave, a homeless woman, and a poor elderly woman. When questioned all claimed to be innocent except for the slave who confessed that the Devil told her to do it. The townspeople began to grow paranoid that the Devil was turning people into...

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