Tuskegee Syphilis Research Study

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Tuskegee Syphilis Research Study
Leslie Valentine
ME1415: Medical Law and Ethics and Records Management
Ultimate Medical Academy
Zakevia Green

Abstract
In this paper I am going to answer the following questions as the relate to the Tuskegee Syphilis Research Study found on page 264 in the Medical Law and Ethics textbook by Bonnie F. Fremgen. The questions are:
1. Could this type of research be conducted today? Why or why not?
2. What should the public have done, since they knew about the study?
3. In your opinion, how should the data be used that is obtained from an unethical experiment and how can we prevent this from happening again?
4. Discuss the code of ethics as it relates to this study?
5. What are your personal thoughts on the ethical standards exhibited through this study?

Tuskegee Syphilis Research Study
Any research like the Tuskegee Syphilis Research Study could not be conducted today. There are many reasons as to why this type of research study cannot be conducted today. One reason is because people of all races are more aware of diseases that today’s society has now than they were back then. Also, people nowadays want to be treated for the disease(s) that they have whether than be experimented with. People in today’s society are also more aware of the researches that are taking place to not allow this type of study to be conducted.
In my opinion, the public should have not allowed this type of research to be conducted. In the research study on page 264 in our textbook it states “ the public was outraged that poor black men had been subjected to a research project without their consent and denied treatment for a treatable disease in an attempt to gain what was seen as useless information” (Fremgen, 2012, p 264). The public in this research did not know anything about this research until the 1960s when a researcher working for the…...

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