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Two Solitude

In: English and Literature

Submitted By awandeemi
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Two Solitudes is far from being a great work of fiction--it can be hokey, preachy, heavy-handed, trite, and dated--but it is both an entertaining human story and a knowing political novel, only slightly marred by MacLennan's over-idealistic nationalism. The Canada that MacLennan presents, a country in which a citizen is either French-Canadian or English-Canadian (or a rare hybrid) never really existed, but the political climate prompted by this illusion is still with us. MacLennan's novel is one of the most sympathetic (and readable) literary chronicles of the tensions and misunderstandings that gave birth to modern Quebec. --Jack Illingworth

“Two solitudes”, which was written by Hugh McLennan at 1945, was his most famous novel. The Author, Hugh MacLennan was born in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, 1907. There are about seven novels, travel books and uncountable essays that mediate between the European cultural heritage and American vigor and idealism. “Among his many honors, he won five Governor Generals Awards.” And finally, Hugh MacLennan died in Montreal in 1990.
It was a literary allegory for English and French Canadian from 1917 to 1939. The author divided this novel into 4 parts. “It is set during World War I, and a cast of “archetype” characters relay the story, being representations of French Canadians or Catholics or Businessman during this time period.” The novel’s plot was focus on the life of the fictional character named Paul Tallard, who is struggling between the differences of his English and French Canadian identities. According to the analysis that I found on the Internet, someone said that “There is only one sentence in the whole novel containing this expression: Two solitudes in the infinite waste of loneliness under the sun.” The author separates the chapters by timeline, which is chronicle form to indicate the truthfulness of Canadian history to...

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