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Understanding Sociology

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Critical Review: Understanding Sociology
DIEU TRAN
San Antonio College
SOCI 1301
August 28, 2014 Chapter one of books always seem to be the most important one since it usually summarize what the book is about. Going through this chapter, I will discuss its 8 points: the purpose or main message of this chapter; the agreement about this chapter; the idea, concept, or theory that I think is the most important; the strength of this chapter; my feeling about the information from this chapter; the contribution that author make in this chapter; the future research; and the evaluation from a scale of 1 to 25. The main message of this chapter is about understanding sociology and how it works in the society. It is shown in the book by going through three main ideas: sociology, major sociology perspectives, and sociological imagination. Sociology is, as defined in the chapter, the scientific study of social behavior and human groups.” It’s similar to the way I’m thinking about sociology, which is the study about behavior of individual or groups in society and how society influences one’s behavior. I think the theory of sociological imagination is the most important out of the three ideas. A recently study has shown that “sociological imagination is an awareness of the relationship between an individual and the wider society.” (Mills, 2000, p.5) There’s an example about using sociological imagination to explain my observation about the overweight of half or more people in my city or hometown: I could say that from the outside I think they are unhappy from being obese, but from their perspective it is a sign of health (p.5). Major strength of this chapter is sociological perspective: functionalist, conflict, and interactionist. People view society in different ways, same with sociologist. In this chapter, the author was giving a direct approach to sociological…...

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