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Union Labour

In: Business and Management

Submitted By BCCsara
Words 321
Pages 2
Labour education is mostly looked at as being practical and developmental in the work place. It is the way learning shapes the processes of work. (Bratton, Mills, Tyrch, Sawchuk, Workplace Learning, A critical Introduction 2004.) Labour education is schooling for union members. It is where the union members learn about issues in the workplace and beyond. They learn the grievance process, how to negotiate contracts, human rights etc. This training helps the union members understand their rights in the work place and helps their own cause. Unions usually offer this training to its members in house. (Athabasca University, Work and Learning, Education 406/Human Resources Management 406, Course Guide, Revision 1, 2009.)

Unions can demand from their employers a form of education that takes place at work. Labour education has tools in its belt to help employees in the work place to learn. In their belt they use tools, issues and labour studies courses in labour education. (Bratton et al. (2004) found page 108). The tool courses are to help unions and thus help to represent their fellow workers, through their knowledge, to do a better job and understand their rights with management. These tools work on leadership, collective bargaining and grievance procedures. This helps to stream line the day to day activities of the work place to run smoothly.

Issue courses are more tuned to racism, sexism and reorganization in the work place. This training is done to understand the issues that affect the workplace environment. How everyone is able to interact with each other in the workplace.

Labour studies are more of a formal education, done in a university and not taken at work. This education by individuals is brought into the work place and affects more management and union relations on a whole as it would relate to collective bargaining.

What...

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