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Unit Plan: Canada in the Dirty Thirties

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The Dirty Thirties and the Emergence
Of Canadian Social Assistance
Grade 10 Academic-CHC2D
Dec. 12, 2011

By: Kate Raatzs,
Archana Selvaragan and Jennifer Joseph

Table of Contents
Task Page
Design Plan Statement 1
Course Outline 2-5
Unit Overview 6
Unit Calendar 7-8
Enduring Understandings/Essential Questions 9-10
Lesson Summaries: a) Causes of Economic Troubles 11 b) Population Changes and Immigration 12-14 c) Technology of the 1930s 15 d) Life in the 1930s 16 e) On-To-Ottawa and Social Unrest 17 f) Social Assistance Programs 18 g) Then and Now Review Lesson 19-21 h) Then and Now Round Table Assignment 22-23
Appendix A: Round Table Discussion Handout 24 Rubric for Round Table Discussion and other Assessment ideas 25-28 Topic Organizer 29-31 Speech Planner 32

Design Process Statement Our group initially decided to work together because each of us was specifically interested in developing lessons for Grade 10 Canadian History – Academic. Some of us wanted to develop our understanding of the curriculum itself, while others wanted to focus on working with students of this age. After reviewing the curriculum of the course, we discussed how the course should be organized. For some aspects of the curriculum, we felt a traditional chronological organization would be beneficial. For other portions, it seemed as if thematic units would serve our students better. In the end, we decided to work with a hybrid of the two models, which contained both chronological units and thematic units.
Our group choose to focus our attention on the ‘Dirty 30s’ and social assistance programs because we felt that this unit was uniquely able to give students multiple opportunities to compare and contrast the history contained within the unit to modern events. Specifically, we found multiple references comparing and contrasting the current global recession to the Great Depression, as well as some comparisons between the Occupy movement and the social unrest exhibited in the 1930s, especially the On-to-Ottawa trek.
In designing the unit, we felt that it was important to utilize backward mapping principles. With this in mind, we began to develop the unit by first creating a summative assessment that would require students to contrast one aspect of modern life with life in the 1930s. We agreed upon the idea of roundtable discussions. We felt that these discussions would give students ample flexibility in the ways in which they were able to express their understanding of the unit. Since multiple roundtables will be required, we chose to assign a different topic to each roundtable, thus giving the students choice about their assessment.
Consistent with backward mapping techniques, we felt it would be beneficial to discuss the summative assessment at the beginning of the unit, both to help students organize their thinking throughout the unit and to provide students ample time to consider each roundtable topic as they progressed through the unit. Thus, we have created student resources which will be distributed at the beginning of the unit and will help structure the unit. Students will be asked to reflect on each lesson and record their thinking using these resources.
Once the summative assessment had been created, we felt that it was very important that each lesson relate directly to the summative assessment and support the enduring understanding on which the roundtables would focus. In addition, we attempted to create lessons which would regularly ask students to compare and contrast the events and society of the 1930s with the present day. To do that, we incorporated roleplaying, timelines, graphic organizers, think-pair-share activities and jigsaw activities. We believe the resulting lessons will help students to develop historical thinking and critical thinking skills.
Grade 10 Canadian History (Academic)-Course Overview

Unit # & Title | Name/title of task | Brief description of task (what type? ind.vs group? content?) | Enduring Understanding Being Addressed | List Types of Formative Assessments or Scaffolding | 1: World War 1 | Group Essay | Students will work in groups of four to create a research paper on their choice of topics related to World War 1 using sources discovered by peers throughout the unit. Each student will be assigned and evaluated on a specific section of the research paper. | Causes of World War I and Canada’s involvement, including the conscription crisis.Canadians’ individual and collective contributions to World War I, both in battle and at home.How Canada’s identity and relationship with Britain changed during World War I. | Thesis statement and outline reviewPeer reviews on outline and rough draftConferences | 2:Consequences of World War 1 and the Roaring 20s | Historical Innovation Inquiry | Students will work individually in this task. Students will investigate a popular innovation or trend that impacted Canada in the 1920s. Students will outline the purpose of the innovation/trend. They will investigate and evaluate the impact of the innovation/trend on Canadian society in the 1920s and today’s society. | Understand the impact of scientific, technological and social developments on Canadians.Contribution of scientific and technological innovations by Canadian scientists and inventors.Technological conditions changed working conditions in Canada since World War 1. | Brainstorming of World War 1 Scientific, Technological and social Innovations Think-Pair-Share (What does Roaring 20s mean?)Peer Conferences | 3: The Dirty 30s and Canadian Social Assistance Programs | Round Table Discussion: Canada Then and Now | Students will hold roundtable discussions comparing and contrasting the 1930s and present day Canada. Roundtables will be moderated by the instructor. Participants will respond to questions from peer audience members and the moderator. | Evolution of the Canadian identity.Understanding of social assistance programs for the Canadian economy.Impact of technological developments on the Canadian society.Compare/contrast economic and social development in the 1930s & 21st century.Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness. | Timeline of Social Assistance ProgramsThink Pair ShareObservations and ConferencingGraphic Organizers | 4: World War II | Docudrama | In this task, students will work in small groups to create a character that portrays the life and thoughts of a person who lived through/served in/experienced a part of WWII. Students will have the choice of the person they want to portray and will present the information as a docudrama to the class. | Causes of WWII.Canada and its people’s contribution to WWII.The holocaust and Canada’s response.Canada’s peacekeeping role and defense of human rights.The effects of WWII on the economy. | TimelineBrainstorming Web ObservationConference | 5:Multicultural-ism and the Expansion of Rights and Freedoms | Interview and Oral Presentation | Students will work individually while interviewing a family member/friend who has immigrated to Canada. They will examine reasons for immigrating, where the majority of immigrants from that country/region settled, when they came, and immigration policies in place at the time and whether there were incentives for people to come. Students will present the information to the class orally with their choice of presentation method. | Reasons for immigration.Patterns of immigration in Canada.Urbanization and population shifts and their impact.The Charter of Rights and Freedoms. | TimelineKWLS ChartOne on one conferencing | 6: Canada in the World Today | Concept Maps | Students will demonstrate their understanding of major themes from previous units to discuss Canada in the world today. They must individually develop a concept map by hand or using Smart Ideas Concept Mapping Software. | Patterns of immigration in Canada.Canada’s peacekeeping role and defense of human rights.Evolution of the Canadian identity.Understand the impact of scientific, technological and social developments on Canadians. Contribution of scientific and technological innovations by Canadian scientists and inventors. | Terminology of major conceptsKey words to connect ideas and concepts Modeled Writing/Group collaboration of a concept map | Course Culminating Activity: (15%) | Platform and Stump Speech | Students will create a platform and stump speech for a ‘new’ political party. The platform and stump speech will:-identify the major issues facing Canada and recommend strategies for dealing with these issues.-show that the philosophy of the new party is in line with Canadian thought by comparing current and historical Canadian issues.-contrast the new party with at least two major current political parties in Canada. | Influences on the evolving Canadian identity.Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada. The contributions of various groups and individuals to Canadian culture and society.How to evaluate events of the past, contrast the events to current events, and create informed opinions about events past and present.Communicate historical thinking in a variety of ways, including written, oral, and visual presentations created for multiple audiences. | Class polls and discussionsOutline of stump speech Exit slips | Course Culminating Assessment:Final exam(15%) | Exam consisting of in class essay, multiple choice and short answer questions. | Students will be given a brief set of possible essay topics in advance of the exam. They will be able to choose the topic they address. In addition, students will be expected to respond to a set of multiple choice questions and 5 of 7 short answer questions | The Evolving Canadian identity.Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada. The contributions of various groups and individuals to Canadian culture and society.How to evaluate events and contrast event and create informed opinions about events past and present.Communicate historical thinking through writing. | Student created review gamesEssay question mind mapsFishbowl activity with questions written by the students |

Unit Overview

The Dirty Thirties and the Emergence of Canadian Social Assistance

The Great Depression also known as the Dirty Thirties was a difficult time period for Canadians. In this unit, students will examine and analyze the economic, social and political impact of the Dirty 30s on the Canadian society. Through roundtable discussions, research, concept mapping and role-playing, students will gain a deeper understanding of the lives of Canadians individually and collectively. The goal of this unit is to allow students to recognize and assess the similarities and differences that parallel the 1930s and our current societies.

In order to achieve this goal, students will learn about the creation of Social Assistance programs in Canada and analyze the effectiveness of it. Students will get the opportunity to compare/contrast the similarities and the differences of the programs implemented in the 1930s and in our current society.

In the 1930s technology and a growing demographic population changed communities in Canada. Students will research specific inventions and examine the impact of technological innovations on human life. By doing so, students will also be able to identify and describe the impact these technologies have on our current society. Lastly, students will focus on the demographic population of the 1930s and analyze the effect of Urbanization on the Canadian Society.

Unit Calendar: The Dirty 30s and Social Assistance Programs Lesson Number and Title | Days | Enduring Understandings | Notes | 1: Causes of Economic Troubles | Day 1 and Day 2 | -Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century-Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged | Introduce unit, discuss summative assessment and pass out description, rubric and topic organizer.Students should be familiar with the stock market crash from the unit on the Roaring 20s. | 2: Demographic Change | Day 3 and Day 4 | -Evolution of Canadian Identity | | 3: Technology | Day 5 – Day 7 | -Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada.-Impact of technological developments on the Canadian Society | | 4: Life in the 1930s | Day 8 and Day 9 | -Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada. -Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century | | 5: On-to-Ottawa and Social Unrest | Day 10 and Day 11 | -Evolution of the Canadian Identity-Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | | 6: Social Assistance Programs | Day 12 and Day 13 | -Evolution of the Canadian Identity-Understanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian Economy-Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness-Outcome of the 1930s: were the programs effective or not? | At the end of day 12, give students 5 minutes to rank the roundtable topics in order of interest. Overnight, assign roundtable topic groups to allow the most students one of their top choices. Pass out speech planner on day 13 when groups are announced. | 7: Then and Now | Day 14 | -Evolution of the Canadian Identity-Understanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian Economy-Impact of technological developments on the Canadian Society-Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century-Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | | 8: Summative Assessment: Roundtable Discussions | Day 15- Day 17 | -Evolution of the Canadian Identity-Understanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian Economy-Impact of technological developments on the Canadian Society-Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century-Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | |

Canadian History Grade 10

Big Ideas of Course- Essential Understandings & Enduring Questions

Big Ideas-Course: * Influences on the evolving Canadian identity. * Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada. * Students will understand the contributions of various groups and individuals to Canadian culture and society. * Students will understand how to evaluate events of the past, contrast the events to current events, and create informed opinions about events past and present. * Students will be able to communicate their historical thinking in a variety of ways, including written, oral, and visual presentations created for multiple audiences.
Essential Questions: * How has the Canadian identity evolved since 1914? What has influenced our understanding of Canadian identity? * How has Canada’s role in international affairs changed in the last century? What events, both inside Canada and globally, have impacted Canada’s place in the global community? * How have relations between various communities in Canada, including native peoples, women, and Francophone communities changed and why? * How has life in Canada been changed by technology? * What political movements have impacted Canada and how? * What individuals most impacted life in Canada? How did they make their impact?
Big Ideas-Unit: The Dirty Thirties and Canadian Social Assistance * Evolution of the Canadian identity * Understanding of social assistance programs for the Canadian economy * Impact of technological developments on the Canadian Society * Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century * Emergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness

Secondary Ideas: * Outcome of the 1930s—were the programs effective or not? * Evolution of Economic and Social Development from the 1920s, 1930s & 21st century

Essential Questions:

1.How did the economic conditions of the 1930s affect the lives of Canadians individually and collectively?
2. Why and how were social programs developed to meet the demands of the Canadian Society?
3. What are some similarities and differences between the 1930s and our current economic and social conditions?
4. What technological developments have occurred since the 1930s and how have they affected the lives of Canadians at home and in the workplace?
5. How did the demographic of Canada’s population change in the 1930s and how did urbanization affect Canadian society?

Lesson Summaries Title | Causes of Economic Troubles | Time | 2 days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Compare/Contrast economic and social development in the 1930s & 21st centuryEmergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged | Activity Overview | -First, the class will brainstorm and discuss their previous knowledge of the Dirty 30s. The students will be asked to consider what problems of the Dirty 30s are still faced by Canadians today. The teacher will explain that students will be studying the Dirty 30s and comparing events of that decade to recent events. The teacher will then describe the major summative assessment for the unit (roundtables) and the class will formulate success criteria together. The teacher will distribute the assessment rubric and graphic organizers which the students will use to organize and reflect on their learning for the unit.-Next, students will watch a ten minute video which discusses similarities between the economic difficulties of the 1930s and of today. Students will then read an article which highlights the differences between the two periods. As they watch the video and read the article, they will complete a chart identifying causes of economic difficulties in the 1930s and today. The class will then brainstorm about additional causes not mentioned in the video or article. Then the class will divide into groups. Each group will conduct further research into one of the causes identified and determine if it was a cause of the Great Depression, the current Global recession, or both. Finally, new groups will be formed which will consist of one member of each of the original groups. Students will share the results of their research with their new group members. | Resources | http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/video/blog/2008/09/current_financial_crisis_echoe.htmlhttp://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2008/11/dont_get_depressed_its_not_1929.html | Assessment Options | Students will complete a Venn diagram illustrating the causes of the Great Depression, the Global Recession, and those causes shared by both, if any.In their journal, students will write one question about the causes of economic crises which they are now able to answer, and one question about which they are still unsure. | Accommodations | Students with reading difficulties will be given a summary of the article. Students may also be given a transcript of the video when appropriate. |

Title | Population Changes & Immigration Deportation in the Dirty Thirties | Time | 2 days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Students will understand the contributions of various groups and individuals to Canadian culture and society.Evolution of Canadian Identity | Activity Overview | Students will examine Immigration Statistics from the Year 1861 to 1961. In doing so, students will recognize the significant drop in immigration during the Great Depression period. The class will examine these numbers and discuss the various reasons for low immigration numbers. Students will then get the opportunity to examine a website that documents the Canadian Immigration Experience, “Moving HERE, STAYING HERE. The Canadian Immigrant Experience”. For this activity, students will examine primary documents from the four main sections of the “Depression Era” topic.Sections: Radical Policies Shipped Out No Refuge Quebec’s Last Frontier Students will be split into four groups. Within that group there will be 4 different expert members. One person will be responsible for the Radical Policies section, the second will look at Shipped Out, third will examine No Refuge and the last expert is responsible for reading Quebec’s Last Frontier. The students will record main points from the primary sources and website. They must understand the material and take good notes. The next day, the expert members will return to their original group and compile their notes together to understand the Canadian immigration experience during the 1930s. Students will be responsible for ensuring they are experts in their specific sections. Part 2 of this activity will involve students participating in a debate. Students will be divided into a group “for” the Immigration Act and a group “against” the Immigration Act/ | Resources | Table showing a condensed version of immigration statistics. Ethnic Origins of immigrants Admitted to Canada [1896-1961] MOVING HERE, STAYING HERE. The Canadian Immigrant Experience. http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/immigrants/021017-2540-e.htmlplease see next page for details. | Assessment Options | Instructor will provide ongoing feedback during the lab portion of this activity. The instructor will also assess student’s knowledge of the topic based on the debate. Students will be evaluated on their content of the knowledge, ability to justify reasons FOR or AGAINST Immigration policies, deportation and etc. Students will also be assessed on their ability to form a conclusion based on information. | Accommodations | For students that find it difficult to work hard by themselves, they may pair up with an expert member from another group (Group A and B’s Radical Policies expert can work together to take notes)Graphic Organizer can be provided, for students with difficulty organizing information. |

Table of the Ethnic Origin of Immigrants Admitted to Canada from 1896-1961 http://faculty.marianopolis.edu/c.belanger/quebechistory/stats/EtnicOriginofImmigrantstoCanada.html Ethnic origin of Immigrants Admitted to Canada
[1896-1961]

Ethnic Origin | 1896-1906 | 1906-1915 | 1916-1925 | 1926-1935 | 1936-1945 | 1946-1955 | 1955-1961 | British (all) | 327,119 | 926,003 | 402,348 | 273,695 | 45,793 | 367,705 | 244,278 | Chinese | 27 | 32,295 | 11,622 | 7 | 1 | 14,104 | 11,162 | French | 6,653 | 18,811 | 4,713 | 3,699 | 1,681 | 24,152 | 16,823 | German | 11,459 | 27,755 | 10,891 | 64,512 | 2,753 | 159,207 | 98,234 | Jewish | 24,415 | 52,494 | 31,284 | 21,856 | 3,656 | 37,474 | 15,975 | Italian | 27,786 | 92,349 | 20,672 | 11,828 | 1,439 | 135,156 | 150,573 | Japanese | 2,282 | 14,514 | 6,107 | 2,479 | 397 | 251 | 952 | Black | 47 | 1,246 | 575 | 604 | 161 | 1,406 | 4,941 | Dutch | 1,122 | 8,758 | 5,002 | 7,855 | 912 | 114,777 | 40,773 | Polish | 42,358 | 67,262 | 18,213 | 35,187 | 2,288 | 61,568 | 17,842 | Russian | 16,046 | 81,770 | 10,976 | 5,153 | 560 | 7,709 | 1,212 | Ukrainian | 269 | 59,861 | 3,671 | 57,719 | 5,663 | 34,335 | 2,106 | American | 259,332 | 730,328 | 313,499 | 180,945 | 56,043 | 90,752 | 65,732 | East Indian | 432 | 5,145 | 178 | 515 | 62 | 1,139 | 3,238 | All Origins | 836,597 | 2,278,396 | 915,943 | 817,706 | 133,238 | 1,222,319 | 854,600 | Source: constructed from data provided in Immigration Statistics Year 1896 to 1961, Statistics Section, Department of Citizenship and Immigration, 1961.
© 2007 Claude Bélanger, Marianopolis College

Title | Technology of the 1930s | Time | 3 days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada.Impact of technological developments on the Canadian society. | Activity Overview | Students will complete a web search to identify some technological inventions of the 1930s. After students have generated a list of inventions they will work together in groups of two or three to complete short descriptions and a list of uses for each of the inventions. The class will then come together to create a master list of inventions and their uses. Students will choose two inventions on the list and will write at least one page using one of the inventions chosen and describe what it would be like to live in the 1930s and all of a sudden have access to this new invention and then, using the other invention, students will write at least one page on what it would be living would be like now if the other invention had never been invented. Students will choose one of their invention stories to share with the class. | Resources | Computer | Assessment Options | Anecdotal notes regarding group work and cooperation.Rubric for the oral presentation measuring understanding of content and presentation skills could be utilized. | Accommodations | Students who have difficulty writing could have someone scribe their ideas for them and then they present them to the class. Coloured cards could be used to help them keep track of their ideas. |

Title | Life in the 1930s | Time | 2 days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Changes in technology, economics, social and working conditions and their effects on Canada. Compare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st century | Activity Overview | Flash pictures of things that represent money and wealth. Have students respond with first thing they think about when they see the pictures. Ask students, what does a job and having money mean to our society? Discuss privileges associated with money and lifestyle. Ask students, what does it mean to not have a job and money? Discuss how it affects lifestyle and health (mental and physical) of people. Show students pictures of people and situations in the 1930s and discuss what they see in the pictures. Remind them that at the time there was a 20-25% unemployment rate.Put students in groups of three. Have each student design a short role play that depicts the father who lost his job (or farmer who can’t sell his crops), the wife, and a child in a family struggling through the Depression. Students should already have a working knowledge of the causes of the Depression and Social Assistance programs available to Canadians through previous lessons. Remind students to incorporate all they have learned so far into their role plays in order to get the most accurate portrayal as possible. Have students present their role plays to the class. | Resources | Pictures from Internet | Assessment Options | ObservationsAnecdotal notesRubric showing understanding of content and group work skills | Accommodations | All students should be able to participate in the role playing. Students who have difficulty with the language can use cards to help keep their thoughts straight. |

Title | On-to-Ottawa and Social Unrest | Time | 2 Days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Evolution of the Canadian identityEmergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | Activity Overview | First, students will view a map depicting the locations of relief camps during the 1930s. The class will review the extent of unemployment and homelessness in Canada in the 1930s. Next, students will watch excerpts from On to Ottawa (Directed by Sara Diamond, Produced by The On to Ottawa Historical Society, and the Women's Labour History Project) which discuss the conditions of the relief camps, and the causes and consequences of the On-to-Ottawa trek. While they watch, they will make notes about what the relief camp workers’ grievances were and how they went about trying to address the grievances. Students will then brainstorm about other ways people addressed grievances with the government in the 1930s and in modern times. Finally, students will be assigned to research the views of one social or political movement from the 1930s (Labour movement, CCF, Union Nationale, Conservative Party, Liberal Party of Canada) and write a letter to the editor explaining the grievances, views, and goals of their movement or party. | Resources | On to Ottawa (Directed by Sara Diamond Produced by The On to Ottawa Historical Society, and the Women's Labour History Project). Map of relief camps. | Assessment Options | Instructor will provide comments and feedback on their letters. | Accommodations | Students with exceptionalities may be given extended time and graphic organizers. |

Title | Social Assistance Programs | Time | 2 Days | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Evolution of the Canadian IdentityUnderstanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian EconomyEmergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectivenessOutcome of the 1930s—were the programs effective or not? | Activity Overview | Students will begin by completing a think pair share activity which asks the students to address the question “How does the Canadian Government help Canadians?” The goal is to generate a list of social assistance programs in Canada. Each student will then choose one social assistance program to investigate. Students must determine the following: 1. When was it established and why? 2. Who did/does it help? 3. Does it benefit Canada as a whole or just the people who receive the benefits? 4. How has the program changed since it began? 5. How many people does it benefit today and how much does it cost to run?Each student will create a timeline showing the formation of the program, any major changes to the program, and its current operating status. After students have created their timelines, they will be posted in the classroom and students will conduct a gallery walk. For each timeline displaced student will post a comment stating one of the following: 1. Why they think the program was initially a good/bad idea at the time it was created. 2. Why they think the program is still necessary or no longer necessary.OR 3. What changes need to be made to improve the program, if any? | Resources | Private and government websites describing various assistance programs and their history, including:http://www.canadabenefits.gc.ca/f.1.2ch.4m.2@.jsp?lang=enghttp://www.mapleleafweb.com | Assessment Options | Observations of timelines and comments. | Accommodations | Students with exceptionalities may be paired. |

Title | Then and Now: Comparing the Dirty 30s and Today | Time | 1 day | Link to Enduring Understandings/Expectations | Evolution of the Canadian IdentityUnderstanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian EconomyImpact of technological developments on the Canadian SocietyCompare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st centuryEmergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | Activity Overview | Students will review the big ideas of the unit by comparing and contrasting images from the 1930s with images of modern Canada. Students will be paired. Then, a set of images, one from the 1930s and one from modern Canada will be displayed. Students will brainstorm with their partner about what the images have in common for approximately 5 minutes. Then students will share their ideas with the class. See appendix A for images. Students will then be given time in class to complete their personal opening speech for their roundtable discussion summative assessment and to review their questions for the other roundtables. | Resources | Images for comparison: Please see the next page for details. | Assessment Options | The teacher will provide oral comments and feedback on students’ opening speeches. | Accommodations | Students with exceptionalities will be given a list of questions which are likely to be discussed during their roundtable discussions. Students will also prepare their notes for use during the roundtable discussion. |

Comparison Images
(Note: the comments below each image are for instructor use and should not be seen by students.) Relief Camp Dormitory, Employment Insurance line
Trenton, Ontario 1930s Ontario, 2011

Canadian Red Ensign National Flag of Canada
Used 1922-1957 1965-Present Mackenzie King on Radio Stephen Harper on YouTube

CCF advertisement 1930s NDP logo, 2011 Dow Jones before and after Black Foreclosure sign after housing crash 2008
Tuesday

Relief Camp Workers board trains Protesters of the Occupy Toronto Movement
On-to-Ottawa Trek

Title | Then and Now: What the Dirty 30s have to say about Canada Today(Unit Summative Assessment) | Time | 3 Days | Enduring Understandings | Evolution of the Canadian IdentityUnderstanding of Social Assistance Programs for the Canadian EconomyImpact of technological developments on Canadian SocietyCompare/Contrast Economic and Social Development in the 1930s & 21st centuryEmergent political/social movements in the 1930s: reasons they emerged and effectiveness | Assessment Overview | Six roundtable discussions will be held, moderated by the instructor. Each roundtable will discuss one aspect of life during the Dirty 30s with life in Canada today. The titles will of each roundtable will be as follow: * Then and Now: Social Assistance Programs * Then and Now: The Canadian Identity * Then and Now: Technology * Then and Now: Political Parties and Political Thought * Then and Now: The Economy * Then and Now: Social Protests and Civil DisobedienceStudents will be assigned a roundtable based on their preferences at the beginning of the unit. For their assigned roundtable, they will be required to prepare a two to three minute speech to be given at the beginning of the round table discussion. A written copy of the speech will be submitted to the teacher before the roundtable is held. For each roundtable for which they will not be a member, students must prepare two questions which could be asked of the panel. These questions will be submitted to the teacher before the roundtables are held, so that they can be incorporated into the discussion. Then, each roundtable will be conducted for approximately 30 minutes. The instructor will draw the topics from a hat to determine the order of the roundtables. The teacher/moderator will ask panel members questions written by their peers as appropriate. Additional questions may be asked as appropriate. See Appendix A for sample questions. | Resources | * Appendix A * Videos demonstrating roundtable formats:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdBCuoHLARk&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-ymB-d-kII | Accommodations | Students with exceptionalities may be allowed the following accommodations: * Use of notes during roundtable * List of questions to be addressed during the roundtable * Written responses to a roundtable discussion classes rather than oral participation |

Appendix A

Round Table Discussion Handout
In this unit we are going to be looking at the political, economic and daily life of Canadians in the 1930s. We will also cover the technological and scientific advancements of the 1930s and how they affected the life of Canadians. Your final assignment for this unit will be to prepare a short 2-3 minute speech on your chosen topic and then participate in a roundtable discussion on that topic. The topics for the roundtable discussion are:

* Then and Now: Social Assistance Programs

* Then and Now: The Canadian Identity

* Then and Now: Technology

* Then and Now: Political Parties and Political Thought

* Then and Now: The Economy

* Then and Now: Social Protests and Civil Disobedience

You will also be required to prepare two questions for the other roundtable topics that you are not participating in. Please refer to the rubric for further help in understanding what is required for the assignment.

A Topic Organizer handout will be given that will help organize your thoughts and key points on all the topics, as well as to record your questions for the roundtable.

Rubric for Round Table

Criteria | Level 1 (50-59%) | Level 2(60-69%) | Level 3 (70-79%) | Level 4(80-100%) | Knowledge & Understanding | -demonstrates limited understanding of a specific aspect of the Dirty 30s (i.e. Social Assistance Program, The Canadian Identity, Technology, Political Parties and Political Thought, The Economy, Social Protest and Civil Disobedience) and the comparison/ contrast with life in current Canadian society. | -demonstrates some understanding of a specific aspect of the Dirty 30s (i.e. Social Assistance Program, The Canadian Identity, Technology, Political Parties and Political Thought, The Economy, Social Protest and Civil Disobedience) and the comparison/ contrast with life in current Canadian society. | -demonstrates a considerable understanding of a specific aspect of the Dirty 30s (i.e. Social Assistance Program, The Canadian Identity, Technology, Political Parties and Political Thought, The Economy, Social Protest and Civil Disobedience) and the comparison/ contrast with life in current Canadian society. | -demonstrates a thorough understanding of a specific aspect of the Dirty 30s (i.e. Social Assistance Program, The Canadian Identity, Technology, Political Parties and Political Thought, The Economy, Social Protest and Civil Disobedience) and the comparison/contrast with life in current Canadian society. | Thinking | -uses analyzing, evaluating and detecting point of view and bias of questions and answers with limited effectiveness-uses limited effectiveness in demonstrating how and why specific aspects of the Dirty 30s and current life is similar or different | -uses analyzing, evaluating and detecting point of view and bias of questions and answers with some effectiveness -uses some effectiveness in demonstrating how and why specific aspects of the Dirty 30s and current life is similar or different | -uses analyzing, evaluating and detecting point of view and bias of questions and answers with considerable effectiveness -uses considerable effectiveness in demonstrating how and why aspects of the Dirty 30s and the current were similar or different | uses analyzing, evaluating and detecting point of view and bias of questions and answers with a high degree of effectiveness -uses a high degree of effectiveness in demonstrating how and why aspects of the Dirty 30s is similar or different | Communication | -expresses and organizes ideas and information into a detailed written response with limited effectiveness-informs and persuades classroom peers with limited effectiveness--uses vocabulary, terminology and conventions related to the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada (i.e. relief camps, Ottawa Trek, refugees)with limited effectiveness | -expresses and organizes ideas and information into a detailed written response with some effectiveness -informs and persuades classroom peers with some effectiveness--uses vocabulary, terminology and conventions related to the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada (i.e. relief camps, Ottawa Trek, refugees)with some effectiveness | -expresses and organizes ideas and information into a written detailed response with considerable effectiveness -informs and persuades classroom peers with considerable effectiveness-uses vocabulary, terminology and conventions related to the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada (i.e. relief camps, Ottawa Trek, refugees)with considerable effectiveness | -expresses and organizes ideas and information into a written detailed response with a high degree of effectiveness --informs and persuades classroom peers with a high degree of effectiveness--uses vocabulary, terminology and conventions related to the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada (i.e. relief camps, Ottawa Trek, refugees)with a high degree of effectiveness | Application | -makes connections between the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada with limited effectiveness | -makes connections between the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada with some effectiveness | -makes connections between the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada with considerable effectiveness | makes connections between the Dirty 30s and current life in Canada with a high degree of effectiveness |

Rubric for Questioning Other Round Tables

LevelCriteria | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Not Demonstrated | Asks questions | Asks questions that would likely encourage a response that is: * pertinent * comprehensive * engaging | Asks questions that would likely encourage a response that is: * focused * detailed * interesting | Asks questions that would likely encourage a response that is: * on-topic * sufficient * ordinary | Asks questions that would likely encourage a response that is: * irrelevant * sketchy * minimally engaging | No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task. | Provides rationale | Provides a high degree of effectiveness in explaining how and why the two required questions are relevant for a Round Table Discussion. | Provides considerable effectiveness in explaining how and why the two required questions are relevant for a Round Table Discussion. | Provides some effectiveness in explaining how and why the two required questions are relevant for a Round Table Discussion. | Provides limited effectiveness in explaining how and why the two required questions are relevant for a Round Table Discussion. | No score is awarded because there is insufficient evidence of student performance based on the requirements of the assessment task. | * Questioning Rubric is from Albert Education. (2007). [Teacher Rubric for Asking Powerful Questions]. Online Guide to Implentation. Retrieved from www.learnalbert.ca or www.learnalberta.ca/.../teacherrubricforaskingpowerfulquestions_bl...

Other Assessment Tools
Observation & Conferencing * Teacher conference with members of the Round Table Groups to ensure that they are on the right track—informal checklist, examination of notes taken so far
Anecdotal Notes * Record any problems or issues that students are facing in regards to this assignment * Record of class participation in this activity (audience & participants)
Think Pair Share * Working with partners to share ideas and brainstorm possible questions that arise during a Round Table Discussion

Teacher Comment: When work is judged to be at the partial understanding stage or not demonstrated, the teacher makes decisions about appropriate interventions to help the student improve.

Topic Organizer
This handout is a space for you to organize the key points or main ideas and your thought about them on the different topics covered in this unit. Use the information here to help you generate your questions for the roundtable discussions at the end of the unit. Topic: Then and Now: Social Assistance Programs | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. | Topic: Then and Now: The Canadian Identity | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. | Topic: Then and Now: Technology | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. | Topic: Then and Now: Political Parties and Political Thought | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. |

Topic: Then and Now: The Economy | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. | Topic: Then and Now: Social Protest and Civil Disobedience | Key Points * * * * * | Your Thoughts * * * * * | Questions 1. 2. |

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