Premium Essay

Unmarried with Children

In: Business and Management

Submitted By dancingstar55038
Words 288
Pages 2
UNMARRIED WITH CHILDREN
1. In 1950 1 in 20 American children was born to an unmarried mother. Today, that rate is ______ and they are usually born to those least likely to be able to support a child on their own.
a. 1 in 3
b. 1 in 6
c. 1 in 10
d. 1 in 30
2. Edin and Kefalas spent ______talking with low-income mothers about their lives and how they perceive marriage and family.
a. five years
b. one year
c. six months
d. three months
3. Edin and Kefalas’ research into low-income mothers and their relationship to society is an example of what sociological theory?
a. Marx’s conflict theory
b. Durkheim’s functionalist theory
c. Mill’s sociological imagination
d. Ganey’s homeostatic theory
4. As Edin and Kefalas illustrate, when a middle- or upper-class woman cannot have a child it is seen as a_________, but when groups of lower-income women are having children outside of marriage, their fertility becomes a matter of________.
a. personal tragedy, public concern
b. family concern, social castigation
c. community loss, community shame
d. family planning, federal planning
5. Edin and Kefalas examine both the ________ and the larger social contexts of poor women who become single mothers.
a. medical charts
b. educational histories
c. social demographics
d. biographies
True or False
6.

Promoting marriage among the poor has become the new war on poverty, President Obama style. False

7.

Most poor, unmarried mothers and fathers readily admit that bearing children while poor and unmarried is not the ideal way to do things. True

8.

The sharp decline in marriage in impoverished urban areas has led some to charge that the poor have abandoned the marriage norm. True...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Sociological Imagination

...socialization of each individual” (M.U.S.E., 2013). Using sociological imagination I will build a connection with being an unmarried pregnant teenager and the impact it has socially in our society. Sociological Imagination As individuals we based our decisions on values instilled in us and peer pressure from our society. “We are individually shaped by society and social interaction through the process of socialization, which begins at birth and continues throughout our lifetime” (M.U.S.E., 2013). Teenage pregnancy has been a concern in our society and over the past 20 years, pregnancy in unmarried teenagers has increased dramatically. “Unmarried pregnant teenager varies based upon race, ethnicity, religion, and socioeconomic status” (Mollborn, 2009). Based on my experience low income families and the community they live in accept unmarried teenage pregnancy, because it is normal to them. Teenage pregnancy has increased and is an undisclosed major problem in our society. As a society we want to make sure everyone is properly educated on teen pregnancy. “Non-marital pregnancy is more common in racial or ethnic minority and low socioeconomic status, these parents are perceived to have low socioeconomic futures, families from high socioeconomic status and communities will discourage a pregnancy that will propel their children to a lower socioeconomic trajectory” (Mollborn,...

Words: 545 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Right of the Unmarried Father in Scots Law

...Denial of automatic parental responsibilities and rights (PRRs) for non-marital fathers has become increasingly difficult to justify in recent years, as a result of changes in social and cultural attitudes. Studies reveal that 51.4% of children are now born outside wedlock. Consequently, statute has intervened throughout the years in an attempt to abolish the notion of the ‘illegitimate’ child and to ameliorate the rights of the unmarried father. In this essay, the writer will describe how a non-marital father can obtain PRRs with reference to recent legislation, discussing any obstacles they may face and consider the extent to which they are still discriminated against in Scots Law. The Family Law (Scotland) Act 2006 came into force on 4 May 2006. This piece of legislation significantly improved the position of the non-marital father by amending the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 which details the legal mediums through which a parent can acquire PRRs. This legislative innovation provided that unmarried fathers can acquire full PRRs providing they register as the father under any of the UK’s Acts enabling registration of births, deaths and marriages as well as registering their paternity after the amendment came into force. However, the mother is not required to register but instead obtains PRRs automatically, which is arguably discriminatory in nature against a man who is the biological father of a child born to the woman, since the mother has no mirroring obligation and......

Words: 1400 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Tax Research 1

...with a divorce. They have three sons together that they both want to remain in their sons lives. So based on the financial concerns of both Kathy M Brent they are unable at this time to financially support to separate homes for them and the children, so they currently all still live in a single-family home in Chicago, Illinois. Brent and Kathy are both financially supporting their three sons and maintaining the upkeep of the house that they are all currently reside. While comparing Brent and Kathy’s annual income, Brent substantially earns more annually than Kathy. They both agree that even though they both support the children and maintain the home that Brent contributes more. In the current tax season Brent has stated that he would like to file a separate Federal Income Tax from Kathy and he would like to claim head of household as his status on the current year’s return. Brent feels that, if he and Kathy keep separate households while under the same rough that he would be eligible to claim head of household status. Question Presented: would Brent still be permitted to file head of household status on his Federal Income Tax return for the current year even though Kathy and Brent still reside in the single-family home with their three children, even though they are maintaining separate households within the same house? Short Answer: Mr....

Words: 936 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Government Welfare

...that welfare is necessary to help those who cannot help themselves, to allow them a better quality of life with the main goal of assisting the children of needy parents. In 2008, FamilyFacts.org reported that $714 billion was spent on welfare. This included $42 billion for housing, $63 billion on food, $154 billion in cash aid, $372 billion in medical care, and $83 billion on other expenses. Many others feel that welfare distributes wealth to those who don’t earn it. To them, welfare encourages illegitimate births, the breakup of families, and discourages recipients from bettering themselves (Mankiw, p.429). Welfare provides the means for a lazy society that is dependent on hard working citizens for their support. Welfare provides the basic needs and allows for a better quality of live that protects the children from hunger and homelessness. The parents of these children often qualify because their income is at or below poverty level and they have met their state’s requirements to receive any benefits. But instead of the system being a temporary crutch, the system allows recipients to grow dependent on welfare and increases their incentive to continue participating in the program. Many recipients remain on benefits much longer than needed and continually engage in practices that keep them eligible. These, in turn, beget a cycle that children see their parents engaging in and therefore accept that behavior as the norm. With members in each generation participating in welfare......

Words: 1673 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Examine the Ways in Which Social Policies and Laws May Influence Families and Households.

...regulating the fair distribution of assets following the breakdown of a marriage. Most current social policies in the UK come from a New Labour perspective, as this party have been in power for almost 12 years. Therefore, many of these current social policies encourage the existence of the family, although not just in the nuclear form endorsed by the New Right. For instance new labour modified the law so that unmarried cohabiting couples, both heterosexual and homosexual, had the right to adopt on a basis equivalent to that of a married couple. This has made adopting easier for unmarried couples with fertility issues, but the biggest change to have resulted from it is that homosexual couples can now, fairly easily, adopt children, leading to a much more diverse range of families. This change has been heavily criticised by New Right thinkers, who claim that it further undermines the nuclear family, by removing the restriction on unmarried couples from adopting children. They also claim that, due to not being raised in the “natural” environment of the nuclear family, that children adopted in this manner will be more likely to take part in anti-social behaviour, and even criminal activities. However, most feminists are in favour of cohabiting couples being afforded similar rights to a married couple. Liberal feminists see it as another step towards equality, moving away from a familistic gender regime, as it removes...

Words: 875 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Women Civil Rights

...but this was not seen as a profession by many, but rather an extension of their domestic work that was appropriate for a woman. Progress for women in medicine beyond the level of nursing was limited. -By the late 1860’s medical colleges had strict controls on the number of women they admitted and allowed to graduate, largely as a result of opposition from male physicians. Nevertheless there was an increase at this time in the number of women beginning to be admitted into higher education generally. Growth of industry -The civil war acted as a catalyst in speeding up the progress of the US towards becoming the world’s leading industrial nation. This increased the work opportunities for women when the war ended. By 1870, 13% of all unmarried women already worked in domestic occupations or increasingly in factories. This figure was to expand significantly in the remaining decades of the 19th century. -The situation for married women, however, did not change significantly. Married women were often banned from working outside the home, either by the policies of some employers or by state legislation. In any case, the overwhelming expectation was that once they were married, women would give up their jobs and be entirely focused on home and family. Married working-class women, however, who needed to augment the family income or escape poverty could participate in laundry, mending or lodgers. Westward Expansion -Further westward expansion in the 1860’s and settlement on...

Words: 773 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Sir Francis Bacon

...drawbacks of life as a single male and a married male possibly with children. Bacon explains that marriage is good for the individual but also for society. He also states that wife and children are a liability and only take back from obtaining wealth. A single man believes that a man with wife and children, who are obstacles to both great courses and little trivial, is the slave of fortune. Bacon presents the merits and demerits of married life and single life in his essay, “Of Marriage and Single Life” According to the essay children are the bills of charges and will reduce their riches. And beyond that being single means that you are free, but having a wife and children are reasons you a man is shackled. However, a single life has some good aspects. “Unmarried men are best friends, best masters, and best servants. In this portion of the essay, Bacon boasts about the fact that a free man gives back to society in a sense. He states that when you don’t have children and a wife to look after you have more time to give back to your community. This is simple logic that expresses what kind of write Bacon was. He states that without the distraction of both wife and children a man can be who he wants to be also he can be a better man. Married men are busy supporting a family so therefore they are no longer free to do what they want, good or bad. Basically, married men are boring and can’t take risks. Unmarried or childless man is helpful to the society. He has time to give......

Words: 1073 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Social Policy Affects

...regulating the fair distribution of assets following the breakdown of a marriage. Most current social policies in the UK come from a New Labour perspective, as this party have been in power for almost 12 years. Therefore, many of these current social policies encourage the existence of the family, although not just in the nuclear form endorsed by the New Right. For instance new labour modified the law so that unmarried cohabiting couples, both heterosexual and homosexual, had the right to adopt on a basis equivalent to that of a married couple. This has made adopting easier for unmarried couples with fertility issues, but the biggest change to have resulted from it is that homosexual couples can now, fairly easily, adopt children, leading to a much more diverse range of families. This change has been heavily criticised by New Right thinkers, who claim that it further undermines the nuclear family, by removing the restriction on unmarried couples from adopting children. They also claim that, due to not being raised in the “natural” environment of the nuclear family, that children adopted in this manner will be more likely to take part in anti-social behaviour, and even criminal activities. However, most feminists are in favour of cohabiting couples being afforded similar rights to a married couple. Liberal feminists see it as another step towards equality, moving away from a familistic gender regime, as it removes...

Words: 789 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Corruption In Nigeria

...Women who are pregnant or have children are not allowed to work in the Police Services and Military services in Nigeria. Moreover, as married women are expected to become mothers, this discrimination in a possibility to be employed in police or military services is being applied to all married women. By virtue of Section 127 of the Police Act, married women are prevented from seeking enlistment in the Nigerian Police Force (Ibid 2010:15). Workplaces in police or military services are thus opened only to unmarried women. If an unmarried woman, who is working there, becomes pregnant, she has to leave her position. Under section 127, when an unmarried police woman is pregnant, she would be discharged from the police force. She can only be re-instated on the approval of the inspector general of police (Ibid 2010:15). If she would like to get married, she needs to obtain an agreement from a commissioner. Under Regulation 124 of the Police Act, a woman police officer who is interested in getting married must initially apply in writing to the commissioner of police for approval (Ibid...

Words: 788 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Social Security

...this fund will used to provide income to them when they become disable to support themselves through their own labours. For example, benefits in United States system are measured such a low income person get the higher benefit than those persons with higher earnings as the high income person get the lower benefits. 2.0 Types of Social Security Benefits in United States. 2.1 Disabilities Benefits Social Security disability benefits is for people whose age 18 or older, unable to work due to the medical condition that’s expected to last at least one year or may result to death and not receiving any benefits on their own Social Security record. Not limited to that particular of disability person, but the family members like spouse and unmarried child of 18 age or younger than 19, whose having the disabled workers can also receive money from Social Security. The documents needed for the application are birth certificate, proof of U.S citizenship, medical evidence or any compensation-type of benefits the disable person have received before. There are two type of benefits for the disable person, which...

Words: 1200 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Family Demographic Shifts and Their Policy Implications

...same time, the percent of non-marital births in the U.S. has risen steadily, from approximately 5% in 1960 to 41% in 2011. In addition to this instability, family structures are becoming increasingly complex as rising numbers of single parents pursue new partners and have more children. Importance: The potential negative impacts of these shifting demographic patterns upon the well-being of children are of particular concern to policy makers. Surveys indicate that children living in single parent households are more likely to live in poverty than children living in married households. According to the 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS), only 9% of married-couple families with children lived in poverty while 41% of single-mother families with children did so. Children born to unmarried parents also experience greater instability and complexity in family structure as a result of the shifting relationships of a parent. Over 30% of children born into single-parent households experienced 3 or more partnership transitions by a parent. Policy Implications: Strong correlations between parental marital-status and child well-being seem to encourage policies aimed at increasing the number of children born and raised in married households. There are two distinct ways of approaching this policy goal. One strategy would be to implement programs that increase marriage rates, either by lowering divorce rates or by increasing marriage rates among non-married parents. Related......

Words: 576 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Feminism vs Igbo Culture

...Feminism or Igbo Culture? Feminism is a body of social theory and political movement primarily based and motivated by the experiences of women. Feminist theory tries to understand the nature of gender inequality and focuses on gender politics and relations. Subjects explored in feminism range from discrimination to stereotyping and many more. As the history of feminism has been studied, feminist movements began in the late 1800’s. Feminist ideas were not only observed in the work place or social life, but also in readings. In Things Fall Apart, there is clearly a feminist point of view. There are certain behaviors that women do not attain, they serve a specific role in the community, have arranged roles in the family, and are limited by the extended family. Although women are “Mother Supreme”, they were looked upon differently by the Igbo because of their feminist views. The opening sentence in Things Fall Apart begins with the description of an alpha male. It is hard not to have a feminist view when a role of masculinity is observed as early as the first sentence. Okonkwo is a self-made, well-respected member of the clan. He has become a wealthy farmer through his own hard work. Behaviors and attitudes that he considers masculine are to have a patriarch mindset, not show love and affection, have a great sense of personal pride, work hard, provide for your family, and being brave. Okonkwo believes that any slight show of weakness is feminine. For example...

Words: 622 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Assess the View That the Growth of Family Diversity Has Led to the Decline of the Traditional Nuclear Family

...traditional nuclear family. The traditional nuclear family consists of a spouse and a husband with children. Firstly, a reason for the decline in the nuclear family is because of divorce. As divorce has increased there has been a rise in cohabitations. Cohabitations involve an unmarried couple in a sexual relationships living together. Whilst the number of divorces increase the number of cohabitations has also, making it fastest growing family type in the UK. There are over two million cohabitaing couples in britian, and in addition about a quarter of all unmarried adults under 60 are now cohabiting – double the amount in 1986. There are many reasons for the increase of cohabitations. Firstly, it can be linked to the decline in stigma attached to sex outside of marriage. This is also relevant to the decline in stigma to divorce, so now people are less bothered about divorce, therefore the outcome after a divorce will be a reconstituted family or a singleton life style. Secondly the increased career opportunities for women now mean that they no longer need a husband to sustain a family or themselves. Also now women do not feel the need to pursue a family, but rather some prefer to pursue a career, which can lead to them never being married, or being married at a later age, which can reduce the chances of having children, reducing the traditional nuclear family which consisted of children and married parents. Secularisation also plays a major part in the decline of the......

Words: 1264 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

The Changing American Family

...the definition of the term “family” has changed radically. The changing American family structure comes from the family division due to divorce and the responsibility of single parents in raising children. The meaning of family ranges from a proof that the social structure of America can meet social, political and economic changes and thrives. For a mother, the financial responsibilities are immense when she raises her child alone. Lynn Olcott, a teacher at Auburn Correctional Facility in New York, stated in her essay “The Ballad of a Single Mother” the trials and inevitable difficulties that comes with being a single mother by playing both parental figure roles. According to her, the financial struggle is mainly due to gender inequalities in workplace and being a one-income family. In a way, the fact of working forces her to put her son in nursery school, which then cost more money and create a vicious circle from a financial perspective. Rebecca M. Blank, a professor of economics at Nothwestern University, adheres to the same topic in her article “Absent Fathers: Why Don’t We Ever Talk About The Unmarried Men?” by calling attention to the problem that the “lack of parental support” form absent fathers “is a major factor contributing to the poverty of single mothers and their children”(Blank, 440). They commonly agree that if the father was in the family home or gave contribution such as child support, it would be easier to the family to struggle and not be disturbed. For......

Words: 644 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Chapter 2 Study Guide

...Study Guide Chapter 2 1. What is a nuclear family? Male and female partners with their children living with them 2. What is an extended family? People outside the immediate family related by blood 3. What is a married-blended family? Formed as a divorce and remarriage, unrelated family members joined to create a new household 4. What is a cohabiting-parent family? Children live with two unmarried biological parents or two adoptive parents 5. What is a single-parent family? Unmarried biologic or adoptive parent who may or may not be living with other adults 6. What is a homosexual family? Lesbian or gay with or without children 7. What is a no-parent family? Children who live independently in foster or kinship care, living with a grandparent 8. What does culture have a direct effect on? Healthcare-seeking behavior and response to treatment 9. What is acculturation? Changes in one’s cultural pattern to those of the host society; may retain parts of their own culture while adopting cultural practices of the dominant society 10. What is assimilation? Becoming in all ways like the members of the dominant culture 11. Ethnocentrism refers to what? The view that one’s own culture’s way of doing things is best 12. What inconsistencies present a significant barrier to effective health care? Language of clients and the language of providers 13. According to Purnell and Paulanka (2008), cultural competence involves what? Cultural competence involves......

Words: 584 - Pages: 3