Premium Essay

Urban Waters

In: Business and Management

Submitted By rpfrosas
Words 3698
Pages 15
Urban Water Partners

Urban Water Partners

Presentation to investors by the executive team
Emily Chai
Brook Aspden
Tiffany Kok
Chloe Muggeridge

What will you gain by investing in
Urban Water Partners?

Financial
Introduction

Analysis

Strategy

Non-financial
Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

Urban Water Partners will generate a 7.5 times return on investment $1.7m

1600000

1400000

1200000

1000000
800000
600000
400000

$0.2m

200000
0
Invested

Introduction

Analysis

Proposed

Strategy

Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

You will also gain non-financial benefits

Introduction

Analysis

Strategy

Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

UWP business structure

Blue Future
Filter supply

UWP

Technicians
Training & checks Fee

• Governance
• Management
• Sales staff

Lease filters

Vendors

Education
Brand awareness

Sale

Customer
Introduction

Analysis

Strategy

Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

Three key points of analysis

Health awareness Introduction

Analysis

Trust based

Strategy

Financials

Water distribution Implementation

Conclusion

Health awareness
Widespread awareness of the dangers of contaminated water

Current solution: charcoal boiling

Ineffective, inefficient and often expensive

Opportunity for better alternative to meet health concerns
Introduction

Analysis

Strategy

Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

Trust based

Customers must trust the purity of the water or they will not purchase Introduction

Analysis

Strategy

Financials

Implementation

Conclusion

Water distribution
Lack of transport infrastructure

Lack of home access Strong water vendor network Most efficient distribution will leverage existing network...

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