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Usa 2012 Agriculture

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Section 17

Agriculture
This section presents statistics on farms and farm operators; land use; farm income, expenditures, and debt; farm output, productivity, and marketings; foreign trade in agricultural products; specific crops; and livestock, poultry, and their products.
The principal sources are the reports issued by the National Agricultural
Statistics Service (NASS) and the
Economic Research Service (ERS) of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
The information from the 2007 Census of
Agriculture is available in printed form in the Volume 1, Geographic Area Series; in electronic format on CD-ROM; and on the
Internet at <http://www.agcensus.usda
.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report
/index.asp>. The Department of
Agriculture publishes annually
Agricultural Statistics, a general reference book on agricultural production, supplies, consumption, facilities, costs, and returns. The ERS publishes data on farm assets, debt, and income on the
Internet at <http://www.ers.usda.gov
/briefing/farmincome/>. Sources of current data on agricultural exports and imports include Outlook for
U.S. Agricultural Trade, published by the
ERS; the ERS Internet site at
<http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing
/AgTrade/>; and the foreign trade section of the U.S. Census Bureau Web site at
<http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade
/statistics/index.html>.
The field offices of the NASS collect data on crops, livestock and products, agricultural prices, farm employment, and other related subjects mainly through sample surveys. Information is obtained on crops and livestock items as well as scores of items pertaining to agricultural production and marketing. State estimates and supporting information are sent to the Agricultural Statistics Board of NASS, which reviews the estimates and issues reports containing state and national data.
Among these reports are annual summaries such as Crop Production,

Crop Values, Agricultural Prices, and Livestock Production, Disposition and Income.
Farms and farmland—The definitions of a farm have varied through time. Since
1850, when minimum criteria defining a farm for census purposes first were established, the farm definition has changed nine times. The current definition, first used for the 1974 census, is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were produced and sold, or normally would have been sold, during the census year.
Acreage designated as ‘‘land in farms’’ consists primarily of agricultural land used for crops, pasture, or grazing. It also includes woodland and wasteland not actually under cultivation or used for pasture or grazing, provided it was part of the farm operator’s total operation. Land in farms includes acres set aside under annual commodity acreage programs as well as acres in the Conservation Reserve and Wetlands Reserve Programs for places meeting the farm definition. Land in farms is an operating unit concept and includes land owned and operated as well as land rented from others. All grazing land, except land used under government permits on a per-head basis, was included as ‘‘land in farms’’ provided it was part of a farm or ranch.
An evaluation of coverage has been conducted for each census of agriculture since 1945 to provide estimates of the completeness of census farm counts.
Beginning with the 1997 Census of
Agriculture, census farm counts and totals were statistically adjusted for coverage and reported at the county level. The size of the adjustments varies considerably by state. In general, farms not on the census mail list tended to be small in acreage, production, and sales of farm products.
The response rate for the 2007 Census of
Agriculture was 85.2 percent as compared with a response rate of 88.0 for the 2002
Census of Agriculture and 86.2 percent for the 1997 Census of Agriculture.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 533

For more explanation about census mail list compilation, collection methods, coverage measurement, and adjustments, see
Appendix A, 2007 Census of Agriculture,
Volume 1 reports <http://www.agcensus
.usda.gov/>.
Farm income—The final agricultural sector output comprises cash receipts from farm marketings of crops and livestock, federal government payments made directly to farmers for farm-related activities, rental value of farm homes, value of farm products consumed in farm homes, and other farm-related income such as machine hire and custom work.
Farm marketings represent quantities of agricultural products sold by farmers multiplied by prices received per unit of production at the local market. Information on prices received for farm products is generally obtained by the NASS
Agricultural Statistics Board from surveys of firms (such as grain elevators, packers, and processors) purchasing agricultural commodities directly from producers.
In some cases, the price information is obtained directly from the producers.
Crops—Estimates of crop acreage and production by the NASS are based on current sample survey data obtained from individual producers and objective yield counts, reports of carlot shipments, market records, personal field observations by field statisticians, and reports from other sources. Prices received by farmers are marketing year averages. These averages are based on
U.S. monthly prices weighted by monthly

534 Agriculture

marketings during specific periods.
U.S. monthly prices are state average prices weighted by marketings during the month. Marketing year average prices do not include allowances for outstanding loans, government purchases, deficiency payments or disaster payments.
All state prices are based on individual state marketing years, while U.S. marketing year averages are based on standard marketing years for each crop. For a listing of the crop marketing years and the participating states in the monthly program, see Crop Values. Value of production is computed by multiplying state prices by each state’s production.
The U.S. value of production is the sum of state values for all states. Value of production figures shown in Tables
852−856 and 858 should not be confused with cash receipts from farm marketings which relate to sales during a calendar year, irrespective of the year of production. Livestock—Annual inventory numbers of livestock and estimates of livestock, dairy, and poultry production prepared by the Department of Agriculture are based on information from farmers and ranchers obtained by probability survey sampling methods. Statistical reliability—For a discussion of statistical collection and estimation, sampling procedures, and measures of statistical reliability pertaining to Department of Agriculture data, see Appendix III.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 823. Selected Characteristics of Farms by North American Industry
Classification System (NAICS): 2007
[297,220,491 represents 297,220,491,000. See text this section and Appendix III]
Industry

2007
NAICS
code 1

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crop production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseed and grain farming . . . . . . . . . .
Soybean farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseed (except soybean) farming. . . .
Dry pea and bean farming. . . . . . . . . .
Wheat farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rice farming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other grain farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(X)
111
1111
11111
11112
11113
11114
11115
11116
11119

Farms
2,204,792
1,051,889
338,237
62,923
515
526
35,232
161,874
3,853
73,314

Vegetable and melon farming. . . . . . . . 11121
Potato farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111211
Other vegetable (except potato) and melon farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111219

40,589
2,182

9,272,945
2,577,795

6,018,702 14,975,322 14,850,087
1,992,430
2,885,906
2,854,320

38,407

6,695,150

4,026,272 12,089,416 11,995,767

93,649

Fruit and tree nut farming. . . . . . . . . . .
Orange groves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Citrus (except orange) groves. . . . . . .
Noncitrus fruit and tree nut farming. . .
Apple orchards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grape vineyards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strawberry farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Berry (except strawberry) farming . . .
Tree nut farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruit and tree nut combination farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other noncitrus fruit farming. . . . . . . .
Greenhouse,nursery, and floriculture production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Food crops grown under cover . . . . . .
Nursery and floriculture production. . .
Nursery and tree production. . . . . . . .
Floriculture production . . . . . . . . . . . .

1113
11131
11132
11133
111331
111332
111333
111334
111335

98,281 12,141,683
8,771
1,535,483
3,429
402,617
86,081 10,203,583
11,550
2,078,125
17,036
2,067,987
1,503
149,972
8,535
870,154
22,821
3,239,199

5,339,755 18,351,629 18,225,583
800,921
2,423,976
2,382,844
205,522
783,426
778,099
4,333,312 15,144,228 15,064,639
488,273
2,259,839
2,251,555
1,061,070
3,890,152
3,883,341
55,461
1,185,736
1,182,263
220,530
1,211,820
1,209,450
1,652,915
3,655,251
3,626,067

126,046
41,131
5,326
79,589
8,284
6,811
3,473
2,370
29,184

111336
111339

995
23,641

292,842
1,505,304

1114
11141
11142
111421
111422

54,889
2,044
52,845
34,532
18,313

3,974,530
85,809
3,888,721
3,287,008
601,713

Other crop farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tobacco farming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cotton farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sugarcane farming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hay farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
All other crop farming . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1119
11191
11192
11193
11194
11199

519,893
9,626
9,968
614
254,042
245,643

Animal production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Cattle ranching and farming. . . . . . . . .
Beef cattle ranching and farming including feedlots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beef cattle ranching and farming. . . .
Cattle feedlots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy cattle and milk production . . . . .

Harvested cropland (acres)
309,607,601
244,213,836
194,191,397
17,599,156
306,033
269,759
29,062,744
86,627,715
3,396,230
56,929,760

Market value of agricultural products sold (1,000)
Total
Crops Livestock 2
297,220,491 143,657,928 153,562,563
141,921,405 135,806,093
6,115,312
74,559,692 69,851,934
4,707,758
5,637,504
5,532,934
104,570
62,238
61,081
1,157
79,297
78,454
844
6,157,944
5,821,678
336,267
39,675,674 38,524,804
1,150,870
1,936,574
1,915,447
21,127
21,010,459 17,917,536
3,092,923

Land in farms (acres)
922,095,840
416,961,540
266,831,616
22,094,100
458,591
382,071
55,992,672
103,071,231
4,233,156
80,599,795

106,488
748,575

301,611
2,639,819

125,235
31,586

286,946
2,625,018

14,666
14,801

1,698,564 16,967,123 16,930,975
18,712
1,552,287
1,550,756
1,679,852 15,414,835 15,380,219
1,505,323
8,901,860
8,875,417
174,529
6,512,975
6,504,801

36,147
1,531
34,616
26,443
8,173

124,740,766 36,965,418 17,067,639 15,947,514
2,518,697
1,219,827
1,147,173
1,077,481
13,081,671
9,778,279
4,357,082
4,300,124
1,299,318
969,321
885,028
881,698
49,923,443 18,606,436
6,488,172
5,807,594
57,917,637
6,391,555
4,190,184
3,880,617

1,120,126
69,692
56,958
3,330
680,578
309,568

1,152,903 505,134,300 65,393,765 155,299,086

7,851,835 147,447,251

1121

744,858 413,261,549 55,185,767 92,538,429

5,109,567 87,428,862

11211
112111
112112
11212

687,540
656,475
31,065
57,318

3,895,789
2,626,582
1,269,207
1,213,778

391,990,769 41,893,929 57,784,399
376,170,540 36,675,357 27,535,096
15,820,229
5,218,572 30,249,303
21,270,780 13,291,838 34,754,031

53,888,610
24,908,514
28,980,096
33,540,252

Hog and pig farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1122

30,546

6,949,176

4,747,504 18,127,114

1,614,030 16,513,083

Poultry and egg production. . . . . . . . . .
Chicken egg production. . . . . . . . . . . .
Broilers and other meat-type chicken production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turkey production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Poultry hatcheries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other poultry production. . . . . . . . . . .

1123
11231

64,570
35,651

7,040,000
2,259,774

2,140,320 37,797,542
477,371
7,546,997

547,736 37,249,806
104,546
7,442,452

11232
11233
11234
11239

17,888
3,405
775
6,851

3,370,828
836,551
69,558
503,289

1,209,528 22,400,358
396,096
4,643,075
9,985
2,777,612
47,340
429,499

306,268 22,094,090
127,009
4,516,067
1,790
2,775,822
8,124
421,375

Sheep and goat farming. . . . . . . . . . . . 1124
Sheep farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11241
Goat farming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11242
Animal aquaculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1125
Other animal production. . . . . . . . . . . .
Apiculture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Horse and other equine production. . .
Fur-bearing animal and rabbit production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
All other animal production . . . . . . . . .

67,254 11,963,667
30,974
8,971,952
36,280
2,991,715
4,777

429,300
324,835
104,465

554,107
435,107
119,000

21,374
18,396
2,979

532,732
416,711
116,021

2,451,244

70,954

1,407,750

18,384

1,389,366

1129
11291
11292

240,898 63,468,664
7,979
503,609
168,694 22,370,495

2,819,920
92,280
675,383

4,874,144
263,268
2,088,845

540,743
19,827
17,332

4,333,401
243,440
2,071,512

11293
11299

2,252
89,224
61,973 40,505,336

16,894
2,035,363

154,325
2,367,706

2,744
500,839

151,581
1,866,867

X Not applicable 1 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) 2007; see text, Section 15. 2 Includes poultry, and their products sold.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1, February
2009. See also <http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 535

Table 824. Farms—Number and Acreage: 1990 to 2010
[As of June 1 (2,146 represents 2,146,000). Based on 1974 census definition; for definition of farms and farmland, see text, this section. Activities included as agriculture have undergone changes in recent years. Data for period 2000 to 2010 are not directly comparable with data for 1990. See source for more detail. Data for 2007 have been adjusted for underenumeration]
Year
Unit
Number of farms. . . . . . 1,000. . . . . . . .
Land in farms. . . . . . . . . Mil. acres. . . . .
Average per farm. . . . . Acres. . . . . . . .

1990
2,146
987
460

2000
2,167
945
436

2004
2,113
932
441

2005
2,099
928
442

2006
2,089
926
443

2007
2,205
921
418

2008
2,200
920
418

2009
2,200
920
418

2010
2,201
920
418

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Farms and Land in Farms, Final Estimates,
1988–1992; Farms and Land in Farms, Final Estimates, 1993–1997; Farm Numbers and Land in Farms, Final Estimates,
1998–2002; Farms and Land in Farms, Final Estimates, 2003-2007; and Farms, Land in Farms, and Livestock Operations 2010
Summary, February 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.

Table 825. Farms—Number and Acreage by State: 2000 to 2010
[As of June 1 (2,167 represents 2,167,000). See headnote, Table 824]
State
United States. . .
Alabama . . . . . . . .
Alaska. . . . . . . . . .
Arizona . . . . . . . . .
Arkansas. . . . . . . .
California. . . . . . . .
Colorado . . . . . . . .
Connecticut. . . . . .
Delaware. . . . . . . .
Florida. . . . . . . . . .
Georgia. . . . . . . . .
Hawaii. . . . . . . . . .
Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .
Illinois. . . . . . . . . . .
Indiana. . . . . . . . . .
Iowa. . . . . . . . . . . .
Kansas. . . . . . . . . .
Kentucky . . . . . . . .
Louisiana. . . . . . . .
Maine. . . . . . . . . . .
Maryland. . . . . . . .
Massachusetts. . . .
Michigan . . . . . . . .
Minnesota . . . . . . .
Mississippi. . . . . . .
Missouri. . . . . . . . .

Farms
Land in farms
Acreage
(1,000)
(mil. acres) per farm
State
2000 2010 2000 2010 2000 2010
2,167 2,201
945
920
436
418
47
49
9
9
191
186 Montana. . . . . . . . .
1
1
1
1 1,569 1,294 Nebraska. . . . . . . .
11
16
27
26 2,514 1,684 Nevada . . . . . . . . .
48
49
15
14
304
278 New Hampshire. . .
83
82
28
25
337
311 New Jersey. . . . . .
30
36
32
31 1,053
864 New Mexico. . . . . .
4
5
(Z)
(Z)
86
82 New York. . . . . . . .
3
2
1
(Z)
215
198 North Carolina. . . .
44
48
10
9
236
195 North Dakota. . . . .
49
47
11
10
222
217 Ohio. . . . . . . . . . . .
6
8
1
1
251
148 Oklahoma . . . . . . .
25
26
12
11
486
444 Oregon. . . . . . . . . .
77
76
28
27
357
351 Pennsylvania. . . . .
63
62
15
15
240
239 Rhode Island. . . . .
94
92
33
31
346
333 South Carolina. . . .
65
66
48
46
736
705 South Dakota. . . . .
90
86
14
14
152
163 Tennessee. . . . . . .
29
30
8
8
277
268 Texas. . . . . . . . . . .
7
8
1
1
190
167 Utah. . . . . . . . . . . .
12
13
2
2
172
160 Vermont. . . . . . . . .
6
8
1
1
89
68 Virginia. . . . . . . . . .
53
55
10
10
192
182 Washington. . . . . .
81
81
28
27
344
332 West Virginia. . . . .
42
42
11
11
266
263 Wisconsin . . . . . . .
109
108
30
29
277
269 Wyoming. . . . . . . .

Farms
Land in farms
(1,000)
(mil. acres)
2000 2010 2000 2010
28
52
3
3
10
18
38
56
31
79
85
40
59
1
24
32
88
228
16
7
49
37
21
78
9

29
47
3
4
10
21
36
52
32
75
87
39
63
1
27
32
78
248
17
7
47
40
23
78
11

59
46
6
(Z)
1
45
8
9
39
15
34
17
8
(Z)
5
44
12
131
12
1
9
16
4
16
35

61
46
6
(Z)
1
43
7
9
40
14
35
16
8
(Z)
5
44
11
130
11
1
8
15
4
15
30

Acreage per farm
2000 2010
2,133
887
2,065
133
86
2,494
205
166
1,279
187
400
433
130
75
203
1,358
134
573
748
192
180
420
173
206
3,750

2,068
966
1,903
113
71
2,057
193
164
1,241
183
407
423
123
57
181
1,374
139
527
669
174
170
375
159
195
2,745

Z Less than 500,000 acres.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Farm Numbers and Land in Farms,
Final Estimates, 1998–2002 and Farms, Land in Farms, and Livestock Operations 2010 Summary, February 2011. See also
<http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.

Table 826. Farms by Size and Type of Organization: 1978 to 2007
[2,258 represents 2,258,000. For comments on adjustment, see text, this section]
Size and type of organization

Unit

Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000. . . . . . .
Land in farms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. acres. . . .
Average size of farm. . . . . . . . . . Acres. . . . . . .

1978
2,258
1,015
449

Not adjusted for coverage
1982
1987
1992
2,241
2,088
1,925
987
964
946
440
462
491

1997
1,912
932
487

Adjusted for coverage
1997 1
2002 1
2007 1
2,216
2,129
2,205
955
938
922
431
441
418

Farms by size:
1 to 9 acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10 to 49 acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50 to 179 acres . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180 to 499 acres . . . . . . . . . . . .
500 to 999 acres . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,000 to 1,999 acres . . . . . . . . .
2,000 acres or more . . . . . . . . .

1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .

151
392
759
582
213
98
63

188
449
712
527
204
97
65

183
412
645
478
200
102
67

166
388
584
428
186
102
71

154
411
593
403
176
101
75

205
531
694
428
179
103
74

179
564
659
389
162
99
78

233
620
661
368
150
93
80

Farms by type of organization:
Family or individual . . . . . . . . . .
Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . .

1,966
233
50
9

1,946
223
60
12

1,809
200
67
12

1,653
187
73
12

1,643
169
84
15

1,923
186
90
17

1,910
130
74
16

1,906
174
96
28

Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section. 2 Cooperative, estate or trust, institutional, etc.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.
1

536 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 827. Farms—Number and Acreage by Size of Farm: 2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section]

Size of farm
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Under 10 acres . . . . . . . . .
10 to 49 acres. . . . . . . . . .
50 to 69 acres. . . . . . . . . .
70 to 99 acres. . . . . . . . . .
100 to 139 acres. . . . . . . .
140 to 179 acres. . . . . . . .
180 to 219 acres. . . . . . . .
220 to 259 acres. . . . . . . .
260 to 499 acres. . . . . . . .
500 to 999 acres . . . . . . . .
1,000 to 1,999 acres . . . . .
2,000 acres or more . . . . .

Number of farms
(1,000)

Land in farms
(mil. acres)

Cropland harvested
(mil. acres)

2002
2,129

2007
2,205

2002
938.3

2007
922.1

2002
302.7

2007
309.6

179
564
152
191
175
142
91
72
226
162
99
78

233
620
154
192
175
139
88
68
213
150
93
80

0.8
14.7
8.8
15.7
20.2
22.3
18.0
17.1
80.6
112.4
135.7
491.9

1.1
15.9
8.9
15.8
20.3
22.0
17.3
16.3
75.9
104.1
127.6
496.9

0.2
4.1
2.5
4.7
6.1
7.3
6.2
6.5
34.1
56.7
72.8
101.6

Percent distribution,
2007
Number
All land Cropland of farms in farms harvested
100.0
100.0
100.0

0.3
4.3
2.5
4.5
5.8
6.6
5.6
5.7
30.4
51.6
69.8
122.5

10.6
28.1
7.0
8.7
7.9
6.3
4.0
3.1
9.6
6.8
4.2
3.6

0.1
1.7
1.0
1.7
2.2
2.4
1.9
1.8
8.2
11.3
13.8
53.9

0.1
1.4
0.8
1.5
1.9
2.1
1.8
1.9
9.8
16.7
22.6
39.6

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.

Table 828. Farms—Number, Acreage, and Value by Tenure of Principal
Operator and Type of Organization: 2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Full owners own all the land they operate. Part owners own a part and rent from others the rest of the land they operate. A principal operator is the person primarily responsible for the on-site, day-to-day operation of the farm or ranch business. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section]

Total 1

Tenure of operator
Type of organization
Full
Part
Family or Partner- Corporaowner owner Tenant individual ship tion

1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .

2,129
2,205
853
661
368
150
173

1,428
1,522
739
492
198
51
41

551
542
70
130
143
84
114

150
141
44
38
27
14
17

1,910
1,906
774
588
312
118
114

130
174
45
45
34
18
32

74
96
26
18
16
12
24

LAND IN FARMS
2002. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. acres. . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. acres. . . . .

938
922

357
344

495
496

87
82

622
574

146
161

108
125

Value of land and buildings, 2007 2. . . . . Bil. dol . . . . . . . .
Value of farm products sold, 2007. . . . . . Bil. dol . . . . . . .

1,744
297

726
117

868
148

150
32

1,203
148

277
62

227
84

Item and year

Unit

NUMBER OF FARMS
2002. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Under 50 acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50 to 179 acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180 to 499 acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
500 to 999 acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,000 acres or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Includes other types, not shown separately. 2 Based on a sample of farms.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>
1

Table 829. Corporate Farms—Characteristics by Type: 2007
[125.3 represents 125,300,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Family held corporations
Item

Unit

Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number. . . . .
Percent distribution . . . . . . . Percent . . . . .

All corporations 96,074
100

Total
85,837
89

1 to 10 stockholders 83,796
87

Land in farms. . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. acres. . . .
Average per farm. . . . . . . . . Acres. . . . . . .

125.3
1,304

114.3
1,331

106.4
1,270

Value of—
Land and buildings 1 . . . . . .
Average per farm. . . . . . . .
Farm products sold. . . . . . .
Average per farm. . . . . . . .

226.6
2,358
84.1
876

200.6
2,336
65.8
766

189.5
2,262
58.9
703

Bil. dol . . . . . .
$1,000. . . . . .
Bil. dol . . . . . .
$1,000. . . . . .

11 or more stockholders
2,041
2

Other corporations

Total
10,237
11

1 to 10 stockholders 9,330
10

11 or more stockholders
907
1

7.8
3,834

11.1
1,080

7.7
829

3.3
3,657

11.0
5,399
6.9
3,378

26.0
2,542
18.3
1,791

20.2
2,170
12.2
1,305

5.8
6,371
6.2
6,787

Based on a sample of farms.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.
1

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 537

Table 830. Family Farm Household Income and Wealth, 2005 to 2009, and by Gross Sales, 2009
[In dollars, except for number of farms. Based on Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) Phase III. A family farm is defined as one in which the majority of the ownership of the farm business is held by related individuals. Nearly all farms
(97 percent in 2009) are family farms. The farm operator is the person who runs the farm, making the day-to-day management decisions. The operator could be an owner, hired manager, cash tenant, share tenant, and/or a partner. If land is rented or worked on shares, the tenant or renter is the operator. For multiple-operator farms, a principal operator is identified as the individual making most of the day-to-day decisions about the operation. About 40 percent of farms have more than one operator, but three-quarters of these are operated by a husband-wife team. Therefore, both operators are considered part of the principal operator household.
Minus sign (–) indicates loss]
2009
Gross sales
Item
Less than $10,000 to
2005
2006
2007
2008
Total $10,000 1 $249,000 1
Number of family farms. . . . . . . . . . 2,034,048 2,021,903 2,143,398 2,129,869 2,131,007 1,281,788
639,270
INCOME PER FAMILY FARM
HOUSEHOLD
Net earnings from farming activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off-farm income of the household. . Earned income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-farm wages and salaries. . . . Off-farm business income. . . . . . Unearned income. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total household income, mean 3 . . .
WEALTH PER FAMILY FARM
HOUSEHOLD
Assets, mean 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-farm assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Debt, mean 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-farm debt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Net worth, mean 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm net worth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non-farm net worth. . . . . . . . . . . .

14,227
67,091
46,034
34,876
11,158
35,283
81,317

8,541
72,502
51,674
38,481
13,193
20,827
81,043

11,364
77,432
58,933
48,947
9,986
18,499
88,796

915,210 1,026,389 1,006,020
677,118
764,485
739,905
238,092
261,905
266,115
99,345
99,766
106,874
54,855
59,731
56,859
44,491
40,035
50,015
815,864
926,623
899,146
622,264
704,754
683,046
193,601
221,869
216,101

9,764
70,032
50,761
42,606
8,155
19,271
79,796

$250,000 or more 2
209,949

6,866
70,302
50,852
43,852
7,000
19,450
77,169

–8,661
75,493
56,386
50,119
6,267
19,107
66,832

2,615
66,562
44,729
37,007
7,722
21,833
69,177

114,609
49,999
35,713
26,439
9,275
14,286
164,609

988,156 1,031,000
749,190
761,894
238,966
269,106
112,705
115,981
61,131
66,149
51,574
49,832
875,451
915,019
688,059
695,745
187,392
219,274

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

NA Not available. 1 Small family farms. Includes rural-residence family farms and intermediate family farms. 2 Large scale family farm. Includes commercial farms. 3 For definition of mean see Guide to Tabular Presentation.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Agricultural Income and Finance Situation and Outlook,
December 2010. See also <http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1254>.

Table 831. Farm Type, Acreage, and Production: 2000 to 2009
[(2,166 represents 2,166,000). Based on Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) Phase III]
Type of farm
Total farms
Number of farms. . . . . . . . .
Total value of production. . .
Total acres operated . . . . . .
Acres operated per farm. . .

Unit

2000

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

1,000. . . . .
2,166
2,152
2,121
2,108
2,095
2,083
2,197
2,192
2,192
Mil dol. . . . 177,286 182,461 186,644 225,698 215,295 226,045 289,530 299,066 278,051
Mil.. . . . . . .
995
955
912
990
916
893
878
894
913
Acres. . . . .
459
444
430
470
437
429
400
408
417

Commercial farms 1
Number of farms. . . . . . . . .
Total value of production. . .
Total acres operated . . . . . .
Acres operated per farm. . .

1,000. . . . .
178
188
188
205
216
219
257
272
271
Mil dol.. . . . 121,202 126,242 134,627 170,130 166,566 178,104 241,728 249,759 230,717
Mil. . . . . . .
392
347
341
429
418
382
424
429
443
Acres. . . . .
2,205
1,843
1,815
2,096
1,939
1,747
1,650
1,580
1,635

Intermediate farms 2
Number of farms. . . . . . . . .
Total value of production. . .
Total acres operated . . . . . .
Acres operated per farm. . .

1,000. . . . .
Mil dol.. . . .
Mil.. . . . . . .
Acres. . . . .

668
41,813
392
587

649
41,981
384
591

607
37,894
349
576

624
38,438
342
547

550
33,872
307
558

566
32,533
318
561

546
30,933
237
434

583
32,718
253
434

577
30,830
270
469

Rural residence farms 3
Number of farms. . . . . . . . .
Total value of production. . .
Total acres operated . . . . . .
Acres operated per farm. . .

1,000. . . . .
Mil dol.. . . .
Mil.. . . . . . .
Acres. . . . .

1,320
14,272
211
160

1,315
14,238
224
170

1,326
14,124
221
167

1,279
17,130
219
172

1,329
14,856
191
144

1,298
15,408
193
149

1,394
16,869
217
156

1,338
16,589
212
158

1,344
16,521
200
149

1
Includes farms with sales of $250,000 or more. 2 Small familly farms whose operators report farming as their major occupation. 3 Includes retirement and residential farms.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, ARMS Phase III—“Structural Characteristics Report,”
<http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/ARMS/beta.htm>.

538 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 832. Organic Agriculture—Number of Farms, Acreage, and
Value of Sales: 2007
[2,577 represents 2,577,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Size and usage
Total acres used for organic production. . . .
1 to 9 organic acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10 to 49 organic acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50 to 179 organic acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180 to 499 organic acres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
500 organic acres or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number
Sales value of organically produced of Acreage commodities and commodity farms (1,000)
20,437
2,577 Organic product sales, total. . . . . . . . . . .
9,251
29 $1 to $4,999. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4,994
115 $5,000 to $9,999. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3,498
348 $10,000 to $24,999. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,808
528 $25,000 to $49,999. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
886
1,557 $50,000 or more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Acres from which organic crops harvested. .
Acres of organic pastureland. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acres being converted to organic production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number of Value farms (mil. dol.)
18,211
1,709
8,285
13
1,935
13
2,318
37
1,515
54
4,158
1,593

16,778
7,268

1,288 Crops 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
975 Livestock and poultry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14,968
2,496

1,122
110

11,901

616 Livestock and poultry products . . . . . . . . .

3,191

477

Includes nursery and greenhouse crops.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.
1

Table 833. Certified Organic Farmland, Crops, and Livestock: 2000 to 2008
[1,776 represents 1,776,000. Economic Research Service collaborates with over 50 state and private certifiers to calculate
U.S. and state-level estimates of certified organic acreage and livestock]
Item
Unit
Farm operations 1 . . . . . . . . . Number. . . . . .
Average farm size. . . . . . . . . acres. . . . . . . .

2000
6,592
269

2001
6,949
301

2002
7,323
263

2003
8,035
273

2004
8,021
380

2005
8,493
477

2006
9,469
310

2007
11,352
378

2008
12,941
372

Total farmland . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 acres. . .
Total cropland . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 acres. . .
Total pasture/rangeland. . . . . 1,000 acres. . .

1,776
557
1,219

2,094
790
1,305

1,926
626
1,300

2,197
745
1,452

3,045
1,593
1,452

4,054
2,331
1,723

2,936
1,051
1,885

4,290
2,005
2,285

4,816
2,161
2,655

Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wheat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soybeans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseeds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hay and silage. . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herbs, nursery, and greenhouse. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other cropland. . . . . . . . . . . .

1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .

416
78
181
30
166
136
55
231
62
43

455
94
195
33
211
174
44
254
72
56

496
96
218
53
145
127
33
268
70
61

548
106
234
46
153
122
28
328
79
78

491
99
214
43
144
114
54
357
80
81

608
131
277
46
156
122
46
411
99
97

624
138
225
65
157
115
45
508
107
96

789
172
330
59
150
100
42
677
132
97

908
195
416
57
164
126
69
793
169
121

1,000 acres. . .
1,000 acres. . .

41
204

15
197

29
198

25
214

8
239

9
298

18
330

18
380

15
415

Livestock 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milk cows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Poultry 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layer hens . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Broilers (meat chicken). . . . .

1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .
1,000. . . . . . . .

56
38
3,159
1,114
1,925

72
49
5,014
1,612
3,286

108
67
6,270
1,052
3,032

124
74
8,780
1,591
6,301

157
75
7,305
1,788
4,769

197
87
13,757
2,415
10,406

257
130
9,195
3,072
5,530

363
166
12,185
3,872
7,436

476
250
15,518
5,538
9,016

1
Number does not include subcontracted organic farm operations. 2 Total livestock includes other and unclassified livestock animals. 3 Total poultry includes other and unclassified poultry animals.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Briefing Rooms, Organic Agriculture,”
<http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Organic/>.

Table 834. Adoption of Genetically Engineered Crops: 2000 to 2010
[In percent. As of June. Based on June Agricultural Survey conducted by National Agricultural Statistical Services (NASS).
Excludes conventionally bred herbicide resistant varieties. Insect resistant varieties include only those containing bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The Bt varieties include those that contain more than one gene that can resist different types of insects.
Stacked gene varieties include only those varieties containing biotech traits for both herbicide and insect resistance]
Genetically engineered crop
Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Insect resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herbicide resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stacked gene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2000
25
18
6
1

2001
26
18
7
1

2002
34
22
9
2

2003
40
25
11
4

2004
47
27
14
6

2005
52
26
17
9

2006
61
25
21
15

2007
73
21
24
28

2008
80
17
23
40

2009
85
17
22
46

2010
86
16
23
47

Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Insect resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herbicide resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stacked gene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61
15
26
20

69
13
32
24

71
13
36
22

73
14
32
27

76
16
30
30

79
18
27
34

83
18
26
39

87
17
28
42

86
18
23
45

88
17
23
48

93
15
20
58

Soybean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Insect resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herbicide resistant. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stacked gene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

54
(X)
54
(X)

68
(X)
68
(X)

75
(X)
75
(X)

81
(X)
81
(X)

85
(X)
85
(X)

87
(X)
87
(X)

89
(X)
89
(X)

91
(X)
91
(X)

92
(X)
92
(X)

91
(X)
91
(X)

93
(X)
93
(X)

X Not applicable.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Adoption of Genetically Engineered Crops in the U.S.,”
July 2010, <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/BiotechCrops/>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 539

Table 835. Farms—Number, Acreage, and Value of Sales by Size of Sales:
2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Acreage
Market value of agricultural products sold
2002
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less than $2,500. . . . . . . . .
$2,500 to $4,999. . . . . . . . .
$5,000 to $9,999. . . . . . . . .
$10,000 to $24,999. . . . . . .
$25,000 to $49,999. . . . . . .
$50,000 to $99,999. . . . . . .
$100,000 to $249,999. . . . .
$250,000 to $499,999. . . . .
$500,000 to $999,999. . . . .
$1,000,000 or more. . . . . . .
2007
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less than $2,500. . . . . . . . .
$2,500 to $4,999. . . . . . . . .
$5,000 to $9,999. . . . . . . . .
$10,000 to $24,999. . . . . . .
$25,000 to $49,999. . . . . . .
$50,000 to $99,999. . . . . . .
$100,000 to $249,999. . . . .
$250,000 to $499,999. . . . .
$500,000 to $999,999. . . . .
$1,000,000 or more. . . . . . .

Value of sales
Average
Total per farm
(mil. dol.)
(dol.)

Farms
(1,000)

Total
(mil.)

Average per farm

2,129
827
213
223
256
158
140
159
82
42
29

938.3
107.0
23.1
34.8
69.5
77.9
110.1
189.4
140.8
94.0
91.7

441
129
108
156
271
494
784
1,191
1,723
2,241
3,198

200,646
485
763
1,577
4,068
5,594
10,024
25,401
28,530
28,944
95,259

2,205
900
200
219
248
155
125
148
93
61
56

922.1
121.5
17.5
27.6
65.8
59.8
78.2
147.6
140.7
119.4
144.0

418
135
87
126
265
386
623
1,000
1,507
1,965
2,593

297,220
435
718
1,553
3,960
5,480
8,961
24,213
33,410
42,691
175,800

Percent distribution

Farms

Acreage

Value of sales 94,244
586
3,582
7,072
15,891
35,405
71,600
159,755
347,927
689,143
3,284,793

100.0
38.8
10.0
10.5
12.0
7.4
6.6
7.5
3.9
2.0
1.4

100.0
11.4
2.5
3.7
7.4
8.3
11.7
20.2
15.0
10.0
9.8

100.0
0.2
0.4
0.8
2.0
2.8
5.0
12.7
14.2
14.4
47.5

134,807
483
3,585
7,104
15,949
35,419
71,429
164,156
357,811
702,417
3,167,050

100.0
40.8
9.1
9.9
11.3
7.0
5.7
6.7
4.2
2.8
2.5

100.0
13.2
1.9
3.0
7.1
6.5
8.5
16.0
15.3
13.0
15.6

100.0
0.1
0.2
0.5
1.3
1.8
3.0
8.1
11.2
14.4
59.1

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.

Table 836. Farms—Number, Value of Sales, and Government Payments by
Economic Class of Farm: 2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Economic class of farm is a combination of market value of agricultural products sold and federal farm program payments. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Number of farms
(1,000)
2007

Economic class

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less than $1,000. . . . . . . . . . . .
$1,000 to $2,499. . . . . . . . . . . .
$2,500 to $4,999. . . . . . . . . . . .
$5,000 to $9,999. . . . . . . . . . . .
$10,000 to $24,999. . . . . . . . . .
$25,000 to $49,999. . . . . . . . . .
$50,000 to $99,999. . . . . . . . . .
$100,000 to $249,999. . . . . . . .
$250,000 to $499,999. . . . . . . .
$500,000 to $999,999. . . . . . . .
$1,000,000 to $2,499,999. . . . .
$2,500,000 to $4,999,999. . . . .
$5 million or more . . . . . . . . . . .

2002, total 2,129
431
307
243
247
272
164
143
163
86
44
21
5
3

Total
2,205
500
271
246
255
274
164
129
149
96
64
42
10
6

Receiving government payments
838
42
85
80
87
110
87
83
110
75
46
27
6
2

Market value of agricultural products sold and government payments (mil. dol.)
2007
Agricultural products Government
2002, total
Total
sold payments 207,192
305,204
297,220
7,984
72
96
77
19
508
448
332
116
870
884
685
199
1,746
1,811
1,488
323
4,320
4,364
3,810
554
5,804
5,795
5,286
508
10,202
9,219
8,644
575
26,119
24,401
23,256
1,145
30,084
34,367
32,980
1,387
30,598
44,578
43,156
1,422
31,701
62,751
61,508
1,243
16,056
33,190
32,839
352
49,112
83,300
83,159
141

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.

Table 837. Farm Production Expenses: 2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Production expenses
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fertilizer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chemicals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seeds, plants, vines, and trees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Livestock and poultry 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gasoline and fuel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Utilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplies, repairs, and maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm labor 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customwork and custom hauling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash rent for land, buildings and grazing fees. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rent and lease for machinery, equipment, and farm share. . .
Interest expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Property taxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other production expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2002
Farms Expenses Percent of
(1,000) (mil. dol.) total 2,129 173,199
100.0
1,190
9,751
5.6
947
7,609
4.4
875
7,599
4.4
554
27,421
15.8
1,241
31,695
18.3
2,024
6,675
3.9
1,241
4,874
2.8
1,899
13,387
7.7
783
22,020
12.7
450
3,314
1.9
498
9,046
5.2
151
1,468
0.8
758
9,572
5.5
1,963
5,351
3.1
1,254
13,418
7.7

2007
Farms Expenses Percent of
(1,000) (mil. dol.) total 2,205 241,114
100.0
1,148
18,107
7.5
919
10,075
4.2
776
11,741
4.9
491
38,004
15.8
1,136
49,095
20.4
2,149
12,912
5.4
1,103
5,918
2.5
1,992
15,897
6.6
665
26,392
11.0
362
4,091
1.7
490
13,275
5.5
109
1,385
0.6
667
10,881
4.5
1,996
6,223
2.6
1,116
17,119
7.1

Purchased or leased. 2002 does not include breeding livestock leased. 2 Includes hired and contract labor.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.
1

540 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 838. Farms—Number, Acreage, and Value by State: 2002 and 2007
[2,129 represents 2,129,000. Data have been adjusted for coverage; see text, this section and Appendix III]
Number of farms
(1,000)

Land in farms
(mil. acres)

Average size of farm
(acres)

Total value of land and buildings 1
(bil. dol.)

State

Market value of agricultural products sold and government payments, 2007
2007
(mil. dol.)
1,744.3
305,204

Total number of operators, 2007
(1,000)
3,337

2002
2,129

2007
2,205

2002
938.3

2007
922.1

2002
441

2007
418

2002
1,144.9

AL . . . . . . . .
AK. . . . . . . .
AZ . . . . . . . .
AR. . . . . . . .
CA. . . . . . . .

45
1
7
47
80

49
1
16
49
81

8.9
0.9
26.6
14.5
27.6

9.0
0.9
26.1
13.9
25.4

197
1,479
3,645
305
346

185
1,285
1,670
281
313

15.1
0.3
10.6
21.2
96.1

20.7
0.3
19.5
32.5
162.5

4,540
59
3,290
7,778
34,125

71
1
26
75
131

CO. . . . . . . .
CT. . . . . . . .
DE. . . . . . . .
FL . . . . . . . .
GA. . . . . . . .

31
4
2
44
49

37
5
3
47
48

31.1
0.4
0.5
10.4
10.7

31.6
0.4
0.5
9.2
10.2

991
85
226
236
218

853
83
200
195
212

23.8
3.5
2.3
29.3
22.6

33.1
5.1
5.3
52.1
31.6

6,217
556
1,092
7,831
7,337

61
8
4
73
69

HI. . . . . . . . .
ID. . . . . . . . .
IL. . . . . . . . .
IN. . . . . . . . .
IA. . . . . . . . .

5
25
73
60
91

8
25
77
61
93

1.3
11.8
27.3
15.1
31.7

1.1
11.5
26.8
14.8
30.7

241
470
374
250
350

149
454
348
242
331

4.6
15.3
66.7
38.4
64.2

8.6
22.7
101.5
52.9
104.2

516
5,788
13,816
8,532
21,124

11
40
111
92
136

KS. . . . . . . .
KY. . . . . . . .
LA . . . . . . . .
ME. . . . . . . .
MD. . . . . . . .

64
87
27
7
12

66
85
30
8
13

47.2
13.8
7.8
1.4
2.1

46.3
14.0
8.1
1.3
2.1

733
160
286
190
170

707
164
269
166
160

32.6
25.5
12.2
2.3
8.5

42.2
37.5
16.7
3.0
14.4

14,840
4,928
2,787
626
1,868

97
124
44
13
20

MA. . . . . . . .
MI. . . . . . . . .
MN. . . . . . . .
MS. . . . . . . .
MO. . . . . . . .

6
53
81
42
107

8
56
81
42
108

0.5
10.1
27.5
11.1
29.9

0.5
10.0
26.9
11.5
29.0

85
190
340
263
280

67
179
332
273
269

4.6
27.1
41.8
15.6
45.3

6.4
34.2
69.2
21.4
63.2

494
5,872
13,626
5,108
7,832

12
85
120
61
164

MT. . . . . . . .
NE. . . . . . . .
NV. . . . . . . .
NH. . . . . . . .
NJ . . . . . . . .

28
49
3
3
10

30
48
3
4
10

59.6
45.9
6.3
0.4
0.8

61.4
45.5
5.9
0.5
0.7

2,139
930
2,118
132
81

2,079
953
1,873
113
71

23.3
35.7
2.8
1.4
7.4

47.6
52.7
3.6
2.3
11.3

3,025
15,893
517
202
994

47
72
5
7
16

NM. . . . . . . .
NY. . . . . . . .
NC. . . . . . . .
ND. . . . . . . .
OH. . . . . . . .

15
37
54
31
78

21
36
53
32
76

44.8
7.7
9.1
39.3
14.6

43.2
7.2
8.5
39.7
14.0

2,954
206
168
1,283
187

2,066
197
160
1,241
184

10.6
12.9
28.0
15.8
39.6

14.6
16.3
34.7
30.6
49.2

2,218
4,481
10,461
6,444
7,302

32
58
77
45
114

OK. . . . . . . .
OR. . . . . . . .
PA . . . . . . . .
RI. . . . . . . . .
SC. . . . . . . .

83
40
58
1
25

87
39
63
1
26

33.7
17.1
7.7
0.1
4.8

35.1
16.4
7.8
0.1
4.9

404
427
133
71
197

405
425
124
56
189

23.8
20.4
26.3
0.6
10.1

40.6
31.0
37.3
1.1
14.0

6,016
4,463
5,885
67
2,420

131
65
95
2
37

SD. . . . . . . .
TN. . . . . . . .
TX . . . . . . . .
UT. . . . . . . .
VT . . . . . . . .

32
88
229
15
7

31
79
247
17
7

43.8
11.7
129.9
11.7
1.2

43.7
11.0
130.4
11.1
1.2

1,380
133
567
768
189

1,401
138
527
664
177

19.6
28.5
100.5
9.0
2.5

39.1
37.1
165.6
13.9
3.6

6,841
2,713
21,722
1,438
680

47
117
373
26
11

VA . . . . . . . .
WA. . . . . . . .
WV. . . . . . . .
WI . . . . . . . .
WY. . . . . . . .

48
36
21
77
9

47
39
24
78
11

8.6
15.3
3.6
15.7
34.4

8.1
15.0
3.7
15.2
30.2

181
426
172
204
3,651

171
381
157
194
2,726

23.3
22.4
4.8
35.8
10.2

34.1
29.8
8.8
49.0
15.5

2,961
6,931
595
9,163
1,186

71
64
35
123
19

U.S.. . . . . .

Based on reports for a sample of farms.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2007 Census of Agriculture, Vol. 1. See also
<http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Full_Report/index.asp>.
1

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 541

Table 839. Balance Sheet of the Farming Sector: 1990 to 2009
[In billions of dollars, except as indicated (841 represents $841,000,000,000). As of December 31]
Item
Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Real estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Livestock and poultry 1. . . . . . . . . . . .
Machinery, motor vehicles 2. . . . . . . .
Crops 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purchased inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Financial assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1990
841
619
71
86
23
3
38

2000
1,203
946
77
90
28
5
57

2001
1,256
996
79
93
25
4
59

2002
1,260
999
76
96
23
6
60

2003
1,383
1,112
79
100
24
6
62

2004
1,588
1,305
79
108
24
6
66

2005
1,779
1,487
81
113
24
6
67

2006
1,924
1,626
81
114
23
6
74

2007
2,055
1,751
81
115
23
7
79

2008
2,023
1,703
81
123
28
7
82

2009
2,057
1,727
80
126
33
7
84

Debt 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Real estate debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm Credit System. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm Service Agency . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commercial banks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Life insurance companies . . . . . . . . .
Individuals and others. . . . . . . . . . . .

131
68
23
7
15
9
14

164
85
30
3
30
11
11

171
89
33
3
31
11
10

177
95
38
3
33
11
10

164
83
33
2
29
10
9

182
96
37
2
35
11
11

196
105
41
2
38
11
12

204
108
43
2
40
12
10

214
113
47
2
42
13
9

243
134
57
2
50
15
10

245
135
58
2
50
14
9

Nonreal estate debt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm Credit System. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm Service Agency . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commercial banks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individuals and others. . . . . . . . . . . .

63
10
10
31
12

79
17
4
45
13

82
20
4
45
13

82
20
4
44
13

81
20
4
44
14

86
22
3
46
15

92
24
3
48
16

96
28
3
51
14

101
32
3
54
13

109
37
3
57
12

111
40
3
57
11

Equity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

709

1,039

1,085

1,082

1,219

1,406

1,583

1,720

1,841

1,781

1,812

FINANCIAL RATIOS (percent)
Farm debt/equity ratio. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm debt/asset ratio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18.5
15.6

15.8
13.6

15.7
13.6

16.4
14.1

13.5
11.9

12.9
11.5

12.4
11.0

11.8
10.6

11.6
10.4

13.6
12.0

13.5
11.9

1
Excludes horses, mules, and broilers. 2 Includes only farm share value for trucks and autos. 3 All non-CCC crops held on farms plus the value above loan rate for crops held under Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC). 4 Includes CCC storage and drying facility loans but excludes debt on operator dwellings and for nonfarm purposes.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Balance Sheet,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data
/FarmBalanceSheet/>.

Table 840. Farm Sector Output and Value Added: 1990 to 2009
[In billions of dollars (179.9 represents $179,900,000,000). For definition of value added, see text, Section 13. Minus sign (–) indicates decrease]
Item
CURRENT DOLLARS
Farm output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash receipts from farm marketings. . . . .
Farm products consumed on farms. . . . . .
Other farm income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change in farm finished goods inventories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Intermediate goods and services consumed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equals: Gross farm value added. . . . . . . .
Less: Consumption of fixed capital . . . . . . .
Equals: Net farm value added. . . . . . . . . . .
Compensation of employees. . . . . . .
Taxes on production and imports. . . .
Less: Subsidies to operators. . . . . . .
Net operating surplus . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAINED (2000) DOLLARS 1
Farm output, total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash receipts from farm marketings. . . . .
Farm products consumed on farms. . . . . .
Other farm income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change in farm finished goods inventories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Intermediate goods and services consumed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equals: Gross farm value added. . . . . . . .
Less: Consumption of fixed capital . . . . . . .
Equals: Net farm value added. . . . . . . . . . .

1990

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

179.9 204.3 212.3 201.9 229.8 262.0 251.5 252.7 302.8 337.8 299.0
171.9 197.6 201.9 195.8 218.5 240.4 240.0 242.5 290.4 320.6 282.2
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
4.9
8.4
9.6
9.6
10.7
12.3
11.3
13.1
12.5
14.6
12.7
2.4

–2.0

0.6

–3.7

0.3

9.0

–0.2

–3.3

–0.5

2.1

3.8

102.6 130.7 136.1 129.6 137.4 143.7 149.5 159.6 187.9 206.7 195.1
77.3
73.6
76.2
72.3
92.4 118.3 102.0
93.1 114.9 131.1 104.0
17.9
23.3
23.9
24.7
25.8
27.4
29.5
31.3
32.9
35.0
35.9
59.3
50.4
52.3
47.7
66.7
90.9
72.5
61.8
82.0
96.2
68.0
13.4
19.7
20.9
20.8
20.5
22.3
22.6
23.1
26.0
26.6
27.6
3.8
4.7
4.7
4.8
5.1
5.2
5.2
5.7
6.6
6.6
6.1
7.6
20.0
20.0
10.8
14.2
11.1
20.9
13.5
10.2
10.3
10.7
49.8
45.9
46.7
32.8
55.2
74.4
65.6
46.4
59.5
73.3
45.1
(NA) 240.6 237.2 236.2 246.1 250.2 251.5 251.9 255.4 255.0 260.7
(NA) 234.8 227.0 231.2 235.5 230.1 240.0 242.1 244.8 243.0 247.3
(NA)
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.5
(NA)
9.3
10.3
9.9
10.6
11.7
11.3
12.3
10.1
9.8
9.3
(NA)

–2.5

0.8

–4.5

0.4

8.1

–0.2

–3.4

–0.6

1.4

3.4

(NA) 159.2 162.1 157.2 156.0 152.7 149.5 152.6 164.7 152.3 152.6
(NA)
83.5
77.7
81.2
91.6
97.9 102.0
99.1
90.3 102.3 108.5
(NA)
26.0
26.3
26.9
27.7
28.5
29.5
30.3
31.0
31.8
32.3
(NA)
57.8
51.6
54.5
64.1
69.4
72.5
68.7
59.2
69.7
75.5

NA Not available. 1 See text, Section 13.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Survey of Current Business, April 2011. See also <http://www.bea.gov/National
/Index.htm>.

542 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 841. Value Added to Economy by Agricultural Sector: 1990 to 2009
[In billions of dollars (188.5 represents $188,500,000,000). Data are consistent with the net farm income accounts and include income and expenses related to the farm operator dwellings. Value of agricultural sector production is the gross value of the commodities and services produced within a year. Net value-added is the sector’s contribution to the National economy and is the sum of the income from production earned by all factors-of-production. Net farm income is the farm operators’ share of income from the sector’s production activities. The concept presented is consistent with that employed by the Organization for
Economic Cooperation and Development. Minus sign (–) indicates decrease]
Item
1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Value of agricultural production. . . . . . . . . . 188.5 220.4 229.3 220.2 243.5 282.7 276.7 275.4 327.6 367.3 331.0 .
Value of crop production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83.2 94.8 95.0 98.3 108.6 124.4 115.2 118.9 151.1 185.1 169.1
Food grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5
6.5
6.4
6.8
8.0
8.9
8.6
9.1 13.6 18.7 14.4
Feed crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.7 20.5 21.5 24.0 24.7 27.4 24.7 29.4 42.3 58.9 50.2
Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5
2.9
3.6
3.4
6.4
4.8
6.3
5.6
6.5
5.2
3.5
Oil crops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.3 13.5 13.3 15.0 18.0 17.9 18.5 18.5 24.6 28.7 31.9
Fruits and tree nuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4 12.4 11.9 12.6 13.4 15.5 17.4 17.3 18.7 19.3 19.0
Vegetables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.3 15.5 15.4 17.1 16.9 16.2 17.0 18.0 19.3 21.0 20.6
All other crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.9 18.7 19.3 20.2 21.0 21.4 22.3 24.5 25.2 25.0 24.1
Home consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Value of inventory adjustment 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.8
2.2
1.5 –2.9 –1.6 10.7 –0.8 –3.6
0.9
8.2
5.3
Value of livestock production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meat animals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Poultry and eggs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous livestock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Home consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Value of inventory adjustment 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90.0
51.1
20.2
15.3
2.5
0.5
0.4

99.1 106.4
53.0 53.3
20.6 24.7
21.9 24.6
4.2
4.1
0.1
0.1
–0.6 –0.4

93.5 104.9 124.4 126.5 119.4 138.4 140.3 119.2
48.1 56.2 62.4 64.8 63.7 65.1 65.0 58.6
20.6 21.2 27.4 26.7 23.4 35.5 34.8 24.3
21.1 24.0 29.5 28.7 26.7 33.1 36.8 32.5
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.6
4.8
4.9
4.8
4.3
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
–0.6 –0.8
0.6
1.3
0.5 –0.4 –1.6 –0.8

Services and forestry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine hire and custom work. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forest products sold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other farm income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gross imputed rental value of farm dwellings. . .

15.3
1.8
1.8
4.5
7.2

26.5
2.2
2.8
8.7
12.7

28.5
2.2
2.5
10.2
13.6

Less: Purchased inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farm origin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed purchased. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Livestock and poultry purchased. . . . . . . . . . . .
Seed purchased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manufactured inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fertilizers and lime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pesticides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Petroleum fuel and oils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electricity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other purchased inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repair and maintenance of capital items . . . . .
Machine hire and custom work. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marketing, storage, and transportation expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contract labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

92.2 121.8 125.7 123.3 130.3 137.4 144.0 153.7 184.3 203.0 190.0
39.5 47.9 48.2 48.3 53.7 57.5 56.9 61.1 73.4 79.8 77.0
20.4 24.5 24.8 24.9 27.5 29.7 28.0 31.4 41.9 46.9 45.0
14.6 15.9 15.2 14.4 16.7 18.1 18.5 18.6 18.8 17.7 16.5
4.5
7.5
8.2
8.9
9.4
9.6 10.4 11.0 12.6 15.1 15.5
22.0 28.7 29.4 28.5 28.8 31.6 35.4 37.5 46.3 55.0 49.0
8.2 10.0 10.3
9.6 10.0 11.4 12.8 13.3 17.7 22.5 20.1
5.4
8.5
8.6
8.3
8.4
8.6
8.8
9.0 10.5 11.7 11.5
5.8
7.2
6.9
6.6
6.8
8.2 10.3 11.3 13.8 16.2 12.7
2.6
3.0
3.6
3.9
3.5
3.4
3.5
3.8
4.3
4.5
4.6
30.7 45.2 48.1 46.6 47.9 48.3 51.6 55.2 64.6 68.1 64.0
8.6 10.9 11.2 10.5 11.0 11.9 11.9 12.5 14.3 14.8 14.7
3.0
4.1
4.0
4.0
3.5
3.6
3.5
3.5
3.8
4.1
3.9

30.0
3.0
2.2
10.5
14.3

33.9
3.4
2.4
11.3
16.8

35.0
2.8
2.5
10.9
18.8

37.2
2.6
0.7
13.2
20.6

38.1
2.7
0.7
14.2
20.6

42.0
3.0
0.7
17.7
20.5

42.7
4.0
0.7
17.3
20.7

4.2
1.6
13.4

7.5
2.7
19.9

7.8
3.1
21.9

7.6
2.7
21.7

7.1
3.3
22.9

7.2
3.1
22.4

8.8
3.1
24.4

9.1
3.0
27.1

10.3
4.4
31.7

10.1
4.7
34.4

10.3
3.9
31.3

3.1
9.3
0.4
5.8

15.8
23.2
0.5
6.9

15.0
22.4
0.5
6.9

5.2
12.4
0.4
6.8

9.2
16.5
0.5
6.8

5.4
13.0
0.5
7.0

15.8
24.4
0.6
8.0

6.2
15.8
0.6
9.0

0.9
11.9
0.6
10.3

0.9
12.2
0.6
10.7

1.2
12.3
0.6
10.4

Plus: Net government transactions 2 . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct Government payments 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor vehicle registration and licensing fees. . . .
Property taxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equals: Gross value added. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Capital consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equals: Net value added. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Employee compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Net rent received by nonoperator landlords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less: Real estate and nonreal estate interest. . . .
Equals: Net farm income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28.0
2.1
2.6
10.1
13.1

99.3 114.4 118.7 102.1 122.4 150.7 148.6 127.9 144.3 165.3 142.2
18.1 20.1 20.6 20.9 21.4 23.1 24.9 26.2 27.0 28.7 30.1
81.2 94.3 98.2 81.1 100.9 127.6 123.6 101.7 117.2 136.6 112.1
12.4 17.9 18.8 19.1 18.7 20.2 20.5 21.2 24.2 25.0 24.9
9.0
13.5
46.3

11.2
14.6
50.6

11.2
13.3
54.9

9.6
12.8
39.6

10.1
11.6
60.5

10.0
11.6
85.8

10.6
13.2
79.3

7.6
14.4
58.5

7.6
15.1
70.3

9.6
15.4
86.6

9.8
15.2
62.2

1
A positive value of inventory change represents current-year production not sold by December 31. A negative value is an offset to production from prior years included in current-year sales. 2 Direct government payments minus motor vehicle registration and licensing fees and property taxes. 3 Government payments reflect payments made directly to all recipients in the farm sector, including landlords. The nonoperator landlords share is offset by its inclusion in rental expenses paid to these landlords and thus is not reflected in net farm income or net cash income.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Income: Data Files—Value Added to the
U.S. Economy by the Agricultural Sector via the Production of Goods and Services, 2000–2009,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data
/FarmIncome/FinfidmuXls.htm>.

Table 842. Cash Receipts for Selected Commodities—Leading States: 2009
[In millions of dollars (43,777 represents $43,777,000,000). See headnote Table 843]
State
Cattle and calves.
Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nebraska. . . . . . . . .
Kansas. . . . . . . . . . .
Colorado . . . . . . . . .
Iowa. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Value
43,777
6,939
6,240
5,547
2,606
2,470

State
Corn . . . . . . . . . .
Iowa. . . . . . . . . . . .
Illinois. . . . . . . . . . .
Nebraska. . . . . . . .
Minnesota . . . . . . .
Indiana. . . . . . . . . .

Value
42,035
7,772
7,534
4,855
3,795
3,288

State
Soybeans. . . . . . . .
Iowa. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . .
Minnesota . . . . . . . .
Indiana. . . . . . . . . . .
Nebraska. . . . . . . . .

Value
30,056
4,435
4,233
2,641
2,516
2,256

State
Dairy products. .
California. . . . . . . .
Wisconsin . . . . . . .
New York. . . . . . . .
Pennsylvania. . . . .
Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .

Value
24,342
4,537
3,271
1,685
1,510
1,431

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Income: Data Files—Cash Receipts by
Commodity Groups 2000–2009,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FarmIncome/FinfidmuXls.htm>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 543

Table 843. Farm Income—Cash Receipts From Farm Marketings: 2000 to 2009
[In millions of dollars (192,098 represents $192,098,000,000). Represents gross receipts from commercial market sales as well as net Commodity Credit Corporation loans. The source estimates and publishes individual cash receipt values only for major commodities and major producing states. The U.S. receipts for individual commodities, computed as the sum of the reported states, may understate the value of sales for some commodities, with the balance included in the appropriate category labeled
“other” or “miscellaneous.” The degree of underestimation in some of the minor commodities can be substantial]
Commodities
2000
2005
2008
2009
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192,098 240,898 318,330 283,406 .
Livestock and products . . . . 99,597 124,931 141,526 119,752
Meat animals. . . . . . . . . . . 53,012 64,813 65,011 58,599
Cattle and calves. . . . . . . 40,783 49,283 48,518 43,777
Hogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,758 14,970 16,050 14,395
Sheep and lambs. . . . . . .
470
560
443
427
Dairy products. . . . . . . . . . 20,587 26,705 34,849 24,342
Poultry/eggs. . . . . . . . . . . . 21,854 28,834 36,832 32,463
Broilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,989 20,878 23,203 21,813
Chicken eggs. . . . . . . . . .
4,289
4,067
8,216
6,156
Turkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,771
3,026
4,477
3,573
Miscellaneous livestock. . .
4,144
4,579
4,833
4,347
Horses/mules. . . . . . . . . .
1,218
1,104
1,158
861
Aquaculture 1. . . . . . . . . .
798
1,063
1,145
1,097
Catfish. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
501
458
410
373
Other livestock. . . . . . . . .
1,970
2,219
2,262
2,152
Crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92,501 115,967 176,804 163,655
Food grains. . . . . . . . . . . .
6,525
8,611 18,708 14,384
Rice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
837
1,589
3,214
3,041
Wheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5,672
7,005 15,456 11,315
Feed crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,546 24,590 58,926 50,176
Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,162 18,486 48,596 42,035
Hay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3,855
4,697
7,508
5,727
Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,950
6,403
5,228
3,489
Tobacco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,316
1,097
1,451
1,485
Oil crops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,478 18,388 28,689 31,912
Peanuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
897
843
1,194
835
Soybeans. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,047 16,918 29,449 30,056
Vegetables. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,758 17,291 21,017 20,593
Beans, dry. . . . . . . . . . . .
436
488
932
794
Potatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,369
2,655
3,651
3,396
Beans, snap. . . . . . . . . .
393
414
486
416

Commodities
2000
2005
2008
2009
Broccoli. . . . . . . . . . . . .
622
539
721
742
Carrots. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
390
592
636
589
Corn, sweet. . . . . . . . . .
709
800 1,089 1,175
Lettuce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,996 1,855 1,961 2,189
Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,341 1,012 1,063 1,155
Onions. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
713
810
777
807
Peppers, green, fresh . .
531
535
637
556
Tomatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . 1,845 2,225 2,407 2,542
Fresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,195 1,604 1,424 1,323
Misc. vegetables . . . . . . 2,153 2,994 3,700 3,234
Watermelons. . . . . . . .
240
429
500
461
Fruits/nuts. . . . . . . . . . . . 12,284 17,138 19,247 18,965
Grapefruit. . . . . . . . . . . .
377
417
358
241
Lemons. . . . . . . . . . . . .
267
345
511
394
Oranges. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,775 1,901 1,978 1,993
Apples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,466 1,712 2,664 1,986
Cherries. . . . . . . . . . . . .
327
548
654
569
Grapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,100 3,491 3,344 3,689
Wine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,909 2,317 2,009 2,447
Raisins. . . . . . . . . . . . .
487
595
668
568
Peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . .
470
511
546
594
Pears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
288
296
388
374
Strawberries . . . . . . . . . 1,045 1,399 1,919 2,124
Blueberries . . . . . . . . . .
223
382
592
542
Raspberries. . . . . . . . . .
79
256
365
363
Almonds. . . . . . . . . . . . .
666 2,526 2,343 2,294
Pistachios . . . . . . . . . . .
245
580
570
593
All other crops. . . . . . . . . 18,645 22,449 23,538 22,650
Sugar beets. . . . . . . . . . 1,113 1,193 1,290 1,411
Cane for sugar. . . . . . . .
881
815
859
864
Greenhouse/nursery. . . 13,710 16,992 16,486 15,915
Mushrooms. . . . . . . . . .
860
899
965
961

See also Table 898.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Income: Data Files—Cash Receipts by
Commodity Groups 2000–2009,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FarmIncome/FinfidmuXls.htm>.
1

Table 844. Value of Agricultural Production, Income, and Government
Payments: 2008 and 2009
[In millions of dollars (364,879 represents $364,879,000,000). Farm income data are after inventory adjustment and include income and expenses related to the farm operator’s dwelling. Minus sign (–) indicates decrease]
Value of agricultural production Net farm income

State

U.S. . . . .
AL . . . . . .
AK. . . . . .
AZ . . . . . .
AR. . . . . .
CA. . . . . .
CO. . . . . .
CT. . . . . .
DE. . . . . .
FL . . . . . .
GA. . . . . .
HI. . . . . . .
ID. . . . . . .
IL. . . . . . .
IN. . . . . . .
IA. . . . . . .
KS. . . . . .
KY. . . . . .
LA . . . . . .
ME. . . . . .
MD. . . . . .
MA. . . . . .
MI. . . . . . .
MN. . . . . .
MS. . . . . .
MO. . . . . .

2008
367,324
5,490
38
4,048
9,636
41,075
7,080
712
1,212
8,382
9,033
677
6,863
18,268
11,100
26,211
15,444
5,858
3,227
749
2,325
714
7,582
18,291
5,814
9,993

2009
330,931
4,967
40
3,529
8,010
37,794
6,640
649
1,173
7,599
8,136
650
5,898
16,285
10,539
24,350
13,872
5,569
2,868
682
2,101
639
6,597
15,374
5,062
9,368

2008
86,598
1,283
5
683
2,808
9,767
1,179
156
188
1,467
2,974
165
1,806
5,503
3,203
6,757
3,426
1,459
715
166
365
156
1,958
5,714
1,352
3,050

2009
62,187
1,019
8
203
1,524
8,782
745
116
193
1,281
2,359
133
927
3,641
2,540
5,013
2,369
1,332
689
139
299
108
1,071
3,020
1,220
2,336

Government payments, 2009
12,263
169
6
112
482
568
192
13
16
80
392
13
140
567
305
767
475
355
247
20
53
16
180
528
481
479

Value of agricultural production 2008

2009

2008

2009

Government payments, 2009

3,590
18,670
679
265
1,311
3,372
5,202
11,072
8,813
8,734
6,901
5,181
6,869
88
2,839
9,194
4,032
22,690
1,789
751
3,806
8,831
721
10,826
1,273

3,299
17,233
654
231
1,224
2,982
4,138
10,442
7,282
8,887
5,910
4,859
5,980
80
2,559
8,232
3,899
20,356
1,512
590
3,518
7,529
655
9,275
1,215

526
4,057
161
39
344
803
1,221
2,795
2,755
1,883
975
960
1,327
16
629
2,999
535
3,565
252
162
456
1,694
5
2,044
92

248
3,276
105
19
295
432
553
2,739
1,936
2,122
130
563
905
14
531
2,376
613
2,124
–52
97
352
962
–35
849
–32

256
419
11
9
17
82
149
486
442
288
229
102
161
6
161
256
265
1,407
44
45
120
189
18
406
34

Net farm income

State

MT. . . . .
NE. . . . .
NV. . . . .
NH. . . . .
NJ . . . . .
NM. . . . .
NY. . . . .
NC. . . . .
ND. . . . .
OH. . . . .
OK. . . . .
OR. . . . .
PA . . . . .
RI. . . . . .
SC. . . . .
SD. . . . .
TN. . . . .
TX . . . . .
UT. . . . .
VT . . . . .
VA . . . . .
WA. . . . .
WV. . . . .
WI . . . . .
WY. . . . .

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Income: Data Files, U.S. and State Income and
Production Expenses by Category, 1949–2009,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/farmincome/FinfidmuXls.htm>.

544 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 845. Farm Marketings, 2008 and 2009, and Principal Commodities,
2009, by State

[In millions of dollars (324,187 represents $324,187,000,000). Cattle include calves; sheep include lambs; and greenhouse includes nursery] 2008
2009
Livestock
Livestock
State rank for total farm marketings
State
and and and four principal commodities
Total
Crops products
Total
Crops products in order of marketing receipts
U.S.
.
324,187 183,096 141,090 283,406 163,655 119,752 Cattle and calves, Corn, Soybeans
AL . . .
4,464
962
3,502
4,215
880
3,335 27-Broilers, cattle and calves, chicken eggs,
AK. . .
31
25
6
32
26
6 50-Greenhouse/nursery, hay, potatoes
AZ . . .
3,465
1,959
1,505
2,943
1,766
1,178 29-Cattle and calves, dairy products, lettuce
AR. . .
8,347
3,997
4,350
7,190
3,226
3,964 12-Broilers, rice, soybeans
CA. . .
36,187 25,554
10,632 34,841 27,027
7,814 1-Dairy products, greenhouse/nursery, grapes
CO. . .
6,509
2,379
4,131
5,553
2,230
3,323 20-Cattle, corn, wheat,
CT. . .
601
413
188
536
384
152 43-Greenhouse/nursery, dairy products, chicken eggs,
DE. . .
1,095
266
828
1,010
239
771 39-Broilers, corn, soybeans
FL . . .
7,978
6,593
1,385
7,100
5,998
1,102 16-Greenhouse/nursery, oranges, tomatoes
GA. . .
7,393
2,735
4,658
6,847
2,556
4,291 18-Broilers, cotton, chicken eggs
HI. . . .
574
511
63
581
510
72 44-Other seeds, greenhouse/nursery, sugar cane
ID. . . .
6,415
3,011
3,405
5,161
2,650
2,511 21-Dairy products, cattle and calves, potatoes
IL. . . .
16,357 14,232
2,125 14,545 12,696
1,849 5-Corn, soybeans, hogs
IN. . . .
9,962
7,105
2,856
8,757
6,389
2,368 8-Corn, soybeans, hogs
IA. . . .
24,753 14,885
9,868 21,014 12,493
8,521 2-Corn, soybeans, hogs
KS. . .
13,967
6,755
7,213 12,085
5,733
6,352 7-Cattle and calves, wheat, corn
KY. . .
4,838
1,930
2,908
4,258
1,829
2,429 25-Horses, broilers, soybeans
LA . . .
3,035
1,985
1,050
2,539
1,762
778 32-sugar cane, rice, soybeans
ME. . .
676
341
335
578
320
258 42-Potatoes, dairy products, chicken eggs
MD. . .
1,965
810
1,156
1,656
751
905 36-Broilers, greenhouse/nursery, corn
MA. . .
570
454
115
481
380
101 46-Greenhouse/nursery, cranberries, dairy products
MI. . . .
6,606
4,078
2,528
5,579
3,674
1,905 19-Dairy products, corn, soybeans
MN. . .
15,838
9,752
6,087 13,325
8,423
4,902 6-Corn, soybeans, hogs
MS. . .
4,968
2,076
2,892
4,327
1,595
2,732 24-Broilers, soybeans, corn
MO. . .
8,436
4,820
3,616
7,696
4,382
3,314 11-Soybeans, corn, cattle and calves
MT. . .
2,902
1,722
1,180
2,565
1,516
1,049 34-Wheat, cattle and calves, barley
NE. . .
17,316
8,996
8,320 15,309
8,026
7,283 4-Cattle, corn, soybeans
NV. . .
572
273
299
533
257
276 45-Cattle, hay, dairy products
NH. . .
213
119
94
179
104
75 48-Greenhouse/nursery, dairy products, apples
NJ . . .
1,118
940
177
1,000
868
133 38-Greenhouse/nursery, horses/mules, blueberries
NM. . .
3,117
710
2,407
2,699
701
1,998 30-cattle and calves, dairy products, hay
NY. . .
4,694
2,011
2,683
3,676
1,680
1,996 26-Dairy products, greenhouse/nursery, corn
NC. . .
9,753
3,291
6,461
9,188
3,478
5,710 10-Broilers, hogs, greenhouse/nursery
ND. . .
7,629
6,717
912
6,352
5,581
771 17-Wheat, soybeans, corn
OH. . .
7,979
5,236
2,744
6,836
4,601
2,234 15-Soybeans, Corn, dairy products
OK. . .
5,838
1,930
3,907
4,845
1,260
3,584 23-Cattle, broilers, hogs,
OR. . .
4,375
3,234
1,141
3,893
2,995
898 28-Greenhouse/nursery, cattle and calves, dairy products
PA . . .
6,122
2,180
3,942
4,980
1,933
3,047 22-Dairy products, mushrooms/agaricus, cattle and calves
RI. . . .
68
57
10
62
53
9 49-Greenhouse/nursery, dairy products, sweet corn
SC. . .
2,360
975
1,385
2,155
907
1,248 35-Broilers, greenhouse/nursery, turkeys
SD. . .
8,048
5,366
2,681
6,861
4,499
2,362 14-Corn, cattle and calves, soybeans
TN. . .
3,116
1,780
1,336
2,841
1,705
1,137 31-Soybeans, broilers, cattle
TX . . .
19,173
8,142
11,031 16,573
5,932
10,641 3-Cattle, broilers, greenhouse/nursery
UT. . .
1,515
527
987
1,186
421
765 37-Cattle and calves, dairy products, hay
VT . . .
688
116
572
517
118
399 41-Dairy products, cattle and calves, maple products
VA . . .
2,999
1,043
1,956
2,642
1,006
1,635 33-Broilers, cattle and calves, dairy products
WA. . .
8,180
6,207
1,974
6,593
4,953
1,640 13-Apples, dairy products, potatoes
WV. . .
525
96
429
496
91
404 47-Broilers, cattle and calves, turkeys
WI . . .
9,886
3,574
6,311
7,610
2,831
4,779 9-Dairy products, corn, cattle and calves
WY. . .
974
226
748
970
224
746 40-Cattle and calves, hay, hogs
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Farm Income: Data Files, 2009 Sector Financial
Indicators Cash Receipts Ranking Data,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FarmIncome/firkdmuXls.htm>.

Table 846. Indexes of Prices Received and Paid by Farmers: 2000 to 2010
[1990–1992 = 100, except as noted]
Item
2000 2005 2009 2010
Item
2000 2005 2009 2010
Prices received, all products. . .
96
114
131
145
Feed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
117
186
180
Crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
110
150
156
Livestock and poultry. . . . . . .
110
138
115
133
Food grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
111
186
176
Seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
124
168
299
288
Feed grains and hay . . . . . . .
86
95
162
165
Fertilizer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110
164
275
252
Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
70
81
117
Agricultural chemicals. . . . . .
120
123
150
146
Tobacco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
94
104
103
Fuels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
129
216
228
284
Oil-bearing crops. . . . . . . . . .
85
106
177
175
Supplies and repairs. . . . . . .
120
140
157
160
Fruits and nuts. . . . . . . . . . . .
98
128
135
140
Autos and trucks. . . . . . . . . .
119
114
110
113
Commercial vegetables 1. . . .
121
130
161
169
Farm machinery. . . . . . . . . . .
139
173
222
230
Potatoes and dry beans. . . . .
93
109
150
137
Building materials . . . . . . . . .
121
142
163
165
All other crops. . . . . . . . . . . .
110
113
124
125
Farm services . . . . . . . . . . . .
118
133
159
161
Livestock and products . . . . . .
97
119
112
131
Rent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110
129
184
191
Meat animals. . . . . . . . . . . . .
94
118
106
124 Interest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
111
138
135
Dairy products. . . . . . . . . . . .
94
116
98
124 Taxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
155
204
207
Poultry and eggs. . . . . . . . . .
106
123
139
152 Wage rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140
165
187
189
Prices paid, total 2 . . . . . . . . . . .
119
142
178
182
39
38
35
38
Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
115
140
183
187 Parity ratio (1910–14 = 100) 3 . .
1
Excludes potatoes and dry beans. 2 Includes production items, interest, taxes, wage rates, and a family living component.
The family living component is the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. See text,
Section 14 and Table 724. 3 Ratio of prices received by farmers to prices paid. “
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Agricultural Prices: Annual Summary, and beginning 2009, “Quick Stats U.S. & All States Data—Prices,” <http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/>. “
U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 545

Table 847. Civilian Consumer Expenditures for Farm Foods: 1990 to 2008
[In billions of dollars, except percent (449.8 represents $449,800,000,000). Excludes imported and nonfarm foods, such as coffee and seafood, as well as food consumed by the military, or exported]
Item
Consumer expenditures, total .
Farm value, total . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marketing bill, total 1 . . . . . . . . .
Percent of total consumer expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1990
449.8
106.2
343.6

1995
529.5
113.8
415.7

2000
661.1
123.3
537.8

2001
687.5
130.0
557.5

2002
709.4
132.5
576.9

2003
744.2
140.2
604.0

2004
788.9
155.5
633.4

2005
830.7
157.8
672.9

2006
880.7
163.2
717.5

2007
925.2
194.3
731.0

2008
958.9
192.3
766.6

76.4

78.5

81.3

81.1

81.3

81.2

80.3

81.0

81.5

79.0

79.9

At-home expenditures 2. . . . . . . . .
Farm value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marketing bill 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Away-from-home expenditures . . .
Farm value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marketing bill 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

276.2
80.2
196.0
173.6
26.0
147.6

316.9
76.1
240.8
212.6
37.7
174.9

390.2
79.6
310.6
270.9
43.7
227.2

403.9
83.9
320.0
283.6
46.1
237.5

416.8
85.7
331.1
292.6
46.8
245.8

437.2
91.4
345.8
307.0
48.8
258.2

463.5
98.5
365.0
325.4
57.0
268.4

488.1
99.3
388.8
342.6
58.5
284.1

517.5
103.2
414.3
363.2
60.0
303.2

543.7
128.3
415.4
381.5
66.0
315.5

563.5
129.0
434.5
395.4
63.3
332.1

Marketing bill cost components:
Labor cost 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Packaging materials . . . . . . . . . .
Rail and truck transport 4. . . . . . .
Corporate profits before taxes. . .
Fuels and electricity. . . . . . . . . . .
Advertising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Depreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Net interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Net rent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Taxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

154.0
36.5
19.8
13.2
15.2
17.1
16.3
13.5
13.9
6.2
15.7
22.2

196.6
48.2
22.3
19.5
18.6
19.8
18.9
11.6
19.8
7.9
19.1
13.4

252.9
53.5
26.4
31.1
23.1
26.1
24.2
16.9
26.7
10.1
23.5
23.3

263.8
55.0
27.5
32.0
24.1
27.5
24.5
18.6
29.4
10.6
24.1
20.4

273.1
56.8
28.4
33.0
24.9
28.1
25.3
19.2
30.3
10.9
24.9
22.0

285.9
59.5
29.7
34.6
26.1
29.4
26.5
20.1
31.7
11.4
26.1
23.0

303.7
63.1
31.6
35.5
27.6
30.8
27.8
21.1
33.2
12.0
27.4
19.6

319.8
66.5
33.2
37.4
31.6
32.7
29.5
22.4
35.3
12.7
29.1
22.7

341.0
70.5
35.2
39.7
33.5
34.9
31.5
23.9
37.6
13.5
31.0
25.2

347.4
71.8
35.9
40.4
34.1
35.6
32.1
24.3
38.3
13.8
31.6
25.7

364.3
75.3
37.6
38.9
37.4
37.3
33.7
25.5
40.2
14.5
33.1
28.8

1
The difference between expenditures for domestic farm-originated food products and the farm value or payment farmers received for the equivalent farm products. 2 Food primarily purchased from retail food stores for use at home. 3 Covers employee wages and salaries and their health and welfare benefits. Also includes imputed earnings of proprietors, partners, and family workers not receiving stated remuneration. 4 Excludes local hauling.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Food Cost Review, 1950–97, ERS Agricultural Economic
Report No. AER780, June 1999 and “ERS/USDA Briefing Room—Food marketing and price spreads: USDA marketing bill,”
<http://ers.usda.gov/Briefing/FoodMarketingSystem/pricespreads.htm>.

Table 848. Agricultural Exports and Imports—Volume by Principal
Commodities: 1990 to 2010
[In thousands (7,703 represents 7,703,000). 1,000 hectoliters equals 264.18 gallons. Includes Puerto Rico, U.S. territories, and shipments under foreign aid programs. Excludes fish, forest products, distilled liquors, manufactured tobacco, and products made from cotton; but includes raw tobacco, raw cotton, rubber, beer and wine, and processed agricultural products]
Commodity
EXPORTS
Fruit juices and wine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beef, pork, lamb, and poultry meats 1 . . . .
Wheat, unmilled. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wheat products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rice, paddy, milled. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed grains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed grain products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feeds and fodders 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fresh fruits and nuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruit products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables, fresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables, frozen and canned. . . . . . . . .
Oilcake and meal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseeds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetable oils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tobacco, unmanufactured. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cotton, excluding linters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IMPORTS
Fruit juices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Malt beverages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coffee, including products. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rubber and allied gums, crude. . . . . . . . .
Beef, pork, lamb, and poultry meats 1 . . . .
Grains 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Biscuits, pasta, and noodles. . . . . . . . . . .
Feeds and fodders 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruits, nuts, and preparations 4 . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables, fresh or frozen. . . . . . . . . . . .
Tobacco, unmanufactured. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseeds and oilnuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetable oils and waxes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilcake and meal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Unit

1990

2000

2005

2007

2008

2009

2010

Hectoliters. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .

7,703
1,451
27,384
863
2,534
61,066
1,430
10,974
2,648
390
1,297
529
5,079
15,820
1,226
223
1,696

14,356
4,935
27,568
844
3,241
54,946
2,062
13,065
3,450
471
2,029
1,112
6,462
28,017
2,043
180
1,485

13,982
4,343
27,040
313
4,388
50,865
3,442
11,422
3,675
394
2,077
1,086
6,905
26,462
1,937
154
3,405

14,470
5,103
32,991
448
3,477
63,215
4,002
11,823
3,553
460
1,938
1,261
8,272
31,077
2,539
187
3,258

14,871
6,437
30,021
389
3,800
59,659
1,286
14,372
4,037
540
2,020
1,604
8,405
35,011
2,900
169
3,001

13,675
6,151
21,920
404
3,426
51,388
1,228
14,594
4,101
506
1,972
1,397
9,251
41,210
3,036
173
2,540

14,986
6,373
27,592
447
4,490
54,794
1,080
18,925
4,311
570
2,139
1,411
10,010
43,297
3,545
179
2,961

Hectoliters. . . .
Hectoliters. . . .
Hectoliters. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .
Metric tons. . . .

33,116
2,510
10,382
1,214
840
1,169
2,071
300
959
5,401
1,898
173
509
1,204
316

31,154
4,584
23,464
1,370
1,232
1,579
4,622
711
1,224
8,354
3,763
216
1,056
1,846
1,254

41,488
7,262
29,947
1,307
1,169
1,778
3,726
1,001
963
9,570
5,183
233
818
2,386
1,541

49,710
8,615
34,749
1,393
1,028
1,610
5,576
1,084
1,236
10,706
5,965
243
1,276
3,117
1,716

47,299
8,487
33,668
1,393
1,053
1,394
6,384
1,038
1,298
10,547
6,124
221
1,555
3,708
1,964

44,234
9,460
30,278
1,348
704
1,430
5,587
1,019
1,330
10,302
6,118
199
1,249
3,523
1,539

42,698
9,592
31,605
1,390
945
1,350
5,170
1,097
1,411
10,967
6,858
164
1,223
3,730
1,504

Includes variety meats. 2 Excluding oil meal. 3 Includes wheat, corn, oats, barley, and rice. 4 Includes bananas and plantains.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States
(FATUS),” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/fatus/> and “Global Agricultural Trade System,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.
1

546 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 849. Agricultural Exports and Imports—Value: 1990 to 2010
[In billions of dollars, except percent (16.6 represents $16,600,000,000). Includes Puerto Rico, U.S. territories, and shipments under foreign aid programs. Excludes fish, forest products, distilled liquors, manufactured tobacco, and products made from cotton; but includes raw tobacco, raw cotton, rubber, beer and wine, and processed agricultural products]
Year
1990. . . .
1995. . . .
1999. . . .
2000. . . .
2001. . . .
2002. . . .
2003. . . .

Exports,
Trade domestic balance products
16.6
39.5
26.0
56.3
10.7
48.4
12.3
51.3
14.3
53.7
11.2
53.1
12.0
59.4

Percent
Imports
of all for conexports sumption
11
22.9
10
30.3
8
37.7
7
39.0
8
39.4
8
41.9
9
47.4

Percent of all imports 5
4
4
3
3
4
4

Year
2004. . . .
2005. . . .
2006. . . .
2007. . . .
2008. . . .
2009. . . .
2010. . . .

Exports,
Trade domestic balance products
7.4
61.4
3.9
63.2
5.6
70.9
18.1
90.0
34.3
114.8
26.8
98.5
33.9
115.8

Percent Imports of all for conexports sumption
8
54.0
8
59.3
8
65.3
9
71.9
10
80.5
11
71.7
10
81.9

Percent of all imports 4
4
4
4
4
5
4

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States
(FATUS),” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/fatus/> and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, “Global
Agricultural Trade System,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.

Table 850. Agricultural Imports—Value by Selected Commodity: 1990 to 2010
[In millions of dollars (22,918 represents $22,918,000,000). For calender year. Includes Puerto Rico, U.S. territories, and shipments under foreign aid programs. Excludes fish, forest products, distilled liquors, manufactured tobacco, and products made from cotton; but includes raw tobacco, raw cotton, rubber, beer and wine, and processed agricultural products]
Commodity
Total 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cattle, live. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beef and veal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pork. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grains and feeds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruits and preparations. . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables and preparations 2. . . . . . .
Sugar and related products. . . . . . . . .
Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Malt beverages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oilseeds and products. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coffee and products . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cocoa and products . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rubber, crude natural . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Value (mil. dol.)
1990
2000
2005
2007
2008
2009
2010
22,918 38,974 59,291 71,913 80,488 71,681 81,856
978
1,152
1,039
1,878
1,761
1,299
1,575
1,872
2,399
3,651
3,285
3,058
2,725
2,828
938
997
1,281
1,162
1,060
978
1,185
891
1,671
2,686
2,883
3,142
2,528
2,619
1,188
3,075
4,527
6,422
8,258
7,435
7,786
2,167
3,851
5,842
7,439
7,899
8,210
9,174
1,979
3,958
6,410
7,713
8,314
8,044
9,316
1,213
1,555
2,494
2,592
2,976
3,075
4,047
917
2,207
3,762
4,638
4,634
4,020
4,279
923
2,179
3,096
3,625
3,668
3,339
3,507
952
1,773
2,998
4,329
6,766
4,799
5,390
1,915
2,700
2,976
3,768
4,412
4,070
4,945
1,072
1,404
2,751
2,662
3,299
3,476
4,295
707
842
1,552
2,119
2,857
1,274
2,820

Percent distribution
1990
2000
2010
100.0
100.0
100.0
4.3
3.0
2.6
8.2
6.2
4.6
4.1
2.6
1.6
3.9
4.3
4.0
5.2
7.9
8.9
9.5
9.9
10.3
8.6
10.2
10.7
5.3
4.0
3.6
4.0
5.7
6.5
4.0
5.6
5.0
4.2
4.5
6.0
8.4
6.9
5.2
4.7
3.6
3.7
3.1
2.2
2.9

Includes other commodities, not shown separately. 2 Includes pulses.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States
(FATUS),” <http://ers.usda.gov/Data/FATUS>, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, “Global Agricultural
Trade System,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.
1

Table 851. Agricultural Imports—Value by Selected Countries of Origin:
1990 to 2010
[In millions of dollars (22,918 represents $22,918,000,000). See headnote Table 849]
Country
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
European Union 1 . . . . . .
Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
China 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brazil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indonesia. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Australia. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thailand. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Colombia. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Malaysia . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Zealand. . . . . . . . . .
India. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guatemala. . . . . . . . . . . .
Costa Rica. . . . . . . . . . . .
Argentina. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peru. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vietnam. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Philippines. . . . . . . . . . . .
Ecuador. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rest of World. . . . . . . . . .

1990
22,918
3,171
5,016
2,614
273
1,563
683
1,174
481
470
790
308
855
285
497
400
389
90
(NA)
418
482
2,958

2000
38,974
8,661
8,303
5,077
812
1,144
998
1,592
1,026
779
1,123
353
1,132
826
710
812
672
196
200
468
451
3,636

2005
59,291
12,270
13,410
8,331
1,872
1,952
1,702
2,421
1,521
1,094
1,437
666
1,712
923
920
916
831
448
422
568
596
5,281

Value
(mil. dol.)
2007
71,913
15,244
15,282
10,169
2,916
2,644
2,081
2,633
1,837
1,507
1,539
1,139
1,733
1,166
1,064
1,236
1,079
683
663
704
691
5,905

2008
80,488
18,009
15,510
10,907
3,451
2,615
2,815
2,425
2,049
1,917
1,769
1,867
1,833
1,601
1,314
1,207
1,257
818
760
916
746
6,701

2009
71,681
14,710
13,378
11,373
2,877
2,433
1,787
2,316
2,145
1,567
1,772
1,295
1,608
1,236
1,297
1,102
1,091
807
727
724
928
6,509

2010
81,856
16,243
14,349
13,578
3,368
2,892
2,886
2,305
2,293
2,029
1,978
1,729
1,665
1,592
1,386
1,305
1,160
973
970
884
869
7,403

Percent distribution 1990
2000
100.0
100.0
13.8
22.2
21.9
21.3
11.4
13.0
1.2
2.1
6.8
2.9
3.0
2.6
5.1
4.1
2.1
2.6
2.0
2.0
3.4
2.9
1.3
0.9
3.7
2.9
1.2
2.1
2.2
1.8
1.7
2.1
1.7
1.7
0.4
0.5
(NA)
0.5
1.8
1.2
2.1
1.2
12.9
9.3

2010
100.0
19.8
17.5
16.6
4.1
3.5
3.5
2.8
2.8
2.5
2.4
2.1
2.0
1.9
1.7
1.6
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.1
9.0

NA Not available. 1 For consistency, data for all years are shown on the basis of 27 countries in the European Union; see footnote 5, Table 1377. 2 See footnote 4, Table 1332.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States(FATUS), “Global Agricultural Trade
System Online (GATS),” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/default.aspx>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 547

Table 852. Selected Farm Products—U.S. and World Production and Exports:
2000 to 2010
[In metric tons, except as indicated (60.6 represents 60,600,000). Metric ton = 1.102 short tons or .984 long tons]
Commodity

Amount
United States
World
2000
2005
2010
2000
2005

Unit

2010

2000

2005

2010

United States as percent of world

PRODUCTION 1
Wheat . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn for grain. . . . . . . . .
Soybeans. . . . . . . . . . . .
Rice, milled . . . . . . . . . .
Cotton 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million bales 3. . . .

60.6
251.9
75.1
5.9
17.2

57.2
282.3
83.5
7.1
23.9

60.1
316.2
90.6
7.6
18.1

583.1
591.4
175.8
399.4
89.1

619.1
699.7
220.7
418.2
116.4

648.1
815.3
262.0
451.6
114.6

10.4
42.6
42.7
1.5
19.3

9.2
40.3
37.8
1.7
20.5

9.3
38.8
34.6
1.7
15.8

EXPORTS 4
Wheat 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soybeans. . . . . . . . . . . .
Rice, milled basis. . . . . .
Cotton 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million . . . . . . . . .
Million bales 3. . . .

28.9
49.3
27.1
2.6
6.7

27.3
54.2
25.6
3.7
17.7

34.7
48.3
42.2
3.6
15.5

101.5
76.9
53.7
24.1
26.2

117.0
81.1
63.4
29.7
44.9

124.7
90.6
95.6
31.4
37.0

28.5
64.2
50.5
10.7
25.7

23.3
66.9
40.3
12.3
39.4

27.8
53.2
44.1
11.3
41.9

1
Production years vary by commodity. In most cases, includes harvests from July 1 of the year shown through June 30 of the following year. 2 For production and trade years ending in year shown. 3 Bales of 480 lb. net weight. 4 Trade years may vary by commodity. Wheat, corn, and soybean data are for trade year beginning in year shown. Rice data are for calendar year. 5 Includes wheat flour on a grain equivalent.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, “Production, Supply and Distribution Online,”
<http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/psdhome.aspx>.

Table 853. Percent of U.S. Agricultural Commodity Output Exported:
1990 to 2009
[In percent. All export shares are estimated from export and production volumes]

Total agriculture 1. . . . .

1990 to
1994,
average
18.5

1995 to
1999,
average
18.6

2000 to
2004,
average
18.5

2000
18.5

2005
19.1

2006
19.6

2007
21.0

2008
19.2

2009
19.8

Livestock 2. . . . . . . . . . .
Red meat. . . . . . . . . . .
Poultry. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4.2
4.1
6.1
3.5

4.5
7.1
12.6
1.4

4.6
8.0
12.0
1.2

4.6
8.1
12.4
1.2

4.4
7.4
11.8
1.2

4.6
8.7
11.7
1.3

5.6
9.4
13.0
2.3

7.7
11.6
14.7
4.5

7.8
12.2
14.8
1.4

Crops 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Food grains. . . . . . . . .
Feed grains. . . . . . . . .
Oilseeds. . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruit and nuts. . . . . . . .
Vegetables. . . . . . . . . .
Sweeteners. . . . . . . . .
Wine and beer. . . . . . .

20.6
14.5
21.4
29.4
16.2
8.9
5.0
3.8

20.7
12.8
21.7
31.8
15.9
11.0
4.6
5.9

20.8
13.3
19.2
33.6
17.5
11.2
4.1
7.3

20.8
13.3
20.7
33.3
17.6
11.2
3.9
6.3

21.5
14.1
20.0
28.2
17.2
12.2
5.3
7.6

22.2
11.8
20.8
32.9
18.9
12.6
6.4
9.0

23.5
14.6
20.0
40.5
20.6
12.2
7.8
9.7

21.2
11.1
15.7
40.8
21.9
15.3
7.2
10.5

21.9
11.9
15.1
45.7
19.9
15.8
8.1
9.2

Commodity group

1
All export shares are computed from physical weights or weight equivalents. 2 Includes animal fats; excludes live farm animals and fish/shellfish. 3 Exports include vegetable oils and oilseed meal. Excludes nursery crops.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Food Availability (Per Capita) Data System, Food
Availability: Spreadsheets,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/FoodConsumption/FoodAvailSpreadsheets.htm>; USDA Foreign
Agricultural Service, “Production, Supply and Distribution,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline>; and Global Agricultural Trade
System, <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.

Table 854. Top 10 U.S. Export Markets for Selected Commodities: 2010
[In thousands of metric tons (50,735 represents 50,735,000)]
Corn
Country
World, total. . . . . . . . .
Japan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Korea, South. . . . . . . . .
Egypt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Taiwan. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . .
China 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Venezuela. . . . . . . . . . .
Dominican Republic. . . .
Rest of world. . . . . . . . .

Amount
50,735
15,491
7,892
7,005
3,615
2,938
1,545
1,455
1,321
1,055
899
7,520

Wheat 1
Country
World, total. . .
Nigeria. . . . . . . .
Japan. . . . . . . . .
Mexico. . . . . . . .
Philippines. . . . .
Egypt. . . . . . . . .
Korea, South. . .
Taiwan. . . . . . . .
Peru. . . . . . . . . .
Colombia. . . . . .
Venezuela. . . . .
Rest of world. . .

Amount
27,592
3,381
3,170
2,434
1,722
1,563
1,528
819
799
699
662
10,815

Soybeans
Country
World, total. . . .
China 2. . . . . . . . .
Mexico. . . . . . . . .
Japan. . . . . . . . . .
Indonesia. . . . . . .
Taiwan. . . . . . . . .
Germany. . . . . . .
Egypt. . . . . . . . . .
Spain. . . . . . . . . .
Korea, South. . . .
Turkey . . . . . . . . .
Rest of world. . . .

Amount
42,325
24,343
3,587
2,551
1,850
1,441
1,171
983
788
721
624
4,266

Poultry meat
Country
Amount
World, total. . . .
3,407
Mexico. . . . . . . . .
595
Russia. . . . . . . . .
332
Hong Kong. . . . . .
209
Canada . . . . . . . .
168
Angola. . . . . . . . .
151
Cuba . . . . . . . . . .
145
Taiwan. . . . . . . . .
105
Lithuania . . . . . . .
94
China 2. . . . . . . . .
90
Georgia. . . . . . . .
89
Rest of world. . . .
1,429

Unmilled. 2 See footnote 4, Table 1332.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, “Global Agricultural Trade System Online (GATS)-FATUS
Commodity Aggregations,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats/Default.aspx>.
1

548 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 855. Agricultural Exports—Value by Principal Commodities:
1990 to 2010
[In millions of dollars (39,495 represents $39,495,000,000). Includes Puerto Rico, U.S. territories, and shipments under foreign aid programs. Excludes fish, forest products, distilled liquors, manufactured tobacco, and products made from cotton; but includes raw tobacco, raw cotton, rubber, beer and wine, and processed agricultural products]
Commodity
Total agricultural exports . . . . . .
Animals and animal products 1 . . . . .
Meat and meat products. . . . . . . . .
Poultry and poultry products. . . . . .
Grains and feeds 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wheat and products. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruits and preparations. . . . . . . . . . .
Nuts and preparations. . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetables and preparations 2. . . . . .
Oilseeds and products 1. . . . . . . . . . .
Soybeans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vegetable oils and waxes . . . . . . . .
Tobacco, unmanufactured. . . . . . . . .
Cotton, excluding linters . . . . . . . . . .
Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1990
39,495
6,636
2,558
910
14,386
4,035
6,037
2,007
978
1,836
5,725
3,550
832
1,441
2,783
3,702

2000
51,265
11,600
5,276
2,235
13,620
3,578
4,469
2,743
1,322
3,112
8,584
5,258
1,259
1,204
1,873
7,207

Value (mil. dol.)
2005
2007
2008
63,182 89,990 114,760
12,226 17,188 21,304
4,299
6,122
8,269
3,138
4,092
5,051
16,364 27,896 36,913
4,520
8,616 11,599
4,789
9,763 13,431
3,468
4,155
4,839
2,992
3,387
3,780
3,571
4,307
5,124
10,229 15,601 23,671
6,274
9,992 15,431
1,656
2,503
3,900
990
1,208
1,238
3,921
4,578
4,798
9,421 11,670 13,093

2009
2010
98,453 115,809
18,046 22,351
7,722
9,338
4,774
4,812
25,293 29,265
5,681
7,038
8,746
9,835
4,661
5,255
4,075
4,795
5,008
5,380
24,081 27,209
16,423 18,557
3,092
3,902
1,159
1,167
3,316
5,746
12,814 14,641

Percent distribution
1990
2000
2010
100.0
100.0
100.0
16.8
22.6
19.3
6.5
10.3
8.1
2.3
4.4
4.2
36.4
26.6
25.3
10.2
7.0
6.1
15.3
8.7
8.5
5.1
5.4
4.5
2.5
2.6
4.1
4.6
6.1
4.6
14.5
16.7
23.5
9.0
10.3
16.0
2.1
2.5
3.4
3.6
2.3
1.0
7.0
3.7
5.0
9.4
14.1
12.6

Includes commodities not shown separately. 2 Includes pulses.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States
(FATUS),” <http://ers.usda.gov/Data/FATUS>, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, “Global Agricultural
Trade System,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.
1

Table 856. Agricultural Exports—Value by Selected Countries of Destination:
1990 to 2010
[(39,495 represents $39,495,000,000). Includes Puerto Rico, U.S. territories, and shipments under foreign aid programs. Excludes fish, forest products, distilled liquors, manufactured tobacco, and products made from cotton; but includes raw tobacco, raw cotton, rubber, beer and wine, and processed agricultural products]
Country
Total agricultural exports 1 . . . .
Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Central America. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
South America 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asia, excluding Middle East 2. . . . . .
Japan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Korea, South. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Taiwan 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
China 3, 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indonesia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Europe/Eurasia 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
European Union 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Russia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Middle East 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Africa 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Egypt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oceania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1990
39,495
4,214
2,560
1,015
483
1,063
15,857
8,142
2,650
1,663
818
275
8,140
7,474
(X)
1,728
1,848
687
343

2000
51,265
7,643
6,410
1,408
1,121
1,704
19,877
9,292
2,546
1,996
1,716
668
7,654
6,515
580
2,323
2,308
1,050
490

Value (mil. dol.)
2005
2007
2008
63,182 89,990 114,760
10,618 14,062 16,253
9,429 12,692 15,508
1,913
2,575
3,592
1,589
2,363
3,106
1,943
3,510
5,334
22,543 32,427 44,209
7,931 10,159 13,223
2,233
3,528
5,561
2,301
3,097
3,419
5,233
8,314 12,115
958
1,542
2,195
8,361 10,598 12,262
7,052
8,754 10,080
972
1,329
1,838
2,844
4,952
6,650
2,773
1,931
2,649
819
1,801
2,050
742
963
1,189

2009
2010
98,453 115,809
15,725 16,856
12,932 14,575
3,082
3,192
2,553
2,923
3,459
4,243
40,614 49,765
11,072 11,819
3,917
5,308
2,988
3,190
13,109 17,522
1,796
2,246
9,377 11,371
7,445
8,894
1,429
1,141
4,745
6,021
1,930
2,301
1,354
2,092
1,282
1,394

Percent distribution
1990
2000
2010
100.0
100.0
100.0
10.7
14.9
14.6
6.5
12.5
12.6
2.6
2.7
2.8
1.2
2.2
2.5
2.7
3.3
3.7
40.1
38.8
43.0
20.6
18.1
10.2
6.7
5.0
4.6
4.2
3.9
2.8
2.1
3.3
15.1
0.7
1.3
1.9
20.6
14.9
9.8
18.9
12.7
7.7
(X)
1.1
1.0
4.4
4.5
5.2
4.7
4.5
2.0
1.7
2.0
1.8
0.9
1.0
1.2

X Not applicable. 1 Totals include transshipments through Canada, but transshipments are not distributed by country after
2000. 2 Includes areas not shown separately. 3 See footnote 4, Table 1332. 4 China includes Macao. However Hong Kong remains separate economically until 2050 and is not included. 5 For consistency, data for all years are shown on the basis of 27 countries in the European Union; see footnote 3, Table 1377.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Foreign Agricultural Trade of the United States
(FATUS);”<http://ers.usda.gov/Data/FATUS> February 2010, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service,
“Global Agricultural Trade System,” <http://www.fas.usda.gov/gats>.

Table 857. Cropland Used for Crops and Acreages of Crops Harvested:
1990 to 2010
[In millions of acres, except as indicated (341 represents 341,000,000)]
Item
Cropland used for crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index (1977 = 100) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cropland harvested 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crop failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cultivated summer fallow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cropland idled by all federal programs . . . . . .
Acres of crops harvested 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1990
341
90
310
6
25
62
322

1995
332
88
302
8
22
55
314

2000
345
91
314
11
20
31
325

2004
336
89
312
9
15
35
321

2005
337
89
314
6
16
35
321

2006
330
87
303
11
15
37
312

2007
335
89
312
8
15
37
322

2008
340
90
316
8
16
35
325

2009
333
88
310
8
15
34
319

2010
335
88
315
5
14
31
322

1
Land supporting one or more harvested crops. 2 Area in principal crops harvested as reported by Crop Reporting Board plus acreages in fruits, vegetables for sale, tree nuts, and other minor crops. Acres are counted twice for land that is doublecropped.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Major Uses of Land in the United States, 2002,”
2006. Also in Agricultural Statistics, annual. Beginning 1991, Agricultural Resources and Environmental Indicators, periodic, and “AREI Updates: Cropland Use.” See also ERS Briefing Room at <http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing
/LandUse/majorlandusechapter.htm#trends>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 549

Table 858. Crops—Supply and Use: 2000 to 2010
[72.4 represents 72,400,000. Marketing year beginning January 1 for potatoes, May 1 for hay, June 1 for wheat, August 1 for cotton,
September 1 for soybeans and corn. Acreage, production, and yield of all crops periodically revised on basis of census data]
Item
CORN
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total supply 1. . . . . . . . . .
Ethanol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total use 2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ending stocks . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 3. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Unit

2000

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Million . . . . . . . .
Bushel. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Dol./bu. . . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

72.4
136.9
9,915
6.82
11,639
628
1,941
9,740
1,899
1.85
18,499

75.1
147.9
11,112
8.81
13,235
1,603
2,134
11,268
1,967
2.00
22,198

70.6
149.1
10,531
11.98
12,510
2,119
2,125
11,207
1,304
3.04
32,083

86.5
150.7
13,038
20.02
14,362
3,049
2,437
12,737
1,624
4.20
54,667

78.6
153.9
12,092
13.53
13,729
3,709
1,849
12,056
1,673
4.06
49,313

79.5
164.7
13,092
8.00
14,774
4,568
1,987
13,066
1,708
3.55
46,734

81.4
152.8
12,447
20.00
14,175
5,150
1,950
13,500
675
5.40
66,650

SOYBEANS
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total supply 1. . . . . . . . . .
Crushings . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total use 2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ending stocks . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 3. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . .
Bushel. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Dol./bu. . . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

72.4
38.1
2,758
4
3,052
1,640
996
2,804
248
4.54
12,520

71.3
43.1
3,068
3
3,327
1,739
940
2,878
449
5.66
17,367

74.6
42.9
3,197
9
3,655
1,808
1,116
3,081
574
6.43
20,555

64.1
41.7
2,677
10
3,261
1,803
1,159
3,056
205
10.10
27,039

74.7
39.7
2,967
13
3,185
1,662
1,283
3,047
138
9.97
29,458

76.4
44.0
3,359
15
3,512
1,752
1,501
3,361
151
9.59
32,145

76.6
43.5
3,329
15
3,495
1,650
1,580
3,355
140
11.70
38,915

WHEAT
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total supply 1, 4. . . . . . . . .
Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total use 2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ending stocks . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 3. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . .
Bushel. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Mil. bu.. . . . . . . .
Dol./bu. . . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

53.1
42.0
2,228
89.8
3,268
1,062
2,392
876
2.62
5,782

50.1
42.0
2,103
81.4
2,725
1,003
2,154
571
3.42
7,171

46.8
38.6
1,808
121.9
2,501
908
2,045
456
4.26
7,695

51.0
40.2
2,051
112.6
2,620
1,263
2,314
306
6.48
13,289

55.7
44.9
2,499
127.0
2,932
1,015
2,275
657
6.78
16,626

49.9
44.5
2,218
115.0
2,988
881
2,038
950
4.87
10,654

47.6
46.4
2,208
110.0
3,294
1,275
2,451
843
5.70
12,992

COTTON
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production 5. . . . . . . . . . . .
Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total supply 1. . . . . . . . . .
Exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total use 2 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ending stocks . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 3. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . .
Pounds. . . . . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Mil. bales 6. . . . .
Cents/lb.. . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

13.1
632
17.2

21.1
6.7
15.6
6.0
51.6
4,260

13.8
831
23.9

29.4
17.5
23.4
6.1
47.7
5,695

12.7
814
21.6

27.7
13.0
17.9
9.5
48.4
5,013

10.5
879
19.2

28.7
13.7
18.2
10.0
61.3
5,653

7.6
813
12.8

22.9
13.3
16.9
6.3
49.1
3,021

7.5
777
12.2

18.5
12.0
15.5
3.0
64.8
3,788

10.7
811
18.1

21.1
15.8
19.5
1.6
82.5
7,318

HAY
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 7, 8. . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . .
Sh. tons. . . . . . .
Mil. sh. tons. . . .
Dol./ton . . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

60.4
2.54
154
84.60
11,557

61.6
2.44
150
98.20
12,534

60.6
2.32
141
110.00
13,634

61.0
2.41
147
128.00
16,842

60.2
2.43
146
152.00
18,639

59.8
2.47
148
108.00
14,716

59.9
2.43
146
112.00
14,401

POTATOES
Acreage harvested . . . . . .
Yield per acre . . . . . . . . . .
Production . . . . . . . . . . . .
Price per unit 3. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . . .

Million . . . . . . . .
Cwt. 9. . . . . . . . .
Mil. cwt. 9 . . . . . .
Dol./cwt. 9. . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . . . . . .

1.3
381
514
5.08
2,590

1.1
390
424
7.06
2,992

1.1
393
441
7.31
3,209

1.1
396
445
7.51
3,340

1.0
396
415
9.09
3,770

1.0
414
431
8.19
3,521

1.0
395
397
8.79
3,489

– Represents zero or rounds to less than half the unit of measurement shown. 1 Comprises production, imports, and beginning stocks. 2 Includes feed, residual, and other domestic uses not shown separately. 3 Marketing year average price.
U.S. prices are computed by weighting U.S. monthly prices by estimated monthly marketings and do not include an allowance for outstanding loans and government purchases and payments. 4 Includes flour and selected other products expressed in grain-equivalent bushels. 5 State production figures, which conform with annual ginning enumeration with allowance for cross-state ginnings, rounded to thousands and added for U.S. totals. 6 Bales of 480 pounds, net weight. 7 Prices are for hay sold baled. 8 Season average prices received by farmers. U.S. prices are computed by weighting state prices by estimated sales.
9
Cwt = hundredweight (100 pounds).
Source: Production—U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, In Crop Production, annual, and Crop Values, annual. Supply and disappearance—U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service,
Feed Situation, quarterly; Fats and Oils Situation, quarterly; Wheat Situation, quarterly; Cotton and Wool Outlook Statistics, periodic; and Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates, periodic. All data are also in Agricultural Statistics, annual. See also
<http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/Ag_Statistics/> and “Agricultural Outlook: Statistical Indicators,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov
/Publications/Agoutlook/AOTables/>.

550 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 859. Corn—Acreage, Production, and Value by Leading States:
2008 to 2010
[78,570 represents 78,570,000. One bushel of corn (bu.) = 56 pounds]
State
U.S. 1. . .
IA. . . . . . .
IL. . . . . . .
NE. . . . . .
MN. . . . . .
IN. . . . . . .
KS. . . . . .
SD. . . . . .
OH. . . . . .
WI . . . . . .
MO. . . . . .
MI. . . . . . .
TX . . . . . .
ND. . . . . .
CO. . . . . .
KY. . . . . .
PA . . . . . .
MS. . . . . .
NY. . . . . .
NC. . . . . .
TN. . . . . .

Acreage harvested
(1,000 acres)
2008 2009 2010
78,570 79,490 81,446
12,800 13,300 13,050
11,900 11,800 12,400
8,550 8,850 8,850
7,200 7,150 7,300
5,460 5,460 5,720
3,630 3,860 4,650
4,400 4,680 4,220
3,120 3,140 3,270
2,880 2,930 3,100
2,650 2,920 3,000
2,140 2,090 2,100
2,030 1,960 2,080
2,300 1,740 1,880
1,010
990 1,210
1,120 1,150 1,230
880
920
910
700
695
670
640
595
590
830
800
840
630
590
640

Yield per acre
Production
(bu.)
(mil. bu.)
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
154
165
153 12,092 13,092 12,447
171
182
165 2,189 2,421 2,153
179
174
157 2,130 2,053 1,947
163
178
166 1,394 1,575 1,469
164
174
177 1,181 1,244 1,292
160
171
157
874
934
898
134
155
125
486
598
581
133
151
135
585
707
570
135
174
163
421
546
533
137
153
162
395
448
502
144
153
123
382
447
369
138
148
150
295
309
315
125
130
145
254
255
302
124
115
132
285
200
248
137
153
151
138
151
183
136
165
124
152
190
153
133
143
128
117
132
116
140
126
136
98
88
91
144
134
150
92
80
89
78
117
91
65
94
76
118
148
117
74
87
75

Price per unit
Value of production
($/bu)
(mil. dol.)
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
4.06
3.55
5.40 49,313 46,734 66,650
4.10
3.59
5.45 8,974 8,690 11,735
4.01
3.53
5.50 8,542 7,248 10,707
4.05
3.58
5.35 5,644 5,640 7,860
3.92
3.47
5.20 4,629 4,317 6,719
4.10
3.66
5.50 3,582 3,417 4,939
4.12
3.49
5.25 2,004 2,088 3,052
3.78
3.23
5.10 2,212 2,283 2,905
4.21
3.55
5.55 1,773 1,940 2,958
3.89
3.57
5.35 1,535 1,600 2,687
4.11
3.58
5.45 1,568 1,599 2,011
3.84
3.53
5.55 1,134 1,092 1,748
4.82
4.01
4.90 1,223 1,022 1,478
3.74
3.18
5.35 1,067
636 1,328
4.14
3.68
5.25
573
557
959
4.36
3.74
5.45
664
710
831
4.16
3.84
5.80
487
505
676
4.63
3.72
4.60
454
326
419
4.32
4.02
5.20
398
321
460
4.91
3.90
5.15
318
365
394
4.53
3.65
4.85
337
319
363

Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Crop Production Annual Summary, January
2011, and Crop Values Annual Summary, February 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
1

Table 860. Soybeans—Acreage, Production, and Value by Leading States:
2008 to 2010
[74,681 represents 74,681,000. One bushel of soybeans = 60 pounds]
State
U.S. 1. . .
IA. . . . . . .
IL. . . . . . .
MN. . . . . .
NE. . . . . .
IN. . . . . . .
OH. . . . . .
MO. . . . . .
SD. . . . . .
ND. . . . . .
KS. . . . . .
AR. . . . . .
MI. . . . . . .
WI . . . . . .
MS. . . . . .

Acreage harvested
(1,000 acres)
2008 2009 2010
74,681 76,372 76,616
9,670 9,530 9,730
9,120 9,350 9,050
6,970 7,120 7,310
4,860 4,760 5,100
5,430 5,440 5,330
4,480 4,530 4,590
5,030 5,300 5,070
4,060 4,190 4,140
3,760 3,870 4,070
3,250 3,650 4,250
3,250 3,270 3,150
1,890 1,990 2,040
1,590 1,620 1,630
1,960 2,030 1,980

Yield per acre
(bu.)
2008 2009 2010
40
44
44
47
51
51
47
46
52
38
40
45
47
55
53
45
49
49
36
49
48
38
44
42
34
42
38
28
30
34
37
44
33
38
38
35
37
40
44
35
40
51
40
38
39

Production
(mil. bu.)
2008 2009 2010
2,967 3,359 3,329
450
486
496
429
430
466
265
285
329
226
259
268
244
267
259
161
222
220
191
231
210
138
176
157
105
116
138
120
161
138
124
123
110
70
80
89
56
65
82
78
77
76

Price per unit
Value of production
($/bu.)
(mil. dol.)
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
9.97
9.59 11.70 29,458 32,145 38,915
10.20
9.52 11.70 4,586 4,627 5,806
10.20
9.80 12.40 4,372 4,215 5,779
10.10
9.39 11.30 2,675 2,674 3,717
9.79
9.48 11.30 2,212 2,459 3,026
10.20
9.80 11.80 2,492 2,612 3,050
10.30
9.78 11.80 1,661 2,171 2,600
9.74
9.61 12.10 1,862 2,216 2,546
9.65
9.18 11.20 1,332 1,615 1,762
9.71
9.26 11.30 1,022 1,075 1,564
9.39
9.38 12.00 1,129 1,506 1,658
9.64
9.66 11.30 1,191 1,185 1,246
9.82
9.54 11.40
687
759 1,012
9.80
9.62 11.40
545
623
938
9.29
9.24 11.10
728
713
846

Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Crop Production Annual Summary, January
2011, and Crop Values Annual Summary, February 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
1

Table 861. Wheat—Acreage, Production, and Value by Leading States:
2008 to 2010
[55,699 represents 55,699,000. One bushel of wheat = 60 pounds]
State
U.S. 1. . .
ND. . . . . .
KS. . . . . .
MT. . . . . .
WA. . . . . .
TX . . . . . .
SD. . . . . .
OK. . . . . .
CO. . . . . .

Acreage harvested
(1,000 acres)
2008 2009 2010
55,699 49,893 47,637
8,640 8,415 8,400
8,900 8,800 8,000
5,470 5,305 5,210
2,255 2,225 2,285
3,300 2,450 3,750
3,420 3,009 2,725
4,500 3,500 3,900
1,936 2,479 2,377

Yield per acre
(bu.)
2008 2009 2010
45
45
46
36
45
43
40
42
45
30
33
41
53
55
65
30
25
34
51
43
45
37
22
31
31
41
46

Production
(mil. bu.)
2008 2009 2010
2,499 2,218 2,208
311
377
362
356
370
360
165
177
215
119
123
148
99
61
128
173
129
123
167
77
121
60
101
108

Price per unit
Value of production
($/bu.)
(mil. dol.)
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
6.78
4.87
5.70 16,626 10,654 12,992
7.31
4.82
6.50 2,297 1,816 2,346
6.94
4.79
5.20 2,471 1,770 1,872
6.84
5.18
6.60 1,139
918 1,431
6.26
4.85
6.75
745
594
997
7.58
5.27
5.05
750
323
644
6.92
5.07
6.05 1,199
663
750
6.93
4.89
5.10 1,154
377
617
6.62
4.57
5.60
397
460
606

Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Crop Production Annual Summary, January
2011, and Crop Values Annual Summary, February 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
1

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 551

Table 862. Commercial Vegetable and Other Specified Crops—Area,
Production, and Value, 2008 to 2010, and Leading Producing States, 2010
[289 represents 289,000. Except as noted, relates to commercial production for fresh market and processing combined. Includes market garden areas but excludes minor producing acreage in minor producing states. Excludes production for home use in farm and nonfarm gardens. Value is for season or crop year and should not be confused with calendar-year income. Hundredweight
(cwt.) is the unit used for fresh market yield and production and is equal to one hundred pounds]
Crop
Beans, snap. . . . . . . . . .
Fresh market. . . . . . . .
Processed. . . . . . . . . .
Beans, dry edible. . . . . .
Broccoli. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabbage 4 . . . . . . . . . . .
Cantaloupes 4 . . . . . . . .
Carrots. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cauliflower. . . . . . . . . . .
Celery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corn, sweet. . . . . . . . . .
Fresh market. . . . . . . .
Processed. . . . . . . . . .
Cucumbers . . . . . . . . . .
Garlic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lettuce, head 4. . . . . . . .
Lettuce, leaf 4. . . . . . . . .
Lettuce, Romaine 4 . . . .
Onions. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peas, green 5. . . . . . . . .
Peppers, bell. . . . . . . . .
Spinach. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Squash . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tomatoes. . . . . . . . . . . .
Fresh market. . . . . . . .
Processed. . . . . . . . . .
Watermelons 5. . . . . . . .

Area harvested
(1,000 acres) 1
2008
289
90
198
1,445
127
66
72
90
37
28
594
233
361
143
149
52
77
153
210
51
46
42
402
105
297
126
129

2009
285
92
196
1,464
126
65
75
82
39
29
613
237
380
144
135
49
76
151
205
52
50
44
434
109
328
124
126

Production
(1,000 cwt) 2

Value of production
(mil. dol.) 3

2010
2008
2009
2010
283 21,984 21,554 20,428
89
5,824
5,225
5,062
194 16,160 16,329 15,366
1,843 25,558 25,427 31,801
122 20,086 19,890 18,219
66 24,516 22,467 22,797
75 19,294 19,279 18,838
81 32,600 29,252 29,198
36
6,648
7,167
6,281
29 20,025 20,074 20,285
585 85,549 93,521 82,937
247 28,899 28,839 29,149
338 56,650 64,682 53,788
88 20,185 20,332 19,475
139 52,952 50,180 50,750
48 12,781 11,845 11,180
80 22,774 22,355 25,259
150 75,120 75,566 73,213
175
8,236
8,834
7,175
53 15,888 16,997 15,739
50
7,792
8,734
6,133
44
6,687
7,219
6,542
394 277,253 312,646 284,442
105 31,137 33,235 28,916
289 246,116 279,411 255,526
133 40,003 38,911 41,153
126 37,349 40,003 40,122

2008
485
308
177
910
721
355
357
636
269
370
1,089
749
340
398
1,063
412
479
834
148
637
206
204
2,398
1,415
982
500
423

2009
415
283
156
790
794
342
350
589
316
404
1,171
846
336
402
1,122
459
613
1,054
141
585
249
203
2,533
1,344
1,219
451
500

2010
447
304
143
838
649
378
314
627
247
399
991
750
241
379
1,206
429
615
1,455
105
637
269
204
2,318
1,391
927
492
461

Leading states in order of production, 2010
(NA)
FL, CA, GA
WI, OR
ND, MI, NE
CA, AZ
CA, NY, FL
CA, AZ, GA
CA
CA, AZ, NY
CA, MI
(NA)
FL, CA, GA
MN, WA, WI
MI, FL, NC
CA, AZ
CA, AZ
CA, AZ
CA,AZ
MN, WI, WA
CA, FL, GA
CA, AZ, TX
MI, CA, FL
(NA)
CA, FL, TN
CA, IN, OH
FL, GA, CA
FL, CA, GA

NA Not available. 1 Area of crops for harvest for fresh market, including any partially harvested or not harvested because of low prices or other factors, plus area harvested for processing. 2 Excludes some quantities not marketed. 3 Fresh market vegetables valued at f.o.b. shipping point. Processing vegetables are equivalent returns at packinghouse door. 4 Fresh market only.
5
Processed only.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Vegetables 2010 Summary, January 2011.
See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Surveys/Guide_to_NASS_Surveys/Vegetables/index.asp>.

Table 863. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables—Supply and Use: 2000 to 2010
[In millions of pounds, except per capita in pounds (8,355 represents 8,355,000,000)]
Year
FRUITS
Citrus:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Noncitrus: 4
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VEGETABLES AND MELONS
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POTATOES
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Consumption
Total Per capita 3

Utilized production 1

Imports 2

Supply, 1 total Exports 2

Ending stocks 8,355
7,320
5,811
7,315
6,880

720
1,109
1,382
1,322
1,390

9,075
8,429
7,193
8,637
8,270

2,445
2,040
1,789
2,362
1,901

6,630
6,389
5,404
6,275
6,369

23.5
21.6
17.9
20.6
20.8

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

13,850
14,369
14,016
14,440
15,150

11,225
12,460
13,437
13,669
13,316

25,074
26,829
27,453
28,109
28,466

3,389
3,477
3,329
3,755
3,603

21,685
23,352
24,125
24,354
24,863

77.8
78.8
79.8
79.9
80.8

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

46,995
46,510
46,608
45,141
44,396
44,026

7,231
9,784
11,157
11,432
11,753
13,179

55,570
57,785
58,927
58,045
57,612
58,761

4,200
4,324
3,878
4,033
3,802
3,957

49,147
51,439
52,704
51,804
51,529
52,623

174.6
173.7
174.5
170.0
167.6
169.7

1,266
1,280
1,472
1,463
1,555
1,381

13,185
12,076
11,225
10,995
10,996
10,961

806
788
1,106
1,178
936
916

13,990
12,863
12,331
12,173
11,932
11,877

677
639
640
642
728
851

13,313
12,224
11,691
11,531
11,204
11,026

47.2
41.3
38.7
37.8
36.4
35.6

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

NA Not available. 1 Crop-year basis for fruits. Supply data for vegetables include ending stocks of previous year. 2 Fiscal year for fruits; calendar year for vegetables and potatoes. 3 Based on Census Bureau estimates as of April 1 for census years and estimates as of July 1 for all other years. 4 Includes bananas.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Fruit and Tree Nuts Situation and Outlook Yearbook and
Vegetables and Melons Situation and Outlook Yearbook. See also <http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/outlook/>.

552 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 864. Fruits and Nuts—Utilized Production and Value, 2008 to 2010, and Leading Producing States: 2010
[4,770 represents 4,770,000]
Fruits and nuts

Unit

Utilized production 1

Value of production
Leading states
(mil. dol.) in order of
2008
2009
2010 production, 2010

2008
2009
2010
FRUITS
Apples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
4,770
4,854
(NA)
2,215
2,247
(NA)
(NA)
Avocados. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
116
299
(NA)
215
430
(NA)
(NA)
Blackberries, cultivated (OR). . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
23
28
24
28
31
36
OR
Blueberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
219
227
249
592
518
641
MI, ME, GA
Cranberries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
393
346
340
456
333
321
MA, WI
Dates (CA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
21
24
24
26
27
28
CA
Figs (fresh) (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
43
44
40
26
30
(NA)
CA
Grapefruit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
1,548
1,304
1,238
273
224
286
FL, TX, CA
Grapes (13 states). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
7,306
7,280
6,854
3,333
3,676
3,472
CA, WA
Kiwifruit (CA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
22
25
34
20
21
(NA)
CA
Lemons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
619
912
882
524
335
381
CA, AZ
Nectarines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
303
220
235
111
139
131
CA, WA
Olives (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
67
46
190
47
32
111
CA
Oranges 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . . 10,076
9,128
8,244
2,199
1,970
1,935
FL, CA
Papayas (Hawaii). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
17
16
14
14
14
10
HI
Peaches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
1,114
1,083
1,132
546
594
615
CA, SC, GA
Pears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
869
956
807
396
356
334
WA, CA, OR
Plums (CA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
160
112
(NA)
57
58
(NA)
(NA)
Plums and prunes (fresh) 4 . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
16
18
(NA)
6
6
(NA)
(NA)
Prunes (dried basis) (CA). . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
368
496
(NA)
194
199
(NA)
(NA)
Raspberries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
75
89
76
365
362
259
CA, WA, OR
Strawberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
1,266
1,401
1,425
1,918
2,130
2,245
CA, FL
Tangelos (FL). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
68
52
41
9
6
7
FL
Tangerines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
527
443
595
236
207
276
CA, FL
NUTS
Almonds (shelled basis) (CA) . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
1,410
1,181
(NA)
2,343
2,294
(NA)
(NA)
Hazelnuts (in the shell) (OR). . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
32
47
(NA)
52
79
(NA)
(NA)
Macadamia nuts (HI). . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
25
21
(NA)
34
29
(NA)
(NA)
Pecans (in the shell) (11 states) . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
97
146
(NA)
260
417
(NA)
(NA)
Pistachios (CA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
139
178
(NA)
570
593
(NA)
(NA)
Walnuts(in the shell) (CA). . . . . . . . 1,000 tons. . . . .
436
437
(NA)
558
739
(NA)
(NA)
1
NA Not available. Excludes quantities not harvested or not marketed. Utilized production is the amount sold plus
2
the quantities used at home or held in storage Production in commercial orchards with 100 or more bearing-age trees.
3
Includes temples and Navel varieties beginning with the 2006–2007 season. 4 Idaho, Michigan, Oregon and Washington.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Citrus Fruits Final Estimates, 2003–2007,
December 2008; Citrus Fruits 2010 Summary, September 2010; and Noncitrus Fruits and Crops 2009 Summary, July 2010.
See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
2

Table 865. Nuts—Supply and Use: 2000 to 2009
[In thousands of pounds (shelled) (331,466 represents 331,466,000). For marketing season beginning July 1 for almonds, hazelnuts, pecans; August 1 for walnuts; and September 1 for pistachios]
Beginning
Marketable
Supply,
Ending
Year
stocks production 1
Imports
total Consumption
Exports
stocks
2
Total nuts:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . .
331,466
1,127,940
293,172
1,752,577
733,921
780,988
237,669
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . .
262,995
1,472,240
431,881
2,167,117
779,131
1,120,833
267,153
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . .
243,133
2,070,933
489,793
2,803,858
1,042,284
1,355,677
405,897
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . .
405,897
2,240,219
439,516
3,085,632
1,082,566
1,460,506
542,560
2009, total 2. . . . . .
542,560
2,104,057
464,537
3,111,154
1,136,968
1,553,305
420,881
Almonds . . . . . . . . . .
413,734
1,363,751
5,610
1,783,095
(NA)
1,030,403
321,255
Pecans. . . . . . . . . . . .
42,225
(NA)
80,107
249,862
139,152
71,188
39,522
Pistachios . . . . . . . . .
32,922
174,769
1,297
208,988
54,701
133,075
21,211
Hazelnuts. . . . . . . . . .
1,127
37,425
7,987
46,539
14,331
30,621
1,587
Walnuts. . . . . . . . . . .
52,553
381,500
3,183
437,235
170,371
229,558
37,305
NA Not available. 1 Utilized production minus inedibles and noncommercial usage. 2 Includes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, cashew nuts, pine nuts, chestnuts, and mixed nuts not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Fruit and Tree Nuts Situation and Outlook Yearbook.
See also <http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/fts/#yearbook>.

Table 866. Honey—Number of Bee Colonies, Yield, and Production:
1990 to 2010
[Includes only beekeepers with five or more colonies. Colonies were not included if honey was not harvested]
Honey-producing
Average price
Value of
Year
colonies 1
Yield per colony
Production
per pound production (1,000)
(pounds)
(1,000 pounds)
(cents)
(1,000 dollars)
1990. . . . . . . . . . . . .
3,220
61.7
198,674
54
106,688
1995. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,655
79.5
211,073
69
144,585
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,622
84.0
220,286
60
132,865
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,409
72.5
174,614
92
160,994
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,443
60.7
148,341
108
159,763
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,342
69.9
163,789
142
232,744
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,498
58.6
146,416
147
215,671
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,684
65.5
175,904
160
281,974
1
Honey producing colonies are the maximum number of colonies from which honey was taken during the year. It is possible to take honey from colonies which did not survive the entire year.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Honey, February 2011. See also
<http://www.nass.usda.gov/Surveys/Guide_to_NASS_Surveys/Bee_and_Honey/index.asp>.
U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 553

Table 867. Farmers Markets Characteristics: 2005
[In percent. Based on 2006 National Farmers Market Survey. A farmers market is defined as a retail outlet in which two or more vendors sell agricultural products directly to customers through a common marketing channel. Markets included were in business in the 2005 season and conducted 51 percent of their retail sales directly with consumers]
Total,
U.S.

Northeast

MidAtlantic

Southeast

Region 1
North
Central

Number of vendors:
Less than 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10 to 19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20 to 39. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40 or more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23.9
25.3
29.0
21.8

42.4
27.9
23.6
6.1

37.4
28.4
22.6
11.6

24.1
22.8
29.7
23.4

17.8
29.4
32.3
20.5

32.3
29.0
17.7
21.0

15.9
19.3
28.4
36.4

9.4
12.5
35.6
42.5

Vendor sales:
$1 to $5,000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$5,001 to $25,000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$25,000 to $100,000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$100,001 and above. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

71.4
22.1
5.9
0.6

70.0
26.2
3.8


61.2
22.8
15.4
0.7

68.1
25.2
4.3
2.4

81.4
15.5
2.9
0.2

71.6
23.0
5.3
0.2

80.4
18.3
1.3


56.1
31.5
11.8
0.6

Months of operation:
Year-round. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seasonal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Less than 4 months. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 to 6 months. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 to 9 months. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
More than 9 months. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12.1
87.9
20.0
59.5
7.6
12.9

3.5
96.5
26.3
68.0
2.3
3.4

13.7
86.3
15.5
57.4
12.9
14.2

19.6
80.4
16.9
42.6
18.2
22.3

4.1
95.9
19.2
72.0
4.6
4.2

17.5
82.5
22.2
47.6
9.5
20.6

4.3
95.7
39.6
52.7
3.3
4.4

35.4
64.6
11.4
42.9
8.6
37.1

Source of goods sold:
Grew products sold (their own products). . .
Organic products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locally grown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pasture raised/free range . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Natural. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hormone or antibiotic free. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chemical free/pesticide free . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(NA)
47.0
87.9
38.4
46.9
29.3
47.6
12.3

65.0
67.3
89.3
33.6
39.3
20.5
36.9
13.9

72.3
37.2
84.8
40.2
41.1
27.7
39.3
13.4

69.8
35.5
90.5
21.6
45.9
20.3
45.9
12.2

76.8
39.8
91.2
42.5
50.9
34.4
46.9
7.3

78.0
30.4
80.6
32.3
32.3
19.4
41.9
19.4

60.3
56.8
88.1
34.3
55.2
28.4
56.7
16.4

68.6
74.5
82.1
46.3
50.4
36.6
65.0
17.1

Characteristic

SouthRocky west Mountain

Far
West

– Represents zero. NA Not available. 1 Composition of regions—Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Mid-Atlantic: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Southeast: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina,
South Carolina, and Tennessee. North Central: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota,
Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Southwest: Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas. Rocky Mountain: Arizona, Colorado,
Idaho, New Mexico, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming. Far West: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.
Source: United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service, National Farmers Market Manager Survey
2006, May 2009, <http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/FARMERSMARKETS>.

Table 868. Horticultural Specialty Crop Operations, Value of Sales, and Total land Area Used to Grow Horticultural Crops: 2009
[Horticultural specialty operation is defined as any place that produced and sold $10,000 or more of horticultural specialty products]

Item

Horticultural specialty crops, total 2. . . . . . . . . . .
Annual bedding/garden plants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herbaceous perennial plants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Potted flowering plants for indoor or patio use. . . . . . .
Foilage plants for indor or patio use . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cut flowers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cut cultivated greens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nursery stock sold. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Propagative material 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sod, sprigs, or plugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dried bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers. . . . . . . . . .
Food crops grown under protection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transplants for commercial vegetable production 4. . .
Vegetable seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flower seeds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aquatic plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cut Christmas trees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Operations
21,585
7,989
6,416
4,043
2,728
1,703
634
8,441
1,178
1,403
223
1,476
502
340
141
375
2,699
212

Value of sales
(1,000)
11,687,323
2,305,913
843,788
871,474
509,873
403,254
84,148
3,850,363
601,657
876,847
48,512
553,270
330,647
89,031
30,825
26,000
249,821
11,901

Greenhouses
(1,000
square feet) 859,063
258,823
27,101
62,208
39,583
53,495
5,443
217,482
29,733
419
183
61,324
32,095
163
289
1,373
1,010
68,340

Total land area 1
Shade
structures
(1,000
Natural square shade feet) (acres)
406,072
8,160
13,858
140
4,330
314
23,893
41
76,645
144
14,248
76
152,512
2,835
87,228
4,184
3,208
53
36
(D)
(D)
(D)
1,562
19
467
4
(D)

308
2
134
1
95
84
27,519
227

Area in open (acres)
572,269
6,815
3,981
1,693
2,314
12,068
2,998
323,539
8,169
85,842
3,736
5,863
7,250
38,819
5,695
1,320
45,091
17,075

D Withheld to avoid disclosure. – Represents zero 1 Total land area represents the land utilized on the operation as the area used for horticultural production. Includes volume of stacked benches and stacked pots and the area used to produce multiple crop types. 2 Excludes acres in production for Christmas trees or sod, sprigs, or plugs. 3 Includes cuttings, plug seedlings, liners, tissue cultured plantlets, and prefinsished plants. 4 Includes strawberries.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2009 Census of Horticultural Specialties,
Vol. 3, AC-07-SS-3. See also <http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/Online_Highlights/Census_of_Horticulture
/index.asp.

554 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 869. Meat Supply and Use: 2000 to 2010
[In millions of pounds (carcass weight equivalent) (82,372 represents 82,372,000,000). Carcass weight equivalent is the weight of the animal minus entrails, head, hide, and internal organs; includes fat and bone. Covers federal and state inspected, and farm slaughtered] Production

Imports

Supply 1

Exports

Consumption 2

Ending stocks RED MEAT AND POULTRY
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

82,372
86,781
42,143
93,460
90,493
91,639

4,136
4,846
4,298
3,646
3,735
3,439

88,480
93,807
91,608
91,520
89,659
89,524

9,344
9,275
11,203
14,352
13,498
13,977

77,067
82,334
84,008
82,590
81,327
81,120

2,069
2,199
2,151
2,451
1,994
2,114

ALL RED MEATS
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46,299
45,846
48,683
50,225
49,274
49,050

4,127
4,804
4,223
3,553
3,631
3,321

51,340
51,837
48,434
47,211
47,191
45,937

3,760
3,373
4,585
6,566
6,046
6,542

46,559
47,385
48,434
47,211
47,191
45,937

1,021
1,080
1,169
1,307
1,114
1,145

Beef:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26,888
24,952
26,523
26,664
26,068
26,419

3,032
3,598
3,052
2,538
2,626
2,297

30,332
29,191
30,205
29,832
29,336
29,281

2,468
697
1,434
1,887
1,935
2,299

27,338
27,919
28,141
27,303
26,836
26,397

525
575
630
642
565
585

Pork:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18,952
20,706
21,962
23,367
23,020
22,458

965
1,025
968
832
834
859

20,406
22,274
23,424
24,717
24,489
23,842

1,287
2,665
3,141
4,667
4,095
4,227

18,642
19,115
19,763
19,415
19,870
19,074

478
494
519
635
525
541

Veal:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

225
165
146
152
147
142

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

230
169
152
159
156
151

(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)

225
164
145
150
147
147

5
5
7
9
9
4

Lamb and mutton:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

234
191
189
180
177
171

130
180
203
183
171
165

372
374
407
376
369
351

5
9
18
18
18
18

354
355
385
343
338
320

13
10
13
21
15
15

POULTRY,
TOTAL
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

36,073
40,935
42,143
43,235
41,220
42,589

9
42
75
92
104
118

37,140
41,970
43,174
44,309
42,468
43,586

5,584
5,902
6,618
7,785
7,452
7,435

30,508
34,949
35,574
35,379
34,136
35,182

1,048
1,119
982
1,144
880
969

Broilers:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30,209
34,987
35,772
36,511
35,131
36,516

6
33
61
79
86
98

31,011
35,721
36,565
37,309
35,961
37,230

4,918
5,203
5,904
6,961
6,818
6,773

25,295
29,608
29,942
29,603
28,527
29,684

798
910
719
745
616
773

Mature chicken:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

531
516
498
559
500
503

2
1
3
3
3
3

540
520
508
566
509
508

220
130
159
159
159
159

311
388
337
415
406
425

9
2
2
3
2
4

Turkeys:
2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2009. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5,333
5,432
5,873
6,165
5,589
5,569

1
7
10
8
13
17

5,589
5,728
6,101
6,434
5,998
5,848

445
569
547
676
534
583

4,902
4,952
5,294
5,361
5,202
5,073

241
207
261
396
262
192

Year and type of meat

NA Not available. 1 Total supply equals production plus imports plus ending stocks of previous year. 2 Includes shipments to territories.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Food Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures,
1970–1997 and “Agricultural Outlook: Statistical Indicators,” <http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/agoutlook/aotables/>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 555

Table 870. Livestock Inventory and Production: 1990 to 2010
[95.8 represents 95,800,000. Production in live weight; includes animals-for-slaughter market, younger animals shipped to other states for feeding or breeding purposes, farm slaughter and custom slaughter consumed on farms where produced, minus livestock shipped into states for feeding or breeding with an adjustment for changes in inventory]
Type of livestock
ALL CATTLE 1
Inventory: 2 Number on farms . . .
Total value. . . . . . . . . . . .
Value per head. . . . . . . .
Production: Quantity . . . . . . . . . .
Beef, price per
100 pounds. . . . . . . . . .
Calves, price per
100 pounds. . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . .

Unit

1990

1995

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Mil.. . . . . . .
Bil. dol.. . . .
Dol. . . . . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . .

95.8
59.0
616
39.2

102.8
63.2
615
42.5

98.2
67.1
683
43.0

94.4
77.2
818
41.6

95.0
87.0
916
41.2

96.3
97.2
1,009
41.8

96.6
89.1
922
41.4

96.0
95.1
990
41.6

93.9
82.4
872
41.2

92.6
78.2
832
41.6

Dol. . . . . . .

74.60

61.80

68.60

85.80

89.70

87.20

89.90

89.10

Dol. . . . . . .
Bil. dol.. . . .

95.60
29.3

73.10 104.00 119.00 135.00 133.00 119.00 110.00 105.00 117.00
24.7
28.5
34.9
36.3
35.5
36.0
35.6
32.0
37.0

HOGS AND PIGS
Inventory: 3 Number on farms . . .
Total value. . . . . . . . . . . .
Value per head. . . . . . . .
Production: Quantity . . . . . . . . . .
Price per 100 pounds. . .
Value of production. . . . .

Mil.. . . . . . .
Bil. dol.. . . .
Dol. . . . . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . .
Dol. . . . . . .
Bil. dol.. . . .

53.8
4.3
79
21.3
53.70
11.3

59.7
3.2
53
24.4
40.50
9.8

59.3
4.3
72
25.7
42.30
10.8

60.5
4.0
67
26.7
49.30
13.1

61.0
6.3
103
27.4
50.20
13.6

61.5
5.8
95
28.2
46.00
12.7

62.5
5.6
90
29.6
46.60
13.5

68.2
5.0
73
31.4
47.00
14.5

67.1
5.4
83
31.4
41.60
12.6

64.6
6.8
106
30.4
54.10
16.1

SHEEP AND LAMBS
Inventory: 2 Number on farms . . .
Total value. . . . . . . . . . . .
Value per head. . . . . . . .
Production: Quantity . . . . . . . . . .
Value of production. . . . .

Mil.. . . . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .
Dol. . . . . . .
Mil. lb.. . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .

11.4
901
79
781
374

9.0
663
75
602
414

7.0
670
95
512
365

6.1
720
119
466
413

6.1
798
130
472
451

6.2
872
141
461
368

6.1
818
134
440
363

6.0
823
138
417
351

5.7
765
133
422
365

5.6
761
135
405
443

80.30 105.00

Includes milk cows. 2 As of January 1. 3 As of December 1 of preceding year.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Meat Animals—Production, Disposition, and
Income Final Estimates 1998–2002, May 2004; Meat Animals—Production, Disposition, and Income Final Estimates 2003–2007,
May 2009; Meat Animals Production, Disposition, and Income 2010 Summary, April 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov
/Publications/index.asp>.
1

Table 871. Livestock Operations by Size of Herd: 2000 to 2010
[In thousands(1,076 represents 1,076,000). An operation is any place having one or more head on hand at any time during the year]
Size of herd
CATTLE 1
Total operations. . . . .
1 to 49 head. . . . . . . . . .
50 to 99 head. . . . . . . . .
100 to 499 head. . . . . . .
500 to 999 head. . . . . . .
1,000 head or more. . . .

2000

2005

2009

2010

1,076
671
186
192
19
10

983
612
164
178
19
10

946
641
131
144
19
11

935
635
129
141
19
11

BEEF COWS 2
Total operations. . . . .
1 to 49 head. . . . . . . . . .
50 to 99 head. . . . . . . . .
100 to 499 head. . . . . . .
500 head or more . . . . .

831
655
100
71
6

770
597
95
73
5

751
596
82
67
6

742
588
82
66
6

Size of herd
MILK COWS 2
Total operations. . . . .
1 to 49 head. . . . . . . . . .
50 to 99 head. . . . . . . . .
100 head or more . . . . .
HOGS AND PIGS
Total operations. . . . .
1 to 99 head. . . . . . . . . .
100 to 499 head. . . . . . .
500 to 999 head. . . . . . .
1,000 to 1,999 head. . . .
2,000 to 4,999 head. . . .
5,000 head or more. . . .

2000

2005

2009

2010

105
53
31
21

78
37
23
15

65
32
17
16

63
31
16
16

87
50
17
8
6
5
2

67
41
10
5
4
5
2

71
50
6
3
4
5
3

69
49
5
3
4
5
3

Includes calves. 2 Included in operations with cattle.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Livestock Operations Final Estimates
2003–2007, March 2009; Farms, Land in Farms, and Livestock Operations 2010 Summary, February 2011. See also
<http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
1

Table 872. Hogs and Pigs—Number, Production, and Slaughter by States:
2008 to 2010
[Production in live weight (67,148 represents 67,148,000). See headnote Table 870]

State
U.S 3. . . . . . . .
IA. . . . . . . . . . .
NC. . . . . . . . . .
MN. . . . . . . . . .
IL. . . . . . . . . . .
IN. . . . . . . . . . .
NE. . . . . . . . . .
MO. . . . . . . . . .

Number on farms 1
(1,000)
2008
67,148
19,900
9,700
7,500
4,350
3,550
3,350
3,150

2009
64,887
19,000
9,600
7,200
4,250
3,600
3,100
3,100

2010
64,625
19,000
8,900
7,700
4,350
3,650
3,150
2,900

Quantity produced
(mil. lb.)
2008
31,411
9,428
4,210
3,777
1,711
1,726
1,385
1,747

2009
31,359
9,608
4,071
3,678
1,839
1,739
1,360
1,694

2010
30,391
9,255
3,777
3,697
1,939
1,754
1,353
1,275

Value of production
(mil. dol.)
2008
14,457
4,040
2,120
1,763
917
818
715
765

2009
12,590
3,580
1,824
1,257
908
728
626
674

2010
16,073
4,527
2,183
1,853
1,128
901
804
705

Commercial slaughter 2
(mil. lb.)
2009
2010
30,723
30,005
8,682
8,144
3,219
3,069
2,592
2,692
2,674
2,582
2,256
2,265
2,068
2,064
2,229
2,196

1
As of December 1. 2 Includes slaughter in federally inspected and other slaughter plants; excludes animals slaughtered on farms. 3 Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Meat Animals Production, Disposition and
Income 2010 Summary, April 2011, and Livestock Slaughter 2010 Summary, April 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov
/Publications/index.asp>.

556 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Table 873. Cattle and Calves—Number, Production, and Value by State:
2008 to 2010
[94,521 represents 94,521,000. Includes milk cows. See headnote, Table 870]
Number on farms 1
(1,000)

State
U.S. 3. . . . .
TX . . . . . . . .
NE. . . . . . . .
KS. . . . . . . .
OK. . . . . . . .
CO. . . . . . . .
IA. . . . . . . . .
SD. . . . . . . .
CA. . . . . . . .
MO. . . . . . . .
MT. . . . . . . .
ID. . . . . . . . .

2009
94,521
13,600
6,350
6,300
5,400
2,600
3,950
3,700
5,250
4,250
2,600
2,110

2010
93,881
13,300
6,300
6,000
5,500
2,600
3,850
3,800
5,150
4,150
2,550
2,170

Production
(mil. lb.)

2011
92,582
13,300
6,200
6,300
5,100
2,650
3,900
3,700
5,150
3,950
2,500
2,200

2008
41,594
7,280
4,622
3,892
2,036
1,783
1,845
1,490
1,968
1,394
970
1,140

2009
41,161
6,924
4,615
3,916
2,149
1,817
1,787
1,471
1,899
1,348
965
1,047

Commercial slaughter 2
(mil. lb.)
2009
2010
42,966
43,662
8,208
8,179
9,104
9,109
8,175
8,347
30
26
3,119
3,269
(4)
(4)
(4)
(4)
2,109
2,204
108
77
27
25
390
346

Value of production
(mil. dol.)
2010
41,574
6,790
4,553
4,090
2,216
1,718
1,814
1,481
1,979
1,253
1,112
1,171

2008
35,608
6,449
4,203
3,321
1,939
1,737
1,606
1,401
1,353
1,275
870
936

2009
31,990
5,481
3,746
2,965
1,890
1,598
1,437
1,326
1,099
1,170
777
800

2010
36,976
6,097
4,137
3,444
2,178
1,763
1,677
1,559
1,345
1,247
1,042
1,028

1
As of January 1. 2 Data cover cattle only. Includes slaughter in federally inspected and other slaughter plants; excludes animals slaughtered on farms. 3 Includes other states, not shown separately. 4 Included in U.S. total. Not printed to avoid disclosing individual operation.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Meat Animals—Production, Disposition and
Income 2010 Summary, April 2011, and Livestock Slaughter 2010 Summary, April 2011, annual. See also <http://www.nass.usda
.gov/Publications/index.asp>.

Table 874. Milk Cows—Number, Production, and Value by State: 2008 to 2010
[9,315 represents 9,315,000]

State
U.S 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number on farms 1
(1,000)
2008
9,315
1,844
1,252
626
549
549
418
464
350

2009
9,203
1,796
1,257
619
545
550
423
469
355

Milk produced on farms 2
(mil. lb.)

2010
2008
2009
2010
9,117 189,982 189,334 192,819
1,754 41,203 39,512 40,385
1,262 24,472 25,239 26,035
611 12,432 12,424 12,713
541 10,575 10,551 10,734
564 12,315 12,150 12,779
413
8,416
8,840
8,828
470
8,782
9,019
9,102
358
7,763
7,968
8,327

Milk produced per milk cow 2
2008
20,395
22,344
19,546
19,859
19,262
22,432
20,134
18,927
22,180

2009
20,573
22,000
20,079
20,071
19,360
22,091
20,898
19,230
22,445

2010
21,149
23,025
20,630
20,807
19,841
22,658
21,375
19,366
23,260

Value of production 3
(mil. dol.)
2009
2010
24,473 31,526
4,540
5,933
3,306
4,192
1,690
2,212
1,519
1,964
1,434
1,904
1,176
1,510
1,209
1,465
1,068
1,416

1
Average number during year. Represents cows and heifers that have calved, kept for milk; excluding heifers not yet fresh.
Excludes milk sucked by calves. 3 Valued at average returns per 100 pounds of milk in combined marketings of milk and cream.
Includes value of milk fed to calves. 4 Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Milk Production, Disposition, and Income 2010
Summary, April 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.
2

Table 875. Milk Production and Manufactured Dairy Products: 1990 to 2010
[193 represents 193,000]
Item
Number of farms with milk cows. . . . . . . .
Cows and heifers that have calved, kept for milk 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milk produced on farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Production per cow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milk marketed by producers 1 . . . . . . . . .
Value of milk produced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash receipts from marketing of milk and cream 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Unit
1,000. . . . . .

1990
193

2000
105

2004
82

2005
78

2006
75

2007
70

2008
67

2009
65

2010
63

Mil. head . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . . .
1,000 lb.. . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . . .
Bil. dol.. . . . .

10.0
148
14.8
146
20.4

9.2
167
18.2
166
20.8

9.0
171
19.0
170
27.6

9.1
177
19.6
176
26.9

9.1
182
19.9
181
23.6

9.2
186
20.2
185
35.7

9.3
190
20.4
189
35.1

9.2
189
20.6
188
24.5

9.1
193
21.1
192
31.5

Bil. dol.. . . . .

20.1

20.6

27.4

26.7

23.4

35.5

34.8

24.3

31.4

Number of dairy manufacturing plants. . . . Number. . . . 1,723 1,164 1,093 1,088 1,094 1,123 1,125 1,248 1,273
Manufactured dairy products:
Butter (including whey butter) . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . . 1,302 1,256 1,247 1,347 1,448 1,533 1,644 1,572 1,564
Cheese, total 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . . 6,059 8,258 8,873 9,149 9,525 9,777 9,913 10,074 10,436
American (excl. full-skim American) . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . . 2,894 3,642 3,739 3,808 3,913 3,877 4,109 4,203 4,275
Cream and Neufchatel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb. . . . . .
431
687
699
715
756
773
764
767
745
All Italian varieties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . . 2,207 3,289 3,662 3,803 3,973 4,199 4,121 4,181 4,424
Cottage cheese—creamed and lowfat. . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . .
832
735
788
784
778
774
714
731
720
Nonfat dry milk 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . .
902 1,457 1,412 1,210 1,244 1,298 1,519 1,512 1,563
Dry whey 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . . 1,143 1,188 1,035 1,041 1,110 1,134 1,082 1,001 1,013
Yogurt, plain and fruit-flavored. . . . . . . . . Mil. lb.. . . . . .
(NA) 1,837 2,707 3,058 3,301 3,476 3,570 3,839 4,181
Ice cream, regular. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. gal.. . . . .
824
980
920
960
982
956
931
918
912
Ice cream, lowfat 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mil. gal.. . . . .
352
373
387
360
377
383
384
400
380
NA Not available. 1 Comprises sales to plants and dealers, and retail sales by farmers direct to consumers. 2 Includes varieties not shown separately. Beginning 1974, includes full-skim. 3 Includes dry skim milk for animal feed through 2000. 4 Includes animal but excludes modified whey production. 5 Includes freezer-made milkshake in most states.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Milk Disposition and Income Final Estimates
2003-2007, May 2009; Dairy Products 2010 Summary, April 2011; and Milk Production, Disposition, and Income 2010 Summary,
April 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

Agriculture 557

Table 876. Milk Production and Commercial Use: 1990 to 2010
[In billions of pounds milkfat basis (147.7 represents 147,700,000,000) except as noted]
Commercial

Commercial
Milk
ComCommodity price per
Year
Farm
Beginmercial
CreditCorDisap100
ProducFarm
marketning supply, poration net
Ending
pear- pounds 3
1
2 tion use ings stock Imports total removals stock Exports ance (dollars)
1990. . .
147.7
2.0
145.7
4.1
2.7
152.5
8.5
5.1
(NA)
138.8
13.68
2000. . .
167.4
1.3
166.1
6.1
4.4
176.7
0.8
6.9
(NA)
169.0
12.40
2005. . .
176.9
1.1
175.8
7.2
7.5
190.5

8.0
3.3
179.2
15.13
2007. . .
185.7
1.1
184.6
9.5
7.2
201.3

10.4
5.7
185.2
19.13
2008. . .
190.0
1.1
188.9
10.4
5.3
204.6

10.1
8.7
185.7
18.33
2009. . .
189.3
1.0
188.3
10.1
5.6
204.0
0.7
11.3
4.5
187.3
12.83
2010. . .
192.7
1.0
191.8
11.3
4.1
207.2
0.2
10.8
8.1
188.1
16.29
– Represents zero. NA Not available. 1 Removals from commercial supply by Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) on a fat
2
3 basis. Prior to 2005, disappearance represents domestic disappearance plus exports. Wholesale price received by farmers for all milk delivered to plants and dealers.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, “Agricultural Outlook: Statistical Indicators,”
<http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/agoutlook/aotables/>.

Table 877. Broiler, Turkey, and Egg Production: 1990 to 2010
[For year ending November 30 (353 represents 353,000,000), except as noted]
Item
Chickens: 1
Number 2. . . . . . . . .
Value per head 2 . . .
Value, total 2. . . . . . .
Number sold . . . . . .
Price per pound. . . .
Value of sales . . . . .

Unit

1990

1995

2000

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Million . . . .
Dollars. . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .
Million . . . .
Cents. . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .

353
2.29
808
208
9.6
94

388
2.41
935
180
6.5
60

437
2.44
1,064
218
5.7
64

454
2.48
1,126
192
5.8
58

456
2.52
1,150
194
6.5
65

458
2.60
1,190
174
5.9
54

459
2.95
1,352
168
5.6
51

447
3.39
1,517
176
6.6
62

452
3.34
1,508
176
(NA)
65

455
3.52
1,600
172
(NA)
72

PRODUCTION
Broilers: 3
Number. . . . . . . . . .
Weight. . . . . . . . . . .
Price per pound. . . .
Production value. . .

Million . . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . .
Cents. . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .

5,864
25.6
32.6
8,366

7,326
34.2
34.4
11,762

8,284
41.6
33.6
13,989

8,741
45.8
44.6
20,446

8,872
47.9
43.6
20,878

8,868
48.8
36.3
17,739

8,907
49.3
43.6
21,514

9,009
50.4
(NA)
23,203

8,550
47.8
(NA)
21,823

8,625
49.2
(NA)
23,696

Turkeys:
Number. . . . . . . . . .
Weight. . . . . . . . . . .
Price per pound. . . .
Production value. . .

Million . . . .
Bil. lb.. . . . .
Cents. . . . .
Mil. dol.. . . .

282
6.0
39.6
2,393

292
6.8
41.0
2,769

270
7.0
40.6
2,828

256
6.9
41.5
2,887

250
7.0
44.5
3,108

256
7.2
48.0
3,468

267
7.6
52.3
3,952

273
7.9
56.5
4,477

247
7.1
(NA)
3,573

244
7.1
(NA)
4,371

Eggs:
Average number of layers. . . . . . . . . . . Thousand. .
(NA) 294,350 327,908 342,395 345,027 349,700 346,498 339,131 337,848 339,961
Eggs per layer. . . . . Number. . .
(NA)
254
257
261
262
263
263
266
268
269
Total production. . . . Billion. . . . .
68.1
74.8
84.4
89.2
90.3
91.8
91.1
90.0
90.5
91.4
Price per dozen. . . . Cents. . . . .
70.8
62.5
61.6
71.3
54.0
58.3
88.5
109.0
(NA)
(NA)
Production value. . . Mil. dol.. . . .
4,021
3,893
4,346
5,303
4,067
4,460
6,719
8,216
6,166
6,518
NA Not available. 1 Excludes commercial broilers. 2 As of December 1. 3 Young chickens of the heavy breeds and other meat-type birds, to be marketed at 2–5 lbs. live weight and from which no pullets are kept for egg production. Not included in sales of chickens.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Poultry Production and Value Final Estimates
1998–2002, April 2004; Turkeys Final Estimates 1998–2002, April 2004; Poultry Production and Value Final Estimates 2003–2007,
May 2009; Chickens and Eggs Final Estimates 1998–2002, April 2004; Chickens and Eggs Final Estimates 2003–2007, March
2009; and Poultry—Production and Value 2010 Summary, and Chickens and Eggs 2010 Summary, February 2011. See also
<http://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/index.asp>.

Table 878. Broiler and Turkey Production by State: 2008 to 2010
[In millions of pounds, live weight production (50,442 represents 50,442,000,000)]
Broilers
Turkeys
Broilers
Turkeys
State
2008
2009
2010
2008
2009
2010
2008
2009
2010
2008
2009
2010
U.S. 1. . . . 50,442 47,752 49,162 7,922 7,149 7,107 MS. . . . . . . 4,876 4,602 4,766
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
AL . . . . . . . 5,846 5,513 5,787
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) MO. . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
651
611
589
AR. . . . . . . 6,380 5,780 5,938
611
568
549 NC. . . . . . . 5,493 5,317 5,419 1,208 1,090
963
CA. . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
435
390
404 OH. . . . . . .
328
338
377
230
203
178
DE. . . . . . . 1,579 1,599 1,631
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) OK. . . . . . . 1,260 1,220 1,503
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
FL . . . . . . .
376
252
314
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) PA . . . . . . .
933
875
839
216
182
159
GA. . . . . . . 7,469 6,874 6,883
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) SC. . . . . . . 1,516 1,522 1,557
478
433
430
IL. . . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) SD. . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
189
187
193
IN. . . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
519
543
573 TN. . . . . . . 1,019
968
987
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
IA. . . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
360
(NA)
(NA) TX . . . . . . . 3,461 3,611 3,647
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
KY. . . . . . . 1,653 1,658 1,674
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) UT. . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
82
103
MD. . . . . . . 1,612 1,399 1,433
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) VA . . . . . . . 1,252 1,204 1,292
484
449
459
MI. . . . . . . .
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
(NA) WV. . . . . . .
351
331
346
102
97
90
MN. . . . . . .
238
246
231 1,306 1,161 1,208 WI . . . . . . .
217
192
199
(NA)
(NA)
(NA)
1
NA Not available. Includes other states, not shown separately.
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Poultry Production and Value Final Estimates
2003–2007, May 2009, and Poultry—Production and Value, 2010 Summary, April 2011. See also <http://www.nass.usda.gov
/Publications/index.asp>.
State

558 Agriculture

U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012

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