Utilitarianism

In: Business and Management

Submitted By popo1616
Words 251
Pages 2
Providence Mwiseneza
BUSN 120
Discussion 2

Utilitarianism is commonly identified with the rule of producing” the greatest good for the greatest number” but I believe they should be exceptions for example child labor even thou it help those under privileged children to bring food on the table we must think in the long run, what will happen to their country since their the future generation.

When they say everyone have rights “to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and later on when they discuss the right to health care but also what kind of fortune it going to cost some. It start to be a problem of” the greatest good for the greatest number “and it will contract with the ethics rights and human rights in general but if they make it fall into government duties for those who did not have the heath care it can help.

In identifying the stakeholders as one of decision-making process should have been given a more time in regard of health care like who is it going to help? How will these big corporations respond since they are going to be an increase incentives spend in health care of their employee? Are they available alternatives? This way we would not be having problem with the cut of working hours for some so that they employer do not have to pay for their health care.

Malveoux, Suzanna. "Obama Sets Executive Pay Limits." CNN. Cable News Network, n.d. Web. 15 Sept.…...

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