Victimisation

In: Social Issues

Submitted By chamahbrian
Words 651
Pages 3
VICTIMISATION Name Institution

Introduction People do not bear responsibility of becoming victims by virtue of their lifestyles or any other thing that may make them to be victims. Some of the things that can make one to be vulnerable to victimization is engaging in practices that are usually dangerous especially illegal drugs, prostitution, bullying, and consumption of alcohol among many other vices. Perpetrators of victimization usually go to certain extents to get their victims and some of the reasons may include the risk factors that consist of things that the victim does that make him or her vulnerable. For example, a robber may scrutinize a person to see if they are careless in carrying something valuable and strategize on how they are going to steal it. The victim may not have knowledge of what is being planned against him or her and innocently carries on with his duties on to become a victim of a crime later. An example is an assault on a prostitute in the car, lodging or the home of a person. The society may think that it is because of her job venture but someone took advantage of the situation and the prostitute was either assaulted or murdered. In such a crime, the prostitute is victimized for something that she was involved in or is doing. Therefore, her lifestyle should not be used as a scapegoat for her being a victim but the perpetrator of such an action should be dealt with justly. Some activities that cause people to be victims especially teens are alcohol consumption and abuse of drugs. Most of these activities happen during spring breaks and pupils end up engaging in illicit behavior especially by consumption of alcohol. Peer pressure makes some of the students to engage in alcohol and end up…...

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