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VINCENNES UNIVERSITY CATALOG
Vol. LXIX August, 2010 No. 61

A COMPREHENSIVE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE OFFERING ASSOCIATE DEGREES IN THE LIBERAL ARTS, SCIENCES, EDUCATION, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY AND OFFERING BACCALAUREATE DEGREES IN SPECIALIZED AREAS Accreditation The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 263-0456 www.ncacihe.org FAX 312-263-7462 Accreditation Review Council on Education in Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting American Bar Association American Board of Funeral Service Education American Health Information Management Association Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Federal Aviation Administration Higher Education Coordinating Board of the State of Washington Indiana State Board of Nursing Joint Review Committee on Education In Radiologic Technology National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships National Association of Schools of Art and Design National Association of Schools of Theatre National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Printing Industries of America, Inc. Approved for Veterans Membership The American Association of Community Colleges Aviation Technician Education Council The Council of North Central Two Year Colleges The Higher Education Transfer Alliance The National Academic Advising Association The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges TOLL FREE NUMBER: 1-800-742-9198 FAX NUMBER: 1-812-888-5868 ADDRESS: 1002 North First Street, Vincennes, Indiana 47591 PHONE: 812-888-8888 WEB: www.vinu.edu myvu.vinu.edu

Dr. Richard E. Helton Twenty-First President of Vincennes University

COMMITMENT TO SERVICES: All employees of Vincennes University are committed to delivering professional instruction and quality service in a timely, caring, and courteous manner.

ABOUT THE COVER: The cover of the 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog was designed and developed by Graphic Design student Kenneth Andis with the assistance of Graphic Design Professors Brad Rock and Ron Wise and Art-Graphic Design Professor Pravin Sevak. Photography was provided by Dave Fisher, Media Services, Learning Resources Center, Vincennes University.

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

Table of Contents Academic Calendars ....................................................................................................................... iv Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Admission and Financial Aid .......................................................................................................... 6 Requirements for Admission ....................................................................................................... 7 Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................... 9 Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses ............................................................................................ 20 Student Life ................................................................................................................................... 28 Student Records Policies and Procedures .................................................................................. 29 Student Regulations ................................................................................................................... 30 Student Services......................................................................................................................... 41 Student Center ........................................................................................................................... 49 Academic Information ................................................................................................................... 53 General Academic Policies and Procedures .............................................................................. 55 Evaluation and Grading System ................................................................................................ 65 Degree and Certificate Requirements for Graduation ............................................................... 68 General Education ..................................................................................................................... 71 Extended Studies ........................................................................................................................... 86 Workforce Development and Community Services ...................................................................... 91 Jasper Campus ............................................................................................................................... 96 Programs of Study ....................................................................................................................... 104 Course Descriptions .................................................................................................................... 375 University Directory .................................................................................................................... 543 Index ............................................................................................................................................ 565 Campus Map................................................................................................................................ 574

Vincennes University does not discriminate based on race, religion, color, national origin or ancestry, age, sex, sexual orientation, or handicap or against disabled veterans and veterans of the Vietnam Era, or other non-merit factors in its employment or educational programs or activities. Any person who believes that such discrimination has occurred in this institution should contact the Affirmative Action Officer of Vincennes University, 1002 North First Street, Welsh Administration Building, Vincennes, Indiana 47591, 812-888-5848. The AAO also hears concerns when a person believes himself or herself to be a victim of discrimination under Title IX, Section 504 and the ADA.

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2010-11 Vincennes University Calendar
Fall Semester 2010 START VU, Late Registration ......................................................................... Thursday, August 19 New Student Orientation begins ............................................................................ Friday, August 20 Classes begin ...................................................................................................... Monday, August 23 Drop and Add .................................................................................... Monday-Friday, August 23-27 Labor Day (No classes) .................................................................................. Monday, September 6 Last day for students to withdraw from first 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................... Friday, September 24 Midterm Examinations .................................................................... Monday-Friday, October 11-15 Midterm Break (No classes) ........................................................ Monday, Tuesday, October 18, 19 Begin Advising and Registration for Spring .....................................................Monday, October 25 Last day for students to withdraw without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................................................................... Friday, October 29 Graduation Application Deadline – Fall............................................................ Friday, November 5 START VU, New Student Registration ....................................................... Saturday, November 13 Last day for students to withdraw from second 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................... Friday, November 19 Thanksgiving Break (No classes) .......................................... Wednesday-Friday, November 24-26 Last day for faculty to withdraw students for non-attendance ......................Monday, November 29 Midyear Commencement (Vincennes Campus) ........................................... Saturday, December 11 Final Examinations ................................................................... Monday-Saturday, December 13-18 Spring Semester 2011 START VU, New Student Registration ................................................................. Friday, January 7 Late Registration .................................................................................................... Friday, January 7 Classes begin ..................................................................................................... Monday, January 10 Drop and Add ................................................................................... Monday-Friday, January 10-14 Martin Luther King and Presidents Day (No classes) ....................................... Monday, January 17 Last day for students to withdraw from first 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval .............................................................. Friday, February 11

2010
S M January T W R 7 14 21 28 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 31 May S M T W 2 9 16 23 30 S 5 12 19 26 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30 M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 S February T W R 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 March M T W R 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 S M 4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26 April T W R F 1 2 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30 S 3 10 17 24

3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31 September M T W R 1 2 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30

S 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

R

F

S

M

6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

June W R 2 3 9 10 16 17 23 24 30

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

S

M

4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

July W R F S 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31 T

August S M T W R 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 31

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

F 3 10 17 24

S 4 11 18 25

S

M

October T W R

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

S 7 14 21 28

November M T W R 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

S

M

5 6 12 13 19 20 26 27

December T W R F 1 2 3 7 8 9 10 14 15 16 17 21 22 23 24 28 29 30 31

S 4 11 18 25

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

2010-11 Vincennes University Calendar Continued Midterm Examinations ................................................................. Monday-Friday, Feb. 28-March 4 Midterm Break (No classes) ................................................................. Monday-Friday, March 7-11 Begin Advising and Registration for Fall and Summer ...................................... Monday, March 14 Last day for students to withdraw without appropriate division dean's approval .............................................................................................................. Friday, March 25 Graduation Application Deadline – Spring ............................................................ Friday, March 25 Last day for students to withdraw from second 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ...................................................................... Friday, April 8 Good Friday (No classes) ......................................................................................... Friday, April 22 Last day for faculty to withdraw students for non-attendance .............................. Monday, April 25 Commencement (Vincennes Campus) ................................................................. Saturday, April 30 Final Examinations ................................................................................ Tuesday-Saturday, May 3-7 Commencement (American Sign Language – Indianapolis) .................................. Thursday, May 5 Commencement (Aviation Technology Center – Indianapolis) .................................. Friday, May 6 Commencement (Jasper Campus) ........................................................................... Saturday, May 7 Summer Sessions 2011 Intersession ........................................................................ Monday, May 9 through Friday, May 27 Summer I Session ................................................... Wednesday, June 1 through Wednesday, July 6 Summer II Session............................................... Thursday, July 7 through Wednesday, August 10 8 Week Session .................................................... Wednesday, June 1 through Wednesday, July 27 10 Week Session .............................................. Wednesday, June 1 through Wednesday August 10 Summer Session Dates to Remember Memorial Day (No classes) .................................................................................... Monday, May 30 Registration for Summer I and 10-week Session ................................................... Tuesday, May 31 Last day for students to withdraw from Summer I courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................................................ Friday, June 24 Independence Day (No classes)................................................................................. Monday, July 4 Registration for Summer II.................................................................................. Wednesday, July 6 Last day for students to withdraw from Summer II courses without appropriate division dean's approval ................................................................................... Monday, August 1 New Student Advising and Registration for Fall Semester Advising for Incoming Freshmen ............................................................................. June 20-July 30

2011
S 2 9 16 23 30 M January T W R 3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31 S 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 F S M 6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28 February T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S M 6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28 March T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31 July W R F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S M April T W R 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 F S 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

May S M T W R F 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31 September T W R F 1 2 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30

S 7 14 21 28

S

M

5 6 12 13 19 20 26 27

June W R 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30 T October T W R

F 3 10 17 24

S 4 11 18 25

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M

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4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

S 3 10 17 24

S 2 9 16 23 30

M

3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31

S 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

F

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31 November S M T W R 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

S 7 14 21 28

August M T W R 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

S

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4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

December T W R F S 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31

2010-11 Vincennes University Calendar v

2011-12 Vincennes University Calendar
Fall Semester 2011 START VU, Late Registration ......................................................................... Thursday, August 18 New Student Orientation begins ............................................................................ Friday, August 19 Classes begin ...................................................................................................... Monday, August 22 Drop and Add .................................................................................... Monday-Friday, August 22-26 Labor Day (No classes) .................................................................................. Monday, September 5 Last day for students to withdraw from first 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................... Friday, September 23 Midterm Examinations .................................................................... Monday-Friday, October 10-14 Midterm Break (No classes) ........................................................ Monday, Tuesday, October 17, 18 Begin Advising and Registration for Spring .....................................................Monday, October 24 Last day for students to withdraw without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................................................................... Friday, October 28 START VU, New Student Registration ....................................................... Saturday, November 12 Last day for students to withdraw from second 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................... Friday, November 18 Thanksgiving Break (No classes) .......................................... Wednesday-Friday, November 23-25 Last day for faculty to withdraw students for non-attendance ......................Monday, November 28 Midyear Commencement (Vincennes Campus) ........................................... Saturday, December 10 Final Examinations ................................................................... Monday-Saturday, December 12-17 Spring Semester 2012 START VU, New Student Registration ................................................................. Friday, January 6 Late Registration .................................................................................................... Friday, January 6 Classes begin ....................................................................................................... Monday, January 9 Drop and Add ..................................................................................... Monday-Friday, January 9-13 Martin Luther King and Presidents Day (No classes) ....................................... Monday, January 16 Last day for students to withdraw from first 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval .............................................................. Friday, February 10

2011
S 2 9 16 23 30 M January T W R 3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31 S 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29 F S M 6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28 February T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S M 6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28 March T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31 July W R F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S M April T W R 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 F S 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

May S M T W R F 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31 September T W R F 1 2 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30

S 7 14 21 28

S

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June W R 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30 T October T W R

F 3 10 17 24

S 4 11 18 25

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S 3 10 17 24

S 2 9 16 23 30

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3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31

S 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

F

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 31 November S M T W R 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

S 7 14 21 28

August M T W R 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

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4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

December T W R F S 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

2011-12 Vincennes University Calendar Continued Midterm Examinations ................................................................. Monday-Friday, Feb. 27-March 2 Midterm Break (No classes) ................................................................... Monday-Friday, March 5-9 Begin Advising and Registration for Fall and Summer ...................................... Monday, March 12 Last day for students to withdraw without appropriate division dean's approval .............................................................................................................. Friday, March 23 Last day for students to withdraw from second 8-week courses without appropriate division dean's approval ................................................................. Thursday, April 5 Good Friday (No classes) ........................................................................................... Friday, April 6 Last day for faculty to withdraw students for non-attendance ................................. Friday, April 20 Commencement (Vincennes Campus) ................................................................. Saturday, April 28 Final Examinations ................................................................................ Tuesday-Saturday, May 1-5 Commencement (American Sign Language – Indianapolis) .................................. Thursday, May 3 Commencement (Aviation Technology Center – Indianapolis) .................................. Friday, May 4 Commencement (Jasper Campus) ........................................................................... Saturday, May 5 Summer Sessions 2012 Intersession ........................................................................ Monday, May 7 through Friday, May 25 Summer I Session ...................................................... Wednesday, May 30 through Tuesday, July 3 Summer II Session................................................. Thursday, July 5 through Wednesday, August 8 8 Week Session ...............................................................Monday, June 4 through Tuesday, July 24 10 Week Session .............................................. Wednesday, May 30 through Wednesday August 8 Summer Session Dates to Remember Memorial Day (No classes) .................................................................................... Monday, May 28 Registration for Summer I and 10-week Session ................................................... Tuesday, May 29 Last day for students to withdraw from Summer I courses without appropriate division dean's approval ........................................................................................ Friday, June 22 Independence Day (No classes)........................................................................... Wednesday, July 4 Registration for Summer II........................................................................................Tuesday, July 3 Last day for students to withdraw from Summer II courses without appropriate division dean's approval ...................................................................................... Monday, July 30 New Student Advising and Registration for Fall Semester Advising for Incoming Freshmen ............................................................................. June 18-July 28

2012
S M 1 2 8 9 15 16 22 23 29 30 January T W R 3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31 May W R 2 3 9 10 16 17 23 24 30 31 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 S M 5 6 12 13 19 20 26 27 February T W R 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 June W R F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 S M 4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26 March T W R F S 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31 April S M T W R 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

S

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6 7 13 14 20 21 27 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

S

M

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3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27

F S 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

July S M T W R F 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 30 31 November T W R F 1 2 6 7 8 9 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30

S 7 14 21 28

S

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5 6 12 13 19 20 26 27

August T W R F 1 2 3 7 8 9 10 14 15 16 17 21 22 23 24 28 29 30 31 December T W R F

S 4 11 18 25

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September T W R F

2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

S 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

S 7 14 21 28

October M T W R 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

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4 5 11 12 18 19 25 26

S 3 10 17 24

S 2 9 16 23 30

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3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31

S 1 5 6 7 8 12 13 14 15 19 20 21 22 26 27 28 29

2011-12 Vincennes University Calendar vii

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

Introduction
A Brief History of Vincennes University One of the first two-year colleges in America, Vincennes University is also Indiana’s oldest college. The heritage of the University began with the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 which stated, "Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and to the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged." In 1801 Jefferson Academy, the direct forerunner of Vincennes University, was founded at Vincennes, Indiana. The Indiana territorial legislature, at its first session in 1806, passed an act to incorporate the first university in the Indiana Territory, "to be called and known by the name and style of Vincennes University." William Henry Harrison, first governor of the Indiana Territory, and later (1841) President of the United States, was the founder of the college and the first chairman of the Board of Trustees of the University. Vincennes University has had a distinguished history, rich with the traditions of many firsts. In the Vincennes University catalog of 1899, the statement appeared that, "Vincennes University is in fact a junior college offering the first two years of the regular college programs." By that statement, Vincennes University claims to be one of the first colleges to develop and recognize the junior college concept in higher education. Today, the University is a model comprehensive two-year "university" offering more than 150 associate degree programs and options, and seven baccalaureate degrees in specialized areas. Vincennes University has a statewide mission and is a fully state-supported college, recognized as being unique in Indiana. In addition to the Vincennes campus, the University has a second campus at Jasper, Indiana and major extension sites at the International Airport in Indianapolis and the Indiana School for the Deaf, also in Indianapolis. Through its dual enrollment program and its unique early college program, the university assists high school students in transitioning into higher education when the student is ready. The university also serves a growing distance education population with more than 30 programs and provides higher education experiences for our military at more than 37 bases. The University's motto as translated from the official seal is, "Learn in Order to Serve." For the past two centuries, for today, and into the future Vincennes University students and graduates strive to make that goal a reality in their lives. Our Vision and Mission Vincennes University Vision Vincennes University is a premier learning institution, widely recognized for leadership in innovation and delivery of successful educational experiences. A breadth of program offerings and a commitment to quality service ensure the University’s role as an important link in Indiana’s economic and cultural vitality. VU is a diverse community whose members all share responsibility for supporting the University mission and are respected for their contributions. Vincennes University Mission Vincennes University, Indiana’s first college, is the State’s premier transfer institution and leader in innovative career programming. The VU community ensures educational access, delivers proven associate and baccalaureate programs, and offers cultural opportunities and community services in a diverse, student-centered, collegiate environment. Our Mission in Practice Vincennes University, Indiana’s first college…Jefferson Academy, the direct forerunner of Vincennes University, was founded at Vincennes, Indiana in 1801. The Indiana territorial legislaIntroduction 1

ture passed an act in 1806 to incorporate the first university in the Indiana Territory, “to be called and known by the name and style of Vincennes University.” William Henry Harrison, first governor of the Indiana Territory and later President of the United States, was the founder of the college and first chairman of the Board of Trustees. is the State’s premier transfer institution…Vincennes University has been recognized for decades as a source of highly qualified, transfer-ready graduates. VU’s transfer programs are designed in coordination with four-year institutions to ensure successful transfer. The university maintains more than 1,000 transfer agreements through close faculty-to-faculty contacts with senior institutions. VU graduates compete successfully with students from four-year institutions in acceptance to limited-admission professional programs. The performance of graduates at fouryear institutions is monitored systematically and points to the quality of VU’s transfer programs. and leader in innovative career programming…Vincennes University provides certificate, associate, and baccalaureate career programs that lead directly to successful employment. However, many programs are both transfer and career in nature, allowing a choice of entering the workplace or continuing toward an associate or baccalaureate degree. Employers recognize Vincennes University’s reputation for quality and innovation as evidenced by high placement rates and positive responses to employer surveys. VU continues to work with employers in program development and revision to ensure that graduates possess the necessary skills to make them valuable contributors to the workforce. The VU community ensures educational access…Vincennes University is the college of choice for many top high school graduates, but the institution also provides developmental education for those whose academic skills are not at the collegiate level. VU provides post-secondary education to students from more than 100 countries and through distance education but is also a preferred choice for many within the nearby geographic area. Educational services are provided on two established campuses and sites worldwide, but new learning sites are also established in rapid response to industry needs. The University strives to control its tuition and fees but also facilitates all forms of public and private financial aid, so that all those with the ability to benefit from a college education may find it at Vincennes University. delivers proven AS and BS programs…Vincennes University embraces responsibility for continuing a rich tradition of academic excellence. VU offers a comprehensive array of certificate, associate and baccalaureate degree programs. The University assures that each program provides the highest level of instruction and preparation for continued study and career achievement. The quality of VU’s programs is proven by the history of effective articulation, graduate success in career placement, and recognition by professional accrediting bodies. The University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. offers cultural opportunities…Vincennes University offers entertainment and cultural programs, such as the Community Series, University musical and theatrical productions, and faculty and guest art exhibits to students and area residents. Community forums, VU athletic activities, and other local interest programs are broadcast by the University’s radio and television stations. Guest lecturers and student activities in a wide range of subject areas are offered to the University and surrounding communities. The Vincennes campus is the location of the state-of-the-art Red Skelton Performing Arts Center. and community services…Vincennes University oversees a variety of programs to benefit the community. Among these are services to senior citizens, those who have not completed high school, potential entrepreneurs, displaced workers, those who need retraining, and other populations seeking education and training services. VU serves as the fiscal agent and administrator for many programs funded through the state and federal governments. in a diverse… Vincennes University values diversity and believes this is an important aspect of the educational experience. Members of the VU community are encouraged to develop and apply
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critical thinking skills to unexamined assumptions and stereotypes. Multicultural campus activities provide a structured opportunity for building alliances among students from diverse backgrounds. The University prepares students to be contributing citizens in a global society. student-centered…Vincennes University is a community fully dedicated to the enhancement of student learning. VU is committed to helping students establish a lifetime of growth in their academic, co-curricular, social, moral and civic endeavors. The University validates the effectiveness of all activities and services through a comprehensive assessment process. Decisions on a student-centered campus are made in the interest of the greater student population. Whether addressing learning, scholarship or community service, the University’s activities are directed toward positively impacting student success. collegiate environment…Vincennes University includes two campuses in southwestern Indiana and two learning sites in Indianapolis. The Vincennes campus provides a 135 acre residential campus with more than 50 buildings; the Jasper campus encompasses 130 acres with an abundance of resources typically found only at a residential campus. Two sites in Indianapolis have been established in response to the demand for interpreters of American Sign Language and trained aviation maintenance technicians. Each VU location provides an attractive setting where learning is paramount, and where student participation is encouraged in activities that build skills for careers, for enrichment, and for lifelong learning. Institutional Functions As an institution of higher education, Vincennes University is committed to provide A comprehensive range of transfer curricula for those who want to complete a baccalaureate degree at another institution by offering the first two years of many baccalaureate programs. A comprehensive range of occupational programs for those who want to begin employment with job entry skills upon the completion of their occupational programs at Vincennes University. Baccalaureate degrees in specialized areas for those who want to complete a baccalaureate program at Vincennes University. General education for all students for the purpose of broadening their understanding of life and their ability to function as citizens in today's society. Developmental education for those who need it in order to succeed in the occupational or transfer programs of their choice. A comprehensive range of student support services aimed at enhancing students' academic, personal and social development. Adult continuing and adult basic education for those who want to prepare for the General Education Development (GED) test or to up-grade their job competencies, improve basic educational skills, and/or gain knowledge of subjects of their own personal interest, or to complete requirements for a certificate or associate degree program of their choice. A comprehensive program of community services and resources for the community by developing specialized opportunities for preparation when occupational needs can be served, by initiating programs of benefit to the community, and by making the resources of the University available for community betterment. Institutional Objectives Vincennes University commits to providing an environment, personnel and facilities that enhance the commitment of VU to Prepare Students to Transfer to Four-Year Colleges and Universities. Vincennes University has a well-established history of success in and a continuing commitment to preparing students in the first two years of many baccalaureate programs. Substantial offerings and programs in a wide variety of instructional areas, advanced placement policies, developmental and refresher courses, and a variety of instructional techniques allow the University to tailor programs
Introduction 3

appropriate to the individual needs of students so that they can reach their academic transfer goals. In all instructional programs, Vincennes University students have practical learning experiences, often including leadership and performing opportunities, normally denied first- and second-year students at baccalaureate educational institutions. Prepare Students for Successful Job Entry Through Occupational Education. Vincennes University has a well-established history of success in and a continuing commitment to excellence in occupational education. The University offers a wide variety of occupational programs that include general education and other support courses. The major purpose of occupational education is to prepare students for successful job entry. Also, a significant number of occupational graduates transfer to continue their education toward an advanced degree. The University supports gender equity in all of its programs. Male and female students who wish to pursue majors in programs non-traditional for their gender have the opportunity and the encouragement to do so at Vincennes University. Allow Students to Complete a Baccalaureate Degree in Specialized Areas. Consistent with its early mission and history, Vincennes University offers a limited number of baccalaureate degrees. The purpose of these degrees is to prepare students for successful job entry or for graduate degree education. Allow Students to Begin Their Postsecondary Education at Their Levels of Readiness. The University works to help students make an effective transition from high school to college. Through academic advising and personal counseling, the University helps students select programs consistent with their goals and courses in which they have reasonable chances to succeed. Opportunities for advanced placement, early completion in courses, as well as courses to overcome educational limitations are available to students. Provide General Education for All Students for the Purpose of Personal Enrichment. The distribution of course requirements in the various divisional areas of study, comprehensive survey courses, functional courses, the broad spectrum of extra-curricular activities, and special cultural convocations and programs offer opportunity for general education to all students. Provide Guidance and Opportunity for Exploration to Those Students Uncertain About Their Educational Goals. The University provides opportunities for students to experience a diversity of academic and occupational alternatives. It offers its students personal assistance in career decisions through academic advising, counseling, interest and aptitude testing, and career information services. Flexible academic regulations allow students to change educational objectives with minimal loss of time and credit. Provide a Campus Environment Conducive to Personal Development. The University, through its campus organizations, campus activities, and on-campus residence halls, provides an environment conducive to personal development. Students may pursue special interests, develop leadership, and find social expression and membership in various organizations and activities. Students may participate in intercollegiate and intramural athletic teams and activities, with equipment and facilities also provided for individual recreation. Numerous opportunities occur for the development and display of students’ talents in the performing, visual, communicative, and literary arts. On-campus residence halls provide an additional dimension for the interaction of students from diverse geographical regions, countries, and cultures. Assist Students in College Transfer and Job Placement. Each year a large percentage of Vincennes University students transfer successfully to more than one hundred baccalaureate colleges and universities. The University's continuous communication and articulation with other postsecondary educational institutions, businesses and industries and the personal guidance by the faculty, staff, and placement personnel assist students in achieving successful transfer and/or job placement. Provide Continuing Education and Educational Outreach Services. Vincennes University has a statewide mission to deliver credit and non-credit educational programs to Indiana residents upon request. In fulfilling this mission the University has established numerous community-based teaching sites including: those developed in cooperation with high schools; the Aviation Technology Center at Indianapolis, Indiana; the Indiana Deaf School; Indiana Corrections Sites; the Jasper campus; and selected National Guard Armories and Army Reserve Centers. To serve Indiana residents who have part-time military obligations and other military personnel, the University has established teaching sites in such locations as diverse as the National Guard Profes4 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

sional Education Center at Camp Robinson, Little Rock, Arkansas; in San Diego to serve not only the Naval Air Base, but also the Amphibious Base at Coronado, and the Naval Hospital at Balboa, and the Naval Air Station in El Centro; two naval bases in Washington, the Amphibious Base at Bremerton and the Submarine Base at Bangor; the Coast Guard Base in Newport, Oregon; and several U.S. Army or multiservice programs at Ft. Benning, Georgia, Ft. McCoy in Wisconsin, and Selfridge, Michigan. The Military Education Program has generated requests for classes from across the United States and its Territories, and University personnel have responded with at least limited offerings. The Vincennes University Jasper Campus offers many community services to the citizens of Dubois County and surrounding counties, particularly the opportunity to complete credit courses leading to the associate degree in transfer and occupational programs as well as a number of specialized baccalaureate degrees. The Jasper Campus, in addition, offers non-credit courses. The Degree Completion Program provides opportunities for students to complete an associate degree via independent study when Vincennes University courses are not otherwise available. Offer a Variety of Educational and Cultural Services to its Communities. The University's radio stations, television station, and campus events are used for the dissemination of educational and cultural opportunities. Entertainment and cultural programs are offered to area residents through the Community Series and the University's musical and theatrical productions and art shows. Provide Diverse Educational, Economic and Training Programs to Designated Clients Throughout the University's Service Area. The University administers major federal and statefunded community-based service programs for a variety of constituencies. Educational Opportunity Programs consist of Education Talent Search, COPE Student Support Services, Upward Bound and Veterans Upward Bound for the first generation college students, students with special economic or educational needs and Vietnam Era Veterans. The Generations Program provides essential social and human services to eligible elderly and disabled clients including CHOICE, Nutrition, Ombudsman and Legal Services, Employment, Nursing Home Pre-admission Screening, Medicaid Waiver Program, and the Retired Senior Volunteer Program. Workforce Development Services delivers employment, training and economic development opportunities to eligible clients, business and industry plus Adult Basic Education, the Business and Industry Assistance Program, IMPACT and Single Parent Displaced Homemaker Services. Provide Opportunity for International and Intercultural Understanding. Students from various countries around the world add an international dimension to the University's campus. Some of the international students need the special services of the English as a Second Language Program. Their presence emphasizes the importance of programs and activities that provide opportunities for person-to-person understanding across national lines, for the inclusion of academic units that promote world understanding, and for the kind of activities that introduce students and the community at large to major international issues. International emphasis programs, including the activities of the host families, are illustrative of the special International students’ projects. The Office of Multicultural Services offers a variety of activities and events to promote understanding and appreciation of the cultural diversity present on our campus, in our communities, and around the world. A number of special activities such as a week honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. are held as well as a number of workshops emphasizing issues of cultural diversity.

Introduction

5

Admission and Financial Aid
Requirements for Admissions ....................................................................................................... 7 Transfer Applicants.................................................................................................................... 8 Provisional Acceptance .............................................................................................................. 9 International Applicants ............................................................................................................. 9 Financial Aid ................................................................................................................................... 9 Purpose....................................................................................................................................... 9 Eligibility ................................................................................................................................... 9 Selection of Recipients ............................................................................................................ 10 Students Responsibilities ......................................................................................................... 10 Refunds .................................................................................................................................... 11 Costs......................................................................................................................................... 11 Method of Application ............................................................................................................. 11 Grants ....................................................................................................................................... 11 Pell Grants ......................................................................................................................... 11 Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) ................................................... 11 Academic Competitiveness Grants.................................................................................... 11 SSACI Grants (Indiana Higher Education Grant) ............................................................. 11 Federal Work Study Program .................................................................................................. 11 Federal Community Service Work Study Program ........................................................... 12 Federal Perkins Loan ............................................................................................................... 12 Federal Stafford Loans............................................................................................................. 12 Federal Nursing Student Loans ................................................................................................ 12 Benefits .................................................................................................................................... 12 GI Bill Benefits ................................................................................................................. 12 Child of Disabled Veteran Grants ..................................................................................... 12 Scholarships ............................................................................................................................. 13 SSACI Scholarships (State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana) ......................... 13 Performing Scholarships and Athletic Grants ................................................................... 13 Non-Performing Scholarships and Grants ......................................................................... 13 Jasper Campus Scholarships ............................................................................................. 16 Satisfactory Academic Progress .............................................................................................. 16 Qualitative and Quantitative Measures ............................................................................. 16 Financial Aid Probation..................................................................................................... 16 Financial Aid Suspension .................................................................................................. 17 Maximum Time Frame ...................................................................................................... 17 Developmental Courses .................................................................................................... 18 Appeals Procedure ................................................................................................................... 18 Withdrawal from Classes ......................................................................................................... 18 Student/Parent Consumer Information .................................................................................... 18 Priority Deadline ...................................................................................................................... 19

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

Requirements for Admission Vincennes University maintains an "Open Door" admissions policy. Students are eligible for admission on the basis of graduation with a high school diploma (a certificate of completion is not sufficient), successful completion of the General Education Development Test (GED), or transfer in good standing from an accredited college. Vincennes University also welcomes students graduating from non-traditional high schools, including home-schooling programs. Students completing these programs must supply the Admissions office with an academic portfolio, a curriculum overview, and a detailed transcript (each course briefly described) indicating date of graduation. Special consideration may be given to those who have not completed one of the above. Vincennes University supports the State of Indiana's Core 40 high school curriculum (see explanation below). It is strongly recommended that students meet the Core 40 requirements, but completion of the Core 40 curriculum is not required for Admissions. Vincennes University reserves the right to deny admission or continuing enrollment to those persons who cannot benefit from the educational services available. Questions should be referred to the Director of Admissions.
CORE 40 -- INDIANA'S HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM Indiana students, who want to be considered for regular admission to Indiana's four-year colleges and be eligible for additional state financial aid, must successfully complete the Indiana Core 40. The same courses are suggested for students planning to seek admission to a two-year public college or entry into the workforce. The following represents Core 40 as adopted by the Indiana Department of Education. 1. Take 28 to 30 credits from this list. In order to graduate from high school in Indiana, you must earn a minimum of 38 credits. The Core 40 goes beyond this state minimum. In addition, your high school may have additional requirements for high school graduation. (One credit equals one semester or onehalf of a school year, except for physical education.) Language Arts - 8 credits in literature, composition, and speech Mathematics - 6-8 credits of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus Science - 6 credits in laboratory science from the following: 2 Biology 2 Chemistry or Physics 2 additional credits from Chemistry, Physics, Earth/Space Science, Advanced Biology, Advanced Chemistry, or Advanced Physics Social Studies - 6 credits distributed as follows: 2 U.S. History 1 U.S. Government 1 Economics 1 World History and/or Geography 1 additional course from above or other approved social studies area Physical Education - 1 credit (two semesters) Health/Safety - 1 credit (two semesters) 2. Choose 8 credits in courses from the list above or the list below. Foreign Languages - Such as Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, Spanish Arts - Take 1 or more years of art, music or drama Computers - Computer applications, computer programming Career Area - At least six credits in a logical sequence from a technical field.

Choose 2 to 4 more credits from any courses at your school.

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7

Admission into selected programs, whether associate or baccalaureate degree, is necessarily limited by facilities and other resources. In the same way admission to the University may, from time-to-time, be capped or deferred when our capacity to serve students has been reached. The following credentials are required for admission: 1. Formal Application for Admission. A non-refundable matriculation fee of $20 must accompany the completed application. 2. Transcript of High School Record. A traditional high school transcript and/or GED scores must be on file in the Admissions Office. A student should request these be forwarded by the high school counselor. High school students who apply for admission will be admitted provisionally pending receipt of a final transcript with a graduation date posted. Students graduating from a non-traditional high school (i.e. home-educated, online, or correspondence) must provide documentation showing a curriculum with academic rigor completed within a traditional high school calendar and a detailed (each course briefly described) transcript documenting a graduation date. Non-traditional high school graduates must also provide an academic portfolio including, but not limited to, samples of course work and assessment methods. 3. ACT-SAT. Vincennes University does not require the ACT or SAT for admission. However, any student applying for an academic scholarship must submit ACT or SAT scores for evaluation. 4. Placement Test Scores. All students who have applied and been accepted for admission to the University must take the Accuplacer Computerized Placement Test (CPT) before they will be able to register for classes. Students may take the test early at the Vincennes University Assessment Center or an approved alternate test site. Arrangements may be made by calling the Assessment Center at 812-888-5404. Students may also wait to take the test when they come for registration (START VU). The English and Reading Departments also use the SAT for initial course placements. 5. Health Science Majors. Entrance into these programs is based upon adequate academic qualifications. All applicants must first be accepted into the University and take the Accuplacer before they will be considered for acceptance to a health science program. These programs of study are Associate Degree Nursing, Funeral Service Education, Health Information Management, Physical Therapist Assistant, Practical Nursing, and Surgical Technology. Acceptance involves an evaluation of candidates in terms of academic grades, test scores, class rank, and in some instances, personal interview. All applicants for these programs are reviewed by an admission committee composed of the Health Sciences and Human Performance Division Dean and appropriate health program director. Applicants must file all required credentials prior to being evaluated. Transfer Applicants Transfer applicants may be admitted with the above credentials or by providing an official transcript (transcripts mailed from another college or university directly to Vincennes University) from each college attended, showing evidence of honorable release for a minimum of 24 transferrable college credit hours. Grades below C- may not be transferred for credit. Students dismissed from another college are normally not eligible for admission until one semester has elapsed. However, applicants with unusual circumstances may warrant special consideration. Transfer applicants will be considered for freshman through junior status in Vincennes University’s Teacher Education baccalaureate programs dependent on application review and academic credentials as outlined on the respective curriculum pages. Transfer applicants for junior status in Vincennes University’s Nursing, Homeland Security, and Technology baccalaureate programs must submit documentation (an official transcript from the degree-granting institution sent directly to the Registrar of Vincennes University) of a completed associate degree in one of the “feeder” programs designated within the curriculum pages of those programs. Both native and transfer applicants who are within six hours of their associate degree completion may conditionally begin their intended baccalaureate program if the remaining courses are not prerequisites for the courses to be taken in that first semester; conditionally admitted students must complete those remaining credit hours by the end of their first semester as juniors. If the courses involved
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are sequential and not prerequisites to courses required in the first two semesters of the program, students will have two semesters to complete the missing hours. Entrance into all baccalaureate programs requires at least a 2.0 G.P.A. in lower division courses. Some programs, like the Teacher Education programs, will require at least a 2.75 G.P.A. for program admission. Provisional Acceptance Provisional admission may be offered to students who do not provide the university with all the necessary documents for official admission. Transfer students who apply with an unofficial college transcript, but have a grade point average of at least a 1.5, will be admitted provisionally pending receipt of a final official transcript. All students who are admitted on a provisional basis will have one semester to produce the requested documentation. Failure to produce the requested documentation will result in the student being unable to register for subsequent semesters. Other provisional admission decisions will be made at the discretion of the Director of Admissions. International Applicants International applicants must submit a certified copy of a high school/secondary school transcript in English, one copy of the official sponsor’s statement, a certified copy of the sponsor’s bank statement, and a clear copy of the student’s passport. A Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score is not required for admission. Students who have completed the English as a Second Language (ESL) requirements or who submitted a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 527 or above (computer-based test of 197 or Internet-based score of 71) must take the College Placement Test before registering for college-level courses. At the current time, the Aviation Technology Center will employ a 500 TOEFL score for unconditional acceptance to the Aviation Maintenance Technology program at the Indianapolis International Airport.

Financial Aid
Purpose To provide students an opportunity for post-secondary education and to promote academic excellence at Vincennes University, the financial aid program is designed to function as a multipurpose financial assistance service for students. One important purpose of the program is to reward outstanding students for past academic accomplishments and those who seem to have outstanding potential. Another purpose is to provide assistance to students who, without such aid, would be unable to attend college. Basic to this philosophy is the belief that the educational opportunities of able students should not be hindered by their financial resources. Vincennes University provides a variety of financial aid for students in the form of grants, loans, part-time employment, and scholarships. Eligibility The eligibility for receiving financial assistance is determined by comparing the cost of attending Vincennes University with the parents' and the student's ability to contribute toward his/her expenses. Financial aid is viewed as being supplemental to all other resources to meet these costs. The goal of the Financial Aid Office is to meet the evaluated need of all eligible students. The evaluated financial need equals the difference between the total estimated cost of attending Vincennes University (including all university charges--room and board, books and supplies, personal expenses, and allowable travel expenses) and the ability of the family to contribute to those educational costs. The factors taken into consideration when evaluating the expected family contribution include parental income and assets, and benefits such as those from Veterans' Administration, rehabilitation awards from outside agencies, and the student's assets and expected savings from summer employment. The basis for determining the family contribution is from the U.S. Department of Education Student Financial Assistance Programs' Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
Admission and Financial Aid 9

Each year that a student wishes to be considered for aid, a FAFSA Form must be filed, listing VU as a school of choice. Approved awards for each year will be based upon proper completion of and timely filing of applications and financial statements, availability of federal and/or university funds, eligibility for the individual programs for which the student is applying, and the applicant's continued enrollment. The amount of assistance may increase or decrease from one year to the next depending upon the educational costs, the financial circumstances of the family, and the level of program funding. Continued eligibility for the various financial aid programs will require the following: (1) continued enrollment; (2) satisfactory academic standing and the progression toward a degree; (3) properly completed and timely filed applications; (4) all university accounts due and payable being current; (5) satisfactory employment if previous student worker; (6) remain eligible by the individual program guidelines; (7) sign an affidavit that all federal financial aid funds received will be used for the applicable payment period for educational expenses; (8) sign necessary documents for the receipt of aid awards; (9) not be in default on a Federal Family Education Loan Program loan; (10) not owe a refund on a Federal Pell Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, or Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant previously received. Selection of Recipients The criteria for selecting applicants for financial aid varies depending upon the program. Federal Pell Grants will be considered first for all undergraduate students applying for federal aid at Vincennes University. Students are automatically considered for all financial aid programs on a priority deadline basis, and the Financial Aid Office uses the FAFSA in selecting applicants for various programs. The office awards respectively from grants, scholarships, college work study and the Federal Family Education Loan Program. Federal Nursing Student Loan recipients are selected based upon evaluated financial need, availability of funds and upon the applicant's enrollment in Associate Degree Nursing at Vincennes University. Students Responsibilities Students receiving financial aid have certain responsibilities under the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal College Work Study Program, Federal Family Education Loan Program (Perkins, Stafford, and Plus Loans), and other aid programs. The applicant must, without exception, report any of the following changes to the Financial Aid Office: (1) withdrawal from school; (2) transfer to another school; (3) dropping below half-time status; (4) name change; (5) address change or parents' address change; (6) joining military service, Peace Corps, or VISTA. If student loans have been received, an exit interview must be arranged with the Financial Aid Office and the Accounts Payable Office before graduating or withdrawing from Vincennes University. Failure on the aid recipient's part to make some satisfactory arrangements for the settlement of a campus account by the due date may result in one of the following official actions: (1) a hold placed on the student's records; (2) refusal of future financial awards. The financial aid applicant is responsible for obtaining, completing, and filing each year the proper financial aid application, statements, forms, etc. on a timely basis. The applicant has the right to seek and receive full information and counsel from the Financial Aid Office in regard to any financial matter. If the family's financial circumstances change due to death, divorce, marriage, disability, or long-term unemployment, the applicant may become eligible for more assistance. The applicant must take the initiative in notifying the office of these changes in writing. Applicants must provide correct information. Knowingly and intentionally misreporting information on financial aid application forms is a criminal offense which could result in indictment under the U. S. Criminal Code. An applicant for financial aid must return all additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information requested by either the Financial Aid Office or the agency to which you submitted your application or financial statement. Applicants are responsible for reading and understanding all forms that they are asked to sign and to keep copies of them. Applicants must accept responsibility for agreements that they sign.
10 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

When accepting a Federal College Work Study award, recipients must perform the work that is agreed upon. Students are also responsible for understanding the school's refund procedures and policies. Refunds A student who completes official withdrawal or is dismissed may receive a refund of registration fees in accordance with the refund policy as found in the "Tuition, Fees and General Expenses" section of this catalog. The Bursar's Office is responsible for refunds. Students withdrawing before the end of the semester who receive financial aid may have a portion of the university refunds returned directly to the applicable program account. In some cases, students who withdraw during the refund period and who receive financial aid funds will be required to return a portion of the award to the appropriate fund since the semester was not completed. Costs Student estimated expense budgets are derived from directly related educational expenses, such as registration fees, room and board, books and supplies, personal and transportation expenses. Budgets are constructed based upon the status of each applicant such as single, married, dependent, independent, etc. Complete student budget data is available from the Financial Aid Office at Vincennes University. Method of Application Completing the FAFSA will allow students to apply for all types of assistance. If the CPS Processing Center receives the FAFSA by March 10, Indiana students will also be applying for aid through the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana. Prior to consideration for aid, Vincennes University requires that a student file an application for admission. The FAFSA is considered to be the official application for financial assistance. Grants Most grants are awarded on the basis of financial need as determined by the U.S. Department of Education and do not require repayment upon completion of a certificate or degree. The maximum award varies with each grant, usually depending on the availability of funds. Federal Pell Grants are awarded by the U.S. Department of Education according to its guidelines. The University processes the award notification, called the Financial Aid Notification, and applies the award to the student's account. Qualified undergraduate students who are enrolled in one or more credit hours are eligible to receive Federal Pell Grants. However, if you are a part-time student, you will receive a reduced amount. If you change universities during the academic year, your Federal Pell Grant may be used at the new school or campus. If you drop any classes, your Federal Pell Grant may be reduced in amount. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are for students who have an expected family contribution (EFC) of zero and need. Federal Academic Competitiveness Grants are for students who complete a rigorous high school program and maintain a high level of achievement in college. SSACI Grants (Indiana Higher Education Grant) awarded by the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana are awarded to Indiana residents who have demonstrated financial need. You must carry at least twelve credit hours. The grant may be used for a total of eight semesters at a college in the state of Indiana. State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana Educational Grant must be renewed by reapplying directly to the Commission through use of the FAFSA. Federal Work Study Program The Federal College Work Study program is a federally funded financial aid program which is designed to award students employment, the earnings from which must be applied toward educational expenses.

Admission and Financial Aid

11

Eligibility for the program is determined by the Financial Aid Office. Placement and employment in the job opportunities are handled by that office also. Total wages that can be earned by the student may not exceed the Work Study award. Students who have been awarded funds through the Federal College Work Study Program should contact the Financial Aid Office, Vincennes Campus, at 812-888-4361 after classes begin to apply for available Work Study employment. Federal Community Service Work Study Program. The community services component of the Federal Work Study Program was authorized by the Higher Education Technical Amendments of 1995 for the community service oriented student. The purpose of the community service work study is to encourage the Federal Work Study recipient to participate in community service activities. If you are a recipient of a Federal Work Study Award, and desire to participate in a community service work study program, please contact the Financial Aid Office, Vincennes Campus, for further details. Federal Perkins Loan This low interest (five percent) loan is made directly to needy students by the college or school that has received federal money for this purpose. If you qualify, you may borrow up to a maximum of $8,000 for the first two years. Federal Stafford Loans An entrance/exit counseling session is required for all first-time loan recipients. Loans awarded by the Financial Aid Office must be repaid at a specified time in the future. What makes these loans attractive to the student are their easy repayment terms. While you are in school, no payments have to be made on Federal Perkins and the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan. Upon leaving school, you generally have a grace period before you have to start repayment. In addition, interest rates are lower than standard bank rates; they range from five percent to eight percent. This loan is available to the student that qualifies based on the level of need as determined by completing the FAFSA. A private lender such as a credit union or bank makes this loan directly to the student. A student can borrow up to $3,500 in federal subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford loans for the first year depending on need. A student can borrow up to an additional $2,000 in a federal unsubsidized Stafford loan depending on need. No interest accrues on the subsidized loan as long as the student is enrolled in at least half-time status. Interest accrues upon disbursement of the unsubsidized loan. The Higher Education Act--Federal Regulation S-428G(b)(1)--requires that Vincennes University, as well as all colleges and universities throughout the nation, not deliver the first installment of a Federal Stafford loan to any student who is entering the first year of a program of undergraduate education at an institution and who has not previously received a Stafford loan until 30 days after the first day of the student's program of study. Federal Nursing Student Loans These loans are available to students admitted to the Bachelor or Associate Degree Nursing Program. The student must demonstrate need. Maximum loans are $2,500 per year with the interest rate of six percent. Repayment will begin six months after you graduate or drop below half-time status. A portion of the loan may be forgiven if you are employed in certain fields of nursing. Benefits Benefits are funds some people are entitled to under special conditions. Like grants, benefits do not have to be repaid. GI Bill Benefits: If you were honorably discharged from the Armed Forces, education benefits may be available upon application to the Veterans' Administration. Child of Disabled Veteran Grants: The Indiana General Assembly legislated this grant program for children of servicemen and other public officers who were disabled or are deceased by a war- or public service-related cause. To be eligible, you must have on file with the Financial Aid Office an approved Remission of Fees form from the Veterans' Administration regarding
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your parent's disability prior to receiving the benefit. Payment of benefits begins with the semester that the Financial Aid Office receives the approved Remission of Fees Form and is not retroactive to prior semesters of attendance. Eligibility lasts for 124 credit hours. Scholarships SSACI Scholarships (State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana) are awarded to Indiana residents who meet certain academic standards. You must carry at least twelve credit hours to be eligible. To become eligible for a scholarship, your high school counselor must make the recommendation during your senior year in high school. Performing Scholarships and Athletic Grants (Vincennes Campus) are awarded (contingent on annual funding levels) in varying amounts to Vincennes campus students with talent in areas such as music, drama, athletics, cheerleading, and other areas. Additional information about the following athletic grants and scholarships is available from the appropriate coach. Baseball Scholarships Basketball Scholarships Bowling Grants Tennis Scholarships Track and Cross Country Grants Volleyball Grants

Additional information about the following performing scholarships and grants is available from the appropriate department chairperson or activity sponsor. Blazerette Scholarships Cheerleader Scholarships Art Scholarships Music Scholarships Theatre Grants

Non-Performing Scholarships and Grants (Vincennes Campus) are awarded in varying amounts both from organizations outside the university community and from various university organizations. Eligibility may be determined by county of residence or by the students' choice of major. Additional information and scholarship applications are available from the Admissions Office. Academic Scholarships Woodrow Allen Scholarship John Alsobrooks Memorial Scholarship Children of Alumni Scholarship American Business Women's Association Scholarships Peggy Archer Memorial Surveying Scholarship Architectural Academics Award M.S. Badollet Memorial Student Loan Fund Charles and Ruth Ballard Scholarship (sponsored by Sigma Phi Epsilon Alumni Association) Isaac K. Beckes Alumni Scholarship Hilda Begeman Memorial Mathematics Scholarship Robert H. & Marjorie K. Begeman Engineering Scholarship Don G. Bell Scholarship Berry Plastics Printing Scholarship Brent C. Bierhaus Memorial Scholarship E. Bierhaus and Son Foundation Scholarship William M. Bierhaus “Doorway” Scholarship Bi-State Authority Scholarship-Aviation Flight Gov. Davis Blues Festival Scholarship Rose Marie Brian Nursing Scholarship Britt Aviation Maintenance FundIndianapolis Campus Britt Tool Inc. Scholarship Broadcasting Department Scholarship Curt Brown Memorial Journalism Scholarship Brunswick Scholarship Elizabeth R. Bryant Scholarship John R. Burt Scholarship John & Eunice Byers Memorial Scholarship Lilbert O. Campbell Memorial Pre-Medicine Scholarship Dick Carmichael Scholarship Carroll-Gordon Scholarship (Doug Carroll Journalism Grant) Congresswoman Julia Carson Scholarship Miss B. Cornelia Carter Scholarship Sherry Carter Memorial Scholarship Caterpillar Dealers Scholarship Dr. Herbert Chattin Memorial Nursing Scholarship C.W. Chu Scholarship
Admission and Financial Aid 13

C.W. Chu Endowment Linda Lou Clodfelder Nursing Scholarship Construction Technology Scholarship Endowment Helen and Melvin Cook Nursing Scholarship Cornelius Scholarship State Representative William Crawford Scholarship Dennis and Linda Cripe Journalism Scholarship Cummins Engine Industrial Drafting Scholarship D.B.A. Products Scholarship in Memory of John Picchetti, Sr. Daviess County IN Alumni Scholarship Fund Alpha Chapter Barbara DeBoer Scholarship Caroll Deem Memorial Scholarship John Deere Partnership Scholarship Earl & Dorothy Diekman Scholarship Gene B. Dinkins Broadcasting Scholarship Daniel and Christine Dittman Scholarship Endowment Ryan Donnoe Memorial Scholarship Duke Energy STEM Scholarship Duke Energy Mining Technology Scholarship Oscar L. Dunn Memorial Scholarship Dunseth Aviation Scholarship Dunseth Special Fund Scholarship Steve “Tank” Ellerman Scholarship Fund Joan Elizabeth Emery Music Scholarship Richard Ertel and Ertel Family Scholarship Ewing Printing Company Scholarship First American Bank Scholarship Thomas Fitzgerald Memorial English Scholarship Fortnightly Club Art Scholarship Dr. C. Phillip Fox Scholarship Alfred R. and Helen M. Friesenhengst Scholarship William G. Galligan Memorial Scholarship Atto Gardner Nursing Scholarship Charles Gardner Memorial Scholarship Patrick Gehl Memorial Scholarship Barbara Loheider Gerhart Scholarship Mary Alice Gerhart Nursing Scholarship Max W. Gerhart Memorial Flight Scholarship George Gettinger Scholarship James S. Gilmore NEWS 25 Scholarship Gold Club Scholarship Alta Jane Gosnell Scholarship Grabbe-Utley Scholarship Steve Graham Scholarship
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Carl and Eulala Gray Music Fund Greene County Golf Outing Scholarship Marva Green Scholarship Endowment Robert E. Green Memorial Scholarship GSH Foundation Nursing and Allied Health Care Scholarship HMC Company Scholarship Gene Haas Foundation Scholarship Donald W. Hamilton Scholarship Carroll and Sunya Hamner Scholarship Hankins Student Assistance Fund Scholarship Phil Harris Scholarship Martha Hart Scholarship (sponsored by Lambda Chi Alpha) Randall Hedden Arts Scholarship Dean J. and E. Hill Academic Scholarship Henry Hinkle Scholarship Joseph Holmes Mining Scholarship Hong Kong Alumni Fund Richard N. Howard Scholarship Joyce Hudgins Memorial Scholarship Marjorie W. Huffman Scholarship Patty Hundson Memorial Music Scholarship Indiana Builders Charitable Foundation Scholarship Indiana Lumber and Builders Supply Association Industrial Drafting Scholarship Instrument Society of America Scholarship Jasper Engines/Transmissions Scholarship Endowment Jasper German-American Bank Scholarship Jasper Old National Bank Scholarship James L. Jernigan Memorial Flight Scholarship Ben Johnson Memorial Scholarship Marie LaVerne Jones Nursing Scholarship KCARC Scholarship Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship Matthew Kirkman Fire Science Scholarship Endowment Knox County Fall Festival Fine Arts Scholarship Andrew W. Kuehn Memorial Scholarship Frank and Julia Ladner Scholarship Richard S. Lawless DDS Memorial Scholarship Med-Health Care Non-Traditional Scholarship Jay Linn Memorial Scholarship Amy Loomis Music Scholarship Richard and Helen Lux Scholarship Endowment John M. Lyons Scholarship William E. Lyons Scholarship

Machine Trades Third Year Option Scholarship Ellis Madding Scholarship Eph and Dorothy Marchino Memorial Scholarship Ernie Marlow Basketball Scholarship Clarence J. and Emma McCormick Scholarship Doug McCormick Memorial Scholarship Laura McCormick Memorial Nursing Scholarship Mac McCormick Scholarship Endowment Lisa McCracken Memorial Scholarship Forrest McGlone Scholarship McKinley Avenue Presbyterian Church Foundation Scholarship Marie Lucier McQuaid Scholarship David G. Meinhart Memorial Journalism Scholarship Miss VU Scholarship Wanda Morehead Trust Scholarship Endowment Phillip Morris Memorial Scholarship Rex Moyer Memorial Scholarship Mozart Amateur Music Scholarship Carolyn Hand Myers Scholarship Ben Nathan Scholarship Alice Thelma Neal Scholarship Endowment Robert J. Nichols MD Scholarship Niehaus Family Scholarship Noble County Scholarship Non-Traditional Student Scholarship Erica Norman Memorial Scholarship Northwest Territory Art Guild Scholarship Patrick Nunn Surveying Scholarship Old National Bank Business Scholarship Jeanette Olsen Memorial Scholarship Rachael E. Osborne Special Education Scholarship Overton and Sons Tool & Die Co. Scholarship Patterson Memorial Scholarship in Memory of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Patterson Herbert & Velma Pepmeier Memorial Scholarship Gregory L. Pittman Law Enforcement Scholarship Polk-Decker Memorial Scholarship Robert and Elaine Pott Foundation Engineering Scholarship Endowment .918 Printing Technology Scholarship Printing Industry of Indiana Association Scholarship Psi Iota Xi American Sign Language Dr. Razi Memorial Scholarship Meredith Reed Scholarships

Regions Bank Associates Children Scholarship Endowment Reitmeyer Aviation Scholarship George S. Ridgway Architectural Scholarship George S. Ridgway Architectural Endowment George S. Ridgway Surveying Scholarship George S. Ridgway Surveying Endowment David J. Rosenburg Memorial Scholarship Lester W. Routt Memorial Scholarship in Chemistry Samonial National Anthem Scholarship Noble P. Sartor Educational Fund in Banking Science and Math Scholarship Shircliff Memorial Business Scholarship in Memory of Charles Shircliff Elson G. Sims Memorial Scholarship Marjorie Sims Memorial Scholarship in Respiratory Therapy Sisters of Saint Benedict Scholarship James Skinner Aviation Scholarship C. B. Smith Hotel/Restaurant Management Scholarship David Sommers Memorial Scholarship Southgate Community Scholarship South Knox High School Schloarship Dorothy J. Spence Memorial Scholarship State Police Career Camp Grants STEP Program Scholarship Support Staff Scholarship Friends of Surveying Technology Edna Tague Scholarship Endowment George R. Tolson Memorial Scholarship Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Ind. Industrial Maintenance Scholarship Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Ind. Leadership Scholarship Tri-Aerospace LLC Scholarship Tammy Tribe Memorial Scholarship Penny Hill Trimble Memorial Scholarship Edward O. Trull Memorial Journalism Scholarship Linda Tucker Vocal Music Scholarship Helen VanWey Scholarship Vectren Foundation Scholarship Vincennes University Campus Ministries Vincennes University Foundation Scholarship Vincennes University Student Union Board Scholarships Wabash Food Service Scholarship Dyal and Violet Wadsworth Scholarship Janet L. Waggoner and Richard L. Yowell Scholarship
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Fred Walker Jr. Journalism Scholarship (Washington, Indiana, Monday Afternoon Club) Dorothy M. Walters Education Scholarship Harry S. Warner Scholarship Watts Flight Scholarship in Memory of Harry T. Watts Phyllis Webster Nursing Scholarship Dr. Norbert Welch Memorial Scholarship Governor Matthew E. Welsh Memorial Scholarship Whitehouse Automotive Technology Scholarship Dale and Dorothy J. Wilkes Memorial Scholarship

Jean Marie Wilkes Memorial Nursing Scholarship Brian D. Williams Memorial Biomedical Scholarship Helen and Hugh Williams History/Political Science Scholarship Katie Winslow Memorial Scholarship Gordon, Arthur, and Iva Wiseman Scholarship WTHI Broadcasting Scholarship WTWO Broadcasting Scholarship Edwin York Scholarship George S. Youst Memorial Scholarship Kathryn Louise Zimmerman Memorial Scholarship

Jasper Campus Scholarships: The following scholarships are available exclusively at the VU Jasper Campus: Scott Bleemel Memorial Law Enforcement Scholarship Raphael Blessinger Lion’s Club Scholarships Julius C. Buettner Memorial Scholarship Sr. Mary Walter Goebel Memorial Scholarship Mauri Gutgsell Memorial Scholarship Arnold F. Habig Scholarship Mabel L. Kuebler Memorial Scholarship Rumbach Journalism Scholarship Henrietta (Sis) Ruxer Nursing Scholarship Hilda Ruxer Memorial Nursing Scholarship Robert and Vivian Seng Memorial Scholarship Sisters of St. Benedict of Ferdinand Scholarship Cheryl Harder Stiles Memorial Scholarship VUJC Academic Scholarships VUJC Alumni Scholarship VUJC Foundation Scholarships WBDC Dubois County Scholarship

Satisfactory Academic Progress Vincennes University is required under Title IV of the Higher Education Act to define and administer standards of satisfactory academic progress for students receiving federal financial aid. Recipients must maintain sufficient progress to assure successful completion of their educational objectives as measured by qualitative and quantitative standards. Qualitative and Quantitative Measures. Non-developmental courses assigned a letter grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, WF, WN, or F contribute to the grade point average (GPA) that determines the qualitative measure. All courses assigned a letter grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, F, I, DE, RD, P, CR, W, WF, or WN count in the quantitative measure, as do transfer credits accepted toward degree programs and any repeated courses. Attempted credit hours are those hours in which students are enrolled at the end of the first week of each semester (add/drop week). Quality hours are credit hours associated with non-developmental courses. After attempting 12 credit hours, students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 1.8 and complete at least 60% of their cumulative attempted credit hours with passing grades. After earning 30 quality hours, students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 1.9 and complete at least 60% of their cumulative attempted credit hours with passing grades. After earning 45 quality hours, students must earn a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 and complete at least 60% of their cumulative attempted credit hours with passing grades. Students who do not meet these conditions will be placed on financial aid probation. Financial Aid Probation. While students are on financial aid probation, they must finish with a semester GPA of at least 2.0, and if probation is due to a low completion rate, they must complete 100% of all courses attempted. If they do not achieve this standard at the completion of their next semester of enrollment, they will be placed on financial aid suspension.

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Students who receive any grades of W, WN, WF, I, or RD do not finish 100% of courses attempted. Courses attempted are those courses in which students are enrolled after the first week of classes (add/drop week). Students will receive a letter clearly stating these requirements, and they must sign and submit an acknowledgement that they understand their status and what they must do to avoid suspension of their financial aid. While they are on probation, they will receive the financial aid for which they are eligible. Thus, there is no appeal of probationary status. Students will be removed from probation after they achieve at least the 60% completion rate and at least the minimum GPA relevant to the number of hours they have earned. Financial Aid Suspension. Students who, while on financial aid probation, do not finish with a semester GPA of at least 2.0 or do not complete 100% of all courses attempted if probation is due to completion rate will have their financial aid suspended. Since this means they will not receive the financial aid for which they would otherwise be eligible, they may appeal their suspension. If their appeal is granted, they will receive the financial aid for which they are eligible, but they will remain on financial aid probation. If a grade of I or RD during a semester of probation is the only reason students have been placed on financial aid suspension, after they submit proof that they have completed the course with a grade other than F, W, WN, or WF, their financial aid will be reinstated as long as the changed grade enables them to meet the minimum semester GPA of 2.0. To appeal financial aid suspension, students must be able to cite and document significant extenuating circumstances that prevented them from meeting the minimum semester requirements. Significant extenuating circumstances include but are not limited to extended illness, a death in the family, or some other serious personal or familial situation. Examples of acceptable documentation include death certificates, diagnostic statements from physicians, and written statements from a non-relative third party familiar with the situation. Appeals will not be granted unless significant extenuating circumstances can be documented. Maximum Time Frame. U.S. Department of Education rules allow colleges and universities to provide federal financial aid for a maximum of up to 150% of the credits needed to complete an academic program. For example, students working toward a degree that requires 64 credits, may receive federal financial aid for attempting up to 96 credits (64+32), and students working toward a certificate of completion that requires 30 credits may receive federal financial aid for attempting up to 45 credits (30+15). Once students have surpassed these limits at the completion of a semester or summer term, they will be on financial aid suspension and will no longer be allowed to receive federal financial aid. Notice that we must count credits attempted and not just credits successfully earned. We must count the credits for courses in which students receive a grade of F, W, WF, WN, DE, RD, or I. We must also count the credits for all courses attempted at Vincennes University whether the courses meet degree requirements or not. There are some exceptions that might make it possible for Vincennes University to provide federal financial aid for additional credits.  The university may exclude up to 30 credits of developmental courses attempted.  The university may exclude transfer credits that do not meet any requirements for the degree or certificate toward which a student is working at Vincennes University.  For students who have already earned one degree or certificate from Vincennes University and are working on a second degree or certificate, credits that are unique to the first degree or certificate earned may be excluded. Purely elective courses are not unique to the first degree or certificate earned and will be counted toward the 150% maximum.  Credits attempted or earned longer than five years ago from the time of appeal that do not count toward the current degree or program may be excluded. Since significant extenuating circumstances may contribute to a student’s failure to complete a degree or certificate program within the 150% maximum time frame, we will accept appeals of suspension of federal financial aid. To appeal financial aid suspension, students must be able to cite and document significant extenuating circumstances that prevented them from meeting the maximum time frame requirements. Significant extenuating circumstances include but are not limited to extended illness, a death in the family, or some other serious personal or familial situation. Examples of acceptable documentation include death certificates, birth certificates, diagnosAdmission and Financial Aid 17

tic statements from physicians, and written statements from a non-relative third party familiar with the situation. Appeals will not be granted unless significant extenuating circumstances can be documented. Developmental Courses. Students may receive financial aid for up to 30 credits of developmental courses. The first 30 credit hours are excluded in determining the maximum time frame. Developmental courses are counted toward the first 12 attempted credit hours that require at least the 60% completion rate with passing grades as described above under “Qualitative and Quantitative Measures.” All remedial course credits after the 30 credit hours will be included in the quantitative measure and the maximum time frame. Appeals Procedure Upon receipt of the suspension notice of future financial aid at Vincennes University, the student has the right of appeal. The formal appeal process is initiated by the student submitting a written letter of appeal to the Financial Aid Office. Letters written by a parent, relative or guardian may not be accepted as the appeal letter, but will be considered along with the formal letter of appeal submitted by the student. The letter of appeal received by the Financial Aid Office will be heard by the Appeals Committee. After the formal appeal review, the student will be notified of the Committee's decision. If the Committee rules in the student's favor, then the student must fulfill all of the Committee's specifications in accordance with the approval. If the student fails to comply, financial aid will be suspended for the next semester of attendance, and the deficiencies must be reconciled before aid eligibility will be reinstated. The decision of the Appeals Committee is final. The Vincennes University Satisfactory Academic Progress policy is enacted and enforced according to the guidelines set forth by the U.S. Department of Education. The Financial Aid Office functions in strict accordance with these guidelines. Please note: The Satisfactory Academic Progress policy is subject to change at any time. For information on the current policy, please contact the Financial Aid Office, Vincennes University, 1002 North First Street, Vincennes, IN 47591. Toll Free Number: 1-800-742-9198 Withdrawal from Classes Since your acceptance of the financial aid package indicates your agreement to meet the minimum credit hour requirements for your awards, withdrawing from one or more classes may jeopardize your aid. In other words, if you drop below the minimum number of hours or you drop out completely, you may be required to repay the University some or all of the aid you received. For example, if you received a Federal Pell Grant based on full-time enrollment and you drop to eleven hours or to five hours, you may have to refund some of the grant to the University or the Department of Education. Also, remember that you must make academic progress to maintain your eligibility for future aid. Before withdrawing from or dropping classes, it would be wise to check with the Financial Aid Office. Student/Parent Consumer Information All enrolled and prospective students will be provided the following information in accordance with Federal Requirements:  Rights under Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA);  FFEL/Direct Loan deferments for Peace Corps or volunteer service;  Vincennes University available financial aid assistance;  Vincennes University institutional information;  Completion/graduation rate and transfer-out rate;  Campus Security Report;  Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data; and  Policy on Return of Title IV funds.

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Priority Deadline To qualify for State of Indiana grants and scholarships, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be received by the CPS Processing Center by March 10. For more information contact the Financial Aid Office, Vincennes University, 1002 North First, Vincennes, IN 47591. Toll Free Number: 1-800-742-9198.

Admission and Financial Aid

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Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses
Tuition and Fees Listing .............................................................................................................. 20 Residency Status Regulations for Assessment of Tuition ......................................................... 22 Institutional Refund Policy .......................................................................................................... 25 Credit Adjustments for Withdrawal ......................................................................................... 25 Return of Title IV Funds .......................................................................................................... 25 Payment of Residence Hall Charges ........................................................................................... 27

IMPORTANT NOTE The following charges are made for tuition and fees each semester. The following fees are given as a guideline and are subject to change for the 2010-2011 academic year upon action of the Board of Trustees: Supplementary Support and Academic Facilities Fees Residents of Indiana, cost per credit hour ............................................ Levels 009-299 $ 138.66 Levels 300-499 $ 160.15 Tuition and Academic Facilities Fees Residents of Crawford, Richland, Lawrence, and Wabash Counties of Illinois, cost per credit hour ............................................................ Levels 009-299 $ 216.88 Levels 300-499 $ 251.14 Non-residents of Indiana and Residents in all counties in Illinois except Crawford, Richland, Lawrence, and Wabash Counties, cost per credit hour ............................................................... Levels 009-299 $ 336.78 Levels 300-499 $ 390.52 Technology Fee, cost per credit hour ....................................................................................... 2.76 Capital Improvement Fee, cost per credit hour...................................................................... 3.43 Residence Hall Room and Board (per semester)1 Harrison, Vigo, Morris, and Godare Halls 10 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,549.00 14 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,603.00 19 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,658.00 19 meals per week for one Summer Session (5 weeks) ................................................... 1,220.00 19 meals per week for both Summer Sessions (10 weeks)............................................... 2,440.00 Intersession (3 weeks – no meals) ...................................................................................... 513.00 Vanderburgh Hall 10 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,746.00 14 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,800.00 19 meals per week ............................................................................................................ 3,855.00

1 In addition, there is a Flexible Meal Plan Program available to all V.U. students. Students should refer to the Student Handbook for an explanation of this program.

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Clark Hall 10 meals per week (2 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 3,943.00 10 meals per week (4 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 4,562.00 10 meals per week (private room with bath) ................................................................... 4,759.00 14 meals per week (2 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 3,997.00 14 meals per week (4 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 4,616.00 14 meals per week (private room with bath) ................................................................... 4,813.00 19 meals per week (2 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 4,052.00 19 meals per week (4 bedroom, 4 student, 2 private bath) .............................................. 4,671.00 19 meals per week (private room with bath) ................................................................... 4,868.00 Residence Hall Deposit Fee (Refundable damage deposit) ................................................... 150.00 Private Room in Residence Hall (per semester) ................................................................... 865.00 Residence Hall Contract Cancellation Fee .......................................................................... 750.00 Malpractice Insurance Fee (For Health Occupations Majors) ............................................... 15.00 Matriculation Fee (not refundable) ......................................................................................... 20.00 Flight Fees ............................................................................................................. 50.00 to 8,637.50 Applied Music Fees (Piano, organ, instrumental, and voice) .................................... 175.00-325.00 All other special course fees ................................................................................... 5.00 to 1,171.00 Student Activity Fee (charged all students taking more than four hours) ............................. 100.00 Off-Campus Meal Tickets (purchased at Tecumseh Dining Center) 40 meals per semester plus $200 Flex Dollars .................................................................... 400.00 80 meals per semester plus $150 Flex Dollars .................................................................... 550.00 80 meals per semester plus $50 Flex Dollars ...................................................................... 850.00 Students may use VISA, Master Card, or Discover Card to pay for all fees billed by the Bursar's Office and for bookstore purchases. Students may also pay on-line through the MyVU account or Blazeronecard.com. The Bursar's Office is open for business from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Billing Addresses. All billing statements are mailed to the permanent address on file for students. If bills are to be mailed to a different address other than the permanent address, students with sufficient cause may make this request at the Bursar's Office. Students are responsible for informing the Registrar's Office of permanent address changes. Bills will not be mailed to the residence halls. Check Cashing Policy. Students are allowed to write personal checks at the bookstore for cash (up to a $100 daily limit). There is a $ .20 charge and a valid student ID is required. Twoparty checks between students are strictly prohibited from being cashed. Checks written from parents or other relatives to a student must adhere to the $100 daily limit and the student will be asked to substantiate that it is from a relative (i.e., same surname and/or permanent address as student).

Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses

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Returned Checks. All checks returned to the University will be assessed a handling charge of $25 per check. The handling charge may be waived if the Bursar's Office receives written notice from the financial institution returning the check that they did so in error or the student remits payment in cash, cashier check, or money order prior to the check being returned. NSF checks are automatically redeposited a second time. A student will temporarily lose their check cashing privileges if the University is holding an unpaid returned check. A student will permanently lose their check cashing privileges if the University has three or more checks returned on the student's account. Payment for an unpaid returned check must be in the form of cash, cashier's check or money order. Financial Encumbrance. Students who have a financial obligation to the University at the end of a semester will not receive their official transcripts until the obligation has been paid in full. Students who have past-due accounts at time of advance registration for future terms may not be eligible to register until their account is current or paid in full whichever applies for that time period. Students registering at mid-term for eight-week classes beginning after midterm will be required to pay for the added hours at the time of registration. Special Course Fees. Additional fees for specific classes are assessed to cover cost for equipment or individualized instruction. The cost for each class that has a special course fee is noted in the class schedule for the term. Students enrolled for classes that have lab fees and subsubsequently withdraw from school or drop the specific classes do not have their account adjusted according to the refund policy. Accounts are adjusted when the Bursar's Office receives written notification of adjustment from the specific department or division responsible. Flight time is pro-rated accordingly. Off-Campus Meal Tickets. During the Fall and Spring semesters student may purchase a meal ticket at Tecumseh Dining Center. The meal ticket is good for 28 days from date of purchase. During the Summer Sessions, meal ticket purchases are for an entire five-week session and only the 19-meal plan is offered. Cost will be pro-rated if term will end prior to normal length of meal ticket plan. Parking Permits and Fines. Students parking on campus must have their vehicles registered with the Vincennes University Campus Police Department. Refer to the Vincennes University Handbook for cost of stickers, fines and parking regulations. Purchase of Books and Supplies. Books and supplies are to be paid for at the time of purchase at the bookstore or charged against a student's credit balance. RESIDENCY STATUS REGULATIONS for Assessment of Tuition General. Vincennes University is a public institution supported by funding from state of Indiana tax revenue. As a state tax-supported institution, the University extends preference in tuition charges to residents of the state of Indiana whose circumstances conform to the University's definition of resident status stated below. Principal elements which determine residency are domicile in Indiana and actions which indicate the intent to make Indiana the permanent residence. A person has but one domicile at any time. Mere physical presence in Indiana, regardless of how prolonged, is insufficient to establish residency without action and intention to make the place a permanent residence and principal home. To establish residency in Indiana under this policy, a person should demonstrate presence and intent to reside permanently in Indiana for reasons other than education objectives. The burden of establishing that a person is domiciled in Indiana for other than educational purposes is upon the person. The regulations, factors, and procedures outlined in this policy will be considered by the University in determining residency status. Residency Status Regulations are subject to change at the discretion of the Vincennes University Board of Trustees. A person holding nonresident status is subject to rules in effect when the petition seeking Indiana residency is filed. Nothing in these rules shall be retroactive to reverse in-state residency status previously granted under former regulations. Vincennes University's definition of the term "resident" may be different from other, nonUniversity agencies. Accordingly, a person who is an Indiana resident for tax or voting purposes, for example, is not necessarily a resident for tuition purposes.
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Regulations. The following regulations are used to determine the resident status for tuition assessment purposes. 1. A person's domicile is presumed to be that of the parent(s) or legal guardian unless the person is independent and establishes a separate domicile. For the purposes of these Regulations, legal guardian and parent are interchangeable. 2. A person who is dependent upon his/her parent(s) or other person in authority, other than spouse, for financial support shall not be considered independent for the purpose of these regulations. A person claiming independence may be requested to present satisfactory evidence that his/her parent(s) has not contributed significantly to his/her support nor claimed him/her as a dependent on federal or state income taxes during the period in which the person attempts to establish and/or maintain residency. Filing and payment of Indiana income tax is necessary to establish residency. 3. In order to be classified as a resident for tuition purposes, an independent person shall be domiciled in Indiana and a bona fide resident for at least six months immediately preceding the first scheduled day of classes for the term for which residency is sought. 4. During the six-month period in which a person attempts to establish residency, a person must be financially independent. He/she must rely upon gainful employment in Indiana or prove reliance upon resources in Indiana for more than fifty percent of the income sufficient to provide for tuition, fees, and normal living expenses, e.g., food, clothing, housing, and transportation. Income earned as a result of University enrollment, such as educational loans or student employment, is not considered evidence of intent to establish residency. 5. A person who is not a citizen of the United States of America may establish resident status unless the person holds a visa which precludes an intent to permanently reside in the United States. Further information about visa classifications may be obtained from the International Student Advisor Office. 6. Non-citizens may commence establishment of residency with notification of permanent residency status by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service provided the person meets and complies with all the applicable requirements of these Regulations. 7. The minor child of persons who, having resided in Indiana for at least six months immediately prior to such a transfer, are transferred by their employers to some location outside Indiana shall be considered an Indiana resident for purposes of tuition assessment. However, this Section shall apply only when the minor child of such parents enrolls in Vincennes University within one year from the time the parents are transferred to some location outside Indiana. If a resident parent(s) establishes a domicile outside Indiana after a dependent is admitted, the dependent shall continue to be classified as a resident until degree completion, assuming timely matriculation, continuous enrollment, and maintenance of a separate residence in Indiana. 8. A person who claims Indiana domicile while living in another state or country must provide proof of continued Indiana domicile. Proof may include, but is not limited to, evidence that the person (or parent or legal guardian) has not acquired a domicile in another state, has maintained a continuous voting record in Indiana, and has filed and paid regular Indiana resident state income tax returns during the absence. 9. A person whose parent(s) moves to Indiana may become a resident at the beginning of the next term of enrollment following the move. 10. An independent person whose parent(s) has established and is maintaining a bona fide residence in Indiana will be regarded as a resident if the independent person lives in Indiana. In the case of divorce or separated parents, if either parent is a bona fide resident of Indiana then the person shall be classified a resident. 11. A nonresident shall be classified as a resident if his/her spouse is a resident of Indiana and meets the applicable requirements of these regulations. A non-citizen may establish residency through his/her resident spouse, provided the non-citizen complies with Section 4 of these Regulations. 12. A person who is actively serving in the Armed Forces of the United States and who is stationed and/or present in the state in connection with that service, may be eligible for a waiver of the nonresident portion of tuition as long as the person remains stationed and/or present in
Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses 23

Indiana. The waiver is extended to the person's spouse and dependent children who also live in the state. A resident of Indiana, and the spouse and dependent children, who is stationed outside of Indiana in active service in the Armed Forces of the United States and who has maintained residency under Section 7 shall be classified as a resident. Factors in Determining Residency. Bona fide residency must be maintained in Indiana for at least six months immediately preceding the first scheduled day of classes for the term for which resident classification is sought. The following circumstances, although not necessarily conclusive, have value in support of a claim for resident classification for tuition purposes. 1. Continuous physical presence--defined as no more than a three-week absence from the state of Indiana--for at least six months as described above. 2. Domicile in Indiana of parent(s), legal guardian, or spouse. 3. Voting or registration for voting in Indiana. 4. Indiana driver's license and automobile registration. 5. Financial independence and payment and filing of Indiana income tax during the tax year or partial tax year immediately preceding the term for which the person is requesting resident classification. Just the filing of Indiana State income taxes, filing without substantial Indiana income earned, will not be judged as a significant criterion for reclassification. 6. Six months of gainful employment in Indiana and prove reliance upon resources in Indiana for more than fifty percent of the income sufficient to provide for tuition, fees, and normal living expenses, e.g., food, clothing, housing, and transportation. Reliance upon income earned from loans and/or grants is not viewed as evidence of intent to establish residency. Employment must be in other than normal part-time student employment. 7. The lease of living quarters and payment of utility bills for six months immediately preceding the term for which the person is seeking residency. 8. Admission to a licensed profession in Indiana and the date of admission. 9. Domicile for six months in the state for other than educational purposes. 10. The State of residence claimed by the personal federal income taxes, and other documents requiring information as the person's State of residence. 11. Public records, such as birth, marriage records, etc. 12. Establishment of financial accounts at Indiana institutions. 13. Other official documents verifying legal, official connection with Indiana or with organizations of institutions within the state of Indiana. 14. Exclusive use of the Indiana address when home or mailing address is requested. Administration. The Director of Admissions, or a designee, shall determine the initial residence classification of each person at the time the person enters or re-enters the University. A person who is not satisfied with a determination concerning his/her residence classification may request the Director of Admission reconsider the determination. The request should include the petition for change of residency status for tuition purposes at Vincennes University (available from the Office of Admissions) and all other materials which are applicable to the claim. The request and accompanying documentation will not be returned, and the person is advised to maintain a copy for his/her record. If the person is still not satisfied with the determination after it has been reconsidered, the person may make a final appeal to the Residency Appeals Board which consists of the Dean of Students (who chairs the Board), and two other college officials, one of whom is appointed by the Assistant Provost for Student Affairs and another appointed by the Senior Director of External Relations. An appeal to the Residency Appeal Board must be in writing and turned in to the Dean of Students office along with the documentation supporting the person's claim. The decision of the Residency Appeals Board shall be final. A person who fails to notify the University of a change of facts or provides false information which might affect classification or reclassification from resident to nonresident status and/or who provides false information or conceals information for the purpose of achieving resident status may be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, as well as other penalties which may be prescribed by law.

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY
Credit Adjustments for Withdrawal

Official Withdrawal from Enrollment. Students who participate in advance or late registration must notify the Dean of Students if they elect not to attend any classes prior to or during the term for which the student registered. Students who officially withdraw during the first week of regular day classes during a semester will receive a 100 percent credit adjustment of tuition and student activity fees; during the second week, a 75 percent credit adjustment; during the third week, a 50 percent credit adjustment; and during the fourth week, a 25 percent credit adjustment. During the fifth week or after, no credit adjustment will be given. Please note: A credit adjustment is based on the charges and not on the amount paid toward the student account if a person elects the payment plan. For example, a student's charge is $900 for the semester that elects the payment plan, making their first payment $330 (one-third of $900 equals $300 plus the $30 payment plan fee). The student withdraws during the third week which is the 50 percent adjustment period. The credit adjustment of $450 would leave a balance owed of $150 (50 percent of $900 equals $450 minus the $300 tuition payment equals the $150 balance still owed). The payment plan is a convenience to the student to spread payments throughout the semester; it does not release the student's obligation to pay charges that have been incurred, in accordance with the University's stated refund policy, because they withdraw from school during the semester. The refund policy adjusts the charges and is not relevant to the amount of the partial payment the student pays when electing the payment plan. Dropping of Courses (for Fall and Spring semesters). Students who drop one or more courses during the first week of regular day classes will receive a 100 percent credit adjustment of tuition and student activity fee; during the second week, a 75 percent credit; adjustment during the third week, a 50 percent credit adjustment; during the fourth week, a 25 percent credit adjustment; during the fifth week or after, no credit adjustment. The University refund policy will be pro-rated for those classes which meet less than normally prescribed for a regular enrollment period. Dropping of Courses (for Summer Sessions - five weeks each). Students dropping courses or withdrawing from school the second day of regular classes will receive a 100 percent credit adjustment; the third or fourth day, a 75 percent credit adjustment; fifth or sixth day, a 50 percent credit adjustment; seventh or eighth day, a 25 percent credit adjustment; and no credit adjustment after the eighth day a class meets. Refunds. Initial refunds for full-time students will be processed using Blazeronecard.com. Students must activate their BlazerOne card to direct the refund preference. All refunds are processed through BlazerOne. Students are encouraged to view their account information on MyVU to determine when their refund will be available. Refunds are identified by the description of “BlazerOne card refund” with a corresponding effective date. Degree Completion Program Refund Policy. Students who withdraw from degree Completion Program courses during the first 30 days after official enrollment are eligible to receive a 100 percent credit adjustment of tuition if no lessons have been completed during that period. If the student has completed less than 50 percent of the lessons, an administrative fee of 10 percent of the tuition for the course plus any amount(s) paid to faculty for evaluation of lessons may be charged. Refunds may not be made if enrollment exceeds 30 days and/or more than 50 percent of the lessons have been completed. Return of Title IV Funds Under Re-authorization of 1998, rules were revised to govern the return of Title IV funds (Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Stafford Loans, Federal Plus Loans and Federal Work Study) disbursed to a student who completely withdraws from a term. The new rules only impact federal aid received by a student. Vincennes University institutional refund policy will continue to remain in effect and will not be dictated by federal law or regulation.
Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses 25

Earned and Unearned Aid. The new rule assumes that a student earns his or her aid based on the period of time he or she remained enrolled. Unearned Title IV funds, other than Federal Work Study, will be returned to the Department of Education. Unearned aid is considered the amount of disbursed Title IV aid that exceeds the amount of Title IV aid earned under the new formula. To determine how much aid was disbursed, a snapshot of the student account will be evaluated as soon as the institution becomes aware that a student withdrew. If earned aid exceeds disbursed, additional funds may be disbursed as a late disbursement to an eligible student. Institutional costs no longer play a role in determining the amount of Title IV funds to which a withdrawn student is entitled. During the first 60 percent of the period of enrollment a student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of time he or she remains enrolled. That is, the percentage of time during the period that the student remained enrolled is the percentage of disburseable aid for that period that the student earned. Aid is disburseable if the student could have received it at the point of withdrawal. Total disburseable aid includes aid that was disbursed and aid that could have been (but was not) disbursed as of the student's withdrawal date. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60 percent point will earn all aid for the enrollment period. Determining the Percentage of Earned Aid. In order to determine the percentage of aid that a student has earned, a student will take the number of days enrolled at the University and divide it by the number of calendar days in the period. A period at Vincennes University will be defined as a semester. It should be noted that any break in a semester that has a minimum of five calendar days will be excluded from the numerator and denominator in calculating the percentage of earned aid. Repayment of Unearned Aid. The responsibility for repaying unearned aid will be shared by Vincennes University and the student in proportion to the aid each is assumed to possess. The share for Vincennes University will be the lesser of the total amount of unearned aid or institutional charges multiplied by the percentage of aid that was unearned. The student's share will be the difference between the total unearned amount and the institution's share. Vincennes University’s share will be reallocated among the Title IV programs, in an order specified by statute, before the student's share. After the student's share is fully allocated among the Title IV programs, any remaining amount owed to a grant will be reduced by half. Timeframe for Returning Funds. Vincennes University will return its share of unearned Title IV funds no later than 45 days after determining that a student withdrew. Students receiving unearned aid attributable to a loan will return their share under the terms and conditions of the promissory note. Students will be responsible to repay unearned aid attributable to a grant under a satisfactory payment arrangement with the Department of Education. Determination of Student Withdrawal from Vincennes University. Vincennes University will determine the withdrawal date by using the date the student began the institution's withdrawal process or officially notified the institution of intent to withdraw or the midpoint of the period for a student who leaves without notifying the institution (unofficial withdrawal). Official Student Withdrawal Policy. Students registered for classes at any Vincennes University site that wish to withdraw from all classes must contact the following offices at their specific campus site to declare their intent to officially withdraw. Vincennes Campus Jasper Campus Aviation Technology Center ASL Center Dean of Students Student Services Director Student Service Advisor Secretary

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PAYMENT OF RESIDENCE HALL CHARGES Residence hall charges are billed with tuition and fees. Bills are printed and mailed approximately two weeks before the due date. For those electing the payment plan, the following payment schedule applies. Fall Semester ....................... 1/3 of total charges due August 2, 2010 1/3 due September 1, 2010 Final Payment due October 1, 2010 Spring Semester................... 1/3 of total charges due January 3, 2011 1/3 due February 1, 2011 Final payment due March 1, 2011 Summer Session .................. 100 percent of cost due upon moving into residence hall Students are not charged for living in the residence halls on a monthly basis. The above payment schedule is designed to spread the cost throughout each semester. Payments may be made for the entire semester charge any time prior to the due dates. All financial aid, including students loans, will be applied to the entire semester charge for housing regardless of the due date before any excess of aid is refunded. For students who move out of the residence halls during the semester or summer sessions, the account is adjusted to reflect the number of days the student actually resided in the dorm. Net charge is pro-rated on a daily basis and is based on the move-out day recorded by the Housing Office.

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Student Life
Student Records Policies and Procedures .................................................................................. 29 Annual Notifications of Rights Under FERPA ........................................................................ 29 Directory Information .............................................................................................................. 29 Student Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 30 Accident Policy ........................................................................................................................ 30 Automobile Policy ................................................................................................................... 30 Racial, Ethnic, and Religious Harassment Policy .................................................................... 30 Sexual Harassment Policy and Grievance Procedures ............................................................. 30 Policy on Public Speaking, Leaflet Distribution, and Demonstration ..................................... 31 Sales Policy .............................................................................................................................. 33 Standards of Student Behavior................................................................................................. 33 Student Grievance Policy ......................................................................................................... 40 Student Services ............................................................................................................................ 41 Academic Skills Center............................................................................................................ 41 Center for Career and Employer Relations .............................................................................. 41 COPE Student Support Services .............................................................................................. 42 Counseling Center.................................................................................................................... 42 Disability Services ................................................................................................................... 42 English as a Second Language (ESL) Program ....................................................................... 43 Curtis G. Shake Learning Resources Center ............................................................................ 43 Shake Library .................................................................................................................... 43 Byron R. Lewis Library..................................................................................................... 43 Center for Teaching and Learning ..................................................................................... 44 Assessment and Testing Center ......................................................................................... 44 Military Science Army ROTC ...................................................................................................................... 44 Air Force ROTC ................................................................................................................ 45 Old Post Bookstore .................................................................................................................. 46 Parents and Family Services .................................................................................................... 46 Program for Adult Student Success (PASS) ............................................................................ 47 Registrar/Student Records – Veterans Affairs Office .............................................................. 47 Residential Life ........................................................................................................................ 47 Student Health Service ............................................................................................................. 48 Student Transition into Education Programs (STEP) .............................................................. 49 TRIO Programs ........................................................................................................................ 49 University Police Department .................................................................................................. 49 Student Center .............................................................................................................................. 49 International and Multicultural Student Affairs ....................................................................... 49 Student Activities ..................................................................................................................... 50 Athletics ............................................................................................................................ 50 Intramural-Recreational Sports Program ........................................................................... 50 Physical Education Complex Facilities ............................................................................. 50 Donald G. Bell Student Recreation Center........................................................................ 50 Cultural, Social, and Traditional Events............................................................................ 50 Student Government .......................................................................................................... 51 Student Organizations .............................................................................................................. 51

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Student Records Policies and Procedures
Annual Notification of Rights Under FERPA The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the University to amend a record should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student in writing of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to provide written consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; an elementary, middle school, or secondary school official serving as a practice teaching supervisor; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility for the University. Upon request, the University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Vincennes University to comply with requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901 Directory Information Vincennes University designates the following items as Directory Information: student name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, date and place of birth, classification (FR/SO/JR/SR), parent's or next-of-kin name and address, enrollment status, major field of study, dates of attendance, degrees received, awards and honors received, most recent previous school attended, photograph, weight and height of members of athletic teams, and participation in officially recognized activities and sports. The University may disclose any of these items without
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prior written consent of the student, unless notified otherwise in writing by the student each semester by the end of the first week of classes.

Student Regulations
Accident Policy In case of an accident, the student has the right to decide whether he/she wants to be treated by a local physician or go to his/her own physician. In either case, the student is financially responsible for the treatment. In cases of minor accidents or illness, the student should report to the Health Office located in Harrison Residence Hall. Automobile Policy Any student, commuter or resident, is permitted to operate a motor vehicle on campus. All such vehicles must be registered with the University Police Department and display an appropriate parking permit. Permits may be purchased either at the University Police Department or online at www.permitstore.com. Students operating motor vehicles on campus must observe University traffic regulations. Violators may be fined and/or have their vehicles towed away at owner's expense. For more information about our department and to review the traffic rules and regulations, visit our web site at www.vinu.edu/police. Racial, Ethnic, and Religious Harassment Policy Vincennes University expects its campus community to respect the rights and dignity of all its members in matters of personnel consideration, admissions, or academic evaluation. Accordingly, the University expressly prohibits racial, ethnic, and religious harassment of its students, employees, and those who seek to join the campus community in any capacity. Racial, ethnic, and religious harassment shall include, but not be limited to: 1. Physical, psychological, verbal and/or written abuse with regard to race, creed, ethnic origin, or religion. (Examples would include unequal academic expectations, physical harm or threat of such harm, written abuse on papers or records, personal verbal insults, jokes based on a person's race, ethnic origin or religious affiliation.) 2. Any harassing activity (one time or multiple times) which acts to deny an individual the full rights and privileges which are inherent in living, studying, working and visiting on the campuses of Vincennes University. Persons participating in harassing activities as defined may be subject to disciplinary action. Anyone having a complaint of racial, ethnic or religious harassment should notify the University Director of Human Resources, the Affirmative Action Officer, or the President. The college official will follow the procedures outlined in the Vincennes University Procedures for Resolving Employee Discrimination Complaints. Sexual Harassment Policy and Grievance Procedures Policy Statement. It is the policy of Vincennes University that sexual harassment will not be condoned. This policy applies equally to faculty, administrators, classified staff, and students and is in keeping with the spirit and intent of guidelines on discrimination because of sex. Members of the university community can expect to be free from sexual harassment and thus all members of the university community should guard against it. The fact that someone did not intend to sexually harass an individual is generally not considered a sufficient defense to a complaint of sexual harassment, although the reasonableness of the accused’s perceptions may be considered. In most cases, it is the effect and characteristics of the behavior on the complaint and whether a reasonable person similarly situated would find the conduct offensive that determine whether the behavior constitutes sexual harassment.

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Policy Guidelines and Procedures Definition. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: A. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or academic pursuits, B. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual, or C. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s employment or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or educational environment. Policy on Public Speaking, Leaflet Distribution, and Demonstrations Vincennes University supports the right of the university community to engage in public speaking, leaflet distribution, and demonstrations provided such activities do not disrupt normal activities or infringe upon the rights of others. Members of the University community are defined for purposes of this policy as University students, employees, and registered student organizations. Public speaking is defined for purposes of this policy as speech directed to a general audience, non specific persons, or directed to specific persons at random. The University will not allow behavior that violates freedom of speech, choice, assembly, or movement of other individuals or organizations. In short, responsible dissent carries with it sensitivity for the civil rights of others. Accordingly, the University will take whatever steps it deems necessary to:  Protect the right of any member of the university community to demonstrate and publicly proclaim any view, however unpopular; and  Protect the freedom of speech, assembly, and movement of any individual or group that is the object of the demonstration Members of the University community sponsoring or organizing a public speaking event, distributing leaflets, demonstrating or carrying out other equivalent activity will be held responsible for compliance with this policy. Sponsorship does not relieve participating individuals from responsibility for their conduct. Vincennes University students participating in a public speaking event, leaflet distribution, demonstration or equivalent activity, whether sponsored or not, are accountable for compliance with the provisions of this policy as well as the Standards of Student Behavior. Violation of this policy may be grounds for disciplinary action against individuals, sponsoring or participating student organizations, and their officers. Members of the University community may invite individuals who are not members of the University community to participate in a public speaking event, distribute leaflets, demonstrate, or carry out equivalent activities. University members who invite non-University participants may be held accountable for their compliance with this policy. Failure by non-University participants to comply with this policy may result in appropriate action under State law. Guidelines for Scheduled Public Speaking, Leaflet Distribution or Demonstrations by Members of the University Community Members of the University community may schedule a public speaking or leafleting event, demonstration, or other equivalent activity in any outdoor area of the campus, the use of which is not otherwise restricted or scheduled. To schedule an event a “Notice of Intent” form must be submitted to the Dean of Students office on the Vincennes Campus or the Director of Student Services on the Jasper Campus. The Dean of Students or Director of Student Services will respond promptly with approval given on a first-come, first-serve basis after an assessment that such an event will not otherwise interfere with scheduled University use or fail to comply with the guidelines outlined in this document. In the event a request is denied, an appeal may be made to the Assistant Provost for Student Affairs on the Vincennes campus or the Dean on the Jasper campus, who shall respond promptly to any such appeal. Persons distributing leaflets are to refrain from littering and may be held responsible for costs incurred as a result of littering. Distribution is defined as individuals handing materials to other individuals who may accept them or refrain from receiving them. Leaving materials unattended on a surface to be picked up is considered littering, not distribution.
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I.

Leaflets, announcements, statements, or materials proposing a commercial transaction or pertaining to the sales of goods or services are considered commercial speech and are not covered by this policy but rather the University Sales Policy. Guidelines for Unscheduled Demonstrations by Members of the University Community It is the intent of this policy to ensure that all demonstrations on campus occur with minimal threat to the safety and security of persons or facilities through proper planning and scheduling. Occasionally, events occur which demand immediate public outcry, and it is not the intent of this policy to limit the students’ rights to protest such events. Members of the University community may hold unscheduled demonstrations, rallies, or equivalent activities, provided the activity does not interfere with routine University functions or does not interfere with an activity in a space which has been reserved in advance. In deciding whether a demonstration is spontaneous, for which no registration is required, the University may consider any relevant evidence, including:  Whether signs or placards used at the demonstration were commercially produced,  Whether participants used amplification equipment,  Whether security was alerted, or media contacted, substantially in advance of the demonstration, or  Whether other circumstances demonstrate advance planning by one or more organizations. III. Public Speaking, Leaflet Distribution, or Demonstrations by Uninvited Individuals Individuals who have not been invited by a member of the University community and who desire to engage in public speaking, leaflet distribution, or demonstrations outdoors on the University’s campus may do so only in accordance with the following procedures:  Persons wishing to engage in public speaking, leaflet distribution, or demonstrations are required to reserve space by submitting a “Notice of Intent” form at the Vincennes campus to the Dean of Students or the Director of Student Services at the Jasper Campus. Events are approved on a space-available basis. Priority will be given to University departments, registered student organizations, students, faculty and staff. Dates are valid only when authorized by the Dean of Students or Director of Student Services on the “Notice of Intent” form. Application may not be made more than ten (10) business days prior to the date of anticipated use. In the event a request is denied, an appeal may be made to the Assistant Provost for Student Affairs at the Vincennes campus or the Dean at the Jasper campus, who shall respond promptly to any such appeal.  Public speaking, leaflet distribution, and demonstrations are limited to the brick area located directly in front of the Beckes Student Union on the Vincennes campus and the awning area in front of the Administration building on the Jasper campus. Public speaking, leaflet distribution, and demonstrations by uninvited individuals are prohibited elsewhere on campus.  A copy of the “Notice of Intent” form must be available for inspection upon request by University officials.  Persons wishing to speak publicly or to distribute leaflets are prohibited from engaging in the sale or promotion of commercial goods or services unless permission is granted under the University Sales policy. Guidelines Applicable To All Public Speaking, Leafleting, and Demonstrations Persons may not block or otherwise interfere with the free flow of vehicular, bicycle or pedestrian traffic. The right of way on streets and sidewalks must be maintained. Persons may not block or otherwise interfere with ingress and egress into and out of campus buildings. Persons shall not obstruct, disrupt, interrupt or attempt to force the cancellation of any event or activity sponsored by the University or by any users authorized to use University facilities. Persons shall not engage in harassing, physically abusive, threatening or intimidating conduct toward any person.
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II.

IV.    

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   



 



Persons shall comply with the directions of a University official acting in the performance of his or her duty. Classes or other scheduled activities shall not be disrupted. Use of public address systems and amplified sound will not be permitted without prior approval from the Dean of Students or Director of Student Services. Where an invited speaker is the object of protest, persons may demonstrate and/or leaflet outside the building where the speech is taking place. Persons who wish to enter the building must do so as members of the audience and must give the speaker a respectful hearing. Failure to grant the speaker a respectful hearing may result in the offending persons being asked to leave. Signs, placards or similar paraphernalia associated with a demonstration will not be carried into the building. The safety and well being of members of the campus community collectively and individually must be protected at all times. The University maintains the right to define the time, place and manner in which activities occur on campus. The Dean of Students Office or Director of Student Services will identify appropriate spaces for planned and spontaneous demonstrations. University property must be protected at all times. In accordance with the Vincennes University Standards of Student Behavior persons on University property may be required to provide identification and evidence of qualification to a University official upon request. Evidence of qualification means evidence that the person is a member of the University community. Persons engaging in activities on University property are subject to and expected to comply with all applicable University policies and procedures.

Failure to adhere to the above described University procedures will result in revocation of an approved application and/or other appropriate administrative action. Sales Policy The Board of Trustees has adopted the following policy governing sales on the Vincennes University campus. Vincennes University requires prior approval for sales on campus by any student, faculty member, staff member, student organization or outside group invited by such a person or organization. The Dean of Students at the Vincennes Campus, or the Director of Student Services at the Jasper Campus will retain the right of approval of the product as well as the date, time, and location of the sales. If the use of buildings other than the Student Union on the Vincennes Campus or the Administration Building on the Jasper Campus is requested, additional approval must be obtained from the respective building supervisor. Approval must also be obtained for sales off-campus by an individual or organization that represent or use the name of the University. Vincennes University also requires prior approval for sales by uninvited outside groups who wish to come on campus. The Dean of Students or the Director of Student Services will retain the right of approval of the product as well as the date and time of the sales. The areas designated for sales by outside groups on the Vincennes campus are the Beckes Student Union Grand Hall or brick area in front of the Union and, on the Jasper Campus, the awning area in front of the Administration building as well as the Administration Building lobby. For the purpose of this policy, sales are defined as the exchange of property or services for a determined amount of money or its equivalent or the recruiting of possible sales. Standards of Student Behavior Introduction. Vincennes University is a community dedicated to personal, academic excellence and growth. Choosing to join this community obligates each member to a standard of ethical behavior as stated in the Student Creed.

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As a Vincennes University student, I commit to a code of civilized behavior. I will practice personal academic integrity; I will respect the dignity of all persons, including myself; I will respect the rights of others; I will not condone bigotry; I will strive for the openness to learn from differences in people, ideas and opinions; I will demonstrate concern for others, their feelings, and their need for conditions which support their work and development. Allegiance to these ideals requires me to refrain from behavior that threatens the freedom and respect every individual deserves. The university is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. Each member of the university community must choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Student behavior that is not consistent with the Standards of Student Behavior is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good citizenship and, when necessary, appropriate consequences are imposed in the form of sanctions. The Vincennes University Standards of Student Behavior is a statement of expectations for students and student organizations on the basis of the philosophy of Vincennes University as well as Federal and State laws. These regulations are prepared to protect the health, welfare, and safety of the students of Vincennes University. Most of the regulations, accordingly, reflect the policies of Vincennes University, State and Federal laws or ones of common sense. This Standards of Behavior policy applies to all students enrolled in Vincennes University courses. Students are expected to be good citizens and to engage in responsible behaviors that reflect well upon their university, to be civil to one another and to others in the university community, and contribute positively to student and university life. Therefore, students should understand the specifics of the conditions they have accepted when they enroll. Students need to be aware that violations of the University Standards of Behavior may result in some form of disciplinary action. Definitions. The following definitions apply to terms found in the Student Standards of Behavior: 1. "University" and “campus” are used interchangeably and both apply to Vincennes University. 2. "Student" includes all persons taking courses at the university, both part time and full time. Persons who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with the university are considered "students". Therefore, sanctions can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms, graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from the university while a disciplinary matter is pending. 3. "Standards" represents the Standards of Student Behavior. 4. "University official" includes any person (student, faculty or staff) employed by the university and performing administrative or professional duties, or any person serving the university in an official capacity. 5. "Member of the university community" includes any person who is a student, university official, trustee, or any other person serving the university in an official capacity, university guests on university property or at a university related activity. 6. "University property" includes all real or personal property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the university and all university facilities whether utilized by the university or a university auxiliary organization. 7. "Organization" means any registered student club or organization. 8. "Shall" and "will" are used in the imperative sense. 9. "May" is used in the permissive sense. 10. "Day" applies to a day when the university is open for normal business, regardless of whether classes are in session (e.g., the day preceding Thanksgiving). In determining any deadlines as set forth in the Code, references to a number of "days" prior to or after occurrence of an event shall not include the day of the event. 11. "Health" applies to physical or mental well-being. 12. “Deliberate Indifference” refers to the conscious or reckless disregard of the consequences of one's actions or inactions.

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13. “Standards of Behavior Administrator” includes the Dean and Associate Dean of Students, or any other university official assigned to administer these standards and to perform the duties prescribed in these procedures. Jurisdiction. This Standard addresses misconduct that takes place on university premises and addresses off campus behavior when it may have or has had an adverse impact upon the university community or, if repeated on the university, poses a threat to the safety of members of the university community. The Standard also applies to university sponsored events, activities, trips, etc., which may occur off campus. A student who violates the Standard and breaks the law is subject to university, civil and/or criminal authorities. The university, at its sole discretion, may pursue disciplinary action against a student while the student is also subject to criminal proceedings. The university reserves this right even if criminal charges are pending, reduced, deferred or dismissed. The Vincennes University judicial system is the responsibility of the Office of Judicial Affairs through the Dean of Student’s office. The Associate Dean of Students has specific responsibility for the operation and administration of the judicial system. Misconduct Activities which Subject a Student or Student Organization to Disciplinary Action. Vincennes University recognizes that it must create an environment where each student will be free to pursue her or his academic interests without interference from others. This includes upholding the integrity of the academic process as well as providing a community free of disruptions. The following restrictions are designed to foster a healthy and peaceful learning community. Apathy or deliberate indifference are not neutral acts and may be violations of this standard. Protecting the Rights of the Educational Process Students are expected to be honest in all academic work. A student’s placement of his or her name on any academic exercise shall be regarded as assurance that the work is the result of the student’s own thought, effort, and study. The following behavior is subject to disciplinary sanctions. 1. Acts of dishonesty, including but not limited to the following: a. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty. Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone else’s work, including the work of other students, as one’s own. Any ideas or materials taken from another source for either written or oral use must be fully acknowledged. A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, opinions, theories, formulas, graphics, or pictures from another person or source without acknowledgement. The instructor will determine appropriate student disciplinary action that is consistent with the academic dishonesty policy contained in the syllabus of the instructor. b. Furnishing false information to any university official, faculty member, or office. c. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any university document, record, or instrument of identification. Incidents under b and c will be referred to the Dean of Students, who will determine appropriate student disciplinary action in keeping with procedures used in the handling of other types of student conduct situations. 2. Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration or other university activities, including its public service functions on or off campus, or of other authorized non-university activities when the conduct occurs on university premises. (This policy is not intended to hinder organized, peaceful, and orderly protests.) Protecting the Rights, Safety, and Dignity of the Individual Any of the following activities, the aiding, abetting, inciting, encouraging, or by his or her presence, supporting of any of the following activities, constitutes misconduct for which students may be subjected to disciplinary action. Student organizations may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including revocation of recognition. These violations include but are not limited to:
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1. physical or verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion and/or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person resulting in an individual being fearful for imminent bodily harm and/or the emotional/mental disruption of a person’s daily life or educational environment; 2. students shall not engage in any act that is sexual in nature and which is committed under pressure, force, threat, or coercion, or without the full and informed consent of all persons involved. For the purpose of this policy, the current, active state code states that consent must be freely and actively given through mutually understandable terms or actions. A person is deemed incapable of giving consent when that person is a minor, is mentally disabled, mentally incapacitated, physically helpless, under the influence of alcohol or drugs to the point of being unable to make a rational decision, unconscious or asleep. A person always retains the right to revoke consent at any time during a sexual act; 3. theft or attempted theft of and/or damage to property either personal or public, on or off campus; 4. hazing, defined as an act which endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or which destroys or removes public or private property, for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in, a group or organization; (Expressed or implied consent of the victim will not be a defense.) 5. failure to comply with verbal and/or written instructions of university officials acting in the performance of their duties and made within the scope of their authority; (Students shall honor the official request of any university official in the performance of his/her duties. Each staff or faculty member represents the institution and the attack or threat of attack on an official is a threat against the university itself. The above is also applicable to student employees when performing their duties within the scope of their authority). Grievances against a staff or faculty member may be filed with the program and department head responsible for that area of the university in accordance with the institution's grievance policy; 6. violation of any policy, rule, or regulation published in hard copy or available electronically on the university website; 7. violation of any federal or state law; 8. possession of firearms, explosives, or fireworks; 9. the use or threat of use of a weapon, or any item or objects that simulate weapons, on university premises that could harm, threaten or cause fear to others; 10. falsely reporting a fire, bomb, or any other emergency by any means; 11. misuse or unauthorized possession of university owned emergency or safety equipment, creating a fire hazard or be in unauthorized possession of flammable or hazardous material; 12. disrupting the normal operations of the university and/or infringing on the rights of other members of the university community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities within any university building or area; (This policy is not intended to hinder organized, peaceful, and orderly protests.) Promoting Personal Responsibility and Integrity The Vincennes University community strongly promotes the development of a personal values system that focuses on each person assuming responsibility for her/his own actions, and on maintaining dignity and truth. The following restrictions outline the primary parameters within each individual shall be held responsible. 1. Students shall not engage in behavior that is disruptive, lewd, or indecent, regardless of intent, which breaches the peace of the community. 2. Students are responsible for the actions of their visitors or guests. Students are expected to take reasonable action to prevent their guests from violating university regulations. 3. Failure to comply and/or interfere with the university disciplinary system. 4. Students shall not falsify or misrepresent facts on any university form or document and the unauthorized and/or improper use of a university form or document.

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a. Forms, Records, and Documents. Falsification of records and/or misrepresentation of facts on any university form or document may result in disciplinary action and/or cancellation of registration. This includes but is not limited to housing contracts, registration material data sheets, fee receipts, checks for payment to the university, applications for vehicle registration, application to be an exception to the housing policy, applications for release from a housing contract, listing an incorrect place of residence, or failure to update a change of correct address. b. ID Card Policies. It shall be illegal for a student to allow his/her Student Identification Card to be used by another person (whether a student or not). These cards are the Property of the university and entitle the student to certain privileges. Therefore, no student shall have access to the privileges on the basis of any but his/her own Student Identification Card. Further, it is against university regulations for any person to alter in any way the information contained on the Student Identification Card. This card must be carried with the student always and must be shown on request to any university official. 5. All activities sponsored by student organizations must receive approval before the event by the Student Activities Office located in Beckes Student Union. The student organization itself, and individual students involved, will be held responsible for violations of the Standards of Behavior. 6. Computing resources may not be used for illegal or disruptive purposes. Examples include: a. Unauthorized copying or use of copyrighted material. b. Destruction of or damage to hardware, software or data belonging to Vincennes University or other users. c. Disruption or unauthorized monitoring of electronic communications. d. Harassment of other users. e. The accidental or intentional introduction of a destructive program, such as a "virus," can have serious consequences. Users should be aware of the threat of viruses on networks and in public labs and use adequate protection against spreading them to their own machines. Both freeware and commercial anti-viral programs are available from various sources. Any attempt to compromise the university computer security systems will not be tolerated. 7. Computing resources shall be used in accordance with the high ethical standards of the university community. Examples of unethical use which also may involve illegality include: a. Violations of computer system security. b. Unauthorized use of computer accounts, files, and data which do not belong to the user. c. Unauthorized use of access codes assigned to others. d. Intentional use of computer telecommunication facilities in ways that impede the computing activities of others. e. Academic dishonesty (plagiarism, cheating). f. Violation of software license agreements. g. Violation of network usage. h. Violation of another user's privacy. Prohibited Use of Illicit Drugs and Alcohol As set forth in local, state, and federal laws, and the rules and regulations of the university, Vincennes University prohibits the manufacture, use, possession, and distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students, employees and visitors in buildings, facilities, grounds or other property owned and/or controlled by the university. This applies to all individuals participating in any university-sponsored activities. The university will enforce all state and federal laws regarding the possession and use of alcohol and the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of any controlled substance. Drug and alcohol laws are vigorously enforced at Vincennes University. Violators are subject to criminal prosecution. The enforcement techniques can range from plain view violation to longterm undercover investigations by local, state, or federal agents and agencies. The inappropriate use of a controlled substance is detrimental to Vincennes University's faculty, staff, students, and the public served. The university will attempt to assist a student or employee involved with the inappropriate use of alcohol or a controlled substance in obtaining rehabilitaStudent Life 37

tion. However, the ultimate responsibility for overcoming a dependency or inappropriate use of alcohol or of a controlled substance is that of the individual. Details of the policy are printed and distributed annually in the Student Handbook and University Employee Manual. Vincennes University has an alcohol abuse program emphasizing education and intervention and meets the requirements of the present drug and alcohol requirement, including the Drug Free Schools and Communities Amendments of 1989. Procedures for the Adjudication of Violations of the Student Standards of Behavior. To the Student: This material has been prepared to assist you in understanding the proceedings which are taking place as a result of a reported incident. The presentation of this information does not presume the degree of your involvement in the reported incident, and the administrator with whom you are involved will not approach your case with any predetermination of a final disposition. Therefore, the receipt of this material should not be interpreted as a prejudgment of your involvement. The State of Indiana has charged Vincennes University with the responsibility for providing an orderly university environment conducive to learning in which persons and property are protected from harm. Priorities inherent among these responsibilities include:  Protect persons and property;  Uphold Federal, State, local laws and university regulations;  Provide an orderly environment conducive to learning;  Encourage the individual growth of students. The Board of Trustees of Vincennes University has adopted university policies and procedures in exercise of the above responsibilities. The university administration is responsible for providing the process for dealing with violations of the policies. The process, which has been developed for handling conduct situations, includes the following: Conduct Adjudication Conduct adjudication is a process, which is used for all alleged violations, which may result in a change of student status. The process contains three fundamental steps: Presentation of Alleged Violations: A student who is accused of an alleged violation of the University Standards of Student Behavior is notified, either in writing (at the last reported local address) or verbally, of the alleged violation by the Dean or Associate Dean of Students. Hearing: Hearings may be conducted by the Associate Dean of Students, the Dean of Students or other hearing officers designated by the Dean of Students. All hearings provide the opportunity for the accused student to respond to charges, to present witnesses, and to raise questions. The hearing officer, through questioning, seeks to arrive at the truth. Should a student fail to appear at a scheduled hearing, after proper notification, the hearing may be conducted in his/her absence at the discretion of the hearing officer. Presentation of Decision: An explanation of the action and its effect on the student is made, which may include probation stipulations and future expectations for the student's behavior. The student is informed of the right to appeal and the procedures to follow. The right to appeal the Dean or Associate Dean of Students decision is afforded all Vincennes University students as a matter of policy and due process. Appeal: A student has the opportunity to appeal the decision of the disciplinary hearing to the Student Life Advisory Committee. Appeal requests must be presented to the Dean or Associate Dean of Students in writing within five business days of the receipt of the decision from the hearing process.

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The Student Life Advisory Committee is composed of faculty, professional staff, and support staff. They are identified during the last month of the spring semester and serve the following academic school year. Description of Rights in Disciplinary Situations Students have been accorded rights in disciplinary situations by the Board of Trustees in keeping with procedural due process. Basically, students have the right: 1. to be aware of the alleged violation a reasonable time before the hearing; 2. to bring an advisor to the hearing; 3. to have a fair hearing; 4. to be informed of the decision; and 5. to appeal decisions of the hearing. The Complainant and Respondent may be assisted by an advisor of their own choice. Advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate in a hearing. Complainants and Respondents who choose an advisor shall notify the Associate Dean of Students or designee prior to the hearing. Advisors may not appear in lieu of the Complainant or Respondent; however, an advisor may consult with the Complainant or Respondent during a hearing and may assist with preparation for the hearing. Standards of Proof In many hearings, there will be strong (i.e., clear) evidence presented to persuade the hearing officer that the student did violate a particular policy. Sometimes, however, there may be ambiguities and contradictions which require that person to decide whom he/she believes or who he/she thinks is more credible. As in a court of law, the student is always innocent until proven otherwise. However, unlike a court, the standard of evidence which must be presented to prove that a student violated the policy is less stringent and the determination of a violation is made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the student charged violated the Standards of Student Behavior. This is known as “a preponderance of the evidence.” In other words, if the hearing officer is weighing the evidence on some imaginary scale, he/she must be more than 50 percent sure that the student violated the policy to find him/her responsible. He/she does not need to be 100 percent or even 75 percent sure, just more than 50 percent sure. Types of Disciplinary Actions The actions that may be taken when a student is charged with a violation of the Student Standards of Behavior range from not in violation up to and including expulsion from the university. The action taken depends on the severity of the violation, the degree of involvement of the student, the individual circumstances of each case, the student's disciplinary record and possibly the student's academic situation.  Not in Violation - A student may be found not in violation when there is evidence presented during the hearing that shows the student was not responsible. A record of that decision will be maintained for one year.  Warning - Minor violations of the conduct code usually merit a warning. If the student has continuing minor violations, he/she is subject to further disciplinary action.  Disciplinary Probation - A report of the student's misconduct is maintained in the disciplinary records in the Dean of Students Office as a severe warning concerning future violation of the conduct code. If no further violation occurs, the incident does not become a part of the student's permanent college records.  Loss of Privileges - Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time.  Restitution - Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.  Discretionary Sanctions - Work assignments, essays, service to the university, or other related discretionary assignments.  Permanent Disciplinary Probation - A report of the student's misconduct is entered PERMANENTLY on his/her college records. This information concerning the violation(s) accompanies the college transcript as a matter of permanent record.
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 

Suspension - In cases of serious misconduct, the student may be suspended from the university for a designated period. Once an individual has been suspended, he/she loses the privilege of returning to the university and/or attending any university activity during this period. When a student is suspended, he/she is expected to immediately check out of the Residence Hall and/or leave the university. Suspension becomes a part of the student's permanent records. Expulsion - In cases of serious misconduct, a student may be expelled PERMANENTLY with no option to return to the university. This also becomes a matter of permanent entry on the student's record. Immediate Temporary Suspension - In cases of serious misconduct, a student may be suspended from the moment of first notification of charges until the hearing. This hearing must be held within a reasonable time after the person has been notified.

Right to Appeal The right to appeal the Dean or Associate Dean of Students decision is afforded all Vincennes University students as a matter of policy and due process. All appeals of disciplinary hearing decisions will be made to the Student Life Advisory Board and an appeals hearing will be called. The Appeals Hearing will include:  the sanctioned student; (who may be assisted by an advisor)  the Dean or Associate Dean of Students;  an Appeals Hearing moderator; and  the five members of the Student Life Advisory Committee Preservation of Records Dependent upon the type of action taken, disciplinary records are maintained on file in the Dean of Students office for specific periods of time: 1. not in violation - one calendar year, unless involved in additional violations 2. warning, loss of privileges, restitution, discretionary sanctions - one calendar year, unless involved in additional violations 3. disciplinary probation - two calendar years after the date of the last action taken 4. permanent disciplinary probation - permanently 5. suspension - permanently 6. permanent suspension - permanently 7. alcohol or drug-related violation - three years following the academic year of violation Standards Review. The Standards of Student Behavior shall be reviewed annually under the direction of the Assistant Provost for Student Affairs. In addition, the Faculty Senate will, as part of the review, be invited to make recommendations with regard to the Standards of Student Behavior. These recommendations will consist of omissions, clarifications, constructive changes, and other matters germane to the proper interpretation and operation of the Standards of Behavior. Questions of interpretation regarding the Standards of Behavior or Student Handbook shall be referred to the Dean of Students office. In keeping with normal university policy approval processes, the Standards of Student Behavior and Student Handbook may, at the sole discretion of the university, be amended at any time. Student Grievance Policy If students have grievances involving University professors or staff members, they are to process such grievances through the University administrative structure. The student should first discuss any grievance thoroughly with the professor or staff member. If the grievance is not resolved, the student should discuss such with the faculty or staff member's immediate supervisor. Any unresolved grievances can be processed through the administrative structure to the President, if necessary. The resolution of student grievances will be transmitted to the student and through the administrative structure to all involved parties.

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1. The student should meet with and discuss the matter thoroughly with the professor or staff member attempting to reach resolution immediately, but no later than 30 calendar days after the incident(s) has occurred. 2. If resolution is not achieved and the student wishes to pursue his/her grievance, the grievance must be filed in written form with the direct supervisor of the faculty or staff member. The grievance must be filed within one week after the meeting with the faculty or staff member, subject to the availability of the parties involved. 3. The supervisor receiving the grievance will do the following within three weeks: a. Inform the faculty or staff of the receipt of the grievance. b. Investigate the situation which may include but not be limited to requesting a statement of circumstances relevant to the grievance from the faculty or staff member, a conference with either or both parties, additional documents and other information relevant to the situation. c. The supervisor makes a ruling regarding the grievance within one week after the requested documents are received and conferences concluded. 4. If either party wishes to appeal the ruling, a statement of appeal must be filed with the direct supervisor of the person making the previous ruling within one week of the postmark of the letter containing the original grievance decision. 5. The hearing process is repeated with the addition of information from the original supervisor. If the appeal is filed by the faculty or staff, the student will be duly notified. 6. The grievance may be continued by either party through the administrative structure to the President.

Student Services
Academic Skills Center The Kirkwood Academic Skills Center at Vincennes University offers many academic support services and classes to help students be more successful in college and provides an environment conducive to study. Free tutoring from both peer and professional tutors is available in most subjects. Study Skills classes provide students with the key abilities necessary to become a successful student by knowing how to learn, including courses in Study Skills, Success Strategies, Learning Strategies, and Career Planning. Other support classes are offered in spelling, phonics, and self-paced and distance education developmental education. Individualized materials are available for students experiencing difficulty in particular areas of study. Extensive equipment is available for student use including internet accessible computers, assistive technology (Kurzweil and Text Help), study tables, carrels, and quiet study areas. The Kirkwood Academic Skills Center in the Shircliff Humanities Building is open weekdays and evenings to all students without charge. Additional Academic Skills tutoring is frequently available at alternative sites across campus. Tutoring begins the third week of classes each semester. The Center for Career and Employer Relations The Center for Career and Employer Relations is a partner with Vincennes University academic divisions, other departments in Student Affairs, and locations across the University community to provide quality services and support to our students and alumni. Services of the Center include assistance with:  Career assessments  Career counseling  Personality profiles  Learning Style inventories  Academic major decision-making  Internships and other experiential learning  Resources for on-campus and local off-campus part-time employment  Networking students with employers  Job search  Transfer to bachelor degree programs other than those offered by Vincennes University
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      

Graduate school information Campus recruitment and career fairs Workshops on career and employer relations topics Classroom presentations Marketing Yourself at VU series Web-based job and resume listing service for students and employers Research on student employment and continuing education upon graduation

The staff of the Center for Career and Employer Relations develops ongoing relationships with local, state, national and international employers through faculty, advisory committees, alumni, friends of the University and professional associations such as the National Association of Colleges and Employers and the Career Development Professionals of Indiana. The Center for Career and Employer Relations is located in the South Lobby of Vigo Hall, across from Tecumseh Dining Center. The phone number is 812-888-4280. COPE Student Support Services COPE Student Support Services offers a complete package of services to promote retention, graduation, and transfer to four-year institutions. Criteria for admission into this program requires that a student be either first generation, (neither parent graduated from a 4-year college), meet income guidelines, or have a documented physical or learning disability. The program is based on an individualized counseling model that includes academic support, assistance with course selection, personal counseling, individualized tutoring, professional and peer mentoring, transfer assistance, career counseling, and assistance in completing financial aid forms and obtaining financial assistance for college. COPE SSS provides academic support groups for students with learning disabilities and offers workshops to all program students on topics such as study skills, stress management, financial literacy, self-esteem and interview skills. We encourage early application to the program since enrollment is limited. Students are accepted on the basis of eligibility, potential and need assessment, and available space. Since this program is funded through a federal grant, there is no additional cost to the student. COPE Student Support Services is located on the third floor of Vigo Hall. The phone number is 812-8884515, and our website is: www.vinu.edu/studentservices/COPEStudentSupportServices. Counseling Center The Vincennes University Counseling Center offers comprehensive emotional and supportive counseling to VU students, staff, and faculty. The Counseling Center is staffed by three mental health professionals, all certified or licensed by the State of Indiana. Therapeutic services are confidential, and in most instances are free of charge. Students may seek out the Counseling Center on their own or come on the suggestion of others. Depression, anxiety, relationship problems, sexual assault, and alcohol or other drug use are just some of the issues that can be discussed. Emergency crisis intervention is available after hours. In addition to direct therapeutic services, referrals to local social service agencies and medical resources are facilitated when appropriate. Consultation, workshops, and educational materials about a variety of topics are also available to individuals and groups. The Counseling Center is located in Room 134 of the Welsh Administration Building; phone 812-888-4374 to schedule an appointment or check out our website under the Current Services tab at www.vinu.edu. Disability Services The Office of Disability Services reviews requests and determines appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities. Students with psychological, physical, sensory, communicative and/or learning disabilities should seek out this office as soon as possible after admission to VU if they require academic accommodations. The student will be required to provide copies of medical or psychometric evaluations that document the presence of a disability and the impact of the disability on the student's level of functioning. The Office of Disability Services also coordinates the availability of assistive technology at various campus locations to provide accessible classroom materials and equipment. Vincennes University complies with the requirements set forth by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act to
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assure the rights of individuals with disabilities to fair, non-discriminatory treatment. The Office of Disability Services is located at the South Entrance of Vigo Hall. The phone number is 812888-4501. Specific procedures for requesting an accommodation for a disability may be found at the Office of Disability Services website at www.vinu.edu/DisabilityServices. Students that will be requesting accommodations should view the Disability Services website for documentation requirements. English as a Second Language (ESL) Program The goal of the English as a Second Language (ESL) Program at Vincennes University is to provide international students with the English language skills needed for successful completion of regular academic course work. The ESL program is required of all international students who apply for regular admission to the University, but who have Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores below 525 (197 Computer Based TOEFL, 71 Internet Based TOEFL). The ESL Department also administers both the Institutional TOEFL and the Focal Skills Test of English Proficiency. Curtis G. Shake Learning Resources Center The Curtis G. Shake Learning Resources Center is home to Shake Library, Byron R. Lewis Historical Collections Library, the Assessment and Testing Center, the Center for Teaching and Learning, Media Services, IHETS classrooms, a two-way distance learning classroom, four computer classrooms containing 106 computers, a conference room, and additional meeting rooms. Shake Library, the main library of Vincennes University, has a seating capacity of more than four hundred and contains space for over 120,000 volumes. The library houses an extensive reference collection, a periodical browsing area with 450 titles, meeting rooms, a microform/multimedia-use area, a computer commons, a computer lab and a computer reference cluster providing student access to 99 networked computer stations, along with facilities to support laptop and wireless usage. All computers in the library provide students with full Internet access, including email, word processing, spreadsheet applications, and many educational software programs. The library contains approximately 90,000 books and bound periodicals, over 30,000 periodical titles available electronically through 36 databases, a media collection consisting of DVDs/videos, CDs, CD-ROMs, and microform copies of journals, magazines and newspapers. The library's resources are available to students, faculty, and staff more than ninety-nine hours each week during the regular school year. Library holdings may be accessed through VU WebCat, the library’s Web-based catalog that lists books, electronic books, DVDs, videotapes, music CDs, and periodical titles in print subscribed to by the library. VU WebCat also has hundreds of links to selected Web sites that are beneficial for college-level research. Library users have access to electronic database providers such as EBSCOhost, LexisNexis, ProQuest, SIRS, NewsBank, Credo Reference, WorldCat, Gale, Facts.com, ARTstor and Britannica Online via the library's home page. In addition, the library has recently added “Film-on-Demand”, a subscription service which provides students and faculty with access to more than 35,000 educational digital video clips through the Web. These web services provide access to citations, full-text articles and images from encyclopedias, journals, magazines, newspapers and other reference materials. To supplement the main library holdings, all students may also make use of the resources and facilities of the Knox County Public Library. The library is a short distance from the University and has an excellent collection of books, periodicals and multimedia. The Byron R. Lewis Historical Collections Library, a part of Shake Learning Resources Center, was opened in 1967. In addition to housing the VU archives, the library contains a Regional History Collection of documents, letters and other valuable papers concerning the area that originally made up the Indiana Territory (1800-1816), and consisted of the present states of Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois and a part of Minnesota. Lewis Library has genealogical materials that include some county and state records. It serves as a historical reference for faculty, staff and students of Vincennes University and is also open to the general public. In addition,
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Lewis Library has a growing, Web-based digital resources collection of books, images and documents. The Center for Teaching and Learning provides and assists faculty and adjunct faculty with professional development in the use and integration of instructional technology in classrooms, consultations, classroom observations, and pedagogical issues. The Center provides faculty with hands-on access to state-of-the-art computers, multimedia equipment for curriculum development and a technologically equipped classroom. The Center conducts workshops and seminars to promote awareness of sound teaching strategies and instructional issues for faculty and adjunct faculty. The Center's Senior Instructional Designer assists faculty in the use of instructional strategies, methodologies and technologies that have been shown to engage students, improve learning, and promote retention. In addition, the Center maintains a professional development library of educational materials for enhancing instructional design, curriculum development, technology integration, and classroom instructional issues. The Assessment and Testing Center provides a secure testing environment for both computerized and conventional, paper/pencil based testing. Online, web based testing technology delivers University Accuplacer placement tests for course placement for new students, and BlackBoard tests for Vincennes University courses, (both “on campus” and Distance Education). Online exams for professional and career certifications are also available for Microsoft, Cisco, Novell, CompTia, Microsoft Office Specialist, and Federal Aviation Administration exams. The Center is a licensed testing site for PearsonVUE, Certiport, CLEP, Lasergrade, and Prometric. The Assessment Center is also a regional State of Indiana G.E.D. testing center, serving the local and surrounding communities. Proctor services to deliver tests are also available to students attending other universities who live in the area and need an objective, professional test proctor and secure test facility. At this time tests given include the following. Accuplacer Computerized Placement Test (CPT) CLEP tests DANTES tests Departmental tests Exit tests for graduating students Foreign Language Placement tests GED High School Equivalency Exam General Education Math Achievement Institutional SAT test National ACT National SAT I and II Quiz programs and study software Written placement tests (DTLS/DTMS)

Testing hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. daily, on normal University work days. Inquiries may be made by phoning 812-888-5404 or email tcronk@vinu.edu. Students who have applied and been accepted for admission to the University may take their Entry/Placement test early by reporting to the Assessment Center, or they may take the test during orientation. All incoming students are to take the Entry/Placement test during or prior to orientation.

Military Science
Army ROTC Army ROTC is a college elective open to all full-time Vincennes University students. Upon completion of the basic course, students qualify to enter the Army ROTC Advanced Course at a university that offers an Advanced ROTC Program, such as the Wabash Army ROTC Battalion at Indiana State University. Upon completion of the Advanced Program, students obtain a commission as an officer in the regular Army, Army Reserve, or Army National Guard. The ROTC program builds students’ leadership expertise, communication, decisionmaking skills and self-confidence, which can be applied immediately while in college or upon graduation from college. The leadership and management skills taught in ROTC are in high demand in the civilian market as well as in the military. The overall program includes the Basic Course (Vincennes University) for freshmen and sophomore level students, and the Advanced Course for juniors and seniors at an upper level institution, such as Indiana State University, in
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Terre Haute. There is no military obligation for students taking the Basic Courses, which focus studies on basic military concepts and the principles of effective leadership and management. The ROTC Advanced Course at an upper level institution focuses on tactical operations as well as advanced techniques of management, leadership and command. Qualified students must meet certain requirements to enroll into the Advanced Course. While in the Advanced Course, students attend the ROTC summer training camp at beautiful Fort Lewis, Washington between their junior and senior academic years. There are, however, several ways to accelerate the student who has missed the opportunity to complete the Basic Course at Vincennes University. For students planning to attend Indiana State University, Rose Hulman Institute of Technology, DePauw University, or Saint Mary of the Woods, this can be accomplished by attending a four to five week ROTC Basic Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, between the student sophomore and junior academic year. Upon graduation from the Basic Camp, the student is fully qualified to contract with the Wabash Valley ARMY ROTC battalion Advanced Course Program in Terre Haute, finish out the remaining two years of ROTC training and obtain a commission as a Second Lieutenant upon graduation from college. For more information, contact the Wabash Battalion Army ROTC at the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Lower Level Logan Library, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, Indiana, 812-877-8345 or via the Internet at http://www.rose-hulman.edu/AROTC/. Air Force ROTC Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at Vincennes University is offered through AFROTC Detachment 218 at Indiana State University under the control of Lieutenant Colonel Tammy K. Lundborg, Commander, and taught by active duty Air Force officers assigned as ROTC faculty. Lieutenant Colonel Lundborg’s office is located in Room 203 of the Myers Technology Center. She may be contacted at either http://www.indstate,edu/afroted/ or tlundborg@isugw.indstate.edu. Credits received as a result of successfully completing Basic Military Science courses may count toward degree requirements as general free electives. All Vincennes students are eligible to enroll in Air Force ROTC courses; however, entry into the Professional Officer Course (POC) is limited to qualified students who have been selected to pursue an Air Force commission. Upon graduation with a baccalaureate degree and completion of the Air Force ROTC program, students receive a commission and enter the active duty Air Force as a second lieutenant. Four-Year Program. The AFROTC curriculum normally spans four years. The first two years allow non-scholarship individuals to try the program without any obligation, while the last two years are for those who complete field training and wish to pursue a career in the Air Force. Field Training. Prior to commissioning, normally between a student’s sophomore and junior year, all cadets must attend a field training session at a designated Air Force base. Field training for cadets is six weeks and involves physical conditioning, weapons and survival training, and opportunities for developing skills as a leader and team member. Financial Assistance. Scholarships can be earned to pay for tuition, textbooks, and laboratory fees. A tax-free monthly allowance, ranging from $250 to $400 per month, is also provided for the academic year. College students are elilgible to apply for the In-College Scholarship Program. Three-year and two-year scholarships are available for students pursuing particular Air Force careers or majoring in certain academic disciplines. Health professions scholarships are also available to qualified students in any academic major who intend to go on to medical school. Nursing scholarships are available to qualified students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in nursing. Students attending summer field training and the optional Professional Development Training program are paid living and travel expenses. Uniforms and books for Air Force ROTC classes are furnished at no charge to students. Air Force ROTC classes are not charged to the students’ tuition. Professional Organizations. Arnold Air Society is a service and professional organization composed of cadets in the Air Force ROTC Program. Cadets are selected for membership based on personal merit and academic achievement. The goal of this organization is to enhance Air Force ROTC programs within the campus environment. Educational Delay. Cadets may request to postpone entering active duty until completion of an advanced degree or professional school. Requests are considered on a case-by-case basis.
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Career Information. Graduates of Air Force ROTC enter the active duty Air Force as second lieutenants. They may pursue careers in technical or non-technical specialties, or as pilots, navigators, nurses, lawyers, and doctors. The Air Force ROTC curriculum is separated into four major areas: 1. Profession of Arms. Designed specifically for the continued development of professional knowledge and skills unique to the Air Force profession. Subject areas include officership, military law, laws of armed conflict, military customs and courtesies, and the individual’s role in supporting organizational and Air Force policies. 2. Communication Skills. Designed specifically to enhance professional development, which is integrated throughout the AFROTC curriculum. Emphasis is on a progressive study of the various communication skills required of Air Force junior officers. The curriculum is designed to provide both instruction and application of principles and concepts in written communication, staff communication instruments, oral communication, and the nature and art of effective listening. 3. Leadership Studies. Designed to examine aspects of military leadership and management functions as part of the overall concept of leadership. An examination of leader variables and characteristics provides a lead-in to a protracted study of leadership theory. Leadership and management skills are developed and applied in Leadership Laboratory and cadet corps activities. Leadership training is emphasized at Field Training where team sports, military drill, and special leadership problems are mandatory. 4. Military Studies/International Security Studies. Designed to develop an understanding of the nature of conflict and how the United States military forces, particularly air and space forces, are developed, organized, and employed. Subjects include the need for national security, the evolution and formulation of American defense policy and strategy, regional security issues, and joint doctrine. Credit received as a result of successfully completing Basic Military Science courses may count toward degree requirements as general free electives. All grades received for Military Science courses are included in cumulative grade point ratios. These courses may not be available on the Vincennes University campus if there is insufficient enrollment. In that case, students may be required to travel to Indiana State University in Terre Haute or to the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville to complete the course requirements. Old Post Bookstore The Bookstore is responsible for providing textbooks, trade books, school supplies, health and beauty aids, snack foods, and a large assortment of apparel and novelty items promoting the Vincennes University name and logo for the student population as well as faculty and staff. The Bookstore also provides fax service, and a copy machine. The Bookstore also offers a check cashing service to students, faculty and staff. There is a 20 cent fee for cashing checks, up to $100 a day; a VU ID is required. The Bookstore can be reached by phone at 812-888-4334, by phone toll free at 866-8082665 (book), by FAX at 812-888-5477 or web site at http://vubookstore.vinu.edu for books and merchandise. Parents and Family Services The Parents and Family Services program provides support to parents and families of Vincennes University students. When questions or concerns arise and you are not sure which office to contact, Parents and Family Services can help. The coordinator may be reached by phone, email, or visit. Direct telephone numbers are 812-888-5004 (local) and 888-852-3940 (toll-free). Direct email is parents@vinu.edu. Parents are encouraged to subscribe to the Vincennes University Parent List Serve at www.vinu.edu. The list serve provides help and assistance to parents and families as they support their students at Vincennes University.

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Program for Adult Student Success (PASS) The Program for Adult Student Success (PASS) provides a transitional and supportive service to the non-traditional student population attending Vincennes University. Through a combination of individual assessment, University and community linkage, PASS assists non-traditional students with Vincennes University educational opportunities and career information, financial aid sources, and a variety of referrals to community and social agencies in a six-county area. Registrar/Student Records/Veterans Affairs Office The Registrar/Student Records/Veterans Affairs Office is responsible for maintaining and updating student academic files and for providing educational support services for veterans of the U.S. military. Students may contact the Registrar/Student Records/Veterans Affairs Office for the following services or for general questions concerning University academic policies and procedures: VU academic transcripts, enrollment certifications, update bio/demographic data (name, address, ID number, etc.), registration, schedule changes, graduation audits. Veterans Affairs assists veterans, dependents, and National Guard/Reserve students with applying for and utilizing Department of Veterans Affairs Education benefits. All of the necessary application forms are available in the office. All eligible students must contact this office in order to obtain benefits. Certification of attendance by this office is mandatory before any educational benefits can be received. The Veterans Affairs School Certifying Officials are located in the Registrar/Student Records/Veterans Affairs Office in the Administration Building. Residential Life Vincennes University offers living facilities in air-conditioned residence halls conveniently located in the heart of the campus. Residence Hall contracts have three meal plan options: A. 10 meal plan – any 10 meals of the 19 meals offered B. 14 meal plan - any 14 meals of the 19 meals offered C. 19 meal plan – three meals Monday-Friday and brunch and dinner Saturday and Sunday Students may now choose from meal plan options which include Flex Dollars. Flex Dollars can be used at the Beckes Student Union Food Court, Grinders Coffee Shop or Tecumseh Dining Center. D. 10 meal plan plus $250 Flex Dollars E. 14 meal plan plus $150 Flex Dollars F. 19 meal plan plus $50 Flex Dollars Six residence halls are located on the Vincennes University campus. All residence halls are tobacco and smoke free. Wireless access in public areas is available in all halls. A brief description about each hall is listed below: Clark Hall, a three story residence hall received a $10 million renovation during the 200708 school year. It reopened in Fall 2008 and includes suite style living consisting of 2 bedrooms for 4 students, 2 bathrooms, and shared living room. Private and handicap accessible rooms are also available. Facility features include a home theatre, computer/study areas, laundry, kitchen, recreational/entertainment areas and card access entry. It is located next to the Shake Learning Resource Center. The Housing/Residential Life office is located in Clark Hall. Godare Hall, a three story residence hall, houses 400 students in double rooms. This hall can be used as a single sex or co-ed occupancy depending on enrollment and will include regular visitation hours and extended visitation hours for students who meet residency requirements. Godare Hall is located near Vigo Hall, the Physical Education Complex and the Student Recreation Center.

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Harrison Hall, a two story brick residence hall, is an all male residence hall. This hall houses students in private and double room settings. Harrison Hall is near the Shake Learning Resource Center and other academic buildings. The Student Health Center is housed in Harrison Hall. Morris Hall is a three story brick residence hall where double rooms are available. This hall includes study areas and a recreation room. The hall is located next to Tecumseh Dining Center. Vanderburgh Hall is an all female residence hall housing 424 students. Female students enjoy adjoining two room suites with a shared bath. This hall includes computer/study areas, recreation/TV lounge, and classroom space. The hall is located next to the Student Recreation Center. Vanderburgh Hall includes both regular visitation and extended visitation hours for students who meet residency requirements. Vigo Hall is a three story residence hall housing 412 students. Double rooms for males and double and private rooms for females are available. This hall houses our Learning Communities and is located near the Physical Education Complex. The Placement, Career and Disability Services, and COPE Student Support Services offices are all located in Vigo Hall. All unmarried students under twenty-one years of age are required to live in University residence halls when space is available unless they reside with parents or legal guardians. Military veterans are exempted from this rule. Contact the Housing/Residental Life office at 812-888-4225 or www.vinu.edu future students tab for information regarding housing options and contract information. Student Health Service The Vincennes University Health Office is located in the William Henry Harrison Residence Hall, to the left of the main lobby. The Health Office is staffed with two registered nurses and services are administered under the supervision of the University consultant physicians at the Medical Center of Vincennes. The University nurses are available for assessment of illnesses and injuries on a ten minute appointment schedule. They may provide over-the-counter medications, initial care and followup care of injuries, tetanus/diphtheria injections following an injury when indicated, and tuberculin screening, as well as administration of required immunizations. The Health Office maintains student immunization records as required under the Indiana College Immunization Law. Vincennes University, in cooperation with the Medical Center of Vincennes has developed a medical care program for students. This cooperative venture has been developed to better serve the medical needs of Vincennes University students and to help decrease the cost of medical services for students. The medical program is included in the room and board fee for Resident Hall students. Off-campus students may enroll in the program by completing an application form and submitting the semester program fee to the VU Health Services by the end of the second week of classes. Under the Vincennes University Student Medical Care Program, physician office call charges for acute problems will be covered. The student will be responsible for a $5.00 copayment to the Medical Center of Vincennes at the time of service. Follow-up forms are given to each student referred to physicians. These forms, completed by the physician, are to be returned to the Health Office after the appointment to be filed with the student's health record. Vincennes University Health Service physical/immunization requirements and forms can be viewed or downloaded from the Health Office web page. Click on the “Student Services” tab at top of page, click on “Health Office” on the left side of the page, and finally click on “Forms”.

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TRIO Programs. Vincennes University’s federally-funded TRIO Programs are educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Vincennes University hosts five outreach and support programs targeted to serve and assist low-income, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to college programs. The secondary programs include: Educational Talent Search, Project ASPIREE and Upward Bound. The post-secondary programs include COPE Student Support Services and Veterans Upward Bound. Student Transition into Education Programs (STEP) STEP is an academic support program providing comprehensive services for learning disabled and AD/HD students in the university mainstream. STEP is designed to help students be more successful in their college courses. Student strengths, rather than deficits, are the emphasis. Compensatory techniques, rather than remediation, are the thrust. STEP is designed to give LD and AD/HD students the opportunity to develop their own unique abilities and to achieve their highest academic potential. Students are encouraged to develop a sense of self-worth and the skills needed to function and learn independently in college. Admission to the program is based on completion of the application process, determination of student eligibility, available funding, and space remaining. Space in the program is limited and early application is important. The STEP fee is $408 per semester. All incoming STEP students are required to major in general studies their first semester at VU. University Police Department The Vincennes University Police Department is operated and available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Authority of the sworn officers is derived from State Statutes, which allow for full police powers on the Vincennes University campus. Our mission is to provide a safe and secure campus for all individuals at VU. All campus police officers undergo an extensive selection process and meet state mandated training requirements. For more information about our department and available services call 812-888-5555 or visit our web site at www.vinu.edu/police.

Student Center
The Student Center located on the second floor of the Beckes Student Union houses the Dean of Students, Student Activities, Mulitcultural and International Student offices. Through partnerships and cooperative efforts, these offices work together to serve the students at Vincennes University. International and Multicultural Student Affairs The Office of International and Multicultural Student Affairs is dedicated to developing healthy perspectives of cultural differences through educational, cultural and social programming activities. The office actively supports student organizations, offers guidance on issues related to diversity, and strives to promote and incorporate an appreciation for the multicultural nature of our society with the collective campus community. Programs and activities sponsored and co-sponsored by the office are designed to create a campus climate that welcomes diversity, eliminates divisions, and decreases intolerance and stereotyping. Therefore, this office embraces all students and endeavors to create awareness, appreciation, action and advocacy around issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, culture, ethnicity and national origin through passive and active programs, speakers, lecture series and community service. Clubs and Organizations affiliated with this office include:  Black Males Initiative (BMI)  Black Student Association (BSA)  Embracing Latino Heritage Club  Essence of Worship Gospel Choir  International Club (IC)  Muslim Student Association
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  

Today’s Black Women (TBW) VU Pride (Gay – Straight Alliance) Women of Essence

Student Activities Students are encouraged to seek opportunities for personal development and enrichment through attendance and participation in extra-curricular programs and activities, including athletics, physical fitness, theatre productions, musical organizations, Leadership and Impact Series and student clubs. Students may take an active role in planning and promoting all campus events by becoming a member of the Campus Activities Board (CAB). Athletics. Vincennes University has a well-rounded intercollegiate sports program. The University believes that sports play an important role in the overall purpose of an educational institution. The University's intercollegiate men's and women's teams are very competitive on a national level. They have won several national championships and have had numerous AllAmerican athletes and All-American Academic Athletes on various intercollegiate teams. Intramural-Recreational Sports Program. The Intramural-Recreational Sports program is designed to provide recreational opportunities for all students. Students may choose to participate in a wide variety of activities ranging from highly competitive team sports to individual and dual sports activities with a more friendly atmosphere. Leagues, tournaments and one day meet events are structured in a way that encourages individual involvement or participation with an organized team representing a residence hall unit, social fraternity/sorority, major area or special interest club, or an independent team/organization. In addition, a co-recreational sports program is available for those individuals who wish to participate in sports activities in a relaxed social atmosphere with both males and females competing together. The development of wholesome competition through enjoyable participation in physical activities is an essential aspect of a wellrounded college education. The Intramural-Recreational Sports Program strives to fulfill that need through its variety of program offerings. Physical Education Complex Facilities. Students will find facilities at the Physical Education Complex for a variety of recreational, competitive and physical fitness activities. Indoor activity facilities include a swimming pool, bowling center/snack bar with billiards and video games, racquet ball courts, dance studio, archery/martial arts room, multipurpose courts, locker/shower rooms, saunas and state-of-the-art Trailblazer Fitness Center. Outdoor facilities include tennis courts, softball fields, sand volleyball courts, and a 400 meter track. Donald G. Bell Student Recreation Center. The Donald G. Bell Student Recreation Center is a state-of-the-art recreation facility that provides Vincennes University students a variety of recreation opportunities at times that are conducive to their schedules. The Center includes nearly 6,000 square feet of physical fitness equipment ranging from a wide selection of cardio equipment, to selectorized weight machines, to an extensive free weight area. The “fieldhouse” section of the Center houses a 200-meter running/jogging track plus four court areas that provide opportunities for basketball, volleyball, and tennis. The Center also includes both men’s and women’s steam rooms, equipment check-out areas, and a student lounge area. Cultural, Social, and Traditional Events. The Tube Race, Homecoming, Family Weekends, and the Miss Vincennes University Pageant are among the outstanding traditional events at Vincennes University. The Alumni Office sponsors a Community Series program which features outstanding performers in various fields. The Vincennes University Theatre Department, Musical Theatre, and Summer Theatre offer a full season of student dramatic and musical productions. The International Student Affairs office hosts a number of cultural banquets throughout the year which highlight various countries and cultures. The banquets include student involvement as well as professional entertainment.

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Student Government (SGA). The Student Government is authorized by the Board of Trustees to service the student body by providing the means to recommend and advise the University in matters pertaining to the general welfare of students. Students are urged to take an active role in the activities of SGA. The SGA is made up of the Executive Council which is comprised of four executive officers, four commissioners and the Student Trustee who lead the SGA, two representatives from each residence hall, two commuter representatives, and eight at-large representatives. These are all elected positions, with the exception of the Student Trustee and the Commissioner of Activities. Clubs and Organizations Academic Interest Groups. These organizations are associated with specific fields of study and provide additional experience developed through group activities. Examples are Auto Mechanics Club and Business Professionals of America (BPA). National Junior College Honoraries. National honorary societies are represented on the campus, emphasizing scholastic or outstanding work in various fields. An example is Phi Theta Kappa. Performing Arts Groups. Students have the opportunity to belong to groups representing the performing arts. Many programs and productions are presented providing students with opportunity to display their talents in a live theatre situation. Examples include choir, band, drama, dance, and art. Special Interest Groups. These organizations are open to students that have an interest in some special activity. Included in this category are such groups as VU Pride (Gay - Straight Alliance) and The International Student Association. Religious Organizations. Campus Ministries and Christian Campus Fellowship provide the religious programming which serves all students. There are several other religious organizations that provide religious study, weekly praise and fellowship opportunities.

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Academic Information
General Academic Policies and Procedures ............................................................................... 55 Definitions ............................................................................................................................... 55 Effective Catalog ..................................................................................................................... 55 Academic Load ........................................................................................................................ 56 Recentered Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Scores ................................................................ 57 Acceptance and Application of Transfer Credit ...................................................................... 57 Higher Education Transfer Alliance Criteria .................................................................... 57 Indiana’s Core Transfer Library ........................................................................................ 58 Earning Credit Through Standardized Testing ........................................................................ 58 College Level Examination Program (CLEP) ................................................................... 58 DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST).................................................................. 58 Excelsior College Examinations (ECE) ............................................................................ 58 College Board Advanced Placement Program .................................................................. 58 Department Exams ............................................................................................................ 59 Early Completion Credit .......................................................................................................... 60 Credit by Examination/Business Courses ................................................................................ 60 Non-collegiate Certification Credit.......................................................................................... 61 Honors Program ....................................................................................................................... 61 Developmental Studies Program.............................................................................................. 62 Change of Curriculum.............................................................................................................. 62 Dropping and Adding Classes ................................................................................................. 62 Transcripts ............................................................................................................................... 63 Attendance Policy .................................................................................................................... 63 Faculty-Initiated Withdrawal of Students from Class.............................................................. 64 Student-Initiated Withdrawal from Class ................................................................................ 64 Withdrawal from School .......................................................................................................... 64 Evaluation and Grading System ................................................................................................. 65 Definitions ............................................................................................................................... 65 Grading System........................................................................................................................ 65 Final Examinations .................................................................................................................. 66 Dean's List................................................................................................................................ 67 Standards of Progress ............................................................................................................... 67 Academic Probation ................................................................................................................. 67 Warning Status ......................................................................................................................... 67 Repeating Courses for Recalculation of Grade Point Average ................................................ 68 Degree and Certificate Requirements for Graduation ............................................................. 68 Degrees Offered ....................................................................................................................... 68 Baccalaureate Degrees ...................................................................................................... 68 Associate Degrees ............................................................................................................. 68 Certificates Offered .................................................................................................................. 68 Certificate of Graduation ................................................................................................... 68 Certificate of Program Completion ................................................................................... 69 Customized Certificate of Applied Learning .................................................................... 69 Technical Certificate for Business and Industry Training ................................................. 69 College Readiness Program ..................................................................................................... 69 Degrees Awarded with Honors ................................................................................................ 70 Awarding of Additional Degrees ............................................................................................. 70 Requirements for Graduation ................................................................................................... 70 Petitions for Graduation ........................................................................................................... 71

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General Education ........................................................................................................................ 71 General Education Skills.......................................................................................................... 71 Definition of General Education .............................................................................................. 73 General Education Models ....................................................................................................... 74 General Education Model for Associate Degrees ............................................................. 74 General Education Model for Baccalaureate Degrees ....................................................... 75 Human Issues and Dilemmas Course Requirement ................................................................. 76 Capstone Experience Requirement .......................................................................................... 76 Basic Skills Core ...................................................................................................................... 77 Computer Skills ....................................................................................................................... 81 Liberal Education Core List ..................................................................................................... 81

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General Academic Policies and Procedures
Definitions For the purposes of all the following academic policies and procedures, the following definitions will apply: Academic Advisor: A member of the faculty or administrative staff who works with each student individually to select courses in which that student will enroll each semester, answer questions related to the student's program of study, and facilitate adherence to the University's academic policies and procedures. Credit Hour: A unit of instructional credit normally associated with each class hour of lecture/discussion or each two to three class hours of laboratory/studio/clinical instruction. Grade Point Average (GPA): See definitions, Evaluations and Grading System (page 65). Class Level Names: Freshman, completion of 1-30 credit hours; Sophomore, 31-60 credit hours; Junior, 61-90 credit hours; Senior, 90+ credit hours. Curriculum (Program): A program of study that includes courses from the student's chosen major, selected general education offerings and courses supportive of the student's major. Degree: A general framework of study intended to develop the knowledge and skills required for the conferring of an academic title. Major: A defined program of study. Program requirements within a major constitute at least 40% of the total credit hours required for degree completion. Concentration: An area of emphasis within a major. At least 50% of the credit hours of the major program requirements of the originating program are embedded within the concentration. Effective Catalog Establishing Which Catalog Is the Effective Catalog. The effective catalog1 for a student is the current catalog2 for the first semester3 for which the student has registered4 for class at Vincennes University as an admitted student.5 That catalog remains the effective catalog for the student unless:

The "effective catalog" is the catalog that establishes the requirements that a student must meet to earn a degree or certificate in the student's selected program at Vincennes University. These requirements include major course requirements and general education requirements that the student must complete; levels of attainment that the student must achieve; and tests, portfolios, and other assessment that the student must successfully accomplish. Other areas (for example, fees, attendance policies, financial aid policies, records policies, or rules of student conduct) listed in the catalog are not set by the "effective catalog" and Vincennes University may freely change these other areas as appropriate. Course requirements that a student must meet to successfully complete an individual course are those in effect at the time the student enrolls or re-enrolls in that course.
2

1

The "current catalog" means either the printed or electronic catalog that governs a particular academic year beginning the first day of the Fall Semester. "Semester" includes Fall or Spring Semester, intersessions, and any summer session.

3

4 A student is not considered "registered" for a class if the student never attends the class, if the student withdraws from the class within the first two weeks of class, or if the student is withdrawn or deregistered from the class within the first two weeks of class. 5

See Requirements for Admission on pages 7, 8 and 9 of this Catalog.

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1. The student and the program advisor agree to make a later catalog the effective catalog with approval of the department chair, or 2. The student does not register in at least one class within a period of sixteen months. In this case, the effective catalog will be the current catalog for the first Semester for which the student is admitted and registered for class at Vincennes University after the sixteen consecutive months' absence. The program advisor and division dean may agree to extend the sixteen month period for a particular student in case of emergency or hardship, thereby allowing the student to keep the original effective catalog; or 3. The student changes programs in which case the effective catalog will be determined by agreement between the student and the advisor of the student's new program with the approval of the department chair. Exceptions to the Effective Catalog. Despite anything in the effective catalog to the contrary: 1. Changes in professional licensing or certification qualifications and standards may make changes in degree or certificate requirements for a student unavoidable. 2. Any program may establish a written policy, published in the catalog, to verify the currency of knowledge and skills of a student when a student enters or reenters the program with previous Vincennes University or transfer coursework. Under the policy, the program either may require a student whose knowledge and skills are not current to retake coursework or may deny the student admission or readmission to the program. 3. If Vincennes University cancels a program, the University has no obligation to allow a student to complete the cancelled program more than two years for any associate degree and after three years for any baccalaureate degree after last permitting students to enter that program. Academic Load Vincennes University defines a full-time student as one who carries twelve or more credit hours during a semester. An average academic load, however, ranges from fifteen to seventeen credit hours. Certain programs require more than seventeen credit hours per semester in order for the program to be completed in two school years for any associate degree and four school years for any baccalaureate degree. In some instances, depending upon the program and the student's ability and academic background, it would be more desirable for the student to enroll in fewer hours each semester. This may require that the student either complete coursework during one or more summer sessions or plan to take more than the four-to-eight semesters normally proposed in order to complete his/her program of study. Since academic success for each of its students is a major goal of Vincennes University, it is strongly recommended that any student working full time carry no more than twelve credit hours per semester. While the normal "maximum load" is seventeen credit hours, the student's academic advisor may approve additional hours. The student and the advisor should jointly consider the student's availability of time, academic performance, and course needs before selecting extra hours. The following standards are not mandatory, but should be considered as part of the extra hours decision: eighteen hours for a student with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.5, nineteen hours with 3.0, twenty hours with 3.5, and twenty-one hours with 4.0. In contrast to the extra hours situation, Vincennes University strongly recommends that any student enrolled in one or more developmental courses should carry a reduced load. Placement into developmental courses occurs only when there is evidence that the student's academic preparation is not sufficient to warrant enrollment in a full schedule of college-level coursework. Further, the need for developmental education may require that the student enroll in more than the four-to-eight normally expected regular full-time semesters in order to complete program requirements. All required developmental hours must be completed before students may enter baccalaureate programs or begin to take 300-400 level courses. The academic load of all students required to take 10 credit hours of –009 courses in their first semester is limited to 15 hours. Exceptions will be permitted only in majors which demonstrate the need for a specific foundations course to “keep a student in contact with his/her major.”
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Such exceptions must be voted upon and approved by the full Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee. Exceptions to the 15 credit hour load will be granted to programs, not individual students, and divisions must apply for the exception using the form developed for this purpose. Recentered Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Scores Students are hereby advised that the Vincennes University catalog has been published using only recentered SAT scores. Therefore, for any students who submit the "old" SAT scores, Vincennes University will convert those "old" scores to recentered scores in order for course placements that depend upon them to be made. Acceptance and Application of Transfer Credit  Higher Education Transfer Alliance Criteria Vincennes University is a member of the Higher Education Transfer Alliance (HETA), a voluntary body which was created by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), itself a governing body in the realm of higher education accreditation. In accordance with its HETA membership, Vincennes University officials make their course transfer decisions as indicated by the following four Criteria: 1. Course content similarity is determined by the receiving department. In addition, HETA requires that Vincennes University provide to the students the reasons for accepting or not accepting courses for credit, including deficiencies of course quality, significant differences in content from the receiving institution’s similarly named course(s), and, if appropriate, the lack of comparability with courses in the student’s designated major. Vincennes University normally accepts credits toward completion of a degree from postsecondary institutions which are accredited for transfer by a regional accrediting association, but does not refuse courses solely because they may originate in non-regionally accredited institutions. The following are corollaries to Criterion 1: a. the review process begins upon receipt of an official transcript mailed from another college or university directly to Vincennes University; b. when transferred as “courses only,” courses receiving less than a C- grade will not be accepted by the University; c. when transferred as part of a completed associate degree as a qualification to enter a baccalaureate degree, the University will accept D grades unless the baccalaureate program specifically requires a minimum of a C in that course; d. Only credit hours are transferred; grades do not transfer and are not calculated into the student’s Vincennes University GPA; e. for students transferring hours toward baccalaureate degrees, Vincennes University will accept up to 65 transfer credit hours. Additional hours may be accepted as transfer credit after consultation with the appropriate academic department; f. Vincennes University reserves the right to review its own courses and all transfer courses for currency of content. 2. Vincennes University, recognizing the changes in student enrollment trends in the United States, strives to be consistent in applying its basic transfer principles to courses from all institutions in order to ensure that students are treated fairly. 3. Vincennes University will apply a higher priority to follow the success of transfer students as they take Vincennes University courses which are sequential to key transfer courses. When a trend emerges and demonstrates that a particular course from a particular institution has not adequately prepared students for these sequential courses, Vincennes University will inform both incoming students from that institution and the institution itself of its course’s deficiency. 4. Vincennes University has the flexibility, within the guidance of the offering program, to accept transfer courses as reasonable course substitutes when the transfer course(s) meets learning goals similar to the required VU courses(s). The following are corollaries to Criterion 4:

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a. when a transfer course is essentially equivalent to a Vincennes University course except for different numbers of credit hours, Vincennes University may accept the hours not applied to a specific course as departmental undistributed elective hours; b. the division dean of the course may authorize the waiver of a required course when more than half of the hours of the individual Vincennes University course are being accepted as undistributed elective transfer hours. Indiana’s Core Transfer Library Indiana’s Core Transfer Library (CTL) is a listing of courses that will transfer to all Indiana public college and university campuses in one of two ways: 1) the CTL course will receive credit for the designated equivalent course at the transfer campus and meet the transfer campus degree program requirements in an equivalent manner, or 2) if there is no agreedupon directly equivalent course, the CTL course will transfer as an elective requirement of the undergraduate degree program provided the program has room for elective credits. CTL transferability is contingent upon a student earning a C grade or higher in the transfer course. These courses are indicated in the Vincennes University catalog and schedule with the transferIN attribute.* For more information on the CTL and a listing of current CTL courses, go to http://www.vinu.edu and click on the Academic Resources tab. *Courses that do not have the transferIN designation will fall into one of the following categories: (1) will transfer to most Indiana public institutions; (2) will transfer to some Indiana public institutions; (3) will transfer to only one or two Indiana public institutions; (4) is not a transfer course. Contact your advisor or transfer institution to determine applicability for any course you wish to transfer.

Earning Credit Through Standardized Testing In addition to transfer credit, students achieving the required minimum score may also earn academic credit from CLEP general examinations or subject examinations; USAFI, ECE or DANTES courses or tests; service school courses and military science credits in accordance with the ACE Guide and College Board Advanced Placement Program.  College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Vincennes University is an approved CLEP Testing Center. CLEP is the most widely accepted credit-by-examination program in the country with more than 2,800 accredited institutions of higher education awarding credit for satisfactory scores on CLEP examinations. CLEP offers General Examinations in broad liberal arts areas and Subject Examinations in many specific subjects, such as accounting, biology, mathematics, psychology, and foreign languages. CLEP tests are administered by the Assessment Center at Vincennes University. DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST). Vincennes University serves as a test center for DANTES Subject Standardized Tests. The Defense Activity for Non-traditional Education Support (DANTES) has made it possible for non-military personnel to utilize this testing service. Individuals who take and pass a DANTES test are entitled to request college credit for the course represented by the exam. Students seeking information about DANTES testing should contact the Military Education Office. DANTES tests are administered by the Assessment Center at Vincennes University. Excelsior College Examinations (ECE). These examinations are offered by Excelsior College (formerly Regents College). The exams were formerly known as ACT PEP (American College Testing Proficiency Examination Program) and Regents College exams. College Board Advanced Placement Program. Vincennes University participates in the College Board Advanced Placement Program. Students must arrange for the Advanced Placement College Grade Report to be sent to the Office of Admissions at Vincennes University. Students should contact the respective departments, the Office of Admissions or the Office of the Registrar for minimum acceptable scores in the various subject areas beyond those listed below.
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Score V.U. Credit Division of Social Science 3, 4 or 5 3, 4 or 5 ECON 201 ECON 202 HIST 139 HIST 139 and HIST 140 HIST 131 HIST 131 and HIST 132 POLS 111

History/Government 3 4-5 3 4-5 3, 4 or 5 Psychology 3, 4 or 5 PSYC 142 Division of Humanities Art General Portfolio Art History 3, 4 or 5 3 4 or 5 English Language and Composition Literature and Composition Foreign Language French French German German Spanish Spanish Chemistry 4 5 Mathematics AB AB BC BC Biology 3 4-5 3 4-5 4 5 Physics CB Mechanics C Electricity and Magnetism B B 5 5 4 5 CHEM 105/105L CHEM 105/105L and CHEM 106L MATH 115 MATH 118 MATH 118 or MATH 115 and MATH 116 MATH 118 and MATH 119 BIOL 105/105L BIOL 105/105L and BIOL 106/106L PHYS 205 PHYS 206/206L PHYS 105/105L PHYS 105/105L and PHYS 106/106L 3, 4 or 5 3, 4 or 5 3 hours undesignated ARTT elective credit ARTT 110 ARTT 131 3 hours undesignated ENGL credit 3 hours undesignated LITR or ENGL credit

2 FREN 101 3, 4 or 5 FREN 101 and 103 2 GRMN 101 3, 4 or 5 GRMN 101and 103 2 SPAN 101 3, 4 or 5 SPAN 101 and 103 Division of Science and Mathematics



Departmental Exams. Advanced placement in certain courses is granted on the basis of department examinations. Only a grade of Cr (credit) may be awarded to a student who establishes advanced placement credit. Students will not be assessed tuition charges for credit earned by advanced placement. Students are not exempt from general education requirements based on national standardized achievement test scores (SAT, ACT) or placement exam scores, such as CPT, COMPASS, or ASSET. Students who place in and complete the following courses with the grades indicated will receive the corresponding departmental advanced placement credit. Students planning to transfer should check with the baccalaureate institution regarding its policies for accepting advanced placement credit.
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Course Number Business1 ACCT 112 Foreign Languages2 ASLG 103 ASLG 201 FREN, GRMN or SPAN 103 FREN, GRMN or SPAN 201 or above Chemistry3 CHEM 106 and CHML 106 CHEM 215 and CHML 215 Mathematics MATH 115 MATH 119 Physics PHYS 106 and PHYL 106

Grade C or better C or better C or better C or better C or better

Departmental Advanced Placement Credit 3 hours of ACCT 111 5 hours of ASLG 101 5 hours of ASLG 101 and 5 hours of ASLG 103 4 hours of FREN/GRMN/SPAN 101 4 hours of FREN/GRMN/SPAN 101 and 4 hours of FREN/GRMN/SPAN 103 3 hours of CHEM 105 and 2 hours of CHML 105 3 hours of CHEM 105, 2 hours of CHML 105, 3 hours of CHEM 106 and 2 hours of CHML 106 3 hours of MATH 102 5 hours of MATH 118 4 hours of PHYS 105 and 1 hour of PHYL 105

C or better C or better

C or better C or better C or better

Early Completion Credit Students seeking early completion credit are to enroll in the course with the regular tuition and fee charges. Laboratory fees will be refunded if early completion is accomplished by the close of the semester's drop and add period. Students seeking early completion credit must fill out the appropriate form which originates with the dean of the division offering the course. Students must request early completion by midterm week. Students may elect to do early completion for a grade of A, B or C or if unsuccessful they must remain in the course. The early completion credit option is available only to students who are enrolled in at least one other non-early completion credit course. Early completion may not be used to replace a grade previously achieved in the course. The maximum number of hours in which a student may receive early completion credit is eighteen. The assigned material for early completion credit will be approved by the department or program chairperson and by the division dean. The completed and evaluated student assignments will be filed in the appropriate division office. Credit by Examination/Business Courses The Division of Business and Public Service offers students who have graduated from high schools that have articulation agreements with Vincennes University or have validated course competencies the option to take the Business departmental examinations to establish Credit by Examination in selected introductory level business courses. These articulation agreements must be based upon certification of specific course competencies agreed upon mutually by appropriate representatives of the University and the high school. A grade of Cr (Credit) will be awarded in applicable courses to students who (1) meet the required competencies as demonstrated by successful completion of the appropriate departmental examination(s) and (2) require no remediation. An examination fee of $15 per course credit hour will be assessed to the student regardless of whether credit is established.

1 The Division of Business offers students who have graduated from high schools that have articulation agreements with Vincennes University or have validated course competencies the option to enroll in "Advanced Placement" classes in selected introductory courses. Enrolling students must (1) meet the required course competencies, (2) require no remediation in their particular program and (3) complete the advanced class with a grade of C or greater. 2

No extra credit will be granted if the foreign language course grade is less than C. Extra credit through advanced placement will be granted only one time per language to any one student. Departmental examinations will be administered to determine placement. Department standards in the form of an examination prepared by the chemistry faculty are used for placement. Advanced placement credit will not be granted if the sequential course in chemistry is completed with a grade of less than C.

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Students who prefer to meet the criteria for traditional course letter grades rather than grades of Cr should consider the options of Early Completion or regular course enrollment. Non-collegiate Certification Credit Vincennes University recognizes that persons may acquire significant learning in noncollegiate settings. Often these persons possess sufficient knowledge that specialized certifications have been earned. In some instances this learning and knowledge may be recognized and corresponding collegiate credits may be awarded when specific competencies and proficiencies are documented and/or demonstrated. Honors Program The Honors Program provides opportunities for multi-talented scholars that are not available to the average student. This includes honors program advising, honors only courses, preprofessional activities, honors designation on transcript, and special housing options for A.S., A.A., or A.A.S. degree seeking students. Students who wish to pursue the Honors Program may apply as follows: Option 1 – For U.S. Students  Have a minimum SAT score of at least 530 in both writing and verbal or a minimum ACT score of 23  Complete and submit the Honors Program application form: www.vinu.edu/honors Option 2—For Transfer Students and those already enrolled at VU  Complete 12 hours of quality college-level course work  Hold a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3  Hold a minimum grade of B in either ENGL 101 or ENGL 112 (or equivalency)  Complete and submit the Honors Program application form: www.vinu.edu/honors Option 3—For International Students  Have a minimum TOEFL score of 528  Complete and submit the Honors Program application form: www.vinu.edu/honors  Achieve a minimum of 93 on the Reading portion of the CPTS placement test*  Achieve a minimum of 120 on the English portion of the CPTS placement test*  Achieve a minimum of 53 on the Math portion of the CPTS placement test* *This test is provided upon arrival at VU. To remain in good standing with the Honors Program and make progress toward graduation, students will be required to be enrolled in an Honors Program course each semester and to maintain an overall grade point average of B (3.0). Honors Program Courses  HUMH 221and HUMH 222 Honors Humanities I and II (6 hours) These two courses will fulfill the Comp II requirement as well as the Humanities elective requirement in the Humanities Common Core for General Education.  SOCH 211 Honors Contemporary Civilization (3 hours) This course will fulfill the Social Science elective requirement for 3 credit hours in the Liberal Education Core. This course can satisfy the Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives requirement for the baccalaureate degree..  Honors Special Topics Course (1 to 3 credit hours) To graduate with the Honors Program designation on their transcript, students will be required to meet the following criteria:  successfully complete all required Honors courses with a C or better grade,  meet all academic program requirements for the major, and  possess a B+ overall grade point average (3.3).

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Developmental Studies Program The Developmental Studies Program is designed for students who need additional preparation before entering a full associate or baccalaureate degree program. It provides students the opportunity to take developmental courses that help improve reading, writing, speaking, math and study skills. Completion of developmental coursework with a grade of C or better promotes the greatest chance for successful completion of college-level coursework. Developmental courses all have a course number under 100. Developmental course credits are not included in graduation requirements that count toward any degree or certificate. Placement in developmental courses is based on a combination of SAT and institutional test scores. Some students may only need to improve their skills in one area; others may require one or more semesters of developmental courses. In some situations, college-level coursework can be taken during the same semester in which the student is enrolled in developmental coursework. Institutional credit granted for developmental courses will not satisfy general education requirements, nor do such courses fulfill graduation requirements. Grades and credit hours earned in developmental courses are not included in the computation of GPA. Students enrolled in developmental studies must have met the established minimum requirements after two semesters of enrollment in a developmental studies course. Students who fail to meet the minimum requirements will be ineligible to continue in an associate degree program. Requests for exceptions to this policy should be directed to the Dean of Students. All students whose placement indicates the need for developmental classes are required to enroll in developmental classes each semester until developmental requirements are satisfied. Students must successfully complete institutionally required developmental courses prior to being eligible for an associate degree or admission to a baccalaureate degree. Protected courses have prerequisites that require students to complete certain academic requirements before enrolling in college level courses. Enrollment in protected courses is open only to students who are able to demonstrate appropriate academic skill levels, either through placement test scores or completion of the prescribed courses. Protected courses have prerequisites, corequisites, and recommended classes to ensure that students have sufficient hours to maintain full-time status and that students have a better chance of success when they enroll in college level courses. Protected courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog with a §. A complete list of protected courses and information regarding departmental basic skills requirements is available from the Director of Developmental Education. The term "successful completion" will be used to establish levels of prerequisite accomplishments for enrollment in courses. As used in the catalog, "successful completion" is defined as having earned a grade of C or better in the prerequisite course. Change of Curriculum A student may change his/her curriculum by obtaining the appropriate form from his/her academic advisor, obtaining the signatures requested on the form, and filing the change with the Registrar’s Office. While it is the student's right to request a change in curriculum, if the proposed change of curriculum seems contrary to the student's best interests, a committee composed of the Dean of Students, the Registrar, and division dean of the student's proposed new curriculum may be called upon to make the final decision regarding the proposed change. Once the student begins his/her new program, the academic advisor of the new curriculum can request that the student’s grade point average be recalculated excluding D and F grades earned in courses which do not apply to the new curriculum. If the student was on probation in the previous curriculum, the student will enter the new curriculum on probation. Dropping and Adding Classes A student should check both course requirements for his/her curriculum and his/her financial aid status before dropping any class. Class withdrawals are not permitted in some required courses. Drop and Add forms may be obtained from the student's academic advisor. The fifth day of classes will be the last day the student may enroll or make changes in registration without official approval. After the fifth day of class, the student will not be allowed to change his/her class schedule by adding classes or changing course sections except within the following situations:
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1. A student who has completed registration with a conflict in time between classes. A conflict would occur when two or more of a student's classes meet for any part of an hour simultaneously. 2. A verified change in a student's off-campus work schedule that causes a conflict with a class. 3. A change in the student's major or educational goal as confirmed and recommended by the academic advisor. 4. A change in a student's schedule by a department or division representative caused by advanced placement or early completion. All exceptions must be approved by the appropriate faculty member, division dean, and Registrar. A student who changes status from a full-time student (twelve or more credit hours in a semester) to a part-time student must have the approval of the Dean of Students. Transcripts A transcript of a student's academic record at Vincennes University is available upon the student's written request to the Registrar's Office. Any transcript issued directly to the student will be marked as such and will be considered unofficial. Official transcripts are those requested in writing by the student, marked with the official seal of the University Registrar, and sent directly by the Registrar's Office to other universities, certification agencies, employers, etc. Attendance Policy Philosophy of Attendance. The Vincennes University policy is premised upon the notion that students will attend all sessions of the classes in which they are enrolled. This policy supports Vincennes University's philosophy that students benefit most from the people and facilities provided by the citizens of Indiana through proper and adequate class attendance. Consequently, missing class for any reason will be regarded as an absence. When absences result from an approved and required University activity, they will not be counted against a student, and the work missed may be made up. Vincennes University believes that students who participate in University-sponsored activities and faculty-developed field trips must develop habits of attendance consistent with such participation, or voluntarily refrain from such participation. For whatever reason an absence occurs, the student is responsible for the work missed. Procedures for Verification of Absences by Students. In most cases, absences which occur as the result of participation in a University-sponsored event--for example, intercollegiate sporting events--need no verification provided by the student. Usually, professors who develop field trips that require students to miss the classes of other faculty members will inform the Dean of Students of that event, the names of students involved, and the names of the professors (as provided to the sponsoring faculty person by the students), whose classes will be missed, and the Dean of Students will send an official notice to all professors on the listing. However, it is always to the students' benefit to make certain that their professors are aware of their participation in University-sponsored events or course-related field trips. When a student misses class for some reason other than a University-sponsored or course-related event, the responsibility to provide verification to the Dean of Students' Office falls directly and solely upon the student. 1. Upon his/her return to classes, the student must complete an Absence form, available at the Office of the Dean of Students. At that time, the student must provide verification of the reason for absences such as illness treated by an off-campus physician, a court appearance, a death in the family, among other possible situations. (Verification means to document that the reason is true by providing evidence.) 2. Any student who visits the campus nurse as part of a limited illness must fill out an Absence form as part of that visit if an absence is advised by the nurse. The University Health Services personnel are the only University staff authorized to offer verification of a student's illness.

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3. Students who wish to make-up work (tests, quizzes, laboratory sessions, paper submissions, among others) missed as the consequence of a non-University caused absence must complete a Request for Make-up Privilege form at the Office of the Dean of Students. The final decision in this matter is made by the faculty person. Faculty-Initiated Withdrawal of Students from Class Students who miss class hours totaling twice the number of credit hours awarded for the course, or the equivalent of two weeks of class instruction, are eligible to be dropped from class. The faculty member may initiate the withdrawal by filling out a Drop for Non-Attendance form. The Dean of Students notifies students when they have been dropped from class and of their right to appeal. Only the student may appeal such a drop for non-attendance, and the student has two possible avenues for appeal. 1. The student may appeal directly to the faculty person for readmission to the course and must provide evidence of extenuating circumstances that caused the absences. The faculty person has the option to readmit the student without a formal appeal hearing. 2. The student may appeal the drop for attendance at the Dean of Students' Office by completing a Drop Petition Appeal form. The Dean of Students will then convene a hearing for the appeal at which readmission will be granted or denied. If there is extenuating information/evidence unknown to the faculty person or Dean of Students, the student is responsible to provide that information/evidence. The hearing is conducted by the Dean or Assistant Dean of Students and is attended by the student, the faculty person involved, and the faculty person's Dean or a representative of that Dean. Student-Initiated Withdrawal from Class Approved withdrawals that are initiated by the student may be made up to and including Friday of the tenth calendar week of each fall or spring semester. (This date may be adjusted for terms less than fifteen weeks in length. See Academic Calendar for exact dates.) Studentinitiated withdrawals will not be permitted after these dates except in case of extended illness, family emergency or other such unavoidable causes and then only with the consent of the class instructor, the student's academic advisor and the dean of the division of the student's major. The approved Drop and Add form is filed with the Registrar. Unless the student is failing the class, the student-initiated withdrawal from class will be recorded on the transcript as a W. If a student who is failing the course is dropped for non-attendance prior to two weeks before the end of the semester, the faculty may assign the grade of WF. Students are to be aware of their responsibility for making withdrawal decisions in time to meet calendar deadlines. Students should also be aware that withdrawals requested after these deadlines to avoid lower than desired course grades will not be considered. Withdrawal from School A student who voluntarily withdraws from the University must, in order to receive an honorable dismissal, notify the Dean of Students of his/her intention by completing a withdrawal card available in the Dean of Students' Office. Failure to conform to this regulation will result in the loss of credit in all subjects. The Dean of Students' Office will notify instructors when withdrawal procedures are complete. The University withdrawal refund policy is outlined on page 25 in this catalog. A student may be withdrawn from the University for medical reasons if he/she cannot psychologically function in the educational environment or has a contagious illness which cannot adequately be isolated in the educational environment. The University reserves the right to deny continued enrollment if the student is failing to make academic progress. Also, the University may deny admission or continued enrollment if the University does not have the resources to meet the academic needs of the student.

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Evaluation and Grading System
Definitions For the purposes of all the following academic policies, the following definitions will apply: Attempted Hours: All credit hours, including developmental courses, into which a student has registered as of the conclusion of the Drop and Add period. This category, therefore, includes all courses in which the student may earn any grade issued by the University. Earned Hours: Those credit hours in which a student has registered and in which grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, P, or CR have been earned. (In those cases where students repeat a course for recalculation of grade point average, the highest grade earned will be used to calculate the grade point average.) Developmental courses are included in earned hours. Quality Hours: All attempted hours, excluding developmental courses, in which a student earns a grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, D, F, or WF. (This total represents the divisor for determining the grade point average.) Quality Points: The sum of the products obtained by multiplying the number of credit hours for each course in which the student has enrolled and for which quality hours have been earned by the multipliers that correspond to grades earned using A = 4.0, A- = 3.7, B+ = 3.3, B = 3.0, B- = 2.7, C+ = 2.3, C = 2.0, D = 1.0, F = 0 and WF = 0. (This total represents the dividend for determining the grade point average.) Grade Point Average (GPA): The quotient obtained by dividing quality points earned by the number of quality hours completed. (Note: Grades and credit hours earned in developmental courses are not included in the computation of GPA.) Grading System The quality of a student's work is indicated by the semester grades reported by the instructors to the Registrar at the close of each term as follows: A and A- represent work of excellent quality; B+, B and B- represent work above average; C+ and C represent average work; D represents below average and non-transfer quality; and F represents not passing. For the purpose of calculating a student's grade point average and determining eligibility for the Dean's List and honors at commencement, the following points are assigned for each hour of credit earned with the corresponding grades: A = 4.0 points, A- = 3.7 points, B+ = 3.3 points, B = 3.0 points, B- = 2.7 points, C+ = 2.3 points, C = 2.0 points, D = 1.0 point, and F = no points. The grade CR (credit) represents course work completed at a C level or above. This grade may be awarded for advanced placement, experience-based learning documented through portfolio development, and certain special courses offered through the military education program. A grade of CR earned through enrollment in a Vincennes University course will remove from the calculation of the grade point average a D or F grade earned through previous enrollment in that same course, although no quality points will be assigned to the CR grade. In modularized, self-paced courses, the grade of DE (Deferred) may be assigned to those students who do not complete their course work in one semester. This grade will be assigned only to those students who attend class on a regular basis and as such does not replace either the W or I which will be issued as described in the following paragraphs. Students who received the deferred grade must re-enroll in the same course the following semester in order to complete the course. Such course re-enrollments will be counted as part of the student's tuition assessment. The DE will remain as part of the student's permanent record with credit and grade being granted during the semester in which the student completes the course. An Incomplete (I) grade may be given in cases where the final examination is omitted or assignments for the last few weeks of the semester are incomplete because of illness or for a cause judged unavoidable. Incomplete grades given for this purpose must be cleared with the appropriate division dean or the Dean of Students before being issued by the faculty. These inAcademic Information 65

complete grades must be made up by midterm of the following semester, or the I automatically becomes a W and the student must re-enroll and pass the course to establish credit. An extension of time to complete the required work may be requested by the faculty and authorized by the appropriate division dean who will in turn notify the Registrar. The RD (report delayed) grade may be issued as an interim course grade in those areas where it is not possible to assign course grades at the normal grade reporting period. This grade may be used as a semester-end grade for courses that are approved for open-entry, open-exit enrollment and completion, such as Degree Completion Program courses. This grade will not be used to permit the extension of work beyond a semester's end in any course that has prescribed beginning and ending dates. A W (withdrawn with passing grade) is recorded when a student is withdrawn within the first ten weeks of the semester or if extenuating circumstances exist and the previously mentioned approval has been granted. When a W is recorded for a course, that course is not included in calculating the grade point average. If a student who is failing a course is dropped from that course for reason of nonattendance prior to two weeks before the end of the last regularly scheduled class period, the faculty may assign the grade of withdrawn failing, WF. If a student who is not failing a course is dropped from that course for reason of non-attendance prior to two weeks before the end of the last regularly scheduled class period, the faculty may assign the grade of withdrawn not failing, WN. Occasionally circumstances may warrant changing a grade after it has been issued. Requests for grade changes must be submitted to the appropriate division or area dean. A student may enroll on a pass-fail (P/F) basis in any University course which is not required on his/her specific curriculum. Therefore, only those courses beyond the minimum number of credit hours required for the degree in which the student is enrolled may be taken on a pass-fail (P/F) basis. The student's pass-fail contract with the instructor is binding as of the close of the semester's drop and add period. Pass is defined as a grade of C or above. The passed and/or failed credit hours are recorded on the student's transcript, but the pass grade (P) does not affect the student's semester or accumulative grade point average. Any credit course offered by the University may be taken for audit (AU). Students wishing to audit a course must notify their instructor no later than the end of the first week of the class and must complete an Enrollment for Audit form which the instructor and the student will sign and which will be kept on file in the Registrar’s Office. Formalized enrollments for audit are not reversible later to enrollments for credit. Students wishing to audit courses must meet the same admissions standards to the institution, the program and the individual course and adhere to the same class attendance policies as regularly enrolled students. Costs for enrolling in courses for audit are the same as those for enrolling for credit. Audited courses do not apply toward the requirements of any degree. The University reserves the right to give priority course enrollment status to students enrolling for credit. Some courses at Vincennes University are designated for grading on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Satisfactory is defined as a grade of C or better. Students should be aware that Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory courses appear on the transcript but are not included in the calculation of the GPA. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading applies to all students in the designated course. Final Examinations Final examinations are given at the end of each semester. A schedule of final examination dates and times will be published each semester. Because the schedule of final examinations may vary from the semester's class schedules, students may find it necessary to adjust their personal schedules in order to meet their class final examination responsibilities. Students are not expected to complete more than three course final examinations on any one day. If the published schedule calls for any students to complete more than three final examinations on any one day, the student should notify the dean of the division of his/her major to arrange for an exception to the final exam schedule.

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Dean's List All students earning a semester grade point average of 3.50 or higher while completing at least twelve credit hours in 100-level or higher courses, with no grade of D, F, I, RD or Z are placed on Dean’s List. This list is published after the close of both the fall and spring semesters. Standards of Progress Students enrolled at Vincennes University are expected to make progress toward an acceptable educational objective. Students who fail to complete at least 60% of their attempted course hours or have a cumulative GPA less than 1.80 in their first academic year will be placed on academic probation unless there are extenuating circumstances. Students on academic probation, whether for a low cumulative GPA or a lower than 60% completion rate must complete 100% of all attempted hours – quality or developmental – in the following semester or be subject to a “Standards of Progress Review” and academic disqualification at the end of each subsequent semester. The “Standards of Progress Review” will be carried out by the Assistant Provost for Academic Affairs, the Dean of Students, and the Registrar. The Review requires those failing to make acceptable progress to show just cause. If sufficient reason is not presented, the individual will be withdrawn. While this policy is intended to be used primarily at end-of-semester grading periods, in some extreme cases, it may be applied following midterm grading periods. Academic Probation Vincennes University is committed to the academic success of all students. Our goal is to assist all students to achieve a minimum of a 2.0 GPA during each semester of attendance. However, full-time and part-time students must maintain a 1.80 cumulative grade point average for up to and including thirty quality credit hours or be placed on academic probation. Thereafter, students must maintain a 1.90 cumulative GPA for credit hours ranging from 31 up to and including 45 credit hours. For all credit hours 46 and above through the completion of either an associate or baccalaureate degree, students must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA. The semester in which the grades below probationary standards are earned will be counted as the first semester of academic probation. Students placed on academic probation for two consecutive semesters of attendance will be placed on the academically disqualified list (outlist/dropped from school). After one non-enrolled semester, students may apply for readmission at the discretion of the University. Students on probation for two consecutive semesters of attendance who wish to change their major curriculum may, however, petition to be reinstated for the following semester. In such cases, they must achieve a semester grade point average consistent with the guidelines above in their first semester on their new curriculum or they will again be placed on the academically disqualified list. Students who achieve a 2.0 semester grade point average while enrolled in seven or more quality hours in their most recent semester of attendance, but whose overall grade point or serial probation might otherwise qualify them for the “outlist,” will not be declared academically disqualified because of this policy. All students should be cognizant of the fact that these standards of probation and academic disqualification apply to both associate degree and baccalaureate degreeseeking students. Warning Status Any student whose cumulative grade point average is below a 2.0 but who is not on academic probation will be placed on academic warning status. Students in this category must be aware that their academic achievement to that time is not sufficient to qualify them for any of the degrees or certificates conferred by the University. Further, students in this category are at risk of falling below the academic probation standards should their work continue at below average levels.

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Repeating Courses for Recalculation of Grade Point Average Any student may repeat any course previously completed regardless of grade earned. While all grades earned will remain a part of the student's permanent record, only the higher (highest) grade will be used to calculate the student's grade point average. A student who has already repeated a course shall have his/her GPA recalculated to reflect the higher (highest) grade earned. A W does not replace a previously earned grade. The probation and academic disqualification status will remain unchanged, but future academic status will be based on the revised GPA computed after the course has been repeated.

Degree and Certificate Requirements for Graduation
Each student is responsible for successfully resolving, within the University guidelines, the requirements for the major and degree or certificate desired. Students must successfully complete institutionally required developmental courses prior to being eligible for a degree. Degrees Offered Vincennes University confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, and Associate in Applied Science.  The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degrees are intended to prepare students for both job placement and/or graduate school. One component of the B.A. degree is an eight-hour foreign language requirement. Not all B.S. degrees include a foreign language component. To qualify for any of the baccalaureate degrees, a student must accumulate at least 124 credit hours, with a minimum of 36 credit hours in upper division (300400 level) discipline and discipline-related courses, including a 300-level Human Issues and Dilemmas course and a 400-level Capstone course. In addition, all students must satisfy the baccalaureate-level general education requirements. The Associate of Arts (A.A.) and the Associate of Science (A.S.) Degrees are intended primarily for students wanting to transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. One component of the A.A. degree is an eight-hour foreign language requirement. The A.S. degree serves as both a transfer or an occupational degree. Students receiving this degree do not have a foreign language requirement. The Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree is designed primarily for students who intend to enter the world of work after completing their degree. It does not have a foreign language requirement. To qualify for any of the associate degrees, a student must accumulate at least sixty-two credit hours as outlined in the program pages of the catalog. In order to receive a degree in a particular major course of study, the number of required hours may exceed sixty-two. In addition, all such students must satisfy the associate degree general education requirements.



Certificates Offered In addition to baccalaureate and associate degrees, the University offers four certificates. Two of these, the Certificate of Graduation and the Certificate of Program Completion, are based to some extent on programs of study. The remaining two certificates are the Customized Certificate of Applied Learning and the Technical Certificate for Business and Industry Training. These Certificates develop specific work-related skills and prepare students for employment. Certificate of Graduation  To qualify for the Certificate of Graduation, a student must complete the specific certificate curriculum included in the Programs of Study section of this catalog. These certificate programs consist of at least two semesters (thirty or more credit hours) but fewer than sixty-nine credit hours. In addition, the student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all credit hours required by the certificate’s curriculum.  The student must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through placement testing or completion of READ 011, ENGL 009, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, 108, or 109 with a grade of C or better.
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The student is responsible for completing general education course work included in the specific certificate curriculum. Any General Education Basic Skills course work (ENGL 101 or 112; SPCH 140, 143, or 148; MATH or MATT 100-level or higher) must be completed with a “C” or higher. All Certificate of Graduation curricula include the following general education minimum hourly requirements: Programs of 30-39 total hours: minimum of 6 hours of general education. Programs of 40-49 total hours: minimum of 9 hours of general education. Programs of 50-59 total hours: minimum of 12 hours of general education. Programs of 60-69 total hours: minimum of 15 hours of general education.*

Certificate of Program Completion  To qualify for a Certificate of Program Completion, the student must complete the specific certificate curriculum listed in the Programs of Study section of the catalog. Such certificates consist of fewer than thirty credit hours, and the student must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all credit hours required in the certificate.  In addition, the student must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through placement testing or completion of READ 011, ENGL 009, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, 108, or 109 with a grade of C or better. Ideally, all Certificates of Program Completion will include at least one General Education Basic Skills communications course (ENGL 101 or 112, SPCH 140, 143, or 148) and any relevant Basic Skills math (MATH or MATT 100-level or higher) or General Education science courses.* *Note: The general education expectations described above do not apply to customized Certificates of Completion or certificate curricula restricted by state, national, or professional guidelines, or certificates that do not have pre-associate degree potential. Customized Certificate of Applied Learning and Technical Certificate for Business and Industry Training  To serve the needs of employers and employees who are seeking specialized training related to a specific field of work, the University provides training tailored to meet the specific needs of those employers and employees.  To qualify for a Customized Certificate of Applied Learning, the student must complete his/her specific set of training needs configured with twenty-nine or fewer credit hours.  To qualify for a Technical Certificate for Business and Industry Training, the student must complete a specific set of courses tailored to meet specific business or industry needs and configured with at least thirty credit hours. Such programs must be approved by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education.  Because of the applied nature of these certificates, they are offered with the understanding that credits may not transfer to other programs or institutions. College Readiness Program This curriculum is a formalized pathway designed to move students into a program of study leading to an AAS, AS, AA, BS or BA degree. This program will serve two populations of students: early college and nontraditional. For both populations, completion of this program indicates that the student is ready to begin college-level courses and therefore will help move underprepared students into the college arena. It will serve as a developmental-level curriculum for students who are unsure of their ability and/or desire to achieve an Associate or Baccalaureate degree. Upon completion of the program, students can either enroll in one of over 200 programs of study or 27 online programs at VU. Completion of this program requires that the students do the following: 1. Take the Accuplacer placement test to determine Math, Reading and Writing competencies 2. Enroll in any developmental sequence of courses as indicated by Accuplacer scores.  Math courses that prepare a student to begin college-level math courses
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 MATH 010 Fundamentals of Math  MATH 013 Algebra I  MATH 016 Algebra II  English courses that prepare a student to begin college level English courses  ENGL 009 Fundamentals of Writing  ENGL 011 Writing Techniques  Reading courses as needed to achieve college readiness level  READ 009 Fundamentals of Reading, Level I  READ 011 Fundamentals of Reading, Level II -or READ 104 Reading Workshop 3. Complete COMP 101 Using the Windows Environment -orCOMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts 4. Complete SSKL 103 Study Skills Degrees Awarded with Honors Vincennes University recognizes academic excellence of its students by awarding both associate and baccalaureate degrees with three levels of honors based on overall grade point average: Cum Laude (3.50-3.69), Magna Cum Laude (3.70-3.89) and Summa Cum Laude (3.904.00). In order to be eligible for such graduation honors, non-military students must complete at least thirty semester hours of Vincennes University course credits, which equals the minimum residency requirement, with the prescribed grade point averages. Students covered by various military agreements must complete at least fifteen semester hours of Vincennes University course credits with the prescribed grade point averages to be eligible for degree honors. Any University area, department, or division may recognize its students in any manner it deems appropriate during the graduation honor convocations for Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior students. Awarding of Additional Degrees Vincennes University awards degrees only in major programs. Options of major programs may provide opportunities for students to complete additional degrees or concentrations, according to the policies which follow: Vincennes University will award only one degree based upon any unique set of courses and course credits. Additional degrees may be earned that use part of the course credits applied to previous degrees. The most common form of additional degree awards occurs in the form of the Double Major. The “double major” usually involves the concurrent award of two separate degrees (e.g., a student may earn a “double major” in English and History). In this instance, the degree will be awarded only where there are at least fifteen (15) credit hours of required major courses, including departmental and/or program requirements and exclusive of any course substitutions, in the additional degree that are over and above those required in the companion degree of the double major. A variation of the “concurrent award of the double major” is the subsequent award of an Upgraded Degree, i.e. from the A.A.S. to the A.S. or A.A. in the same major discipline (e.g. the A.A.S. to the A.S. in Construction Technology). The University will not concurrently award both the A.A.S. and the A.S./A.A. in the major discipline. In a manner similar to the double major, the “upgraded degree,” the A.S./A.A., will be awarded only in those instances where there are at least six (6) additional credit hours in either departmental/program requirements or general requirements beyond those required in the previous A.A.S. degree. Any credit hours required for the upgrade from the A.A.S. to the A.S./A.A. degree must be taken at Vincennes University. Requirements for Graduation  In order to graduate, all students, whether baccalaureate or associate degree level, must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA (C average) exclusive of hours marked W (Withdrawal) and developmental courses. In order to receive a degree in a particular major course of study, the number of required hours may exceed sixty-two.  Credits toward graduation will be accepted from accredited transfer institutions of higher education; CLEP general examinations or subject examinations; USAFI, ECE, or DANTES
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courses or tests; service school courses and military science credits in accordance with the ACE Guide; and, College Board Advanced Placement Program. All students, unless enrolled in the Technology Apprenticeship Option or served under a Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC), Servicemembers Opportunity College--Associate Degree (SOCAD), Servicemembers Opportunity College--Marine Corps (SOCMAR), or Servicemembers Opportunity College--Navy (SOCNAV-2) program agreement, must complete at least thirty semester hours at Vincennes University in order to be eligible for graduation with either an associate or baccalaureate degree. Of the total number of hours required for a specific baccalaureate degree, only ten of the last forty hours may be transfer hours. In associate degrees, only six of the last fifteen hours may be transfer hours except in those associate degree programs that require more than sixty-eight total hours. Students enrolled in associate degree programs that require more than sixty-eight hours and who have completed at least sixty-two hours of coursework, all of which is required and directly applicable in their degree program and who have otherwise met their residency requirement, may transfer back all remaining hours required in their programs. All active duty military personnel covered by SOC, SOCAD, SOCMAR, or SOCNAV-2 agreements must complete at least fifteen semester hours in courses from accredited colleges and universities, and of these fifteen, at least six hours must be earned through Vincennes University courses. Military personnel not covered by SOC, SOCAD, SOCMAR, or SOCNAV-2 agreements must complete all fifteen semester hours through Vincennes University courses.

Each degree category and each program offered by Vincennes University reflects a significant commitment to the general education of students. All Vincennes University degrees, whether associate or baccalaureate, require courses in general education to be completed consistent with the degree categories as outlined elsewhere in this catalog. (See pages 74, 75 and 76 for the associate and baccalaureate general education requirement models.) Petitions for Graduation All candidates for graduation must (1) file a Petition for Graduation with the Registrar as soon as possible in their final semester and (2) clear all University obligations.

General Education
General Education Skills General education is an integral component of the learning process at Vincennes University, one which allows our students to prepare in a well-rounded fashion for future careers and educational pursuits. The skills listed below are general education skills which have been identified by the faculty as the minimum expected of a student graduating from this institution. Some skills (marked with an asterisk*) will be measured by basic skills assessment instruments at the conclusion of a student's program of study while others are to serve as guidelines for faculty and student as the student progresses through his/her program. A. Reading The student should: 1. summarize material accurately and concisely; 2. interpret subject matter literally and inferentially;* 3. seek and acquire vocabulary through reading;* 4. seek and understand subject matter pertinent to his/her career. B. Writing The student should: 1. write a document showing a clear purpose, effective organization, adequate supporting details, and using a mechanically correct style; 2. critically analyze and evaluate his/her own and others' writing;* 3. appropriately incorporate ideas from outside sources into his/her own words with proper credit given; 4. be able to write a personal resume.
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C. Oral Communication Skills The student should: 1. express himself/herself clearly, using appropriate speaking styles that suit the message, purpose, and context; 2. use nonverbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal message; 3. actively listen to and critically evaluate oral communication; D. Critical Thinking/Problem Solving The student should: 1. use reasoning skills based on accuracy, clarity, solid evidence, depth and fairness;* 2. define the problem;* 3. analyze the problem for possible causes;* 4. develop possible strategies for solutions;* 5. select and implement strategies for solutions;* 6. evaluate the effects of the strategy(ies) for solutions. E. Mathematics The student should: 1. apply a combination of arithmetic and algebraic skills appropriate to his/her major;* 2. apply geometric spatial skills appropriate to his/her major;* 3. solve problems using the appropriate skills identified above in both rote exercises and novel situations appropriate to his/her major. F. Science Skills The student should: 1. apply the use of observation and/or measurements to propose, analyze, test, and refine explanations for various physical or biological phenomena, appropriate to his/her major; 2. express, in written or verbal mode, the level of knowledge and understanding of the current scientific explanations of the physical and/or biological phenomena, appropriate for his/her major; 3. apply the proper use of English and metric systems of weights and measures. G. Computer Skills The student should: 1. have the ability to start up and move into a word processing program, complete the mechanical requirements of good writing (i.e., margins, spacing, font sizes, tabbing, centering, headers), editing (including cutting and pasting), spell checking, and printing. 2. have the ability to find, evaluate, and select Internet sources to incorporate in their writing. Students will also be able to document these properly. 3. have the ability to save files to hard drives and disks, and they should be able to retrieve them. H. Health and Physical Education Skills The student should: 1. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the positive effects of physical activity and exercise upon the quality of individual health related fitness by: a. identifying the essential components of physical fitness and their specific positive effects upon individual health related fitness goals; b. identifying and applying safe principles of fitness conditioning for development of an effective personal exercise and physical activity program; c. demonstrating skills in assessing personal fitness levels and needs for the purpose of planning and initiating lifelong fitness activity; 2. recognize positive lifestyle choices and take responsibility for his/her well-being in making decisions regarding nutrition, body composition, stress management, personal safety, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, consumer health care, and other areas of life which influence personal wellness; 3. gain basic knowledge and skill in appreciation for a variety of exercise and physical activity skills useful in the pursuit of lifelong fitness.

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Library and Research Skills The student should: 1. use the library as a source for lifelong learning, for leisure, personal, and professional needs; 2. select and evaluate basic library reference tools and information sources, including professional journals which pertain to a student's particular field of study, and understand appropriate techniques for recording and organizing needed information; 3. use basic computerized systems for accessing library resources; J. Cultural and Historical Awareness To develop into a positive contributing member of society, the student should: 1. express verbally and in writing the effects of historical and political forces on their chosen career; 2. have knowledge of historical events, cultural diversity, geography, and various political and economic systems of the world; 3. have increased self-awareness of the psychological and social forces which shape and contribute to their behavior; 4. have an awareness of literature and the arts. K. Socialization The student should: 1. respond to others in a polite, courteous manner; 2. demonstrate respect for other people's values; 3. demonstrate responsible behavior by accepting accountability for his/her own actions; 4. present a positive attitude about learning and studying by attending class and completing assignments; 5. learn to balance extra-curricular activities with academic activities and efforts. Definition of General Education General Education at Vincennes University focuses on two distinct but interrelated educational components. Each component is essential to ensure development of measurable basic skills, critical and creative thinking skills, and a breadth of knowledge needed both to strengthen students' work in their major and to achieve the levels of understanding expected of all college graduates. The first component of general education at V.U. is basic skills. The purpose of this study is to ensure that students read, write, speak, and compute at a college level. These skills are necessary, not only for the communication and computation crucial to a successful life after completion of a degree, but also for the active and successful participation in the pursuit of a degree. Basic skills will be enhanced as students progress through the remainder of their course work, and especially as they complete general education's second component, liberal education. The purpose of this study is to actualize the students' potential to live fuller lives as individuals and as members of different social institutions. This course work provides the opportunity for students to develop an appreciation of humanity's varied responses to life lived in the natural world, both as an individual and as a part of society. As a consequence of this study, students should achieve a better understanding of the world and people around them, and should thus be able to live a fuller and more participatory life.

I.

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General Education Models General Education Model for Associate Degrees effective 2010-11 Basic Skills Core
Credit Hours

Reading: Earn a C or above in at least one Reading Intensive course. Writing: ENGL 101 or 112 (A.A., A.S., A.A.S.; Students successfully completing ENGL 112 have satisfied the Liberal Education Core 3 credit-hour writing requirement) .. 3 Mathematics: One 100-level or higher MATH or MATT course (A.A.S.) One 100-level or higher MATH course (A.A., A.S.) .......................................... 3 Oral Communication: One of the following as appropriate for the major: SPCH 140 (A.A.S.) SPCH 143 (A.A., A.S., A.A.S.) SPCH 148 (A.A., A.S., A.A.S.) ..................................................................................... 2-3 Total Credit Hours for A.A.S. ............................................................................................. 8-9 Total Credit Hours for A.A. and A.S....................................................................................... 9 Skills Enhancement and Liberal Education Core For A.A. One of the following Writing Skills Courses: ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, 210, -orthe combination of LITR 220-221 .............................................................................................. 3 Computer Skills ............................................................................................................................ * Health and Wellness: PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -and- HLTH 211 First Aid................................................ 2-3 Laboratory Science (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) .............................. 3 Social Science (chosen from the Liberal Education Core list) ..................................................... 6 Humanities (the first three hours chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list, the second three hours chosen from the Broad Core Liberal Education list) .................................. 6 Foreign Language ......................................................................................................................... 8 (Foreign Language directed toward the B.A. degree must include 8 hours of intermediate language in the same language) Total Credit Hours for A.A. ............................................................................................ 28-29 For A.S. Credit Hours One of the following Writing Skills Courses: ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, 210, -orthe combination of LITR 220-221 .............................................................................................. 3 Computer Skills ............................................................................................................................ * Health and Wellness: PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -and- HLTH 211 First Aid................................................. 2-3 Laboratory Science (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) ............................. 3 Humanities (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) .......................................... 3 Social Science (chosen from the Liberal Education Core list)..................................................... 6 One of the following: Humanities, Science/Mathematics** (chosen from the Broad Core Liberal Education list)................................................................................................................ 3 Total Credit Hours for A.S. ............................................................................................. 20-21 For A.A.S. Computer Skills ............................................................................................................................ * Health and Wellness: PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -and- HLTH 211 First Aid................................................ 2-3 Science (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) ................................................ 3 Social Science (chosen from the Liberal Education Core list)..................................................... 3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics**, Science, Social Science or Writing .............................................................................................. 6 Total Credit Hours for A.A.S. ........................................................................................ 14-15

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Note: Courses for Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social Science in the General Education Program must be selected from courses listed in the approved Liberal Education list. These courses must be outside the major specialization courses to qualify as general education. *See explanation of Computer Skills on page 81. **The Basic Skills Core mathematics requirement may not be used for this credit.

Major Program Specialization Courses All other courses, as determined and prescribed by the program, which may include additional academic skills, communication, general education, occupational, technical, free electives or other program requirements.

General Education Model for Baccalaureate Degrees effective 2010-11 Basic Skills Core
Credit Hours

Writing: ENGL 101 or 112 (B.A., B.S.; Students successfully completing ENGL 112 have satisfied the Liberal Education Core 3 credit-hour writing requirement) ......... 3 Speaking: SPCH 143 or 148 (B.A., B.S.) ................................................................................... 3 Mathematics: MATH 102, 103 or higher MATH course (B.A., B.S.) ....................................... 3 Total Credit Hours for B.A. and B.S..................................................................................... .9 Skills Enhancement and Liberal Education Core For B.S. Credit Hours Writing: Choose one of the following: ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, 210, -orthe combination of LITR 220-221 ..................................................................................... 3 Humanities and Values: 3 hours must be either PHIL 111, 212, or 313. All courses taken from either the Humanities Common or Broad Core.. .................................................... 9 Social Sciences and History: 3 hours must be a history course chosen from the Social Science Core; the remaining 6 hours must be taken from courses listed on the Social Science Core. ................................................................................... 9 Biological and Physical Sciences: One course must be a physical science course and one a biological science course. One of these two courses must be a laboratory science selected from the AA/AS Science and Mathematics Common Core ................. 7 Computer Skills: ........................................................................................................................... * Health and Wellness: PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -and- HLTH 211 First Aid..................................... 2-3 Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives: ......................................................................................... 3 Senior Capstone Experience: ........................................................................................................ 3 Note: All B.S. programs require 6 credit hours of upper division general education. Those requirements are satisfied by completing the following:  A 300-level Human Issues and Dilemmas course This requirement can be fulfilled by choosing a Human Issues and Dilemmas course from one of the three distribution categories listed above: Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences.  Senior Capstone Experience Total Credit Hours for B.S. ..................................................................................... 36-37 General Education Total Hours for B.S........................................................................... 45-46
*See explanation of Computer Skills on page 81.

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For B.A. Writing: Choose one of the following: ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, 210, -orthe combination of LITR 220-221 ..................................................................................... 3 Humanities and Values: 3 hours must be either PHIL 111, 212, or 313. All courses taken from either the Humanities Common or Broad Core.. .................................................... 9 Foreign Language: 8 hours of intermediate language in the same language. May be completed during the A.A. level course work. ................................................................ 8 Social Sciences and History: 3 hours must be a history course chosen from the Social Science Core; the remaining 6 hours must be taken from courses listed on the Social Science Core. ................................................................................... 9 Biological and Physical Sciences: One course must be a physical science course and one a biological science course. One of these two courses must be a laboratory science selected from the AA/AS Science and Mathematics Common Core ................. 7 Computer Skills: ........................................................................................................................... * Health and Wellness: PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -and- HLTH 211 First Aid..................................... 2-3 Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives: ......................................................................................... 3 Senior Capstone Experience: ........................................................................................................ 3 Note: All B.A. programs require 6 credit hours of upper division general education. Those requirements are satisfied by completing the following:  A 300-level Human Issues and Dilemmas course This requirement can be fulfilled by choosing a Human Issues and Dilemmas course from one of the three distribution categories listed above: Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences.  Senior Capstone Experience Total Credit Hours for B.A...................................................................................... 44-45 General Education Total Hours for B.A. ......................................................................... 53-54
*See explanation of Computer Skills on page 81.

Major Program Specialization Courses All other courses as determined and prescribed by the program. Human Issues and Dilemmas Course Requirement Human Issues and Dilemmas Courses are 300-level Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences courses intended to advance students’ abilities to understand and address the complexities of human life. The courses will actively engage students in discussion and treatment of the dilemmas that arise when issues are considered from multidisciplinary perspectives. The courses will empower students to create knowledge and meaning by identifying issues, synthesizing various perspectives, and determining solutions to dilemmas through both individual evaluation of problems and collaborative efforts with others. As such, these courses will enhance students’ critical thinking, information management, writing, speaking, and collaboration skills. Capstone Experience Requirement The Capstone Experience (XXXX 490, Capstone Experience) is a three-credit hour course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of the major course work and the general and liberal education course work. Students will be required to complete a major research project aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to their major field of study. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be life-long learners.

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The course will require a major research project (the length will need to be determined, but the major paper should be nothing less than 10 pages and probably should be closer to 15-20, minimum), oral summary presentation of the results of the project, extensive reading and/or research, critical thinking, and possibly experiential learning as part of the projects designed with input from the students involved in the course. Additionally, the courses should be less focused on delivering new information than synthesizing and integrating knowledge and skills, and the projects should include some effort to deal with social, philosophic, economic, political or historical problems and issues related to or raised by the content of the major field of study. As such, the courses could conceivably be used as assessment of major program and general/liberal education learning, and could be used to assess student preparedness for employment. The texts used for the courses will be more “philosophic” in nature, intended to acquaint students with the problems related to the major field, rather than being texts used to expose students to new areas of technical learning. General Education: Basic Skills Core The general education core at Vincennes University includes those courses that are designed to develop a common set of basic skills competencies for all students pursuing a baccalaureate or an associate degree. All students are required to demonstrate a minimum level of competence in all of the general education core areas, as described below, as a condition of fulfilling the requirements for the A.A., A.S., A.A.S., and the B.A. or B.S. degrees. Students are not exempt from general education requirements based on national standardized aptitude test scores (SAT, ACT) or placement exam scores, such as CPT, COMPASS, or ASSET. The common core areas and the criteria for achievement are established as follows. Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog using R, W and S superscripts respectfully. (Academic advisors will have a complete list available for student use.) Students are responsible for meeting all of their reading, writing, and speaking intensive requirements for graduation. They must be aware that taking classes designated as reading, writing, and/or speaking intensive will satisfy those requirements only under the following conditions: (1) students must have completed all reading requirements, English Composition I (ENGL 101) or Rhetoric and Research (ENGL 112), and/or a required speech course before taking intensive courses to satisfy intensive requirements, (2) students must successfully complete (C or better) the intensive class in order to receive intensive credit, and (3) students must complete all intensive course assignments in order to successfully complete the course (C or better). In addition, students should be aware that they may not be enrolled in a reading intensive class without having completed all of their reading requirements. Also, students who have not completed English Composition I (ENGL 101) or Rhetoric and Research (ENGL 112) and a required speech class might not be prepared for the writing or speaking requirements of the class. These students may enroll in the intensive class, but must obtain instructor permission, on the first day of class, in order to remain enrolled in the course. Every program includes courses that will satisfy the intensive requirements, and students should complete the requirements using these courses; however, when necessary, other intensive courses may be used to complete the intensive requirements. Only Vincennes University courses designated as intensive since Fall of 1998 will satisfy the intensive requirements described in the Vincennes University catalog. Courses transferred from other institutions or experience-based learning credit courses will not satisfy the intensive credit unless an equivalent intensive experience can be verified. When a student can provide adequate documentation of an equivalent intensive experience, the intensive requirement will be considered met. I. READING A. In order to demonstrate college level proficiency in reading, the student should: 1. summarize material accurately and concisely; 2. interpret subject matter literally and inferentially; 3. seek and acquire vocabulary through reading; and 4. seek and understand subject matter pertinent to his or her career.

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B. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Reading for the A.A., A.S., and A.A.S.: 1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in reading by satisfying the conditions of either Criterion No. 1, or Criterion No. 2. 2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are: a. Placement scores require no developmental/remedial reading upon initial matriculation; and b. Earn a C or better in at least one Reading Intensive course. 3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are: a. Placement scores require developmental/remedial reading upon initial placement; and b. Earn a C or better in READ 009, READ 011, READ 103, OR READ 104 and demonstrate college level reading on a standardized reading test; and c. Complete and earn a C or better in at least one Reading Intensive course subsequent to completion of the requirements of 3b. 4. If and only if, the student has attempted and failed to satisfy the conditions of Criterion No. 1 or No. 2, and student chooses not to repeat those steps, he or she may satisfy the Reading Intensive requirement by achieving a CPT Reading score of 93 or higher prior to graduation. C. Criteria for Approval as a Reading Intensive Course: 1. A Reading Intensive course is one that reinforces the reading skills expected of college students; and 2. Any course will be approved as Reading Intensive if it meets at least one of the following criteria: a. At least twenty percent of a student's grade is based on reading that is not covered by lecture or study guide. This reading may be part of the text(s) required for the course but not covered by the instructor in class, study guides, or study sessions, or it may be reading that is expected in addition to textbook reading and that is completed independent of normal classroom activities (such as reading expected to make up at least twenty percent of material covered on tests or research papers that constitute at least twenty percent of the course grade), or b. Reading is the central activity of the approved course and a student could not pass the course without doing the required reading for the course, as, for example, in the case of Literature courses. II. WRITING A. In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in writing, the student should: 1. write a document showing a clear purpose, effective organization, adequate supporting details, and using a mechanically correct style; 2. critically analyze and evaluate his or her own and others' writing; 3. appropriately incorporate ideas from outside sources into his or her own words with proper credit given; 4. be able to write a personal resume. B. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.A. and A.S.: 1. Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1. If the student fails to meet these conditions, he/she may then attempt to meet the conditions of Criterion No. 2. 2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are: a. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101 and b. Earn a passing grade in one of the following: ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, or 210, and c. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing Intensive course. - or d. Earn a C or better in ENGL 112 and

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e. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing Intensive course. 3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 may be met if and only if a student has attempted, but not completed Criterion No. 1 successfully. Criterion No. 2 is as follows: If the student has failed to earn a C or better in any of the approved Writing Intensive courses in his or her major or in the liberal education core and chooses not to repeat that approach, then, prior to graduation, the student must pass a writing test administered by the English Department. C. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.A.S: 1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by meeting the following criteria: a. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101 or ENGL 112, and b. Earn a C or better in an approved Writing Intensive course either in his or her major or the liberal education core, or c. If the student fails to earn a C or better in an approved Writing Intensive course and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then the student must, prior to graduation, pass a writing test administered by the English Department. D. Criteria for Approval as a Writing Intensive Course. 1. While it is assumed that students will most often select a Writing Intensive course within their majors, courses identified as meeting the Liberal Education component may also qualify as Writing Intensive. For a course to be designated as a Writing Intensive course, the following criteria must be met. 2. The course uses writing as one of its tools to promote the learning of course materials. 3. Assignments involving writing should be given throughout the semester and regular feedback given to the students on ways to improve their writing. At least one of the writing assignments should require a rough draft submitted for comment and returned before the final draft is expected. 4. Individual writing assignments may vary in scope and length according to the needs of the major or the course. The type of assignment should be determined by the type of writing required for success in advanced study or in the profession. Research papers, summaries, essay exams, lab reports, journals, and other appropriate writing forms may all be used. A minimum of 2000 words, exclusive of rough drafts, for the entire course is expected. At least one writing assignment must require students to use and document outside sources in their writing. 5. Writing, as described in D.4, above, should be a significant part of the overall course grade. "Significant" is intended to mean one of the following options: (1) Written work will determine at least forty percent of the course grade. (2) If written work will count some percentage less than forty percent, then with revisions, all written work must achieve a passing grade. In the case of option 2, failure to complete writing assignments with an average grade of C or higher will result in failure of the course. It is assumed that instructors will identify, in their syllabi, writing objectives such as the type of writing expected, the number of writing assignments, and the percentage of the grade to be determined by each writing assignment. 6. Instructors will provide students with criteria used to evaluate their writing. Such criteria must reflect the standards of the profession or discipline. 7. Instructors will provide assistance to students to help them with their writing – and/or direct them to the resources available on campus to provide additional assistance. This assistance might include the following: sample papers that meet the requirement; group activities that give students feedback on their writing; requiring outlines or rough drafts that are returned with comments before the paper is completed; tutorials in the lab; and individual conferences.

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III. ORAL COMMUNICATION A. In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in oral communication, the student should: 1. Express him- or herself clearly, using appropriate styles that suit the message, purpose, and context; 2. Use non-verbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal language; 3. Actively listen and critically evaluate oral communication; 4. Seek and acquire vocabulary through speaking and listening. B. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Oral communication for the A.A., A.S., and A.A.S.: 1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in oral communication by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1 and Criterion No. 2. 2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are: Earn a C or better in the public speaking course appropriate to the degree sought: a. A.A., A.S., A.A.S.: SPCH 143 or 148. b. A.A.S.: SPCH 140. (If the student's placement scores require concurrent registration in ENGL/READ 009 and MATH 010, it is recommended that the student take SPCH 009 before attempting Criterion 1.) 3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are: Earn a C or better in an approved Speaking Intensive course either in the student's major or on the Liberal Education Core list. 4. If, and only if, the student has attempted and failed to meet the conditions of Criterion 2 and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then prior to graduation, the student must pass at a seventy percent level, the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) and Speech Comprehension tests administered by the Speech Department. C. Criteria for Approval as a Speaking Intensive Course. 1. A Speaking Intensive course reinforces the oral communication skills beyond normal classroom discussion. 2. Preferably, but not necessarily, the course occurs within the major and includes one or more of the following types of speaking experiences: a. Present one oral report or participate on a symposium or panel discussion. b. Deliver an oral presentation of one's work to peers or deliver oral critiques of others' work. c. Deliver sales presentations. d. Participate in and have evaluated oral communication activities such as roleplaying or simulations of job-related experiences; i.e., interviews, peer counseling, conducting business meetings, teaching a lesson, explaining processes or procedures, among others. e. Engage in some form of persuasion, debate, or argumentation. D. Evaluation of Speaking Experiences in a Speaking Intensive Course. 1. Just as spelling, grammar, sentence structure, and word choice are elements evaluated in written assignments, the types of oral presentations listed above under D are evaluated in the following ways: a. Having a clear organization, with an introduction, body, and conclusion. b. Supporting contentions with documented evidence. c. Using appropriate speaking styles that suit the message, purpose, and context. d. Using nonverbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal language. IV. MATHEMATICS A. In order to demonstrate Mathematics proficiency, the student should be able to: 1. apply a combination of fundamental arithmetic and algebra skills, 2. apply fundamental geometric spatial skills, and 3. solve problems using the appropriate skills identified above in both rote and novel situations.

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B. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.A. or A.S. Degrees: Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by satisfying the conditions of the following criteria. 1. Earn a C or better in one 100-level or higher MATH course and pass a standardized test prior to graduation. C. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.A.S. Degree: Each student who is a candidate for the A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by satisfying the conditions of one of the following criteria. 1. Earn a C or better in one 100-level or higher MATH or MATT course and pass a standardized test prior to graduation. 2. Earn a C or better in the Apprenticeship Courses MATA 101, MATA 102, MATA 103, MATA 104, MATA 105, and MATA 106. Computer Skills All Vincennes University students should develop the minimum computer skills described in section G of the General Education Skills through a “computers across the curriculum” approach to developing these skills. Beginning in the basic skills courses and continuing through other general education and program course work, students will be expected to develop and apply these skills. In addition, most programs expect majors to enhance their basic computing skills with program-related computer skills. Programs requiring a skills-enhancing course identify those specific requirements on the program pages.

Liberal Education Core List
ECON 100 Elements of Economics ECON 201 MicroeconomicsR ECON 202 MacroeconomicsR ECON 203 Survey of Labor EconomicsR ECON 208 Personal Financial ManagementR HIST 125 History of American TechnologyR HIST 131 Survey of European History I HIST 132 Survey of European History II HIST 139 American History I HIST 140 American History II HIST 155 Survey of Architectural HistoryR/W HIST 235 World Civilization IR HIST 236 World Civilization IIR POLS 111 American National Government POLS 112 State and Local Government POLS 201 Introduction to Political ScienceR/W POLS 210 Personal Law POLS 211 Introduction to World PoliticsR/W/S Social Science PSYC 141 Applied PsychologyS PSYC 142 General Psychology PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology PSYC 240 Human SexualityR PSYC 253 Introduction to Social Psychology PSYC 280 Health Psychology SOCH 211 Honors Contemporary CivilizationR/W/S SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology SOCL 154 Cultural Anthropology SOCL 164 Introduction to Multicultural Studies SOCL 245 Cultural Diversity: SociologyR/W/S SOCL 250 Sociology of Aging SOCL 252 Social Problems SOCL 253 Introduction to Social Psychology SOCL 254 Introduction to Archaeology SOCL 260 Sociological Aspects of Death SOCL 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families

Humanities Common Core LITR 223 American Literature IIR ARTT 110 Art Appreciation ARTT 130 Art History I – Pre-history to 1500 LITR 224 Survey of English Literature IR/W/S th R/W ARTT 131 Art History II – 1500 to 20 Century LITR 225 Survey of English Literature IIR/W/S R/W/S HUMH 221 Honors Humanities I MUSM 118 Music Appreciation PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy HUMH 222 Honors Humanities IIR/W/S PHIL 212 Introduction to EthicsR/W/S HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities IR/W/S R/W/S HUMN 211 Introduction to Humanities II RLST 201 Major Religions of the West RLST 202 Major Religions of the East LITR 100 Introduction to LiteratureR/W THEA 100 Theatre Appreciation LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature IR/W/S THEA 245 Theatre History IR/W LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature IIR/W/S R LITR 222 American Literature I THEA 250 Theatre History IIR/W

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Humanities Broad Core ARTT 110 Art Appreciation LITR 222 American Literature IR ARTT 116 Drawing I LITR 223 American Literature IIR ARTT 130 Art History I – Pre-history to 1500 LITR 224 Survey of English Literature IR/W/S th R/W ARTT 131 Art History II – 1500 to 20 Century LITR 225 Survey of English Literature IIR/W/S S ARTT 213 Ceramics I LITR 227 Introduction to World FictionR/W/S S LITR 228 Introduction to World PoetryR/W ARTT 220 Photography I ASLG 101 American Sign Language I LITR 229 Introduction to World DramaR/W ASLG 103 American Sign Language II LITR 230 Contemporary LiteratureR/W/S ASLG 111 The Deaf Community LITR 240 Children's LiteratureR R/W FACS 156 Marriage and the Family LITR 250 The Twentieth Century Mystery NovelR/S FACS 206 Fundamentals of Nutrition MUSM 100 Voice Class FREN 101 French Level I MUSM 101 Beginning Piano Class FREN 103 French Level II MUSM 118 Music Appreciation GRMN 101 German Level I MUSM 140 Beginning Guitar Class GRMN 103 German Level II PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy HUMH 221 Honors Humanities IR/W/S PHIL 212 Introduction to EthicsR/W/S R/W/S PHIL 213 LogicR/W/S HUMH 222 Honors Humanities II HUMN 164 Introduction to Multicultural Studies PHIL 220 Philosophy of Religion HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities IR/W/S RLST 201 Major Religions of the West RLST 202 Major Religions of the East HUMN 211 Introduction to Humanities IIR/W/S SPAN 101 Spanish Level I HUMN 245 Cultural Diversity: HumanitiesR/W/S SPAN 103 Spanish Level II JOUR 216 Mass CommunicationsR/W/S SPCH 202 Oral Interpretation of LiteratureS LITR 100 Introduction to LiteratureR/W R LITR 210 Literature of the Old Testament THEA 100 Theatre Appreciation THEA 146 Fundamentals of Acting LITR 211 Literature of the New TestamentR THEA 245 Theatre History IR/W LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature IR/W/S R/W/S LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II THEA 250 Theatre History IIR/W Science and Mathematics Common Core for A.A. and A.S. CHEM 107 World of Chemistry Laboratory Sciences CHEM 110 General, Organic and Biochemistry BIOL 100 Human Biology CHEM 120 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials BIOL 101 Plant and Animal Biology CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants BIOL 105/105L Principles of Biology I/Lab ERTH 100 Earth Science BIOL 107 Essentials of Human Anatomy and ERTH 115/115L Physical Geology/Lab Physiology PHYH 232 Honors Physical Science-Physics BIOL 111/111L Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab PHYS 100 Physics for Health-Related Professions CHEM 100/100L Elementary Chemistry/Lab PHYS 105/105L General Physics I/Lab CHEM 101/101L Elementary Organic Chemistry PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers IW and Biochemistry/Lab CHEM 103/103L Introduction to Chemistry/Lab PHYT 101 Technical Physics CHEM 104 Consumer Science PSCI 101 Physical Science CHEM 105/105L General Chemistry I/Lab PSCI 103 Basic Physics of Music and Sound Science and Mathematics Broad Core for A.A. and A.S CHEM 110 General, Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory Sciences CHEM 120 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials BIOL 100 Human Biology CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants BIOL 101 Plant and Animal Biology ERTH 100 Earth Science BIOL 105/105L Principles of Biology I/Lab ERTH 115/115L Physical Geology/Lab BIOL 107 Essentials of Human Anatomy and ERTH 214/214L Historical Geology/Lab Physiology PHYH 232 Honors Physical Science-Physics BIOL 111/111L Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab PHYS 100 Physics for Health-related Professions BIOL 112/112L Anatomy and Physiology II/Lab PHYS 105/105L General Physics I/Lab BIOL 210/210L Microbiology/Lab PHYS 106/106L General Physics II/Lab CHEM 100/100L Elementary Chemistry/Lab PHYS 107 Geometrical Optics CHEM 101/101L Elementary Organic Chemistry PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers IW and Biochemistry/Lab CHEM 103/103L Introduction to Chemistry/Lab PHYS 206/206L Physics for Scientists and EngiCHEM 104 Consumer Science neers IIR/Lab CHEM 105/105L General Chemistry I/Lab PHYS 218 Essentials of General Physics CHEM 107 World of Chemistry PHYT 101 Technical Physics CHEM 108 Chemistry for the Studio Artist PSCI 101 Physical Science 82 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

PSCI 102 Physical Science for Elementary Education Majors PSCI 103 Basic Physics of Music and Sound Sciences AGRI 103 Fundamentals of HorticultureW BIOL 108 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 109 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 200 Heredity and SocietyR/W/S BIOL 201 Issues in BiologyR/S CHEM 106 General Chemistry IIR ERTH 101 Earth and Environmental LecturesS ERTH 105 Geography of Indiana ERTH 106 Economic GeographyS ERTH 111 Introduction to Remote SensingR ERTH 115 Physical Geology

ERTH 204 Oceanography ERTH 207 World Geography ERTH 208 Principles of Conservation ERTH 210 General Astronomy ERTH 214 Historical Geology ERTH 221 Meteorology PHYS 105 General Physics I PHYS 106 General Physics II PSCI 104 Energy and the Environment Mathematics MATH 102 College Algebra MATH 104 Trigonometry MATH 110 Statistics MATH 111 Finite Mathematics MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I MATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

Science and Mathematics Common Core for A.A.S. Laboratory Sciences PHYT 101 Technical Physics BIOL 100 Human Biology PSCI 101 Physical Science BIOL 101 Plant and Animal Biology BIOL 105/105L Principles of Biology I/Lab Sciences CHEM 100/100L Elementary Chemistry/Lab BIOL 200 Heredity and SocietyR/W/S CHEM 101/101L Elementary Organic Chemistry BIOL 201 Issues in BiologyR/S and Biochemistry/Lab CHEM 106 General Chemistry IIR CHEM 103/103L Introduction to Chemistry/Lab ERTH 101 Earth and Environmental LecturesS CHEM 104 Consumer Science ERTH 105 Geography of Indiana CHEM 105/105L General Chemistry I/Lab ERTH 106 Economic GeographyS CHEM 107 World of Chemistry ERTH 112 CartographyW CHEM 110 General, Organic and Biochemistry ERTH 115 Physical Geology CHEM 120 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials ERTH 204 Oceanography CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants and Coolants ERTH 207 World Geography ERTH 100 Earth Science ERTH 208 Principles of Conservation ERTH 115/115L Physical Geology/Lab ERTH 210 General Astronomy PHYS 100 Physics for Health-Related Professions ERTH 221 Meteorology PHYS 105/105L General Physics I/Lab PHYS 105 General Physics I PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers IW PSCI 104 Energy and the Environment PHYT 100 Physics for Technicians Science and Mathematics Broad Core for A.A.S. PHYS 105/105L General Physics I/Lab Laboratory Sciences PHYS 106/106L General Physics II/Lab BIOL 100 Human Biology PHYS 107 Geometrical Optics BIOL 101 Plant and Animal Biology PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers IW BIOL 105/105L Principles of Biology I/Lab BIOL 111/111L Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab PHYS 206/206L Physics for Scientists and EngiCHEM 100/100L Elementary Chemistry/Lab neers IIR/Lab CHEM 101/101L Elementary Organic Chemistry PHYS 218 Essentials of General Physics and Biochemistry/Lab PHYT 100 Physics for Technicians CHEM 103/103L Introduction to Chemistry/Lab PHYT 101 Technical Physics CHEM 104 Consumer Science PSCI 101 Physical Science CHEM 105/105L General Chemistry I/Lab PSCI 103 Basic Physics of Music and Sound CHEM 107 World of Chemistry CHEM 108 Chemistry for the Studio Artist Sciences CHEM 110 General, Organic and Biochemistry AGRI 103 Fundamentals of HorticultureW CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants and Coolants BIOL 108 Principles of Human Anatomy and ENGT 160 Hydraulics, Pneumatics and Mechanics Physiology I ERTH 100 Earth Science BIOL 109 Principles of Human Anatomy and ERTH 115/115L Physical Geology/Lab Physiology II ERTH 214/214L Historical Geology/Lab BIOL 200 Heredity and SocietyR/W/S PHYS 100 Physics for Health-Related Professions BIOL 201 Issues in BiologyR/S Academic Information 83

CHEM 106 General Chemistry IIR ERTH 101 Earth and Environmental LecturesS ERTH 105 Geography of Indiana ERTH 106 Economic GeographyS ERTH 111 Introduction to Remote SensingR ERTH 112 CartographyW ERTH 115 Physical Geology ERTH 204 Oceanography ERTH 207 World Geography ERTH 208 Principles of Conservation ERTH 210 General Astronomy ERTH 214 Historical Geology ERTH 221 Meteorology

PHYS 105 General Physics I PHYS 106 General Physics II PSCI 104 Energy and the Environment Mathematics MATH 102 College Algebra MATH 104 Trigonometry MATH 110 Statistics MATH 111 Finite Mathematics MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I MATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MATT 107 Applied Mathematics III MATT 109 Business Mathematics

ENGL 102 English Composition II ENGL 107 Business English ENGL 108 Technical Writing ENGL 109 Broadcast Writing

Writing Core for A.A.S ENGL 112 Rhetoric and Research ENGL 205 Business Communications ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing

Diverse Cultures and Global Perspectives Course List SPAN 230 Survey of Spanish Civilization ERTH 207 World Geography SPAN 240 Survey of Spanish American Culture FREN 230 Contemporary French Civilization GRMN 230 A Survey of German Civilization TECH 300 Workplace Diversity THEA 245 Theatre History I HUMN 245 Cultural Diversity: Humanities THEA 250 Theatre History II SOCH 211 Honors Contemporary Civilization SOCL 245 Cultural Diversity: Sociology Human Issues and Dilemmas Course List PHIL 313 Contemporary Ethical Issues

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Extended Studies
Distance Education/Degree Completion ..................................................................................... 86 Credit by Examination ............................................................................................................. 87 Experienced-based Learning Credit ......................................................................................... 87 Military Education Program ....................................................................................................... 88

Distance Education/Degree Completion Vincennes University’s Distance Education and Degree Completion Programs offer students the opportunity to pursue their education goals without having to spend extended periods of time on a college campus. Over 400 courses are offered through the Distance Education Program, with more than 27 degrees available entirely online. Students who need access to college courses and who need flexibility to accommodate busy schedules, find Vincennes University’s Distance Education Program to be the answer. Degrees available online at Vincennes University include: Associate in Arts 1050 Behavioral Sciences 1053 Behavioral Sciences – Psychology Concentration 1054 Behavioral Sciences – Sociology Concentration 1450 Liberal Arts – Social Science Concentration Associate of Applied Science 2250 General Studies 4832 Pharmacy Technician 5250 Accounting 5360 Business Management 5450 Computer Programming Technology 5590 Administrative Office Technology 5900 General Studies – Business Studies 6050 Funeral Service Education 7501 Law Enforcement Studies Concentration 8901 General Studies - Technology Apprenticeship Degree Completion Programs 6030 Emergency Medical Services 6550 Surgical Technology 7350 Fire Science & Safety Technology Associate of Science 1050 Behavioral Sciences 1053 Behavioral Sciences – Psychology Concentration 1054 Behavioral Sciences – Sociology Concentration 1450 Liberal Arts – Social Science Concentration 1500 Social Work 2250 General Studies 5050 Business Administration 5405 Supply Chain Logistics Management 5510 Information Technology 6050 Funeral Service Education 6150 Health Information Management 7501 Law Enforcement Studies Concentration 8901 General Studies - Technology Apprenticeship Certificates of Program Completion 1055 Behavioral Sciences – Substance Abuse Certificate 1056 Behavioral Sciences – Community Rehabilitation Certificate 2255 Directed Studies Certificate 2257 Collegiate Studies Certificate 6551 Surgical Assisting Certificate

New technology solutions are vastly changing and improving the ways we teach and learn. Distance Education courses are created to utilize that technology to deliver courses to students wherever they are. Classes are delivered to the student – anywhere in the world! Distance courses are highly portable, providing students additional flexibility in scheduling and completing

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classes. Many of the barriers that have prevented students, both traditional and non-traditional, from pursuing their academic goals have now been laid aside. Courses are available to students over the Internet, by traditional paper-based correspondence, and in some cases, by CD. Within the state of Indiana, television and 2-way video courses are offered on a case specific basis. Courses are scheduled year-round and offered in four different term options to accommodate a variety of student needs: regular semester-based courses, 8week courses, 6-month courses, and a select number of 12-month courses. A schedule of courses can be found at www.vinu.edu/distance, or by contacting the Distance Education office at 1-800880-7961. Students interested in pursuing their degrees through Vincennes University’s Distance Education Program are subject to the University’s standard admissions requirements. Students may apply online at www.vinu.edu. Students may register for Distance Education courses by contacting the Distance Education office. Students choosing the distance education option are required to develop the same competencies and satisfy the same degree requirements as campusbased programs. Credits earned through the Distance Education Program are applicable to the University’s residency requirements. Financial Aid is available for eligible students taking distance education courses. Eligibility is determined in the same manner as for other campus-based programs. Special rules apply for courses scheduled for terms longer than traditional semester-based courses. Students should refer to the Financial Aid section of this catalog for specific information and may contact the Financial Aid Office at Vincennes University for course eligibility determinations. Students with credits earned through CLEP or Dantes (DSST) standardized testing programs, and/or credits earned through other colleges or universities may request that Vincennes University award appropriate transfer credit toward their degree programs. Students should arrange to have official transcripts forwarded to the Office of the Registrar for transfer consideration. Military students desiring an evaluation of military training and experience for college credit according to approved ACE guidelines, should contact the Military Education Program office at Vincennes University. Credit by Examination. Vincennes University offers students the opportunity to enroll in courses on a credit by examination basis. Students who wish to pursue this option must first enroll in the desired course, pay the standard tuition and fees, and advise the instructor of their intent to attempt to earn the credit by comprehensive examination. Students will receive the course syllabus and may purchase the required course materials. Students are required to prepare for a single, comprehensive examination that covers all course content and objectives. The instructor will refer students to the Distance Education Office to arrange for the examination. It is the student's responsibility to study the material required for the course and prepare for a single, comprehensive examination that covers the course. The results of this examination will provide the sole basis for determining whether credit is earned for the course. Some courses require skill proficiencies and may not qualify for credit by examination. The maximum time allowed between the enrollment date and the exam date is the regularly scheduled length of the course term. Experienced-based Learning Credit. Vincennes University offers adults the opportunity to earn college credit for significant lifetime learning and experience. Such experience may include lifetime work-experiences, earned certifications, in-service training, reading and personal study, and extensive volunteer work. Students develop a comprehensive portfolio detailing their life experiences and specifically describing the college-level learning derived. Documentation is required. Students register for and complete the Portfolio Development course (ENGL 125) under the supervision of an English faculty member. Once the portfolio is appropriately developed, it is reviewed and evaluated by faculty from various disciplines to determine the award of experiential credit. The university’s academic deans are ultimately responsible for the final determination of credit to be granted. The transferability of experiential credit varies among institutions. Students should contact schools directly to determine policies regarding the transfer of experienced-based credit.

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Military Education Program The Vincennes University Military Education Program (MEP) was implemented Fall 1987 to assist the soldiers of the Indiana National Guard and the Indiana-based United States Army Reserve Units in meeting the newly mandated educational requirements established by the United States Congress. A combination of specially developed one credit hour classes and traditional college classes were taught in National Guard armories and Reserve centers to meet this need. At the request of the National Guard Bureau, Vincennes University established a program site at the National Guard Professional Education Center, Camp Robinson in North Little Rock, Arkansas, in Spring 1988. This was the catalyst for the MEP to expand to other states and branches of the military. Today the program serves a variety of military populations nationwide. The out-of-state resident and weekend programs provide access to associate degree and certificate programs for active duty and active reservists in the Army, Army Reserves, National Guard, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. Vincennes University is one of thirty-two colleges and universities that partners with the Navy in their Navy College Distance Learning Partnership Program. The Partners provide distance delivery of Rating (occupational) related degrees to sailors worldwide. Vincennes University is providing associate degrees in Business Studies, Electronics Technology and Law Enforcement for ten Navy ratings. The Technology Apprenticeship Option, A.A.S. degree, is available to sailors completing apprenticeships in fourteen civilian trades, representing thirty-six Navy Ratings. VU has entered into a partnership with the Army National Guard Education Support Center to offer a specialized A.A.S. degree in Business Studies for their Recruiting Retention Non-Commissioned Officers. Additionally, Vincennes University participates as the lead institution in the United States Coast Guard Cutter Afloat Program. This program provides instructor-led courses aboard deployed United States Coast Guard Cutters and allows students to enroll in courses that complement operational commitments. Vincennes University MEP maintains offices at the following locations. Naval Station, Bremerton, Washington Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Washington Norfolk-Hampton Roads, Virginia Regional Coast Guard Station, San Diego, California US Coast Guard, Island Alameda, CA Selfridge ANGB, Selfridge, Michigan United States Coast Guard Station, Newport, Oregon The foundation of the program is giving service members access to a college education by combining a variety of learning experiences to work toward completion of an associate and/or a baccalaureate degree. In order to provide increased access to degree completion, we offer the following opportunities for the military student enrolled in our program. Vincennes University offers six (6) one-credit hour weekend courses at various military sites around the country. The purpose of these courses is to update and improve both military and personal skills to aid in military promotion and college success. After successful completion of one course with Vincennes University, the student's military experience will be evaluated using a customized computer program to award college credit based on the American Council on Education's (ACE) Guide. The student will receive a transcript that includes credit received from in-resident courses, experiential learning (military) credit, transfer credit from other accredited colleges, and DANTES and CLEP tests, with proper documentation. They also receive a degree plan (SOCAD, SOCGUARD, SOCNAV, SOCCOAST or SOCMAR agreement), for an associate degree. Military students’ options for completing their degrees through Vincennes University include on-site classes, distance education courses, and transfer courses from other accredited colleges and universities. For additional information, contact the Military Education Program, Vincennes University, Vincennes, Indiana 47591, call 812-888-5832 or check the MEP website, www.vinu.edu/military, for email addresses for appropriate sites and programs. Fort Benning, Georgia NGPEC Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas Naval Air Facility, El Centro, California Naval Base Coronado, San Diego, California Naval Medical Center, Balboa, San Diego, California
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Authorization to Award Degrees in the State of Washington Vincennes University is authorized by the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB) and meets the requirements and minimum educational standards established for degreegranting institutions under the Degree–Granting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes Vincennes University to offer the following programs: Associate of Science in Behavioral Sciences; Associate of Science in Behavioral Sciences-Psychology Concentration; Associate of Science in Behavioral Sciences-Sociology Concentration; Associate of Science in Business Administration; Associate of Applied Science in General Studies; Associate of Applied Science in General Studies-Business Studies; Associate of Science in General Studies; Associate of Applied Science in Law Enforcement Studies Concentration; Associate of Science in Law Enforcement Studies Concentration; Associate of Science in Hotel/Motel Management; and Bachelor of Science in Homeland Security and Public Safety. Authorization by the HECB does not carry with it an endorsement by the board of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the Act or the applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the HECB office at P.O. Box 43430, Olympia, WA 98504-3430. Authorization to Award Degrees in the State of Oregon Vincennes University is authorized by the State of Oregon to offer and confer the academic degrees following a determination that state academic standards will be satisfied under OAR 583030. Vincennes University is authorized to offer the following programs: Associate of Science in General Studies and Associate of Applied Science in General Studies. Inquiries concerning the standards or school compliance may be directed to the Office of Degree Authorization, 1500 Valley River Drive, Suite 100, Eugene, Oregon 97401.

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Workforce Development and Community Services
Adult Basic Education.................................................................................................................. 91 Business and Workforce Assistance Program ........................................................................... 91 Off Campus Continuing Education ............................................................................................ 92 Credit Courses.......................................................................................................................... 92 Non-credit Courses .................................................................................................................. 92 Senior Scholars Program.......................................................................................................... 92 Admission and Tuition Information......................................................................................... 92 Project EXCEL ............................................................................................................................. 92 Project LINK ................................................................................................................................ 92 Workforce Development Services ............................................................................................... 93 Generations ................................................................................................................................... 93 Indiana Military Programs (IMP/DFAS) ................................................................................... 93 Statewide Business and Industry Training Program ................................................................ 94 Veterans Upward Bound ............................................................................................................. 94

Adult Basic Education Adult Basic Education (ABE) is a federally funded program pursuant to the Adult Education Act. The purpose of the program is to provide opportunities for adults to receive instruction in basic academic skills, practical literacy skills and to complete high school equivalency requirements through the General Education Development (GED) testing program. Vincennes University Adult Basic Education offers individualized instruction in classes at 24 sites located throughout an eleven county region of Southwestern Indiana. Students seek basic education in order to pursue advanced educational goals, enhance occupational advancement and/or to increase their employability. Business and Workforce Assistance Program The Business and Workforce Assistance Program is a Vincennes University Statewide Services activity designed to provide technical, managerial, and economic development assistance to communities and emerging or existing businesses with the additional responsibility of assisting with their expansion and training needs. The program also maintains the Pathway Assessment Center to help individuals have access to high quality jobs and employers find qualified and motivated workers.

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Off Campus Continuing Education Vincennes University offers a variety of both credit and non-credit courses which are intended to provide educational opportunities to individuals at select locations within surrounding communities of the Vincennes campus. These courses provide individuals the opportunity to continue their education, improve their present knowledge and skill sets, acquire new skills, and achieve personal enrichment. Credit Courses. Traditional face-to-face courses, taught by Vincennes University faculty, are offered in response to the special needs and interests of area residents at select off campus locations. For information regarding credit courses offered via distance education, please refer to the Continuing Studies/Distance Education section of this catalog or contact the Distance Education office at 812-888-5900 or 800-880-7961. To view the off campus site locations and schedule of classes, please visit www.vinu.edu. For more information, contact the Off Campus Continuing Education Office at 812-481-5909. Non-credit Courses. Non-credit classes and workshops are offered and/or developed in response to the special needs and interests of area residents at select off campus locations, as well as via the internet. Internet courses are offered through partnerships with Ed 2 Go and Gatlin Education Services. To view the off campus site locations and schedule of classes, please visit www.vinu.edu. For more information, contact the Off Campus Continuing Education Office at 812-481-5909. Senior Scholars Program. Indiana residents sixty years of age or older, retired, not employed full-time, and who have a high school diploma or GED may enroll for credit courses with tuition waived on a space available basis. Books, fees, parking permit charges, and other course expenses are the responsibility of the student. Admission and Tuition Information. For information regarding Admission policies and procedures, please refer to the “Admission and Financial Aid” section of this catalog or contact the Office of Admissions at 800-742-9198. Junior and senior high school students may enroll in courses if permission is granted by their parents and respective principals or guidance counselors. Forms for granting permission are available in the Advisement Center (812-888-4451). Students wishing to withdraw from the University or drop a credit course should refer to the “Tuition, Fees, and General Expenses” section of this catalog. No refunds are normally given for non-credit courses after the first class meeting. If a course is cancelled due to insufficient enrollment, all tuition and fees are refunded. Project EXCEL Project EXCEL, Indiana’s first dual credit/concurrent enrollment program, offers transcripted college credit to eligible high school students who enroll in VU courses offered at their local high school or career/technical center. Project EXCEL is accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP), a validation of the academic integrity, the program standards, and the student achievement associated with the program. For more information, contact the Project EXCEL office at 812-888-4337 or 800-670-1230 or visit our website at www.vinu. edu/EXCEL. Project LINK Project LINK provides additional opportunities for eligible high school students to enroll and participate in college courses. Courses are taught by Vincennes University professors and are made available through two-way video. High schools may elect to give high school credit in addition to the student receiving college credit from Vincennes University. For more information, contact the Project LINK office at 812-888-4337 or 800-670-1230 or visit our website at www.vinu.edu/PROJECTLINK.

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Workforce Development Services Workforce Development Services (WDS) administers the Workforce Investment Act programs on behalf of Vincennes University in two of the eleven regions in Indiana. Employment and training services are provided to adults, economically disadvantaged youth, veterans, and dislocated workers needing assistance to obtain employment leading to self-sufficiency. These services may include assessment, case management, training assistance, supportive services, job search activities, and follow-up. In Region 8, WDS contracts with the South Central Regional Workforce Board to deliver workforce development services through a network of offices located in Brown, Daviess, Greene, Lawrence, Martin, Monroe, Orange and Owen Counties. Individuals seeking further information about WDS in Region 8 should call 812-888-5291. In Region 11, WDS contracts with the Grow Southwest Indiana Regional Workforce Board to deliver services through a network of offices and access sites located in Dubois, Gibson, Knox, Perry, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Vanderburgh and Warrick Counties. Individuals seeking further information about WDS in Region 11 should call 812-482-3006. Generations Generations is the designated Area Agency on Aging serving Daviess, Dubois, Greene, Knox, Martin and Pike Counties. The program serves people over the age of 60 and their caregivers. Services are designed to provide clients with choices that allow them to maintain their dignity and independence. Generations serves more than 3,000 clients, assisting individuals to remain independent in their homes and contribute to their communities. Services include: Case Management to assess client service needs, develop care plans and coordinate resources; Nutrition Services to provide nutritious, hot meals through Meals on Wheels home delivery and neighborhood meal sites; Volunteer Services including Knox County Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), Tax Counseling for the Elderly and AngelWorx; Link-Age Aging and Disability Resource Center providing information & referral to inform, guide, direct and link individuals to needed and available resources; Pre-Admission Screening to determine the appropriateness of nursing facility placement; Caregiver Program to provide services for family caregivers including educational programs, support group meetings and respite care; Ombudsman to investigate and resolve complaints made by/on behalf of residents of longterm care facilities; and Health and Wellness programs to promote lifelong learning, positive aging and an enhanced quality of life for older adults. Generations is also the 2-1-1 Call Center for Knox, Dubois, Greene and Pike counties. For more information about Generations, call 812-888-5880. The Indiana Military Education Programs (IMP/DFAS) The Indiana Army/Air National Guard Program & Reserve Program (IMP). The Vincennes University, Indiana Army/Air National Guard Program assists soldiers in the Indiana Army/Air National Guard and Indiana based U.S. Army Reserve units in meeting the newly mandated educational requirements established by the U.S. Congress. A combination of specially developed credit courses and traditional college courses are taught in Indiana Army/Air National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve units. In addition, Vincennes University offers students evaluation of military occupational specialties (MOS) and service schools, using the Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS), Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript (SMART) and/or the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) to establish college credit. Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS) Indianapolis Program. The Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS) program was part of the former Vincennes University Fort Benjamin Harrison Center program that originally started in 1972. DFAS provides free classroom facilities and equipment for Vincennes University courses leading to various associate degree programs. These degree programs include; Accounting, Business Management, Business Administration, General Studies and General Studies with a Business Option. Courses offered at the DFAS are exclusively for Active Duty Military, Department of Defense civilian employees and contractors.

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To request college courses in your unit, armory or facility, find out about currently scheduled classes, or for additional information about the Indiana Military Education Programs, please call 317-381-6006. Statewide Business and Industry Training Program The Business and Industry Training Program’s mission is to make education and training available to all interested companies throughout the State of Indiana. Curriculum is designed and tailored to meet the training needs of each specific business or industry; incorporating company culture. VU’s Business and Industry Training provides quality education and training that produces measurable improvement in job performance of incumbent workers and gives the competitive edge needed to compete in a global market. Classes can be as short as a one day workshop, a certificate program or employees can complete a two year degree. Training programs include, but are not limited to: Supervision, Quality, Industrial Maintenance, Robotics, Certified Nursing Assistant, Medical Office Management, Leadership Development, Lean, CNC Train the Trainer, ABB Robotics Train the Trainer, Qualified Medication Aide, and the list goes on. Vincennes University’s Business and Industry Training also includes Tractor-Trailer Driver Training. This is an eight-week certificate program which is offered at the Indianapolis Aviation Technology Center in Indianapolis and at the new state-of-the-art Indiana Center for Applied Technology at the Vincennes campus in Vincennes, Indiana. This program is open to the general public and is designed to prepare students to enter the tractor-trailer truck driver training certificate at an entry level driving position. For more information on Business and Industry Training, interested persons should call one of the following numbers: Northern Indiana 574-250-0528 Central Indiana 317-849-5983 Southern Indiana 812-888-4297 Tractor Trailer Driver 317-381-6029 (Indianapolis), 812-888-5150 (Vincennes) Veterans Upward Bound Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Veterans Upward Bound provides free educational services to academically and financially disadvantaged military veterans with the goal of post-secondary enrollment. VUB offices in Indianapolis and Muncie, Indiana, serve 120 veterans who have been honorably or generally discharged and who have completed a minimum of 180 days of active service. The VUB service area includes Marion, Morgan, Shelby, Delaware, Madison, Blackford, Jay, Randolph, and Henry counties. Services include academic preparation and college, career and financial aid counseling. VUB staff work closely with area schools, employment office veteran’s representatives, Veterans Administration staff, and other agencies at both the federal and state levels to ensure program participants receive coordinated academic, career, and financial aid services. Support services continue throughout the veteran’s program of study or training. VUB also offers cultural experiences throughout the year that include the Annual Recognition Banquet and trips to area museums. For more information about Veterans Upward Bound in the Indianapolis area, call (317) 927-9605. In the Muncie area, call (765) 289-1861, ext. 2107.

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Jasper Campus
Vincennes University Jasper Campus was developed cooperatively by Vincennes University and COHERE, Inc. in February, 1970. COHERE, Inc. (Committee on Higher Education and Related Events) was a Dubois County citizens action group dedicated to the improvement of education and cultural enrichment for the area. It was founded by concerned citizens in 1960 and, having fulfilled its goals, was dissolved in 1978. Completion of a two-story administration/classroom building in Fall 1974 enabled the Jasper Campus to move from temporary facilities in the central business district of Jasper to its permanent facility on a 130-acre tract south of Jasper on Indiana 162. A new addition completed in 1987 includes classrooms and faculty and administrative offices. Opened in 1987, the downtown campus facility, including both classroom and office space, houses continuing education classes and various federal programs. Alvin C. Ruxer, a Jasper businessman and member of the Vincennes University Board of Trustees, provided funding to construct the Ruxer Student Center, which includes a dining center, gymnasium, weight room, classroom and the Indiana Baseball Hall of Fame. The facility opened in 1990. The Arnold F. Habig Center began holding classes in the Fall of 1998. Named for Jasper businessman and University benefactor, Arnold F. Habig, this addition houses science, computer and technical laboratories. The campus library is also located in this facility. The new Academic Classroom Building, opened in spring of 2007, houses the nursing program, the Academic Support Center, computer labs and classrooms. The Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Associate in Applied Science and Bachelor of Science degrees and Certificates of Graduation are awarded through the Jasper Campus in accordance with degree and certificate requirements for graduation listed in this catalog. The following transfer and occupational programs of study are offered at the Jasper Campus. Plans of study for these programs are on the pages noted. Programs unique to the Jasper Campus (indicated with an * below) are included in alphabetical order in the pages immediately following. Programs of Study
Accounting 5250 ........................................................................................................................................ 112 Administrative Office Technology 5590 .................................................................................................... 114 Administrative Concentration 5591 ..................................................................................................... 115 Legal Concentration 5592 .................................................................................................................... 115 Medical Concentration 5593 ................................................................................................................ 115 Banking Certificate 5320* ............................................................................................................................ 98 Behavioral Sciences 1050 .......................................................................................................................... 136 Psychology Concentration 1053 ......................................................................................................... 138 Sociology Concentration 1054 ........................................................................................................... 139 Business Administration 5050 .................................................................................................................... 151 Business Management 5360 ....................................................................................................................... 152 Entrepreneurship Concentration 5361 .................................................................................................. 153 Finance Concentration 5362* ............................................................................................................... 153 Marketing Management Concentration 5363 ....................................................................................... 153 Supply Chain and Logistics Concentration 5364 ................................................................................. 153 Clerical – General Certificate 5606 ............................................................................................................ 159 Clerk – Medical Certificate 5610 ............................................................................................................... 160 Computer Programming – Database Certificate 5455 ................................................................................ 166 Computer Programming Technology 5450 ................................................................................................ 167 Computer Programming Technology – Networking Concentration 5451* ........................................... 99

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Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Elementary Concentration 1100 .......................................................................................................... 191 Special Education Concentration 1252 (ICHE Pending for Jasper Campus) ..................................... 206 Education Teacher – B.S. Degrees .............................................................................................................. 183 Special Education, Mild Intervention 1000 (B.S.) .............................................................................. 207 General Studies 2250 .................................................................................................................................. 245 General Studies - Business Studies 5900.................................................................................................... 246 General Studies Certificate 2256* .............................................................................................................. 100 Health Care Management 6000 (B.S.)........................................................................................................ 258 Health Information Management Certificate – Coding or Transcription Concentration 6155* .................. 101 Coding Concentration 6156*............................................................................................................... 101 Transcription Concentration 6157* ..................................................................................................... 101 Homeland Security and Public Safety 7000 (B.S.) ..................................................................................... 265 Law Enforcement 7500 .............................................................................................................................. 277 Liberal Arts 2400........................................................................................................................................ 282 Management Training Certificate 5520 ...................................................................................................... 298 Nursing, Associate Degree 6250 ................................................................................................................ 314 ADN-RN Completion Concentration for Licensed Practical Nurses 6252 ......................................... 318 Nursing, Practical 6350 .............................................................................................................................. 322 Nursing, RN to BSN Completion 6001 (B.S.)............................................................................................ 311 Pharmacy Technician Certificate 4831 ....................................................................................................... 327 Pharmacy Technician 4832 A.A.S. Degree ................................................................................................ 328 Sales Training Certificate 5551 .................................................................................................................. 348 Social Work 1500 ....................................................................................................................................... 349 Web Publishing and Design Certificate 5453 ............................................................................................. 371 Web Site Development for E-Commerce 5752* ........................................................................................ 102 For a Jasper Campus catalog or other information, write to Vincennes University Jasper Campus, 850 College Avenue, Jasper, Indiana 47546, or telephone 812-482-3030.

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BANKING 5320 A One-Year Program Leading to a Certificate of Program Completion This program would provide a credential for those individuals who are unable to complete an Associate Degree, but who need verification of training taken in the field of Banking. All FINC prefixed courses are approved by the American Institute of Banking.
Credit Hours

BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 FINC 100 Introduction to Financial Institutions ............................................. 3 FINC 205 Money and Banking ....................................................................... 3 FINC 220 Credit and Collections .................................................................... 3 FINC 230 Real Estate Finance ........................................................................ 3 FINC 245 Introduction to Investments............................................................ 3 MATT 109 Business Mathematics .................................................................... 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business................................................................. 3 __ 27

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BLAW 203 ................. 3 FINC 100.................... 3 FINC 220.................... 3 FINC 230.................. 3 Total Hours: 12 Semester II COMP 110 ................. 3 FINC 205.................... 3 FINC 245.................... 3 MATT 109 ................. 3 MGMT 100 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University's minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011.

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COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY – NETWORKING CONCENTRATION 5451 A Two-Year Concentration Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This sequence of courses contains the theory and applications of computer techniques to prepare students for entry-level positions in the field of networking. The rapid expansion of computers into all areas of business requires knowledge of how communications are formed and sent in various methods. Students will complete all university requirements and gain skills in both the hardware and software aspects of the networking field.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 44 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 CNET 150 Intro to Firewalls & VPNs ............................................................. 3 CNET 231 Microsoft Windows Administration .............................................. 4 CNET 233 UNIX/Linux Administration .......................................................... 4 CNET 240 Web Server Management ............................................................... 3 CNET 250 Firewalls & Network Security ....................................................... 3 COMP 107 Web Page Design ........................................................................... 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 COMP 130 Communications and Networking.................................................. 3 COMP 146 Personal Computer Configuration.................................................. 3 COMP 176 Introduction to Visual Programming.............................................. 3 COMP 215 Database Management/SQL........................................................... 3 COMP 252 Introduction to Java Programming ................................................. 3 COMP 295 Systems Development .................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 110 ................. 3 COMP 130 ................. 3 COMP 146 ................. 3 COMP 176 ................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II ACCT 100 .................. 3 COMP 215 ................. 3 CNET 231 .................. 4 ENGL 108 .................. 3 MATH 102 ............... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester III COMP 107 ................. 3 CNET 150 .................. 3 CNET 233 .................. 4 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Dir Econ Elect .......... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV CNET 240 .................. 3 CNET 250 .................. 3 COMP 252 ................. 3 COMP 295(R/W/S)..... 3 Lab Science Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 15

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by COMP 295. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14 ENGL 108 Technical Writing .......................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 3 Directed Economics Elective – Social Science Core.......................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by Major Program Requirements.

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GENERAL STUDIES 2256 A Certificate of Program Completion General Studies is a program designed primarily for students who have not selected a specific college educational goal by the time they have entered Vincennes University Jasper Campus. This certificate allows students to experience classes from all three departments on the Jasper Campus and select two other courses according to their individual interests. Graduates of this certificate who ultimately decide to pursue an Associate Degree may enter the General Studies (A.S. or A.A.S.) program with no loss of credit.
Credit Hours

ENGL 101 English Composition I ..................................................................... 3 100 Level or Higher Mathematics Course .......................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective .............................................................................. 3 Computer Awareness/Literacy Elective ......................................................... 1-3 Electives1 ........................................................................................................... 6 ____ 16-18 NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in READ 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

1

Students should consult with an advisor as to recommended electives.

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HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE Coding or Transcription Concentration A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion

6155

This program will prepare graduates for entry-level employment as health information coding specialists or transcriptionists. Those who complete the program will possess the basic knowledge and skills required to code or transcribe medical documentation with accuracy, clarity, and timeliness. Graduates will understand the principles of professional and ethical conduct in the work place. Upon completion of the certificate, students will be qualified to work in outpatient settings. The program is designed to serve non-traditional students enrolled in college courses on a part-time basis. It is anticipated that the program will appeal to individuals who are currently employed in a medical or health care setting and who are interested in upgrading their skills in the area of clinical coding or transcription. Standards for Progression and Graduation Students must complete all Health Information Management (HIMT) and Biology (BIOL) courses with a grade of C or above. Failure to meet this requirement will result in a withdrawal of the student from the Health Information Management Certificate program.
Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 107 .......................3 BIOL 107L .....................1 ENGL 101 ......................3 HIMT 110 ......................3 Concentration .............. 3 Total Hours: 13 Semester II COMP 110 .....................3 SPCH 143 .......................3 FNRL 285 ......................3 HIMT 130 ......................2 Concentration ......... 3-4 Total Hours: 14-15

Credit Hours

BIOL 107 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology.............................. 3 BIOL 107L Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory ........... 1 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ................................................ 3 ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................... 3 FNRL 285 Pathology........................................................................................ 3 HIMT 110 Medical Terminology for Allied Health ......................................... 3 HIMT 130 Medicolegal Aspects of Health Records ........................................ 2 SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................ 3 Coding or Transcription Concentration .......................................................... 6-7 _____ 27-28

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011, READ 009 and 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

Coding Concentration 6156

7

Transcription Concentration 6157

6

Semester I MATT 109 Business Mathematics ........................................ 3 Semester II HIMT 201 Medical Coding1 ................................................. 4

Semester I HIMT 206 Medical Transcription I.................................... 3 Semester II HIMT 207 Medical Transcription II .................................. 3

1

HIMT 201 Medical Coding is for outpatient coding only.

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WEB SITE DEVELOPMENT FOR E-COMMERCE 5752 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion This certificate program prepares graduates to qualify for entry-level and/or advanced positions in the field of Web Site Development for E-Commerce. Potential positions available for graduates include but are not limited to job titles such as: Webmaster, Web Designer, Web Developer, Web Editor, and related occupations in the electronic commerce field.
Credit Hours

COMP 107 Web Page Design ........................................................................... 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 COMP 113 Advanced Web Page Design .......................................................... 3 COMP 175 Principles of Computer Programming............................................ 3 COMP 215 Database Management/SQL........................................................... 3 COMP 252 Introduction to Java Programming ................................................. 3 CWEB 213 Web-Based Electronic Commerce ................................................. 3 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 MGMT 280 Introduction to Marketing .............................................................. 3 __ 27

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 107 ................. 3 COMP 110 ................. 3 COMP 175 ................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MGMT 280 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II COMP 113 ................. 3 COMP 215 ................. 3 COMP 252 ................. 3 CWEB 213 ............... 3 Total Hours: 12

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or ENGL 011, READ 009 and 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

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Programs of Study
Bachelor Degree-Completion (DegreeLink) ............................................................................. 105 BridgeBack to ISU ...................................................................................................................... 105 Course Requirements ................................................................................................................. 105 Dual Admission (VU-ISU) ......................................................................................................... 106 Index of Programs of Study by Division................................................................................... 106 ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator (VU Campus Office) .................................................. 106 Programs of Study ..................................................................................................................... 112

At Vincennes University there are programs of two general types: those designed specifically for transfer and those designed as occupational programs. Vincennes University each year undertakes continuing articulation with representatives of Indiana's public colleges and universities. These articulations have proven to be highly effective methods to assure that our college transfer associate degree programs are consistent with the first two years of the baccalaureate degree programs offered by these institutions. These articulation efforts have enabled Vincennes University to experience a long history of success in transferring academic credits to these institutions. Students are reminded, however, that several factors may affect credit transfer, including: Grades earned in courses completed for transfer, with most colleges requiring grades of C or higher in order for the course credits to transfer; applicability of courses in the curriculum at the receiving institution; and, degree requirements of the receiving institution. The receiving institution makes the final decision regarding the acceptance and application of transfer course credits. Vincennes University offers Occupational Workforce Development programs through several instructional divisions. A principal purpose of these programs is to develop in graduates the technical knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for successful job entry, continued employment and advancement. Several of these programs have also been articulated with four-year institutions which allow graduates of these programs to pursue baccalaureate degrees in selected fields of study. Long-range planning and guidance from business and industry leaders have helped provide the modern equipment and relevancy found in Vincennes University Occupational programs. Students are reminded, however, that several factors may affect job placement, including: Geographical distribution of job availability; the state of the economy; the individual student's record of academic achievement; and, the employer's perception of the student's abilities. Clearly, decisions relative to employment are always the employer's. The occupational programs are technically and vocationally oriented curricula designed primarily for students who plan to enter employment immediately upon graduation. Some students, however, choose to continue their education at a transfer institution. In addition, many VU occupational programs have articulation opportunities with the following Universities: Ball State University, Indiana State University, Indiana UniversityPurdue University--Indianapolis, Purdue University, Eastern Kentucky University, Ferris State University, Murray State University, Southern Illinois University, and Western Kentucky University. Please see your program/major advisor for specific information about these opportunities.

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Bachelor Degree-Completion (DegreeLink) DegreeLink is a Vincennes University-Indiana State University Partnership program that enables VU students (and graduates) to transfer VU associate degrees to ISU and complete selected ISU bachelor of science degrees. Students have the option of completing their bachelor degrees on the ISU campus located in Terre Haute, Indiana – or via distance learning. In addition, selected ISU bachelor degreecompletion programs are offered on the Vincennes campus through a combination of on-campus (VU) and distance learning. The following chart shows which VU degrees “link” to ISU bachelor of science degrees. Course-by-course credit transfer is possible for “nonlinking” degrees earned from VU.
Transfer To

Vincennes University Program A.S. in Architectural or Industrial Drafting A.S. in Business Administration A.S. in Business Administration A.S. in Corrections or Law Enforcement A.S. in Electronics Technology A.S. in Nursing A.A.S., A.S. or A.A. in any program A.A.S., A.S. or A.A. in any program A.A.S. or A.S. in any industrial technical program A.S. in any technology-related program

Indiana State University Program B.S. in Mechanical Design Technology B.S. in Business Administration B.S. in Insurance B.S. in Criminology B.S. in Electronics Technology B.S. in Nursing B.S. in Human Resource Development B.S. in Career and Technical Education B.S. in Industrial Supervision B.S. in Industrial Technology

In addition to the bachelor degree-completion opportunities available through DegreeLink (above), transfer agreements link over 60 VU programs to ISU bachelor degrees offered on the ISU campus. For information and assistance, contact the ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator, located in the Welsh Administration Building 135, at 812-888-6003. Visit DegreeLink on the web at www.indstate.edu/degreelink/VU. BridgeBack to ISU BridgeBack to ISU is a Vincennes University–Indiana State University partnership program for high school graduates who were unsuccessful in their initial request for admission to Indiana State University. This program offers those students an excellent opportunity to strengthen skills and prepare for future success at Indiana State University. For information on program requirements, contact the ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator, located in the Welsh Administration Building 135, at 812-888-6003. Course Requirements In order that the student may plan his or her program, plans of study are listed for all curricula on the pages immediately following. Special transfer requirements may need to be considered in addition to degree requirements. Students are strongly urged to consult the catalogs of institutions to which they intend to transfer. Students who intend to transfer to Indiana State University should contact the ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator, located in the Welsh Administration Building 135, at 812-8886003. Careful planning will minimize transfer problems. Students should not necessarily expect to complete Vincennes University programs in four consecutive semesters as suggested by the recommended sequence on the following program outlines. If any developmental courses are necessary to prepare the student for courses required in the program or if the student enters a program consisting of sequential courses other than at the beginning of the fall semester, this is particularly true. Enrolling in summer school classes might well be an option a student might consider if they wish to complete their university program in two years.
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For the benefit of working students and students who are parents, it is recommended that they enroll in no more than nine hours per semester. Vincennes University will provide accessibility to handicapped students in its academic and vocational programs by insuring their enrollment in sections of programs which are accessible. Students having questions about enrollment in any courses in these programs should contact the University's Coordinator of Disabled Students Services, Vigo Hall, Vincennes University or telephone 812-888-4501. Dual Admission Dual Admission is a Vincennes University–Indiana State University partnership program that allows students to be admitted to VU and ISU at the same time. Dual admission is ideal for students who plan to transfer a Vincennes University associate degree or certificate program and complete a bachelor degree at Indiana State University. Dual admission guarantees VU students maximum credit transfer and admission to ISU programs for which they are eligible–if the associate degree or technical certificate is completed at Vincennes University. For more information, contact the VU Admissions Office or the ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator, located in the Welsh Administration Building 135, at 812-8886003. ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator (VU Campus Office) The Indiana State University (ISU) Enrollment Services Coordinator offers Vincennes University students (and graduates) assistance and information on ISU degrees and transfer programs—including VU-ISU partnership programs listed in this catalog: BridgeBack to ISU; Dual Admission; and DegreeLink (bachelor degree-completion programs). To request information or schedule an appointment, contact the ISU Enrollment Services Coordinator, located in the Welsh Administration Building 135, at 812-888-6003 or 866-647-6710 (toll free). PROGRAMS OF STUDY BY DIVISION Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs
Education-Mathematics 4000 ...................................................................................................................... 195

Bachelor of Science Degree Programs
Education-Mathematics 4000 ...................................................................................................................... 195 Education-Science 4001 .............................................................................................................................. 200 Education-Special Education, Mild Intervention 1000................................................................................ 207 Health Care Management 6000 ................................................................................................................... 258 Homeland Security and Public Safety 7000 ................................................................................................ 265 Nursing RN to BSN Completion 6001 ....................................................................................................... 311 Technology 8000 ......................................................................................................................................... 361

Aviation Technology Center
Aviation Maintenance Technology 8120..................................................................................................... 134 Transport Category Aircraft Technician Certificate (at ATC) 8122 ................................................... 135 Avionics and FCC General Radiotelephone Certificate (at ATC) 8126.............................................. 135

Business and Public Service Division
Accounting 5250 ........................................................................................................................................ 112 Accounting Certificate 5251 ................................................................................................................ 113 Office Accountant Training Certificate 5252 ....................................................................................... 325

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Business and Public Service Division Continued: Administrative Office Technology 5590 ..................................................................................................... 114 Administrative Concentration 5591 ..................................................................................................... 115 Legal Concentration 5592 .................................................................................................................... 115 Medical Concentration 5593 ................................................................................................................ 115 Advanced Culinary Techniques 7251 ......................................................................................................... 116 Advanced Quality Management Certificate 5651 ...................................................................................... 116 Agribusiness 5300 ...................................................................................................................................... 117 Agribusiness Certificate 5302 ............................................................................................................. 118 Precision Ag Certificate 5303 .............................................................................................................. 338 Bowling Industry Management and Technology 3250............................................................................... 148 Broadcast Production and Sales 2110 ........................................................................................................ 149 Business Administration 5050DL ................................................................................................................ 151 Business Management 5360 ....................................................................................................................... 152 Entrepreneurship Concentration 5361 .................................................................................................. 153 Finance Concentration 5362 (Jasper Only) .......................................................................................... 153 Marketing Management Concentration 5363 ....................................................................................... 153 Supply Chain and Logistics Concentration 5364 ................................................................................. 153 Clerical – General Certificate 5606 ........................................................................................................... 159 Clerk – Medical Certificate 5610 ............................................................................................................... 160 Computer Programming – Database Certificate 5455 ................................................................................ 166 Computer Programming Technology 5450 ................................................................................................ 167 Computer/Software Support Specialist 5440............................................................................................... 168 Corrections 7150 ....................................................................................................................................... 173 Cosmetology 7200 ..................................................................................................................................... 174 Culinary Arts 7250 ..................................................................................................................................... 175 Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Business Concentration 5100 .............................................................................................................. 188 Education, Teacher – B.S. Degrees ............................................................................................................. 183 Emergency Medical Services 6030 ............................................................................................................ 218 Paramedic Certificate 6033 ................................................................................................................. 220 Emergency Management and Planning 6034 ............................................................................................. 217 Entrepreneurship Certificate 5404 ............................................................................................................... 228 Fire Science and Safety Technology 7350 ................................................................................................ 240 Fire Science and Safety Technology Certificate 7351 ....................................................................... 241 General Studies - Business Studies 5900 ................................................................................................... 246 Homeland Security and Public Safety 7000 (B.S.)...................................................................................... 265 Horticulture Technology 7400 ................................................................................................................... 269 Hospitality Certificate 7452 ........................................................................................................................ 270 Hospitality/Culinary Arts Certificate 7453 ................................................................................................. 271 Hotel and Motel Management 7450 ........................................................................................................... 272 Information Technology 5510 .................................................................................................................... 274 Web Design Concentration 5512.......................................................................................................... 275 Programming and Game Development Concentration 5513 (A.S.degree)........................................... 275 Programming and Game Development Certificate 5456...................................................................... 342 Introduction to Food Service 7252 ............................................................................................................. 276 Law Enforcement 7500DL ........................................................................................................................... 277 Law Enforcement Studies Certificate 7502 ......................................................................................... 279 Law Enforcement Studies Concentration 7501 ................................................................................... 280 Law Enforcement, Conservation 7550 ....................................................................................................... 281 Loss Prevention and Safety 7800 ................................................................................................................ 297 Management Training Certificate 5520 ...................................................................................................... 298 Multimedia Communications 2430 ............................................................................................................ 307 Paralegal 7600 ............................................................................................................................................ 326 Restaurant and Food Service Management 7750 ....................................................................................... 347 Sales Training Certificate 5551 .................................................................................................................. 348
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Business and Public Service Division Continued: Supply Chain Logistics Management 5405 ................................................................................................ 350 Supply Chain and Logistics Certificate 5403 ....................................................................................... 351 Virtual Assistant Certificate 5611 .............................................................................................................. 369 Web Development 5750 ............................................................................................................................. 370 Web Programming Certificate 5753 ........................................................................................................... 371 Web Publishing and Design Certificate 5453 ............................................................................................ 371

Health Sciences and Human Performance Division
Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Health Promotion/Health Education Concentration 3106 ................................................................... 194 Physical Education Concentration 3104 .............................................................................................. 199 Education, Teacher – B.S. Degrees ............................................................................................................. 183 Funeral Service Education 6050 ................................................................................................................. 242 Health Care Management 6000 (B.S.) ......................................................................................................... 258 Health Information Management 6150 ....................................................................................................... 263 Massage Therapy 6700 ................................................................................................................................ 302 Massage Therapy Certificate of Graduation 6701 ................................................................................ 304 Nursing, Associate Degree 6250DL ............................................................................................................ 314 ADN-RN Completion Concentration for Licensed Practical Nurses 6252 ........................................ 318 Nursing, Practical (Certificate) 6350 .......................................................................................................... 322 Nursing, RN to BSN Completion 6001 ...................................................................................................... 311 Physical Education 3100 ............................................................................................................................ 329 Fitness and Wellness/Personal Trainer Concentration 3102 ............................................................... 330 Sports Management Concentration 3101 ........................................................................................... 331 Sports Medicine/Athletic Training Concentration 3103...................................................................... 332 Physical Fitness Leadership Certificate 3150 ............................................................................................. 334 Physical Therapist Assistant 6400 .............................................................................................................. 335 Radiography 6650 ...................................................................................................................................... 343 Surgical Technology 6550 .......................................................................................................................... 354 Surgical Assisting Certificate 6551 ..................................................................................................... 352 Surgical Technology Certificate 6500 ................................................................................................. 357

Humanities Division
American Sign Language 2030 .................................................................................................................. 119 Art Art-Design (Graphic Design/Visual Communications Emphasis) Transfer 2100 ............................... 122 Pre-Art Therapy 2053.......................................................................................................................... 124 Studio Concentration 2050 ................................................................................................................. 126 Collegiate Studies Certificate 2257 ............................................................................................................. 161 Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Art Concentration 2051/2052 .............................................................................................................. 186 English Concentration 2151 ............................................................................................................... 192 Family and Consumer Sciences Concentration 2306 .......................................................................... 193 Education, Teacher – B.S. Degrees ............................................................................................................. 183 Family and Consumer Sciences 2300 ......................................................................................................... 229 Child Development Concentration 2301 ............................................................................................ 230 Dietetics Concentration 2302 ............................................................................................................. 231 Fashion Merchandising Concentration 2303 ...................................................................................... 232 Interior Design Concentration 2304 ................................................................................................... 233 Professional Nanny Certificate 2305 ................................................................................................... 234 General Studies 2250 A.A.S./A.S. Degree ................................................................................................. 245 Directed Studies Certificate 2255 ........................................................................................................ 247 Graphic Design-Occupational 2700 (formerly Commercial Art and Graphic Design-Occupational 8140)) .............................................................................................................................................. 254
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This program is also available as part of “DegreeLink” with ISU.

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Humanities Division Continued: Graphic Design-Multimedia and Web Graphics Concentration-Occupational 2701 (formerly Commercial Art and Graphic Design-Multimedia and Web Graphics Option-Occupational 8142)) ............................................................................................................................................... 256 Liberal Arts 2400......................................................................................................................................... 282 English Concentration 2150 ............................................................................................................... 285 Journalism Concentration 2350 .......................................................................................................... 287 Modern Foreign Languages Concentration 2200 ............................................................................... 288 Philosophy Concentration 2480 ......................................................................................................... 289 Photojournalism Concentration 2352 ................................................................................................. 290 Print Media Advertising Concentration 2351 ..................................................................................... 293 Religious Studies Certificate 2481 ............................................................................................................. 346 Workplace Readiness Skills Certificate 2850............................................................................................. 374

Jasper Campus
(See page 96 for Index of Jasper Programs)

Science and Mathematics Division
Biological and Physical Sciences Medical Concentrations Pre-Chiropractic Supplemental Certificate 4065........................................................................... 141 Pre-Health Information Administration Concentration 4660 ....................................................... 142 Pre-Occupational Therapy Concentration 4780 ........................................................................... 143 Biological, Biomedical Sciences 4010 ........................................................................................................ 144 Biotechnology Concentration 4011 ...................................................................................................... 145 Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant Concentration 4012 .................................................................... 145 Pre-Chiropractic Concentration 4013 ................................................................................................... 145 Pre-Forensic Science Concentration 4014 ............................................................................................ 145 Pre-Medicine Concentration 4015 ........................................................................................................ 145 Pre-Nuclear Medicine Technology Concentration 4016 ...................................................................... 145 Pre-Physical Therapy Concentration 4017 ........................................................................................... 146 Pre-Physician Assistant Concentration 4018 ........................................................................................ 146 Chemical Sciences 4070 .............................................................................................................................. 154 Biochemistry Concentration 4071 (I.U. Transfer)................................................................................ 155 Chemistry Concentration 4072 ............................................................................................................. 155 Pre-Clinical Laboratory Concentration 4073 ....................................................................................... 155 Pre-Dental Concentration 4074 ............................................................................................................ 155 Pre-Environmental Health Science Concentration 4075 ...................................................................... 155 Food Science Concentration 4076 ........................................................................................................ 155 Pre-Optometry Concentration 4078 ..................................................................................................... 155 Pre-Pharmacy Concentration 4079 ....................................................................................................... 155 Pre-Veterinary Concentration 4080 ...................................................................................................... 156 Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Chemistry Concentration 4120 ............................................................................................................. 189 Mathematics Concentration 4602 ......................................................................................................... 197 Engineering Science 4550 ........................................................................................................................... 222 Agricultural and Biological Engineering Concentration 4551 ............................................................. 223 Biomedical Engineering Concentration 4552....................................................................................... 223 Chemical Engineering Concentration 4553 .......................................................................................... 223 Civil Engineering Concentration 4554 ................................................................................................. 223 Computer Science Concentration 4555 ................................................................................................ 223 Electrical Engineering Concentration 4556 .......................................................................................... 223 Food Process Engineering Concentration 4557.................................................................................... 223 Mathematics Concentration 4558 ......................................................................................................... 224 Mechanical Engineering Concentration 4559 ...................................................................................... 224 Physics Concentration 4560 ................................................................................................................. 224 General Science – Pre-Veterinary Technology 4891................................................................................... 244 Geological and Earth Science/Geosciences 4460 ........................................................................................ 251 Agriculture Concentration 4461 ........................................................................................................... 252 2010-11 Programs of Study 109

Science and Mathematics Division Continued: Earth Science Concentration 4462 ....................................................................................................... 252 Forestry and Conservation Concentration 4463 ................................................................................... 252 Geography Concentration 4464............................................................................................................ 252 Geology Concentration 4465................................................................................................................ 252 Pharmacy Technician 4832 ......................................................................................................................... 328 Pharmacy Technician Certificate 4831................................................................................................. 327

Social Sciences and Performing Arts Division
Assistive Technology 1030 ........................................................................................................................ 128 Assistive Technology Certificate 1031 ............................................................................................... 129 Behavioral Sciences 1050 .......................................................................................................................... 136 Community Rehabilitation Certificate 1056 ....................................................................................... 137 Psychology Concentration 1053 ......................................................................................................... 138 Sociology Concentration 1054 ........................................................................................................... 139 Substance Abuse Certificate 1055 ...................................................................................................... 140 Dance/Theatre Certificate 2605 .................................................................................................................. 176 Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Early Childhood Concentration 1150 ................................................................................................. 190 Elementary Concentration 1100 ......................................................................................................... 191 Music Concentration 2452/2453 ......................................................................................................... 198 Secondary Concentration 1350 ............................................................................................................ 205 Special Education Concentration 1252 ............................................................................................... 206 Education, Teacher – B.S. Degrees ............................................................................................................. 183 Special Education, Mild Intervention 1000 (B.S.) ............................................................................... 207 Mathematics 4000 (B.S./B.A.) ............................................................................................................. 195 Science 4001 (B.S.) .............................................................................................................................. 200 Fine Arts Costume Construction Concentration 2601 ........................................................................................ 235 Music, Fine Art Concentration 2450 .................................................................................................. 236 Music Theatre Concentration 2451 ................................................................................................ 237 Technical Theatre Concentration 2603 ............................................................................................... 238 Theatrical Production Concentration 2600 ..................................................................................... 239 Liberal Arts Anthropology Concentration 1451 ..................................................................................................... 283 Economics Concentration 1453 .......................................................................................................... 284 History Concentration 1454 ............................................................................................................... 286 Political Science Concentration 1456 ................................................................................................. 291 Pre-Law Concentration 1400 .............................................................................................................. 292 Public Administration Concentration 1457 ........................................................................................ 294 Public Relations Concentration 2500 ................................................................................................. 295 Social Science Concentration 1450 ..................................................................................................... 296 Music – Audio Recording 2440.................................................................................................................. 309 Audio Recording Certificate 2441....................................................................................................... 310 Social Work 1500 ....................................................................................................................................... 349

Technology Division
Architectural Studies Technology/CAD 8300 ............................................................................................ 120 Automotive Technology 8030 .................................................................................................................... 130 Aviation Flight Technology 8090............................................................................................................... 132 Aviation Maintenance Technology 8120.................................................................................................... 134 Collision Repair and Refinishing 8070....................................................................................................... 162 Computer Integrated Manufacturing (Robotics) Technology 8480 ............................................................ 163 Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology Industrial Maintenance Concentration 8481........... 165 Construction Technology 8240 ................................................................................................................. 169 Building Materials Marketing Concentration 8241 ............................................................................ 171 Diesel Technology 8272 .............................................................................................................................. 177 Diesel, Truck and Heavy Equipment Concentration 8273 .................................................................. 178 John Deere Ag-Tech Concentration 8274 ............................................................................................ 178 110 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

Technology Division Continued: John Deere C & CE (Consumer & Commercial Equipment) Concentration 8275 .............................. 178 Drafting and Design/CAD 8330 ................................................................................................................. 180 Education, Teacher – Associate Degrees..................................................................................................... 182 Technology Concentration 8340 ......................................................................................................... 209 Education, Teacher – B.S. Degrees ............................................................................................................. 183 Electronics Fundamentals Certificate 8367 ................................................................................................ 210 Electronics Technology 8360DL ................................................................................................................. 215 Biomedical Technician Concentration 8361 ...................................................................................... 211 Computer Repair Technician Technology Concentration 8363 ......................................................... 214 Specialist Concentration (Distance Education Delivery) 8366 ........................................................... 216 Electronics Technology - Computer Networking Security and Wireless Specialists 8256 ......................... 212 Electronics Technology - Computer Networking Specialist 8255 ............................................................. 213 General Studies - Technology Apprenticeship 8901 .................................................................................. 248 General Technology 8365 .......................................................................................................................... 250 Manufactured Housing Component Assemblies Certificate 8415 (off-campus only) .............................................................. 299 Core Objectives Certificate 8416 (off-campus only)........................................................................... 299 Electrical Systems Certificate 8413 (off-campus only) ....................................................................... 300 Finish Carpentry Certificate 8412 (off-campus only) ......................................................................... 300 Mechanical Systems Certificate 8414 (off-campus only).................................................................... 301 Wood Framing Certificate 8411 (off-campus only) ........................................................................... 301 Mining Technology 8500 ........................................................................................................................... 306 Precision Manufacturing Technology 8470................................................................................................. 340 Advanced CNC Manufacturing 8472 .................................................................................................. 339 Injection Mold Tooling Concentration 8471 ....................................................................................... 341 Surveying Technology 8510 ...................................................................................................................... 359 Civil Drafting/CAD Concentration 8511 ............................................................................................ 360 Technology 8000 (B.S.) .............................................................................................................................. 361 Technology Apprenticeship – Associated Builders & Contractors Association 8550................................ 365 Electrical Concentration 8551 .............................................................................................................. 366 Carpentry Concentration 8552 ............................................................................................................. 366 HVAC Concentration 8553 .................................................................................................................. 366 Plumbing Concentration 8554 .............................................................................................................. 366 Sheet Metal Concentration 8555 .......................................................................................................... 366 Pipefitter Concentration 8556 .............................................................................................................. 366 Lineman Concentration 8557 ............................................................................................................... 366 Tractor-Trailer Driver Training Certificate 8520 ....................................................................................... 368 Tractor-Trailer Driver Training-Externship 8521........................................................................................ 368 Tractor-Trailer Driver Training-Motor Coach 8522 .................................................................................... 369 Welding Technology 8541 (Pending ICHE Approval) ............................................................................... 372 Welding Technology Certificate 8540........................................................................................................ 374
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This program is also available as part of “DegreeLink” with ISU.

2010-11 Programs of Study

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ACCOUNTING 5250 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This career program in accounting is specifically designed to prepare students for positions as junior accountants, accounting clerks, bookkeepers, accounting trainees, and office managers. The program balances the specialty in accounting with management, business law, and computer courses, in addition to the general education support courses. Accounting majors must obtain a minimum grade of C in each accounting course to receive the A.A.S. degree in Accounting.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 44-45 ACCT 140 Introduction to General Ledger/Inventory ..................................... 1 ACCT 141 Introduction to Accounts Payable .................................................. 1 ACCT 142 Introduction to Accounts Receivable ............................................. 1 ACCT 143 Introduction to Payroll ................................................................... 1 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................. 3 ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II ............................................................ 3 ACCT 255 Income Tax Accounting ................................................................ 3 ACCT 291 Accounting Software Applications ............................................... 3 ACCT 295 Individual Income Tax Preparation ................................................ 3 ACCT 292 Accounting Cases and Problems .................................................... 2 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business................................................................. 3 MGMT 275 Fundamentals of Finance ............................................................... 3 MGMT 293 Integrated Business Project ............................................................ 3 OADM 233 Spreadsheets................................................................................... 3 OADM 234 Databases....................................................................................... 3 Business Elective ............................................................................................ 2-3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ACCT 140 .................. 1 ACCT 141 .................. 1 ACCT 142 .................. 1 COMP 110 ................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109/ MATH 102................. 3 MGMT 100 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 143 .................. 1 ACCT 291 .................. 3 ENGL 205 .................. 3 OADM 233 ................ 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATT 109 Business Mathematics -orMATH 102 College Algebra ............................................................................. SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by BLAW 203. The Mathematics Intensive requirements may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

ACCT 201 .................. 3 ACCT 255 .................. 3 BLAW 203(RWS) ...... 3 ECON 201 ................. 3 OADM 234 ................ 3 Business Elec ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester IV ACCT 202 .................. 3 ACCT 292 .................. 2 ACCT 295 .................. 3 MGMT 275 ................ 3 MGMT 293 ................ 3 Lab Science Elec 3-4 Total Hours: 17-18

Liberal Education Core 14-15 ECON 201 Microeconomics ............................................................................. 3 ENGL 205 Business Communications ............................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ........................................ 3-4
Computer Skills are enhanced by Major Program Requirements. _____

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ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE 5251 A Certificate of Program Completion This program provides students with a broad range of technical skills directed toward the accounting function of business. Its primary emphasis would concentrate on the technical skills to successfully administer the accounting function for a small to medium-sized business. This certificate would also provide a basis for continuing study toward the A.A.S. degree in Accounting.
Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ACCT 140 .................. 1 ACCT 141 .................. 1 ACCT 142 .................. 1 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATT 109 ................. 3 OADM 233 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 100/201 ........... 3 ACCT 143 .................. 1 ACCT 296 .................. 2 ACCT 291 .................. 3 OADM 266 ................ 3 Elective ..................... 2 Total Hours: 14

Credit Hours

ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting -orACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................. ACCT 140 Introduction to General Ledger/Inventory ..................................... ACCT 141 Introduction to Accounts Payable .................................................. ACCT 142 Introduction to Accounts Receivable ............................................. ACCT 143 Introduction to Payroll ................................................................... ACCT 296 Accounting Cases & Problems...................................................... ACCT 291 Accounting Software Applications ............................................... ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATT 109 Business Mathematics .................................................................... OADM 233 Spreadsheets................................................................................... OADM 266 Professional Business Image .......................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................ Approved Elective ..............................................................................................

3 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 __ 29

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or placement in ENGL 009 or 011 and READ 009 and 011.

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ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE TECHNOLOGY 5590 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This program is structured to permit graduates to complete many of the education requirements set forth by the Professional Secretaries International for the Certified Professional Secretarial (CPS) Examination. Courses include computer concepts and applications, business law, economics, accounting, and principles of management, as well as the various recommended secretarial skill subjects and word processing. Students will have an opportunity to take the Microsoft Office User Certification exams (additional fee required).
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements1 44-48 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 ACCT 206 Payroll Accounting ........................................................................ 3 COMP 107 Web Page Design -orCOMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .............................................. 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business................................................................. 3 OADM 100 Keyboarding I -and/orOADM 150 Keyboarding II -and/orOADM 210 Advanced Communication Tools2 ............................................... 3-7 OADM 155 Records Management .................................................................... 3 OADM 161 Word Processing ............................................................................ 3 OADM 215 Machine Transcription ................................................................... 2 OADM 232 Presentation Software .................................................................... 3 OADM 233 Spreadsheets .................................................................................. 3 OADM 234 Databases ....................................................................................... 3 OADM 260 Office Management ....................................................................... 3 OADM 261 Integrated Business Software......................................................... 3 OADM 266 Professional Business Image ......................................................... 3 OADM 269 Office Professional Seminar .......................................................... 3
General Education Requirements See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109 ................. 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 OADM 100 or 150 ..... 2 OADM 161 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 215 .. 2-3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester II COMP 107 or 110 ...... 3 ENGL 107 .................. 3 OADM 150 or 210 .. 2-3 OADM 155 ................ 3 SPCH 148 ................... 3 Lab Science Elec . 3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester III ACCT 100 .................. 3 OADM 210 ............. 0-3 OADM 215 ................ 2 OADM 232 ................ 3 OADM 233 ................ 3 OADM 234 ................ 3 PSYC 142 ............ 3 Total Hours: 17-20 Semester IV ACCT 206 .................. 3 OADM 260(R/W/S) .... 3 OADM 261 ................ 3 OADM 266 ................ 3 OADM 269 ................ 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs........ 68-73

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATT 109 Business Mathematics .................................................................... SPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications ......................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by OADM 260. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 ENGL 107 Business English ............................................................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 215 First Aid ..................................................................................... 2-3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 3 Social Science Elective – Core List .................................................................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

(Continued on the following page)

1 Some courses listed as Major Program Requirements will be replaced by courses listed in a concentration. See “Sequence of Courses” for a complete listing of required courses for each concentration. 2 Placement will take place at initial advising.

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Courses in Concentrations: Administrative Concentration 5591 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................. ACCT 291 Accounting Software Applications ................................................ BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... Legal Concentration 5592 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... OADM 235 Legal Transcription ........................................................................ PARA 160 Civil Procedures............................................................................. 9 3 3 3 8 3 2 3

Medical Concentration 5593 11 OADM 170 Medical Terminology .................................................................... 3 OADM 219 Medical Transcription ................................................................... 2 OADM 230 Medical Insurance Billing .............................................................. 3 OADM 231 Advanced Medical Insurance Billing............................................. 3 Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
ADMINISTRATIVE 5591 Semester I COMP 107 or 110 ...... 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109.................. 3 OADM 100 or 150 ..... 2 OADM 161................. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 215 . 2-3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester II ACCT 201 .................. 3 ENGL 107 .................. 3 OADM 150 or 210 ..2-3 OADM 155................. 3 SPCH 148 ................... 3 Lab Science Elec . 3 Total Hours: 17-18 LEGAL 5592 Semester I ACCT 100 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109 .................. 3 OADM 100 or 150 ..... 2 OADM 161 ................. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 215 . 2-3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester II ENGL 107 .................. 3 OADM 150 or 210 . 2-3 OADM 155 ................. 3 PARA 160 .................. 3 SPCH 148 ................... 3 Lab Science Elec . 3 Total Hours: 17-18 MEDICAL 5593 Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109 ................. 3 OADM 100 or 150 ..... 2 OADM 161 ................ 3 OADM 170 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 215.. 2-3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester II ACCT 100 .................. 3 ENGL 107 .................. 3 OADM 150 or 210 .. 2-3 OADM 155 ................ 3 OADM 219 ................ 2 SPCH 148 .................. 3 Lab Science Elec. 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester III OADM 210 ............. 0-3 OADM 230 ................ 3 OADM 232 ................ 3 OADM 233 ................ 3 OADM 234 ................ 3 PSYC 142 ........... 3 Total Hours: 15-18

Semester III BLAW 203 ................. 3 OADM 210 ..............0-3 OADM 215................. 2 OADM 232................. 3 OADM 233................. 3 OADM 234................. 3 PSYC 142 ............ 3 Total Hours: 17-20 Semester IV ACCT 291 .................. 3 OADM 260(R/W/S) .... 3 OADM 261................. 3 OADM 266................. 3 OADM 269................. 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs ........68-73

Semester III BLAW 203 ................. 3 OADM 210 ............. 0-3 OADM 215 ................. 2 OADM 232 ................. 3 OADM 233 ................. 3 OADM 234 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ............ 3 Total Hours: 17-20 Semester IV OADM 235 ................. 2 OADM 260(R/W/S) .... 3 OADM 261 ................. 3 OADM 266 ................. 3 OADM 269 ................. 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Cr Hrs ....... 67-72

Semester IV OADM 231 ................ 3 OADM 260(R/W/S) ... 3 OADM 261 ................ 3 OADM 266 ................ 3 OADM 269 ................ 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs ....... 68-73

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ADVANCED CULINARY TECHNIQUES 7251 A Certificate of Program Completion This program is designed for those who already have basic culinary skills and wish to explore more advanced culinary techniques in areas of pastry, presentation, and more. This program is designed as an intensive program for students who have completed an A.S. or A.A.S. in Culinary Arts.
Credit Hours

CULN 230 CULN 250 CULN 280 CULN 281

Nutrition for the Food Service Professional ................................... Off-Site Catering ............................................................................ Advanced Culinary Techniques I ................................................... Advanced Culinary Techniques II..................................................

3 3 9 9 __ 24

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CULN 230 ......................3 CULN 280 ................... 9 Total Hours: 12 Semester II CULN 250 ......................3 CULN 281 .................... 9 Total Hours: 12

ADVANCED QUALITY MANAGEMENT 5651 A Certificate of Program Completion This certificate exposes students to managerial methods and concepts that address the challenges facing today’s organizations. Traditional managerial topics will be augmented with contemporary concepts in the areas of management, teambuilding, human resource development, benchmarking, operations management, creative problem solving, and quality management.
Credit Hours

MGMT 305 Principles of Management ............................................................. 3 MGMT 341 Human Resource Management ...................................................... 3 MGMT 433 Organizational Management ......................................................... 3 PRDM 357 Total Quality Management ............................................................ 3 TECH 455 Problem Solving............................................................................. 3 __ 15

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I MGMT 305 ....................3 MGMT 341 ....................3 MGMT 433 ....................3 PRDM 357 .....................3 TECH 455 .................... 3 Total Hours: 15

NOTE: All students must have junior standing to enter this program.

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AGRIBUSINESS 5300 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This program provides opportunities in off-farm agricultural operations. Major emphasis is upon agribusiness operations, marketing, sales and processing of farm products.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 42 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting -orACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ........................ 3 AGBS 101 Agribusiness Industries. ............................ 3 AGBS 152 Agricultural Sales...................................... 3 AGBS 254 Nutrient Management ............................... 3 AGBS 260 Introduction to Precision Ag ..................... 3 AGBS 264 Agribusiness Operations ........................... 3 AGRI 101 Introductory Agricultural Business and Economics ............................................... 3 AGRI 104 Crop Production…….. .............................. 3 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ................ 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .......... 3 COMP 201 The Computer in Business ........................ HORT 130 Crop Pest Management ............................. 3 MGMT 250 Introduction to Management ..................... 3 Agricultural Elective ..................................................... 3 Diesel Elective ............................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 -

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)

Semester I AGBS 101 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 HORT 130 ............... 3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester I AGBS 101 ................3 ENGL 101 ................3 HORT 130 ...............3 MATH 102...............3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester II AGBS 152(R/W/S) .. 3 AGRI 104(S) ........... 3 BIOL 101................. 4 COMP 110............... 3 MATT 109............... 3 PFWL 100 ............. 2 Total Hours: 18

Semester II AGBS 152(R/W/S) ...3 AGRI 104(S) ............3 COMP 201 ...............3 ENGL 102/205.........3 Lab Sci Elec ..... 3-4 Total Hours: 15-16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATT 109 Business Mathematics (or higher mathematics) ........................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester III AGBS 254 ............... 3 AGBS 260 ............... 3 AGRI 103(W) .......... 3 Agricultural Elec ..... 3 MGMT 250 ............. 3 Diesel Elective ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester III AGBS 254 ................3 AGBS 260 ................3 AGRI 103(W)...........3 MGMT 250 ..............3 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 18

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by AGBS 152 or AGBS 264 or BLAW 203. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by AGBS 152 or AGBS 264 or AGRI 103 or BLAW 203. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by AGBS 152 or AGBS 264 or AGRI 104 or BLAW 203. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV ACCT 100/201 ........ 3 AGBS 264(R/W/S) .. 3 AGRI 101 ................ 3 BLAW 203(R/W/S) . 3 HIST 139/Soc Sci Elec ................ 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester IV ACCT 100/201.........3 AGBS 264(R/W/S) ...3 AGRI 101.................3 BLAW 203(R/W/S) ..3 PFWL 100 ................2 HIST 139/Soc Sci Elec ................ 3 Total Hours: 17

Liberal Education Core 15 20-21 AGRI 103 Fundamentals of Horticulture ................... 3 3 BIOL 101 Plant and Animal Biology ......................... 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II -orENGL 205 Business Communications ........................ 3 HIST 139 American History I -orSocial Science Elective—Core List ............................... 3 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 2 Humanities Elective—Common Core List .................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective--Common Core List......... 3-4 Social Science Elective(s)--Core List ............................ 3 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by AGBS 254 and AGBS 260.

__ ____ 66 65-66

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AGRIBUSINESS CERTIFICATE 5302 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion This certificate will expose students to agribusiness concepts and skills to meet the challenges facing the agricultural community. Agribusiness basics will be enhanced with new concepts and technology.
Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AGBS 101 .................. 3 AGBS 254 .................. 3 AGBS 260 .................. 3 Electives ................... 3 Total Hours: 12 Semester II AGBS 152 .................. 3 AGBS 264 .................. 3 Electives ................... 6 Total Hours: 12

Major Program Requirements Credit Hours AGBS 101 Agribusiness Industries .................................................................. 3 AGBS 152 Ag Sales ......................................................................................... 3 AGBS 254 Fertilizers ....................................................................................... 3 AGBS 260 Introduction to Precision Ag .......................................................... 3 AGBS 264 Agribusiness Operations ................................................................ 3 Approved Electives1 ........................................................................................... 9 __ 24

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University's minimal requirements through placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011; READ 009 and 011; and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

1

Approved electives include AGBS Electives, AGRI Electives, MGMT Electives, ERTH 111 Introduction to Remote Sensing, and ERTH 112 Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

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AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2030 (Available at Indiana School for the Deaf, Indianapolis) A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.A. Degree American Sign Language is an intensive two-year program designed to prepare students to pursue a baccalaureate degree in American Sign Language interpreting. It will also serve as a foundation in several fields in the area of services for deaf persons: education, rehabilitation, social work, and counseling.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 30 ASLG 111 The Deaf Community..................................................................... 3 ASLG 201 American Sign Language III .......................................................... 5 ASLG 203 American Sign Language IV .......................................................... 5 ASLG 206 American Sign Language Grammar ............................................... 3 ASLG 207 American Deaf Culture .................................................................. 3 ASLG 215 Careers in American Sign Language.............................................. 2 ASLG 220 Linguistic Structure of American Sign Language .......................... 3 ENGL 249 Elements of General Linguistics .................................................... 3 ENGL 250 English Grammar ........................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ASLG 101 .................. 5 ASLG 111 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 ENGL 250 .................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II ASLG 103 .................. 5 ASLG 215 .................. 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III ASLG 201 .................. 5 ASLG 206 .................. 3 ENGL 249 .................. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 SOCL 164 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV ASLG 203 .................. 5 ASLG 207(R/W/S) ..... 3 ASLG 220 .................. 3 PHIL 212 .................... 3 Lab Science Elec ...... 4 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by ASLG 207. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 28 ASLG 101 American Sign Language I............................................................. 5 ASLG 103 American Sign Language II ........................................................... 5 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics ..................................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 SOCL 164 Introduction to Multicultural Studies ............................................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 4
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

__ 67

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ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES TECHNOLOGY/CAD 8300 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Graduates of this program may be employed as entry-level Architectural Technicians within architectural and/or engineering firms, residential design firms, campus planning, city planning or zoning offices and other governmental agencies. Opportunities also include, construction management and supervision positions, building inspection, kitchen, bath and furniture design companies or architectural/construction product sales, and teaching in a technical school or program. PC/CAD skills are an integral part of this program. There are a variety of four-year transfer programs.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 48 ARCH 102 Architectural Drafting and Print Reading . 4 ARCH 110 Fundamentals of Architectural Drawing ... 3 ARCH 130 Architectural Rendering and Illustration ... 3 ARCH 141 Introduction to Architectural CAD ........... 3 ARCH 160 Architectural Working Drawing ............... 5 ARCH 161 Architectural Computer-Aided Drawing ... 4 ARCH 221 Advanced Architectural Software Applications ............................................ 4 ARCH 241 Intermediate Architectural CAD ............... 5 ARCH 271 Design I -orARCH 281 Advanced Design I .................................... 4 ARCH 272 Design II -orARCH 282 Advanced Design II .................................. 4 ARCH 291 Advanced Architectural CAD ................... 6 SURV 100 Surveying Fundamentals -orSURV 181 Site Surveying and Planning1 .................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the General education and assessment requirements.

48 4 3 3 3 5 4 4 5 4 4 6 3

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARCH 102 ............... 4 ARCH 110 ............... 3 ARCH 130 ............... 3 ARCH 141 ............... 3 ENGL 101................ 3 Math Elec ............... 3 Total Hours: 19

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARCH 102 ................ 4 ARCH 110 ................ 3 ARCH 130 ................ 3 ARCH 141 ................ 3 ENGL 101 ................ 3 MATH 102/ 104(M) ................. 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester II ARCH 160 ............... 5 ARCH 161 .............. 4 SURV 100/181 ........ 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elective .................. 3 Soc Sci Elec........... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III ARCH 221 ............... 4 ARCH 241 ............... 5 ARCH 271/281........ 4 ENGL 102 ............... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 SPCH 143 ......... 3 Total Hours: 21-22 Semester IV ARCH 272/282(S) ... 4 ARCH 291(R/W/S) .. 6 HIST 155(R/W) ....... 3 PHYS 105/105L or PHYT 101 ...... 4-5 Humanities Elec 3 Total Hours:20-21

Semester II ARCH 160 ............... 5 ARCH 161 ............... 4 SURV 100/181 ........ 3 Hum/Sci/Soc Sci/ Writing Elect ......... 3 Math Elect.............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III ARCH 221 ............... 4 ARCH 241 ............... 5 ARCH 271/281 ........ 4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ......... 2-3 SPCH 143 ......... 3 Total Hours: 18-19

Basic Skills Core 9 ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 3 MATH 102 College Algebra -orMATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ SPCH 143 Speech ....................................................... 3 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .. 3

9 3 3 3 -

The Reading and Writing requirements may be met by ARCH 291 or HIST 155. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by ARCH 291 or ARCH 272 or ARCH 282. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by Mathematics Elective for A.A.S., or MATH 102 or MATH 104 for A.S., or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV ARCH 272/282(S) ... 4 ARCH 291(R/W/S) .. 6 HIST 155(R/W) ........ 3 Science Elect ......... 3 Total Hours: 16

Liberal Education Core 14-15 21-23 ENGL 102 English Composition II ............................. 3 HIST 155 Survey of Architectural History ................ 3 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ............................................... 2-3 2-3

(Continued on the following page)

1 Students that will double major in Surveying Technology are encouraged to take PHYS 218 for PHYT 101, take MATH 102 and MATH 104, and complete SURV 125 and SURV 165 by the end of their second year in the Architectural program.

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PHYS 105 General Physics I -andPHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I -orPHYT 101 Technical Physics1 .................................... Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... Mathematics Elective1 - Broad Core List ..................... Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List1 .................................................................. One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics**, Science, Social Science or Writing .........................................................
Computer Skills are enhanced by ARCH 141.

3 3 3

4-5 3 3 3 -

____ ____ 71-72 78-80

1

MATH 104 is recommended if MATH 102 was selected to satisfy the Basic Skills Core Requirement.

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ART – DESIGN (GRAPHIC DESIGN/VISUAL COMMUNICATION EMPHASIS) 2100 TRANSFER A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.S. Degree Graphic Design is a specific field in which a “graphic designer” employs image and type to organize visual elements and text effectively and clearly using a concept. Visual Communication is a more general field in which a “designer” uses letterform and visual elements, such as color and shape, to communicate visually and verbally a specific message. A “graphic artist” then mechanically reproduces the art made by design artists for mass printing. The intent of this visual arts program is to function as the first two foundation years of a four- or five-year “design” curricula at another institution after completing the A.S. degree requirements. This program may be used as the basis for many design specific fields, such as commercial art, computer graphics, web design, product design, display design, surface design, and corporate identity design. Continuation toward an advanced degree such as a B.F.A. or M.F.A., highly enhances one's career opportunities in design. Vincennes University is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 42 ARTT 111 Two-Dimensional Design .............................................................. 3 ARTT 112 Color and Design ........................................................................... 3 ARTT 114 Three-Dimensional Design ............................................................ 3 ARTT 116 Drawing I ....................................................................................... 3 ARTT 117 Drawing II ...................................................................................... 3 ARTT 130 Art History I--Pre-history to 1500.................................................. 3 ARTT 131 Art History II--1500 to Present ...................................................... 3 ARTT 140 Computer Art and Design .............................................................. 3 ARTT 201 Typographic Design ....................................................................... 3 ARTT 203 Graphic Design I ............................................................................ 3 ARTT 204 Graphic Design II ........................................................................... 3 ARTT 211 Art Portfolio Development ............................................................. 2 ARTT 212 Art Portfolio Assessment ............................................................... 1 ARTT 220 Photography I ................................................................................. 3 200-Level Art Elective1 ...................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARTT 111 .................. 3 ARTT 116 .................. 3 ARTT 130 .................. 3 ARTT 140 .................. 3 ENGL 101 ................ 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester II ARTT 114 .................. 3 ARTT 117 .................. 3 ARTT 131(R/W)......... 3 ARTT 201 .................. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 SPCH 143/148(W) ... 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications ......................................................

9 3 3 3

Semester III ARTT 112 .................. 3 ARTT 203(S).............. 3 ARTT 211 .................. 2 ARTT 220(S).............. 3 ENGL 102 ............... 0-3 LITR 220(R/W/S)/ Human Elective ........ 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Soc Sci Elective .. 3 Total Hours: 19-22

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by ARTT 131 or LITR 220. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by ARTT 131 or LITR 220 or SPCH 148. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by ARTT 203 or ARTT 220 or LITR 220. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 18-21 ENGL 102 English Composition II2 ............................................................ 0-3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................................................... 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 4 Social Science Electives – Core List .................................................................. 6 (Continued on the following page)

1 Select one of the following: ARTT 208 Printmaking I, ARTT 213 Ceramics I, ARTT 215 Sculpture I, ARTT 218 Painting I, ARTT 232 History of Design. 2 Students not selecting the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 3 hours in a Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

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LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orHumanities Elective – Common Core List 1. ...................................................... 3 LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II -orHumanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core Core List1 ............ 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by ARTT 140. The Second Writing Skills Course requirement may be met by LITR 220/221.

Semester IV ARTT 204................... 3 ARTT 212................... 1 LITR 221 or Hum/ Sci/Math Elec ........... 3 200-Lev Art Elec ........ 3 Lab Science Elec ........ 4 Soc Sci Elective ........ 3 Total Hours: 17

_____ 69-72

Students not selecting the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 3 hours in a Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

1

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ART – PRE-ART THERAPY 2053 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares students who are interested in becoming art therapists. Art therapy combines the artists’ understanding and practice of creative visual expression with the therapists’ understanding of personal dynamics. Art therapy can be a diagnostic tool and/or a primary form of therapy. Art therapists are employed in psychiatric hospitals, special education programs, nursing homes, drug abuse agencies, halfway houses, employee assistance programs and in private practice. Persons wishing to enter this field may earn a bachelor's degree in Art Therapy. More frequently, a bachelor's degree in Art or Psychology is followed by a master's degree in Art Therapy. This program combines study of art, psychology and general education courses appropriate for transfer to a four-year school where a degree in art, psychology or art therapy is sought.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 42 ARTT 111 Two-Dimensional Design .............................................................. 3 ARTT 112 Color and Design ........................................................................... 3 ARTT 114 Three-Dimensional Design ............................................................ 3 ARTT 116 Drawing I ....................................................................................... 3 ARTT 117 Drawing II ...................................................................................... 3 ARTT 130 Art History I – Pre-history to 1500 ................................................ 3 ARTT 131 Art History II – 1500 to Present ..................................................... 3 ARTT 140 Computer Art and Design .............................................................. 3 ARTT 211 Art Portfolio Development ............................................................. 2 ARTT 212 Art Portfolio Assessment ............................................................... 1 ARTT 218 Painting I ........................................................................................ 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology .................................................................... 3 200-Level Studio Elective, 2D Area1 ................................................................. 3 200-Level Studio Elective, 3D Area2 ................................................................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARTT 111 .................. 3 ARTT 114 .................. 3 ARTT 116 .................. 3 ARTT 130 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17

Semester II ARTT 112 .................. 3 ARTT 117 .................. 3 ARTT 131(R/W)......... 3 ARTT 140 .................. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 Soc Sci Elective ....... _3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I3 .................................................................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................

9 3 3 3

Semester III ARTT 211 .................. 2 ARTT 218(S).............. 3 ENGL 102 ............... 0-3 LITR 220 or Hum/ Sci/Math Elec ........... 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Soc Sci Elective ......... 3 SPCH 143/148..... 3 Total Hours: 17-20

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by ARTT 131. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by ARTT 213, 215 or 218. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 18-21 ENGL 102 English Composition II3 ............................................................. 0-3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 4

(Continued on the following page)

1

Select the following: ARTT 200 Drawing I, ARTT 208 Printmaking I, or ARTT 220 Photography I. Select from the following: ARTT 213 Ceramics I or ARTT 215 Sculpture I.

2

Students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete a 3-hour Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

3

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LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orHumanities Elective – Common Core List1........................................................ 3 LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II -orHumanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List1 ..................... 3 Social Science Electives – Core List .................................................................. 6
Computer Skills are enhanced by ARTT 140. The Second Writing Skills Course requirement may be met by LITR 220/221. _____

Semester IV PSYC 249 ................... 3 ARTT 212................... 1 LITR 221/Human Elective ..................... 3 Lab Science Elec .... 4 200-Level 2D Studio Elective .......... 3 200-Level 3D Studio Elec(S) .......... 3 Total Hours: 17

69-72

Students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete a 3-hour Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

1

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ART - STUDIO CONCENTRATION 2050 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This curriculum provides the first two years of foundation studies in visual art which are intended to transfer as the first two years at other institutions that offer degrees in various specialized studio majors, such as painting, ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photography. This program may lead to additional, related fields, such as animation, film making, computer graphics, art therapy, art history, arts administration, museum work, teaching, model making, prototype building, display design, and other art-related careers. Vincennes University is accredited with the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.
Credit Hours - A.S. A.A.

Major Program Requirements 42 ARTT 111 Two-Dimensional Design I ....................... 3 ARTT 112 Color and Design ...................................... 3 ARTT 114 Three-Dimensional Design ....................... 3 ARTT 116 Drawing I .................................................. 3 ARTT 117 Drawing II ................................................. 3 ARTT 130 Art History I – Pre-history to 1500 ........... 3 ARTT 131 Art History II – 1500 to Present ................ 3 ARTT 140 Computer Art and Design ......................... 3 ARTT 208 Printmaking I ............................................ 3 ARTT 211 Art Portfolio Development ........................ 2 ARTT 212 Art Portfolio Assessment .......................... 1 ARTT 213 Ceramics I ................................................. 3 ARTT 215 Sculpture I ................................................. 3 ARTT 218 Painting I ................................................... 3 ARTT 220 Photography I ............................................ 3 200-Level Studio Electives............................................ General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 12

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARTT 111 ............... 3 ARTT 114 ............... 3 ARTT 116 ............... 3 ARTT 130 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 PFWL 100 ............. 2 Total Hours: 17

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARTT 111 ................3 ARTT 116 ................3 ARTT 130 ................3 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102...............3 PFWL 100 .............. 2 Total Hours: 17

Semester II ARTT 112 ............... 3 ARTT 117 ............... 3 ARTT 131(R/W) ...... 3 ARTT 140 ............... 3 MATH 102 .............. 3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II ARTT 112 ................3 ARTT 114 ................3 ARTT 117 ................3 ARTT 131(R/W) ......3 SPCH 143/148 .........3 200-Lev Stu Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester III ARTT 211 ............... 2 ARTT 213(S) ........... 3 ARTT 218(S) ........... 3 ARTT 220(S) ........... 3 ENGL 102 ............ 0-3 LITR 220 or Hum/ Sci/Math Elec ........ 3 Soc Sci Elective 3 Total Hours: 17-20

Semester III ARTT 211 ................2 ENGL 102 ............ 0-3 LITR 220/Human Elective ..................3 Foreign Lang ............4 Soc Sci Elective .......3 200-Level Studio Electives(S) .... 6 Total Hours: 18-21

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by ARTT 131. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by ARTT 202, 208, 213, 215, 218 or 220. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 18-21 26-29 ENGL 102 English Composition II1 ......................... 0-3 0-3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 2 (Continued on the following page)

1 A.A. degree students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 6 hours of Humanities Electives in addition to ENGL 102. A.S. degree students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete a 3-hour Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

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Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... Social Science Electives – Core List ............................. LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orHumanities Elective – Common Core List1................... LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II -orHumanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List1 ......................................................... Foreign Language Electives ..........................................

4 6 3

4 6 3

Semester IV ARTT 208(S) ........... 3 ARTT 212................ 1 ARTT 215(S) ........... 3 LITR 221/Hum Elective .................. 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 4 Soc Sci Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester IV ARTT 212 ............... 1 LITR 221/Human Elective .................. 3 Foreign Lang ........... 4 Lab Science Elec ..... 4 Soc Sci Elective....... 3 200-Level Studio Elective(S) ........... 3 Total Hours: 18

3 -

3 8

The A.A. Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum; For the A.S., Computer Skills are enhanced by ARTT 140. The Second Writing Skills Course requirement may be met by LITR 220/221. _____ _____

69-72 71-74

1 A.A. degree students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 6 hours of Humanities Electives in addition to ENGL 102. A.S. degree students who do not select the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete a 3-hour Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1030 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree Assistive Technology Specialists, Practitioners, and Suppliers play a vital role as members of the total transdisciplinary team providing services to individuals with disabilities. This program will prepare students with the knowledge and skills to provide a practical approach to assistive technology applications in educational, rehabilitation, health care, business and a variety of related settings. Students will study multiple applications of new technologies and old technologies from computer access to augmentative communication, home, work, school, and recreation modifications, and environmental control systems. Upon completion of the academic requirements (with combined experience), students will be prepared for careers in assistive technology and eligible to take the RESNA credentialing exam for Assistive Technology Practitioners and Suppliers.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 40-41 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers -or- Elective ........................ 3 HIMT 110 Medical Terminology for Allied Health......................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology............................................................ 3 PSYC 251 Fundamentals of Assistive Technology ......................................... 3 PSYC 261 Assessment, Selection, and Evaluation of Assistive Technology .. 3 PSYC 271 Applications in Assistive Technology............................................ 3 PSYC 275 Internship/Special Project in Assistive Technology ....................... 3 PSYC 279 Review Course for Assistive Technology Credentialing .......... 0-1 PSYC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 Electives1........................................................................................ 13 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 HIMT 110 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 251 ................... 3 PSYC 291 ................... 3 SOCL 151 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II EDUC 200 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148............ 3 Math Elective ............. 3 Elective ................ 4 Total Hours: 16 Semester III ENGL 102 .................. 3 PSYC 201 ................... 3 PSYC 261(W) ............ 3 Lab Sci Elec ............... 3 Humanities Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester IV PSYC 271 ................... 3 PSYC 275(R/S) .......... 3 PSYC 279 ................ 0-1 Electives .............. 9 Total Hours: 15-16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or Higher Mathematics Course ........................................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication .......................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by PSYC 275. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by PSYC 261. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology .................................................................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List .............................................................. 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

_____ 63-64

1 Recommended electives: PSYC 130 Introduction to Human Services, PSYC 180 Ethics in the Helping Professions, courses required for related disciplines.

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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1031 A Certificate of Program Completion Assistive Technology Specialists, Practitioners, and Suppliers play a vital role as members of the total transdisciplinary team providing services to individuals with disabilities. This program will prepare students with the knowledge and skills to provide a practical approach to assistive technology applications in educational, rehabilitation, health care, business and a variety of related settings. Students will study multiple applications of new technologies and old technologies from computer access to augmentative communication, home, work, school, and recreation modifications, and environmental control systems. The certificate is designed to serve as professional development for individuals with experience in assistive technology or those who have degrees in related fields. Upon completion of the academic requirements (with combined experience), students will be prepared for careers in assistive technology and eligible to take the RESNA credentialing exam for Assistive Technology Practitioners and Suppliers.
Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 200/Elective ... 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 141/142............ 3 PSYC 251 ................. 3 Total Hours: 12 Semester II EDUC/PSYC 291....... 3 PSYC 271 ................... 3 PSYC 275 ................... 3 PSYC 261(W) ............ 3 PSYC 279 ............ 0-1 Total Hours: 12-13

Credit Hours

EDUC 200 ENGL 101 PSYC 141 PSYC 142 PSYC 251 PSYC 261 PSYC 271 PSYC 275 PSYC 279 PSYC 291 EDUC 291

Computer Technology for Teachers -or- Elective ........................ 3 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 Applied Psychology -orGeneral Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Fundamentals of Assistive Technology ......................................... 3 Assessment, Selection, and Evaluation of Assistive Technology .. 3 Applications in Assistive Technology............................................ 3 Internship/Special Project in Assistive Technology ....................... 3 Review Course for Assistive Technology Credentialing .......... 0-1 Introduction to Exceptionalities -orIntroduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 ____ 24-25

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements either through placement tests or enrollment in MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

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AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 8030 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Graduates are prepared for entry into the automotive service industry and/or transfer to a Baccalaureate Degree Program. A tool set and uniform must be purchased/obtained by students before or during enrollment. Details, requirements and pricing may be obtained through the department.
Credit Hours – A.A.S. A.S. Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AUTO 105 ............... 2 AUTO 110 ............... 3 AUTO 110L ............ 1 AUTO 120 ............... 5 AUTO 120L ............ 3 ENGL 101 ............. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II AUTO 102 ............... 2 AUTO 130 ............... 4 AUTO 130L ............ 3 AUTO 160 ............... 3 AUTO 160L ............ 1 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Math Elective ........ 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester III AUTO 215 ............... 5 AUTO 215L ............ 3 AUTO 230 ............... 3 AUTO 230L ............ 1 Science Elec ........... 3 Hum/Math//Soc Sci/Writing Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 18 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AUTO 105 ............... 2 AUTO 110 ............... 3 AUTO 110L ............ 1 AUTO 120 ............... 5 AUTO 120L ............ 3 ENGL 101 ............. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II AUTO 130 ............... 4 AUTO 130L ............ 3 AUTO 160 ............... 3 AUTO 160L ............ 1 MATH 102 .............. 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Writing Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester III AUTO 230 ............... 3 AUTO 230L ............ 1 AUTO 215 ............... 5 AUTO 215L ............ 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Elective ........... 3 Total Hours: 20-21 Semester IV AUTO 210 (R/W/S) 4 AUTO 210L ............ 3 AUTO 280 ............... 3 Directed Elec ........ 2-3 Humanities Elec ...... 3 Soc Sci Elec...... 6 Total Hours: 21-22

Major Program Requirements 51-52 49-50 AUTO 102 Alternative Fuel Vehicles ........................ 2 AUTO 105 Transportation Fundamentals................... 2 2 AUTO 110 Transportation Electrical .......................... 3 3 AUTO 110L Transportation Electrical Laboratory ....... 1 1 AUTO 120 Automotive Chassis Systems ................... 5 5 AUTO 120L Automotive Chassis Systems Laboratory 3 3 AUTO 130 Automotive Engine Systems .................... 4 4 AUTO 130L Automotive Engine Systems Laboratory . 3 3 AUTO 160 Automotive Electronics ........................... 3 3 AUTO 160L Automotive Electronics Laboratory ......... 1 1 AUTO 210 Automotive Engine Performance ............. 4 4 AUTO 210L Automotive Engine Performance Laboratory ............................................ 3 3 AUTO 215 Automotive Drive Trains ........................ 5 5 AUTO 215L Automotive Drive Trains Laboratory ..... 3 3 AUTO 230 Transportation HVAC.............................. 3 3 AUTO 230L Transportation HVAC Laboratory ........... 1 1 AUTO 280 Automotive Service Capstone.................. 3 3 Directed Elective1 ....................................................... 2-3 2-3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ 100-level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .. SPCH 143 Speech ......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by AUTO 210. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a Mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 112, 205, or 210) ........................................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid .............................................. 2-3 2-3 Lab Science Elective ..................................................... 3 Science Elective ............................................................ 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3 6 Humanities or Science or Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ......................................................... 3

Semester IV AUTO 210 (R/W/S) . 4 AUTO 210L ............ 3 AUTO 280 ............... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ..........2-3 Directed Elec ........2-3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Writing Elec ......... 3 Social Sci Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 20-22

1 Students should select one of the following: AUTO 102 Alternative Fuel Vehicles DRAF 101 Introduction to Drafting DRAF 120 Computers for Technology DRAF 140 Introduction to CAD

MTTD 105 MTTD 205 WELD 160 WELD 165

Metallurgy and Industrial Blueprint Reading Welding and Fabrication General Welding Advanced General Welding

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One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

-

____ ____ 74-76 78-80

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AVIATION FLIGHT TECHNOLOGY 8090 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This program offers the ground school and flight instruction for the Federal Aviation Administration’s Commercial Pilot flight test with Instrument rating. Students may elect to obtain the Flight Instructor certificate. All applicants should have a FAA Class II medical prior to starting classes. Vincennes University training aircraft, as do all aircraft, have weight and balance limitations. Some individuals may be denied entry into the program because of their size and/or weight.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 45 AFLT 100 Primary Ground School ............................ 5 AFLT 105 Primary Flight ........................................... 3 AFLT 110 Ground Instruction on Primary Flight Maneuvers ........................................... 2 AFLT 160 Powerplant Lecture ................................... 2 AFLT 176 Instrument Flight ....................................... 3 AFLT 181 Commercial Ground School...................... 3 AFLT 186 Commercial Flight I .................................. 3 AFLT 210 Instruments, Radios and Systems .............. 2 AFLT 216 Commercial Flight II ................................. 4 AFLT 221 Instrument Ground School ........................ 5 AFLT 261 Aviation Instructor Fundamentals ............. 3 AFLT 263 Flight Training Techniques ....................... 3 AFLT 295 Flight Instructor-Airplane Rating -orAFLT 296 Advanced Flight ........................................ DRAF 120 Computers for Technology ....................... 2 Flight Elective ........................................... 2 Elective ..................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

42 5 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 4 5 3 3 2 2 -

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AFLT 100 ................ 5 AFLT 105 ................ 3 AFLT 110 ................ 2 DRAF 120 ............... 2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AFLT 100 ................5 AFLT 105 ................3 AFLT 110 ................2 DRAF 120 ...............2 ENGL 101 ...............3 MATH 102(M) ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II AFLT 160 ................ 2 AFLT 176 ................ 3 AFLT 186 ................ 3 AFLT 221 ................ 5 ENGL 108 ............... 3 MATH 104 ............ 3 Total Hours: 19

Semester II AFLT 160 ................2 AFLT 176 ................3 AFLT 186 ................3 AFLT 221 ................5 ENGL 102 ...............3 MATH 104 ............ 3 Total Hours: 19

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester III AFLT 181 ................ 3 AFLT 210 ................ 2 AFLT 216 ................ 4 PFWL 100 ............... 2 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Science Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester III AFLT 181 ................ 3 AFLT 210 ................ 2 AFLT 216 ................ 4 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PHYS 105 ................ 4 PHYS 105L ............. 1 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 19

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by AFLT 263. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by AFLT 261. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14 ENGL 102 English Composition II ............................. ENGL 108 Technical Writing ..................................... 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 PHYS 105 General Physics I ...................................... PHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I .................... PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3

22 3 3 2 4 1 3 -

Semester IV AFLT 261(S) ........... 3 AFLT 263(R/W) ...... 3 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Flight Elective ......... 2 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 14

Semester IV AFLT 261(S) ...........3 AFLT 263(R/W) ......3 AFLT 295/296 .........2 PSYC 142 ................3 Humanities Elec. .....3 Social Sci Elec. ...... 3 Total Hours: 17

(Continued on the following page)

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Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... Computer Skills are enhanced by DRAF 120. __

3 3
__

68

73

Elective courses within the Flight Department: AFLT 101 Experience in Aviation, 2 credit hours AFLT 201 Instrument Flight Instructor Theory, 2 credit hours AFLT 270 High Performance Aircraft, 2 credit hours AFLT 280 Instrument Flight Instructor – Airplane Rating, 2 credit hours AFLT 292 Precision Flight Maneuvers, 2 credit hours AFLT 295 Flight Instructor – Airplane Rating, 2 credit hours AFLT 296 Advanced Flight, 2 credit hours

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AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY 8120 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares students for a career as an Aviation Maintenance Technician. Successful completion of the program and the required FAA exams leads the student to an Airframe and Powerplant Technician rating (A&P).
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S. Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AMNT 102 .............. 4 AMNT 104 .............. 4 AMNT 106 .............. 4 AMNT 107 .............. 4 DRAF 120 or COMP 101............1-2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102 ....... 3 Total Hours: 23-24 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AMNT 102...............4 AMNT 104...............4 AMNT 106...............4 AMNT 107...............4 DRAF 120 or COMP 101 ........... 1-2 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102....... 3 Total Hours: 23-24

Major Program Requirements 65-66 65-66 AMNT 102 General Aviation Maintenance ................. 4 4 AMNT 104 Introduction to Electricity ......................... 4 4 AMNT 106 Materials, Processes and Welding............. 4 4 AMNT 107 Hydraulics and Pneumatics ....................... 4 4 AMNT 162 Aircraft Sheetmetal ................................... 4 4 AMNT 164 Aircraft Systems........................................ 4 4 AMNT 166 Composite and Nonmetallic Structures ..... 4 4 AMNT 167 Aircraft Electrical...................................... 4 4 AMNT 202 Powerplant Fuel and Induction Systems ... 4 4 AMNT 204 Reciprocating Engine Overhaul ................ 4 4 AMNT 206 Powerplant Systems and Propellers .......... 4 4 AMNT 207 Powerplant Electrical ................................ 4 4 AMNT 262 Turbine Engines ........................................ 4 4 AMNT 264 Engine Installation and Troubleshooting .. 4 4 AMNT 266 Aircraft Inspection .................................... 4 4 AMNT 287 FAA Certification ..................................... 4 4 DRAF 120 Computers for Technology -orCOMP 101 Using the Windows Environment .......... 1-2 1-2 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Semester II AMNT 162 .............. 4 AMNT 164 .............. 4 AMNT 166 .............. 4 AMNT 167 .............. 4 HIST 125 ................. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ..........2-3 SPCH 143 ......... 3 Total Hours: 24-25

Semester II AMNT 162...............4 AMNT 164...............4 AMNT 166...............4 AMNT 167...............4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 SPCH 143 ................3 Hum/Math/Soc Sci/Sci Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 24-25 Semester III AMNT 202...............4 AMNT 204...............4 AMNT 206...............4 AMNT 207...............4 ENGL 102 ................3 HIST 125..................3 PHYT 101 .............. 4 Total Hours: 26

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by AMNT 262. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by AMNT 264. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III AMNT 202 .............. 4 AMNT 204 .............. 4 AMNT 206 .............. 4 AMNT 207 .............. 4 ENGL 102 ............... 3 PHYT 101.............. 4 Total Hours: 23

Liberal Education Core 15-16 21-22 ENGL 102 English Composition II ............................. 3 3 HIST 125 History of American Technology.............. 3 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................ 2-3 2-3 PHYT 101 Technical Physics...................................... 4 4 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3 One course from one of the following areas: Humanities or Science – Broad Core List -orSocial Science – Core List .......................................... 3 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by DRAF 120 or COMP _____ _____ 101. 89-91 95-97

Semester IV AMNT 262(R/W)..... 4 AMNT 264(S) ......... 4 AMNT 266 .............. 4 AMNT 287 .............. 4 Hum/Math/Soc Sci/Sci Elec ......... 3 Total Hours: 19

Semester IV AMNT 262(R/W) .....4 AMNT 264(S) ..........4 AMNT 266...............4 AMNT 287...............4 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Sci Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 22

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AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY AVIONICS AND FCC GENERAL RADIOTELEPHONE CERTIFICATE 8126 A Certificate of Program Completion (Available at Indianapolis Aviation Technology Center) This certificate is designed to introduce the student to the required knowledge of basic electronics and rules necessary in preparation for the FCC General Radiotelephone License and to provide general Avionic knowledge. There will be a focus on Elements I & III, plus Element VIII (for radar endorsement). This will include, but not be limited to: Antennas, Amplifiers, Audio Transmitters and Receivers, Digital applications, Aviation Navigation and Communication Systems, Multivibrators, Oscillators, Pulse Equipment, Radar, Transmission Lines and Wavelength identifications and applications.
Credit Hours

AMNT 295 Aviation Maintenance Avionics I .................................................. AMNT 296 Aviation Maintenance Avionics II ................................................. AMNT 297 FCC GROL Pre-testing .................................................................. ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... FCC Testing (optional) .......................................................................................

4 4 2 3 0 __ 13

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AMNT 295 ................ 4 Total Hours: 4 Semester II AMNT 296 ................. 4 ENGL 101 ................. 3 Total Hours: 7 Summer I

NOTE: All students must have completed AMNT 104 &167, (or) an A&P (or) obtained Departmental Approval. NOTE: This Avionics and FCC Radiotelephone Certificate of Program Completion is designed to match the requirements for testing for the FCC General Radiotelephone First Class License with a Radar Endorsement.

AMNT 297 ................. 2 Total Hours: 2 Summer II FCC-Testing ............... 0 Total Hours: 0

AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRCRAFT TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE 8122 A Certificate of Program Completion (Available at Indianapolis Aviation Technology Center) This curriculum prepares certificate mechanics for careers as Aviation Maintenance Technicians in the airline, corporate, or commuter aviation industry.
Credit Hours

AMNT 190 AMNT 300 AMNT 305 AMNT 320 AMNT 330 AMNT 340

Boeing 737 General Familiarization .............................................. 2 Boeing 737 Inspection and Servicing Procedures .......................... 3 Boeing 737 Line Maintenance ....................................................... 3 Advanced Aircraft Electronic Systems .......................................... 6 Transport Category Aircraft Inspection and Repair ....................... 3 Air Carrier Operations ................................................................... 3 __ 20

Recommended Sequenceof Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Summer AMNT 190 ................. 2 AMNT 300 ................. 3 AMNT 305 ................ 3 Total Hours: 8 Semester II AMNT 320 ................. 6 AMNT 330 ................. 3 AMNT 340 ............... 3 Total Hours: 12

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 1050 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This program offers a coordinated study of psychology and sociology, two fields associated with the development of valid generalizations about human behavior. The program can provide background for government service, pre-law, teaching, or any people-related career. It permits the exploration of psychology or sociology as areas of future specialization. A concentration in either psychology or sociology can be selected.
Credit Hours - A.S. A.A.

Major Program Requirements 33 ECON 201 Microeconomics -or200-Level Social Science Elective ............ 3 ECON 202 Macroeconomics -or200-Level Social Science Elective ............ 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology....................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology ............................. 3 SOCL 252 Social Problems ........................................ 3 Directed Elective1 .......................................................... 3 Social Science Electives2 ............................................... 6 Electives ........................................................................ 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

27 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 -

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ............... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SOCL 151 ................ 3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 14

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ................3 PFWL 100 ................2 SOCL 151 ................3 SPCH 143 ................3 Foreign Lang .......... 4 Total Hours: 15

Semester II

Semester II ENGL 102 ................3 Math Elective ...........3 PSYC 142 ................3 SOCL 252 ................3 Foreign Lang .......... 4 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 100-level or higher MATH course ................................ SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by POLS 211, PSYC 249 or SOCL 245. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

ENGL 102 ............... 3 Math Elective .......... 3 PSYC 201 ................ 3 SOCL 252 ................ 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester III ECON 201/200-Level Soc Science Elec ... 3 HIST 139/235 .......... 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Science Elec ... 6 Total Hours: 15

Semester III ECON 201/200-Level Soc Science Elec ....3 HIST 139/235 ..........3 Humanities Elec .......3 Lab Science Elec......3 Soc Sci Electives.... 6 Total Hours: 18

Liberal Education Core 20 ENGL 102 English Composition II3 ............................ 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 235 World Civilization I .................................. 3 HIST 140 American History II -orHIST 236 World Civilization II ................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List ......................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ......................................................... 3 Foreign Language Electives .......................................... The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. __

28 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 8
__

Semester IV ECON 202/200-Level Soc Science Elec ... 3 HIST 140/236 .......... 3 Dir Elec(R/W/S) ....... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec . 3 Electives ................ 6 Total Hours: 18

Semester IV ECON 202/200-Level Soc Science Elec ....3 HIST 140/236 ..........3 PSYC 201 ................3 Dir Elec(R/W/S) .......3 Humanities Elec ..... 3 Total Hours: 15

62

64

1 The student must choose one of the following classes to meet intensive requirements: POLS 211 Introduction to World Politics, PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology or SOCL 245 Cultural Diversity: Sociology. 2 Recommended electives: PSYC 240 Human Sexuality, PSYC 250 Behavioral and Emotional Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence, SOCL 260 Sociological Aspects of Death, SOCL 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families, or other social science courses. 3

Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing for ENGL 102.

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – COMMUNITY REHABILITATION 1056 A Certificate of Program Completion This comprehensive one-year program is designed to prepare students to work in a variety of rehabilitation programs and human services settings. It is anticipated that the program will appeal to individuals who are seeking a career in a helping profession and/or those who would like to specialize in this area and are interested in upgrading their skills. This program will provide specific training to students. Upon completion of the certificate program, students will be able to assess the needs and then implement the necessary care and training to persons with a variety of special needs (e.g., elderly, mental illness, learning and developmental disabilities, emotional problems, terminal illness, etc.). Students will also understand the importance of professional conduct, theories of normalization applied in the least restrictive environment and consumer based philosophy.
Credit Hours

ECON 208 Personal Financial Management -orEDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers -orMGMT 240 Microcomputers in Business -orSSKL 110 Workplace Readiness Skills .......................................................... 3 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 HLTH 211 First Aid ......................................................................................... 2 PSYC 130 Introduction to Human Services..................................................... 3 PSYC 160 Delivering Human Services -orEDUC 202 Paraprofessionals in the School ..................................................... 3 PSYC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 SOCL 240 Social Work Practice -orEDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 Psychology Electives 1 ....................................................................................... 6 Elective2.............................................................................................................. 3 __ 29

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 HLTH 211 .................. 2 PSYC 130 ................... 3 PSYC 291 ................... 3 Psychology Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 14 Semester II ECON 208/EDUC 200 MGMT 240/ SSKL 110 ................ 3 PSYC 160/ EDUC 202 .............. 3 SOCL 240/EDUC 290 ............................ 3 Psychology Elec ......... 3 Elective ..................... 3 Total Hours: 15

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements either through placement tests or enrollment in MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

1 PSYC 141 Applied Psychology, PSYC 142 General Psychology, PSYC 180 Ethics in the Helping Profession, PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, PSYC 242 Educational Psychology, PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology. 2 Selection of elective should be in area of interest. Recommended courses: EDUC 251 Fundamentals of Assistive Technology, LAWE 150 Introduction to Criminology, LAWE 250 Juvenile Delinquency, SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology, SOCL 153 Introduction to Social Work, SOCL 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families, SSKL 103 Study Skills.

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 1053 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This program allows students to begin a concentration in psychology that will lead eventually to a major in that field. The study of psychology prepares individuals for positions in industry, education, government, business, health care and religion.
Credit Hours - A.S. A.A.

Major Program Requirements 33 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology....................... 3 PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology ............................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology ............................. 3 SOCL 252 Social Problems ........................................ 3 200-level Psychology Elective ...................................... 3 Social Science Electives1 ............................................... 9 Elective .......................................................................... 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

27 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 3

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ............... 3 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SOCL 151 ................ 3 Elective .................... 3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ENGL 102 ............... 3 HIST 139/235 .......... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 SOCL 252 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ................3 PFWL 100 ................2 PSYC 142 ................3 SOCL 151 ................3 Foreign Lang .......... 4 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ENGL 102 ................3 HIST 139/235 ..........3 SOCL 252 ................3 SPCH 143 ................3 Foreign Lang .......... 4 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 100-level or higher MATH course 2 .............................. SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by PSYC 249. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III BIOL 100 .................4 Math Elective ...........3 PSYC 201 ................3 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Sci Elec .............3 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester IV HIST 140/236 ..........3 PSYC 249(R/W/S)....3 Psychology Elec.......3 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 15

Liberal Education Core 21 BIOL 100 Human Biology ......................................... 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II3 ............................ 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 235 World Civilization I .................................. 3 HIST 140 American History II -orHIST 236 World Civilization II ................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List ......................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List4 ........................................................ 3 Foreign Language Electives .......................................... The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across __ the Curriculum.

29 4 3 3 3 2 3 3 8 __ 65

BIOL 100................. 4 Math Elective .......... 3 PSYC 201 ................ 3 Soc Sci Elec ............. 3 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 16

Semester IV HIST 140/236 .......... 3 PSYC 249(R/W/S) ... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec . 3 Psychology Elec ...... 3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 15

63

1

Students should check with their advisors and jointly consider transfer institution requirements when selecting these electives. Students transferring to Southern Illinois University should select MATH 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing for ENGL 102. MATH 111 Finite Mathematics recommended for students transferring to Indiana University.

2

3

4

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – SOCIOLOGY CONCENTRATION 1054 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This program allows students to begin a concentration in sociology that will lead eventually to a major in that field. The study of sociology prepares individuals for positions in industry, education, government, business, welfare, and various community agencies.
Credit Hours - A.S. A.A.

Major Program Requirements 33 ECON 201 Microeconomics -or200-Level Social Science Elective ............ 3 ECON 202 Macroeconomics -or200-Level Social Science Elective ............ 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology....................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology ............................. 3 SOCL 154 Cultural Anthropology1 ............................. 3 SOCL 252 Social Problems ........................................ 3 SOCL 253 Introduction to Social Psychology ............ 3 SOCL 254 Introduction to Archaeology1 -or200-Level Social Science Elective ............ 3 Directed Elective2 .......................................................... 3 Elective .......................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

27 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 -

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ............... 3 HIST 139 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SOCL 151 ............. 3 Total Hours: 12

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ................3 PFWL 100 ................2 PSYC 142 ................3 SOCL 151 ................3 Foreign Lang .......... 4 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ENGL 102 ................3 SOCL 254/200-Level Soc Sci Elec ...........3 SPCH 143 ................3 Foreign Lang ............4 Lab Science Elec.... 3 Total Hours: 16

Semester II ENGL 102 ............... 3 SOCL 252 ................ 3 SOCL 254/200-Level Soc Sci Elec........... 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec . 3 Lab Science Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III ECON 201/200-Level Soc Sci Elec........... 3 HIST 140 ................. 3 Math Elective .......... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 201 ................ 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 100-level or higher MATH course ................................ SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by POLS 211, PSYC 249 or SOCL 245. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III ECON 201/200-Level Soc Sci Elec ...........3 HIST 139..................3 Math Elective ...........3 SOCL 252 ................3 Dir Elec(R/W/S) ..... 3 Total Hours: 15

Liberal Education Core 20 ENGL 102 English Composition II3 ............................ 3 HIST 139 American History I.................................... 3 HIST 140 American History II .................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List ......................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ......................................................... 3 Foreign Language Electives .......................................... The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. __

28 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 8 __ 64

Semester IV ECON 202/200-Level Soc Sci Elec........... 3 SOCL 154 ................ 3 SOCL 253 ................ 3 Elective .................... 3 Dir Elec(R/W/S) ..... 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester IV ECON 202/200-Level Soc Sci Elec ...........3 HIST 140..................3 SOCL 154 ................3 SOCL 253 ................3 Humanities Elec ..... 6 Total Hours: 18

62

1

SOCL 154 and 254 are offered in alternate years, spring semester only.

The student must choose one of the following classes to meet intensive requirements: POLS 211 Introduction to World Politics, PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology or SOCL 245 Cultural Diversity: Sociology.
3

2

Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing for ENGL 102.

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139

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – SUBSTANCE ABUSE CERTIFICATE 1055 A Certificate of Program Completion This certificate program is designed primarily for professionals and paraprofessionals who are interested in becoming specialists in the area of substance abuse counseling. The courses could, however, benefit a wide variety of persons, including teachers, school counselors and administrators, personnel counselors, nurses, and ministers. This program will train students to recognize and treat substance abusers as well as to develop prevention and treatment programs. Fieldwork will be required with some of the courses. A certificate program provides students with a Certificate of Completion, not an associate degree and not a credential to be a fully certified counselor. Students wishing to receive a degree should major in social work or another behavioral science program and then specialize in the Substance Abuse Program.
Credit Hours

ENGL 101 SOCL 180 SOCL 181 SOCL 280 SOCL 281 SOCL 282

English Composition I ................................................................... 3 Clinical Aspects of Substance Abuse1 ........................................... 3 Therapeutic Interventions with Substance Abusers I1 .................... 3 Therapeutic Interventions with Substance Abusers II1 .................. 3 Substance Abuse Treatment Programs1 ......................................... 3 Practicum in Substance Abuse Counseling1............................... 0-3 _____ 15-18

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I SOCL 180 .................. 3 SOCL 181 .................. 3 ENGL 101 ................. 3 Total Hours: 9 Semester II SOCL 280 .................. 3 SOCL 281 .................. 3 SOCL 282 ............... 0-3 Total Hours: 6-9

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in READ 011 and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

1

This optional practicum will be offered on an arranged basis for those students who desire this practical experience. See course description for details.

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BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES PRE-CHIROPRACTIC SUPPLEMENTAL CERTIFICATE 4065 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion A Doctor of Chiropractic is a primary health care provider whose emphasis is the relationship of the structural and neurological aspects of the body, primarily the spine and nervous system. Drugs and surgery are not part of the chiropractic philosophy. This certificate, when added to the Biology (4010) A.S. degree, provides the general education and supportive courses for transfer to a College of Chiropractic. This certificate has been developed in cooperation with Logan College of Chiropractic to meet their current admission requirements. However, the application process is competitive and completion of these prerequisites does not guarantee acceptance. Students considering application to other Chiropractic colleges should check with the colleges that they are planning to attend to be sure all requirements for admission are met.
Credit Hours

BIOL 230 BIOL 230L BIOL 312 HCMG 301 HCMG 351 HCMG 401 HCMG 436 PHYS 105 PHYS 105L PHYS 106

General Microbiology ................................................................... General Microbiology Laboratory ................................................ Pathophysiology............................................................................ Seminar in Health Care Services .................................................. Medical Practice Management ...................................................... Finance in Health Care Organizations II ....................................... Health Care Economics................................................................. General Physics I .......................................................................... General Physics Laboratory I........................................................ General Physics II .........................................................................

2 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 1 4 __ 29

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester V BIOL 230 ................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 HCMG 301 ................. 3 HCMG 401 ................. 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 15 Semester VI BIOL 312 ................... 4 HCMG 351 ................. 3 HCMG 436 ................. 3 PHYS 106 ................ 4 Total Hours: 14

2010-11 Programs of Study

141

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES PRE-HEALTH INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION 4660 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree Health Information managers are responsible for developing and maintaining manual and computerized health information systems. They are responsible for collecting, storing and releasing health care data. These health information specialists frequently interact with other medical, financial, and administrative personnel. Some of their concerns are medicolegal problems, reimbursement issues, and data security. While many health information managers are employed in hospitals, others work for insurance companies, psychiatric facilities, computer companies, physician group practices, drug companies, and government agencies. This program is primarily designed to transfer to the Indiana University Health Information Administration program at IUPUI. Upon transfer, 60 hours credit will be awarded toward a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Information Administration. Since Health Information Administration programs at other schools may differ from Indiana University's, students planning to transfer to other schools should consult with their advisor on course choices. Admission to Health Information Administration programs, including IU’s, is competitive. A student's completion of the prerequisite courses and meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the program. Students should refer to each school’s current bulletin for specific admission requirements.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 35 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................ 3 ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II ........................................................... 3 BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II .......................................................... 2 BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II........................................ 1 BIOL 210 Microbiology ................................................................................ 2 BIOL 210L Microbiology Laboratory .............................................................. 2 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business .................................................... 3 CHEM 101 Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry........................ 3 CHEM 101L Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory ..... 1 COMP 201 The Computer in Business ............................................................ 3 CSCI 126 Introduction to Computer Tools for Scientists and Engineers ...... 3 HIMT 110 Medical Terminology for Allied Health ....................................... 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business ............................................................... 3 MGMT 257 Supervision ................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 111 ................... 2 BIOL 111L ................. 1 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102(M) ........... 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 112 ................... 2 BIOL 112L ................. 1 CHEM 101 ................. 3 CHEM 101L ............... 1 ENGL 205 .................. 3 SOCL 151 .................. 3 SPCH 143/148.......... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester III ACCT 201 .................. 3 BIOL 210(R/W/S)....... 2 BIOL 210L ................. 2 COMP 201 ................. 3 HIMT 110 .................. 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 15 Semester IV ACCT 202 .................. 3 BLAW 203 ................. 3 CSCI 126 .................... 3 MATH 110 ................. 3 MGMT 257 ................ 3 PHIL 212 .................. 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. MATH 102 College Algebra ............................................................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication .......................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by BIOL 210. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102.

9 3 3 3

Liberal Education Core 20 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I............................................................ 2 BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I ......................................... 1 ENGL 205 Business Communications ............................................................ 3 MATH 110 Statistics ........................................................................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ............................................................. 2 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics.................................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ...................................................................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology ................................................................. 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by COMP 201.

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BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY CONCENTRATION 4780 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This program provides the first two years of general education and supportive courses for application to occupational therapy programs. IUPUI only admits baccalaureate students to its new MS OT program. The University of Southern Indiana in Evansville admits students into its BS/MS in OT1 program as juniors after two years of prerequisite courses. USI occupational therapy students complete an additional two and one-half years (including three summers) of courses and internships to earn the BS/MS in OT degree. Upon completion of the BS/MS in OT degree and appropriate qualifying examinations, the occupational therapist will be prepared to work with physicians, physical and speech therapists, psychologists, and other specialists to plan therapeutic activity programs. Completion of the A.S. degree in Pre-Occupational Therapy does not guarantee admittance into a BS/MS in OT program.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 33 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I ......................................................... 2 BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I....................................... 1 BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II ........................................................ 2 BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II ..................................... 1 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ........................................... 3 HIMT 110 Medical Terminology for Allied Health ..................................... 3 HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities I....................................................... 3 HUMN 211 Introduction to Humanities II ..................................................... 3 PSYC 249 Abnormal Psychology ................................................................ 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology............................................................... 3 History Electives2 ............................................................................................... 3 Psychology Elective3 .......................................................................................... 3 Directed Elective4 ............................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CHEM 100/100L ....... 4 ENGL 101 .................. 3 HIMT 110 .................. 3 MATH 102(M) ........... 3 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester II COMP 110 ................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PSYC 201 ................... 3 SOCL 151 .................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III ARTT 110 .................. 3 BIOL 111 ................... 2 BIOL 111L ................. 1 HUMN 210 ................ 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 249(R/W/S) ...... 3 Directed Elec ............ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOL 112 ................... 2 BIOL 112L ................. 1 HUMN 211 ................ 3 PHIL 212 .................... 3 History Elec................ 3 Psychology Elect ...... 3 Total Hours: 15

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................ MATH 102 College Algebra .......................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ........................................................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by PSYC 249. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102.

9 3 3 3

Liberal Education Core 21 ARTT 110 Art Appreciation ......................................................................... 3 ENGL 102 English Composition II............................................................... 3 CHEM 100 Elementary Chemistry -andCHEM 100L Elementary Chemistry Laboratory ............................................. 4 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .......................................................... 2 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics ................................................................. 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................................................... 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology ........................................................ 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

__ 63

1 USI recommends that the student take OT 151 Orientation to Occupational Therapy on their campus before applying to the BS/MS in OT program. 2 Students should select HIST 139 American History I, HIST 140 American History II, HIST 235 World Civilization I or HIST 236 World Civilization II. 3 Students should select one of the following as a Psychology elective: PSYC 251 Fundamentals of Assistive Technology or PSYC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities. 4 Students should select one of the following: ERTH 207 World Geography, ERTH 208 Principles of Conservation or POLS 211 Introduction to World Politics.

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BIOLOGICAL, BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 4010 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to A.S. Degree This degree program is designed for students interested in a career in biology. Students may elect concentrations in medicine, biotechnology, biotechnology laboratory assistant, chiropractic, forensic science, physician assistant, physical therapy and nuclear medicine. An A.S. degree in biological, biomedical sciences or any of these concentrations is much in demand for research and teaching in universities and for research and development in biological and pharmaceutical industries, medical laboratories, state and federal governments because the graduates acquire an outstanding range of skills in problem-solving, data handling, analysis, observation, team working, communication and report writing that employers value greatly. This program has been articulated with 4-year institutions in Indiana.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements1 30-34 BIOL 106 Principles of Biology II................................................................. 3 BIOL 106L Principles of Biology Laboratory II .............................................. 1 BIOL 211 Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology -andBIOL 211L Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory -orBIOL 212 Human Systems II: Anatomy and Physiology -andBIOL 212L Human Systems II: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory -orBIOL 220 Molecular Biology -andBIOL 220L Laboratory in Molecular Biology -orBIOL 230 General Microbiology -andBIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory -orBIOL 308 Genetics2 ................................................................................... 8-9 CHEM 106 General Chemistry II..................................................................... 3 CHEM 106L General Chemistry/Qualitative Analysis Laboratory .................... 2 CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry I...................................................................... 3 CHEM 215L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ................................................... 2 CHEM 216 Organic Chemistry II .................................................................... 3 CHEM 216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II .................................................. 2 MATH 104 Trigonometry -orMATH 110 Statistics -orMATH 115 Survey of Calculus I -orMATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I -orPHYS 105 General Physics I -andPHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I3 ................................................... 3-6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102(M) ......... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106(R) .............. 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106 ................. 3 CHEM 106L(W)......... 2 ENGL 102/210 ........... 3 MATH 104/110/115 MATH 118/ PHYS 105/105L .... 0-3 SPCH 143/148..... 3 Total Hours: 15-18 Semester III BIOL 221/211L / BIOL 212/212L / BIOL 220/220L / BIOL 230/230L / BIOL 308 ................. 4 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 MATH 104/110/115 MATH 118/ PHYS 105/105L ....... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Soc Sci Elec-Core .... 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ..................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication .......................................................
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by BIOL 106 or CHEM 106. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by CHEM 106L. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by BIOL 211 or CHEM 215L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

(Continued on the following page)

1

Some courses listed as Major Program Requirements will be replaced by courses listed in a concentration. See “Sequence of Courses” for a complete listing of required courses for each concentration. 2 Students wishing to complete the Pre-Chiropractic Supplement Certificate should select BIOL 211/211L-212/212L. 3 Students wishing to complete the Pre-Chiropractic Supplement Certificate should select MGMT 275 and PHED 294.

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Liberal Education Core 23 BIOL 105 Principles of Biology I .................................................................. 3 BIOL 105L Principles of Biology Laboratory I ............................................... 1 CHEM 105 General Chemistry I ...................................................................... 3 CHEM 105L General Chemistry/Quantitative Analysis Laboratory .................. 2 ENGL 102 English Composition II -orENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing ...................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ............................................................. 2 Humanities Elective – Common Core List1........................................................ 3 Social Science Electives – Core List .................................................................. 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by CHEM 105L. Courses in Concentrations: A.S. Biotechnology Concentration 4011 4 FREN 201 French Level III -orGRMN 201 German Level III -orSPAN 201 Spanish Level III ............................................................................... 4 Biotechnology Laboratory Assistant Concentration 4012 BIOL 105 General Chemistry I .......................................................................... BIOL 105L General Chemistry/Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ...................... CSCI 126 Introduction to Computer Tools for Scientists and Engineers........... Elective ........................................................................................................... 9 3 1 3 2 ____ 62-66

Semester IV BIOL 221/211L / BIOL 212/212L / BIOL 220/220L / BIOL 230/230L / BIOL 308.............. 4-5 CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L ............... 2 Humanities ElecCommon Core .......... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core. 3 Total Hours: 15-16 Total Credit Hrs 62-66

Pre-Chiropractic Concentration 4013 8-11 BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II -andBIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II (Options of BIOL 106) ... 0-3 PHYS 106 General Physics II ............................................................................. 4 PHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II........................................................... 1 PSYC 142 General Psychology........................................................................... 3 Pre-Forensic Science Concentration 4014 IUPUI-11 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I ................................................. BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I .............................. BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II................................................ BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II ............................. HIST 132 Survey of European History II ........................................... 3 LAWE 100 Survey of Criminal Justice ................................................. 3 LAWE 155 Substantive Criminal Law .................................................. MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II.......................................................... MATH 119 Calculus/Analytic Geometry II .......................................... 5 PHYS 106 General Physics II .............................................................. PHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II............................................ PU-12 2 1 2 1 3 3 4 1

Pre-Medicine Concentration 4015 A.S.-5 A.A.-5 PHYS 106 General Physics II .............................................................. 4 4 PHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II............................................ 1 1 A.S. Pre-Nuclear Medicine Technology Concentration 4016 12 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .................................................. 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry -orMATH 115 Survey of Calculus I .......................................................................... 3 MATH 110 Statistics ............................................................................................ 3 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics ........................................................................ 3
1

Students wishing to complete the Pre-Chiropractic Supplemental Certificate should select PHIL 212.

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145

Pre-Physical Therapy Concentration 40171 ...........................................................11 PHYS 106 General Physics II ............................................................................. 4 PHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II........................................................... 1 Directed Elective2 ..................................................................................................... 3 Directed Elective3 ..................................................................................................... 3 Pre-Physician Assistant Concentration 4018 9 PHYS 100 Physics for Health-Related Professions............................................. 3 Directed Electives4 ................................................................................................... 6 Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
BIOTECHNOLOGY 4011 A.S. BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ASSISTANT 4012 A.S. Semester I BIOL 105 .................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105.................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102(M) ......... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106(R) ............... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106.................. 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 CSCI 126 .................... 3 MATH 104/110 ........ 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III BIOL 230 .................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 CHEM 215.................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 PFWL 100 .................. 2 SPCH 143/148 ............ 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core ..... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOL 220 .................... 3 BIOL 220L ................. 2 Humanities ElecCommon Core .......... 3 Social Sci Elec-Core ... 3 Writing Course ........... 3 Elective ..................... 2 Total Hours: 16 Total Credit Hrs ........ 63 PRECHIROPRACTIC 4013 A.S. Semester I BIOL 105/105L or BIOL 111/111L ...... 3-4 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ........... 3 Total Hours: 14-15 Semester II BIOL 106/106L or BIOL 112/112L .... 3-4 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L(W) ........ 2 MATH 102(M)........... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 SPCH 143 ........... 3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester III CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L ................ 1 Soc Sci Elec-Core .... 3 Total Hours: 16 PRE-FORENSIC SCIENCE 4014 (Transfer to PU) Semester I BIOL 105 .................. 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 115 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106 .................. 3 BIOL 106L ................ 1 CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 MATH 116(M) .......... 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 111 .................. 2 BIOL 111L ................ 1 CHEM 215 ................ 3 CHEM 215L(W/S)..... 2 PFWL 100 ................. 2 PHYS 105 ................. 4 PHYS 105L ............... 1 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV BIOL 112 .................. 2 BIOL 112L ................ 1 LAWE 155 ................ 3 PHYS 106 ................. 4 PHYS 106L ............... 1 Humanities ElecCommon Core ......... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core ... 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs....... 68 PRE-FORENSIC SCIENCE 4014 (Transfer to IUPUI) Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 Total Hours: 17 Semester II BIOL 106 ................... 3 BIOL 106L ................ 1 CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 MATH 119 ................ 5 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III ARTT 110.................. 3 CHEM 215 ................ 3 CHEM 215L(W/S) ..... 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 HIST 235 ................... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 Total Hours: 16

Semester I BIOL 105.................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 118(M) ......... 5 Total Hours: 17 Semester II CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 FREN 201/GRMN 201/SPAN 201 ........ 4 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III BIOL 230.................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 ECON 201 .................. 3 HIST 139 .................... 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOL 220.................... 3 BIOL 220L ................. 2 CHEM 216 ................. 3 PHIL 212 .................... 3 PHYS 105................... 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 16

Semester IV CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L .............. 2 PHYS 106 .................. 4 PHYS 106L ................ 1 Soc Sci Elec-Core ...... 3 Humanities ElecCommon Core ........ 3 Total Hours: 16 Total Credit Hrs .. 62-64

Semester IV CHEM 216 ................ 3 CHEM 216L .............. 2 ECON 201 or PSYC 141 ................ 3 HIST 132 ................... 3 LAWE 100 .............. 3 Total Hours: 14

Total Credit Hrs ........ 65

Total Credit Hrs ....... 64

1 Although there is some room in the MPT program for electives, it is recommended that applicants attempt to complete all of University of Evansville's general education requirements before entry into the professional program. This could be accomplished by adding 6 hours of foreign language and two 3-credit directed electives (see footnote 3) to the course of study outlined above. In addition, a "Fitness/Wellness" course would need to be taken after transfer to University of Evansville. 2 Electives acceptable for transfer to University of Evansville include the following: ARTT 110 Art Appreciation MUSM 118 Music Appreciation ERTH 207 World Geography POLS 201 Introduction to Political Science HIST 235/236 World Civilization I/II SOCL 154 Introduction to Archeology LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I SPCH 100 Theatre Appreciation 3 Students transferring to University of Evansville should take MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I and six hours of directed electives; see footnote 3. Students transferring to IUPUI should select one of the following mathematics course sequences: MATH 102 College Algebra, MATH 104 Trigonometry and MATH 110 Statistics MATH 111 Finite Mathematics, MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I and MGMT 265 Business Statistics 4 Choose one course from ARTT 110 Art Appreciation, MUSM 118 Music Appreciation or SPCH 100 Theatre Appreciation and one course from LITR 224 or 225 Survey of English Literature I or II.

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PRE-MEDICINE 4015 A.S.

PRE-MEDICINE 4015 A.A.

Semester I BIOL 105.................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 SPCH 143/148 .......... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106(R) .............. 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106 ................. 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 ENGL 102/210 ........... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core .... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 PHYS 105................... 4 PHYS 105L ................ 1 Humanities ElecCommon Core .......... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core .... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L ............... 2 MATH 118(M)1 .......... 5 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 106................... 4 PHYS 106L .............. 1 Total Hours: 17

Semester I BIOL 105 .................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105.................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Foreign Lang ............ 4 Total Hours: 18 Semester II BIOL 106(R) ............... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106.................. 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 SPCH 143/148 ............ 3 Foreign Lang ............ 4 Total Hours: 16 Semester III CHEM 215.................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 PHYS 105 ................... 4 PHYS 105L ................ 1 Humanities ElecCommon Core .......... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core ..... 6 Total Hours: 19 Semester IV CHEM 216.................. 3 CHEM 216L ............... 2 ENGL 102/210 ........... 3 MATH 118(M)1 .......... 5 PHYS 106 ................... 4 PHYS 106L ................ 1 Humanities ElecBroad Core.............. 3 Total Hours: 21 Total Credit Hrs ........ 74

PRE-NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY 4016 A.S. Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102(M)......... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106(R) .............. 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106 ................. 3 CHEM 106L(W) ........ 2 MATH 104/115 ......... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III BIOL 211(S) .............. 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 COMP 110 ................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 15

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY 4017 A.S. Semester I BIOL 1054 .................. 3 BIOL 105L4 ................ 1 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102(M) ........... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core5 ..... 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester II BIOL 106(R)4 ............. 3 BIOL 106L4 ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 Directed Elective ...... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III BIOL 211(S) ............... 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 CHEM 1066 ................ 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHIL 111/2127 ........... 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 19 Semester IV BIOL 212 ................... 3 BIOL 212L ................. 1 PHYS 106 .................. 4 PHYS 106L ................ 1 Directed Elective ........ 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core3 ... 3 Total Hours: 15

PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT 4018 A.S. Semester I BIOL 105 .................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 1128 ................. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II BIOL 106(R)............... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106 ................. 3 CHEM 106L(W) ......... 2 MATH 110(M) ........... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 100 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III BIOL 230 .................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 BIOL 211 .................. 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(S) .......... 2 HIST 235 .................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV BIOL 212 .................... 3 BIOL 212L ................. 1 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Humanities ElecCommon Core9 ......... 3 Directed Elec ............ 6 Total Hours: 16

Semester IV BIOL 212 ................... 3 BIOL 212L ................. 1 MATH 110................. 3 PHIL 212.................... 3 PSYC 142 .................. 3 Humanities Elec2........ 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core3 ... 3 Total Hours: 19 Total Credit Hrs ....... 66

Total Credit Hrs ........ 63

Total Cr Hrs............. 65

Total Cr Hrs ............. 67

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1 A SAT Math score of 570 or greater is a prerequisite for MATH 118. Students with SAT Math scores below 570 must take the necessary prerequisites before enrolling in MATH 118. Students should consult with their advisor for specific mathematics courses. 2 Students should select from the following Humanities courses: ARTT 110 Art Appreciation, MUSM 118 Music Appreciation, LITR 220 World Literature I, LITR 222 American Literature I, or PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Students should select from the following Social Science courses based on where they plan to transfer: ECON 201 Microeconomics, ECON 202 Macroeconomics, POLS 111 American National Government, POLS 112 State and Local Government, PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology, and SOCL 154 Cultural Anthropology. 4 Students transferring to IUPUI should substitute electives for BIOL 105/105L and BIOL 106/106L. 5 Students transferring to IUPUI should substitute two three-hour courses from Sociology or PSYC 142/Psychology Elective sequence. (The psychology elective may be any 200-level psychology course that has PSYC 142 as a prerequisite.) Students transferring to University of Evansville must take PSYC 142 and SOCL 151 Introduction to Sociology. 6 Students transferring to IUPUI should substitute electives for CHEM 106/106L. 7 Students transferring to University of Evansville must take PHIL 111. 8 Students not qualifying for ENGL 112 must satisfy the writing requirement by completing ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 English Composition I and II. 9 Choose one course: HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities I, HUMN 211 Introduction to Humanities II, or PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy.

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BOWLING INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY 3250 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Graduates are prepared for entry-level positions within the bowling industry in center management, sales, marketing, and technical fields.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S. Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BOWL 101 .............. 3 BOWL 106 .............. 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MGMT 100 ............. 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 142 .............. 3 Total Hours: 17 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ACCT 100 ................3 BOWL 101...............3 BOWL 106...............3 ENGL 101 ................3 PFWL 100 ................2 PSYC 142 .............. 3 Total Hours: 17

Major Program Requirements 41 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting ......................... 3 BOWL 101 Lane and Pinsetter Maintenance I ............. 3 BOWL 106 Lane and Pinsetter Laboratory I ................ 3 BOWL 151 Lane and Pinsetter Maintenance II ............ 3 BOWL 156 Lane and Pinsetter Laboratory II............... 3 BOWL 205 Pro Shop Operations and Instruction ........ 2 BOWL 210 Bowling Lanes Management I .................. 3 BOWL 215 Management and Pro Shop Laboratory I .. 2 BOWL 220 Lineage Development ............................... 3 BOWL 270 Bowling Lanes Management II ................. 3 BOWL 275 Management and Pro Shop Laboratory II . 2 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .......... 3 HLTH 211 First Aid .................................................... 2 HOTL 210 Hotel Conventions and Marketing ............ 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business............................ 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

38 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 2 3 -

Semester II BOWL 151 .............. 3 BOWL 156 .............. 3 COMP 110............... 3 HOTL 210 ............... 3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester II BOWL 151...............3 BOWL 156...............3 COMP 110 ...............3 HLTH 211 ................2 HOTL 210 ................3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . MATT 109 Business Mathematics ............................... SPCH 143 Speech .......................................................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester III BOWL 205 .............. 2 BOWL 210(S) ......... 3 BOWL 215 .............. 2 ENGL 107 ............... 3 HLTH 211 ............... 2 MATT 109............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester III BOWL 205...............2 BOWL 210(S) ..........3 BOWL 215...............2 ENGL 107 ................3 MATH 102...............3 Humanities Elec– Common Core ...... 3 Total Hours: 16

The Reading Intensive and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by BOWL 220. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by BOWL 210. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14 ECON 208 Personal Financial Management ............... 3 ENGL 107 Business English ....................................... 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List ......................... PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... Computer Skills are enhanced by COMP 110.

20 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 __ 67

Semester IV ACCT 100 ............... 3 BOWL 220(R/W) .... 3 BOWL 270 .............. 3 BOWL 275 .............. 2 ECON 208 ............... 3 Science Elec .......... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester IV BOWL 220(R/W) .....3 BOWL 270...............3 BOWL 275...............2 ECON 208 ...............3 Hum Elec-Brd Core .3 Lab Science Elec.... 3 Total Hours: 17

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BROADCAST PRODUCTION AND SALES 2110 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Specific skills needed for effective performance in the broadcasting industry are taught. Radio and television broadcasting fundamentals of production, copywriting, programming, sales, and management are explored with practical experience in the University-owned and operated radio and television stations under actual on-air conditions. The primary objective is effective performance in the broadcasting industry.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 45-49 45-49 BCST 100 Introduction to Mass Communications ..... 3 3 BCST 110 Broadcast Performance ............................. 3 3 BCST 120 Beginning Radio Production ..................... 3 3 BCST 140 Beginning Television Production .............. 3 3 BCST 150 Broadcast Sales I ....................................... 3 3 BCST 161 Advanced Radio Production ..................... 3 3 BCST 180 Advanced Television Production .............. 3 3 BCST 210 Broadcast Promotion ................................. 3 3 BCST 221 Broadcast Programming ............................ 3 3 BCST 235 Newsroom Operations............................... 3 3 BCST 240 Broadcast Management ............................. 3 3 BCST 250 Broadcast Sales II ..................................... 3 3 BCST 260 Video Editing and Post-Production ........... 3 3 BCST 270 Electronic News Gathering/Electronic Field Production .................................... 3 3 BCST 280 Television Program Producing and Directing ............................................... 3 3 BCST 285 Internship in Broadcasting1 ................. 0-4 0-4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BCST 100 ............... .3 BCST 110 ................ 3 BCST 120 ................ 3 BCST 140 ................ 3 ENGL 101 ............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BCST 100. ............... 3 BCST 110 ............... 3 BCST 120 ................ 3 BCST 140 ................ 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 SPCH 143/148...... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II BCST 150 ................ 3 BCST 161 ................ 3 BCST 180 ................ 3 ENGL 109 ............... 3 SPCH 143/148......... 3 Math Elective ....... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II BCST 150 ................ 3 BCST 161 ................ 3 BCST 180 ................ 3 ENGL 109 ............... 3 MATH 102 ............. 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . 100-level or Higher Mathematics Course ...................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester III BCST 221 ................ 3 BCST 235(W). ......... 3 BCST 240(R)........... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 Science Elec ........... 3 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester III BCST 221 ................ 3 BCST 235(W) .......... 3 BCST 240(R) ........... 3 BCST 250 ................ 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 Lab Science Elec .... 3 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 20

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by BCST 240. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by BCST 235. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by BCST 280. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV BCST 210 ............... 3 BCST 250 ................ 3 BCST 260 ................ 3 BCST 270 ................ 3 BCST 280(S) ........... 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci Elec ........ 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester IV BCST210 ................. 3 BCST 260 ................ 3 BCST 270 ................ 3 BCST 280(S) ........... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elective .................. 3 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 18

Liberal Education Core 14 ENGL 109 Broadcast Writing ..................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 Laboratory Science Elective—Common Core List ....... Science Elective-Common Core List............................. 3 Humanities Elective-Common Core List....................... Social Science Elective(s)-Core List ............................. 3 Humanities or Science/Mathematics ElectiveBroad Core List .......................................................... -

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1

See course description for details.

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One course from the following areas: Humanities, Mathematics or Science – Broad Core List –orSocial Science - Core List ........................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by BCST 235, 260 and 280.

-

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NOTE: Student may register for 200-level Broadcasting courses only if all 100-level Broadcasting courses have been completed, or are in the process of completion, or by departmental approval. A grade of C or better must be maintained in all courses in the major area or the course(s) must be repeated.

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 5050 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This program is designed primarily for the purpose of preparing students to transfer to four-year schools of business. The curriculum includes a mixture of general education and business courses aimed at providing a foundation for further study and a career in business. Students interested in specializing during their junior and senior years in accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, management information systems, etc. should enroll in this program. Individuals who hope to eventually enter such career fields as public relations, law, hospital administration, etc. might also want to consider this program.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 35-36 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................. 3 ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II ............................................................ 3 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... 3 COMP 201 The Computer in Business ............................................................. 3 ECON 201 Microeconomics ............................................................................. 3 ECON 202 Macroeconomics ............................................................................ 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business................................................................. 3 MGMT 265 Business Statistics .......................................................................... 3 Social Science Elective1 ..................................................................................... 3 Directed Elective ................................................................................................ 3 Electives ........................................................................................................ 5-6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 SOCL 151/Sociology Elective..................... 3 MATH 102/111 .......... 3 Lab Science Elec . 3-4 Total Hours: 15-16 Semester II PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Dir English Elec ......... 3 Elective ................ 5-6 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester III ACCT 201 .................. 3 COMP 201 ................. 3 ECON 201 .................. 3 MATH 115/Science Elective...................... 3 Humanities Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester IV ACCT 202 .................. 3 BLAW 203(R/W/S) ... 3 ECON 202 .................. 3 MGMT 265 ................ 3 Directed Elective ........ 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra -orMATH 111 Finite Mathematics (or higher mathematics).................................. SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by BLAW 203. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 115 or a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 20-21 Directed English Elective2 .................................................................................. 3 MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I -orScience Elective – Broad Core List .................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology -orSociology Elective –Core List ............................................................................ 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ........................................ 3-4 Humanities Elective – Common Core List3........................................................ 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by COMP 201.

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1 Suggested social science electives include HIST 139 American History I, HIST 140 American History II, POLS 111 American National Government, and POLS 201 Introduction to Political Science. Students planning to transfer to Indiana University should enroll in either HIST 139 or HIST 140. 2 Examples of a second course in English would be ENGL 102 English Composition II, ENGL 205 Business Communications, and ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing. Selection of English electives depends upon the English requirement of the baccalaureate institution to which the student is transferring. 3 Strongly recommended humanities elective(s): PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy, PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics (especially for students transferring to University of Southern Indiana), or PHIL 213 Logic.

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BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 5360 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This program prepares students for a variety of entry-level positions in the field of office administration, sales, retailing, materials distribution, finance and small business operations. In addition, most of the courses are designed to assist the employed persons in upgrading their skills. The curriculum includes several basic subject areas such as accounting, economics, management, labor relations, marketing and computer skills. The development of managerial skills useful in a variety of job situations is emphasized.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements1 42 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting -orACCT 100 Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business ..................................................... 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 CWEB 213 Web-Based Electronic Commerce ................................................. 3 ENTR 121 Creating a Small Business.............................................................. 3 MGMT 100 Introduction to Business................................................................. 3 MGMT 250 Introduction to Management .......................................................... 3 MGMT 255 Principles of Salesmanship ............................................................ 3 MGMT 257 Supervision .................................................................................... 3 MGMT 275 Introduction to Business Finance ................................................... 3 MGMT 280 Introduction to Marketing .............................................................. 3 MGMT 293 Integrated Business Project ............................................................ 3 MKTG 155 Consumer Behavior........................................................................ 3 Business Elective2 .............................................................................................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ......................3 MATT 109/102 ..............3 MGMT 100 ....................3 MKTG 155 .....................3 SPCH 143 ..................... 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester II ACCT 201/100 ...............3 COMP 110 .....................3 ENGL 205 ......................3 MGMT 250(R/W)...........3 MGMT 255 ....................3 PFWL 100 .................... 2 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATT 109 Business Mathematics -orMATH 102 College Algebra ............................................................................. SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

Semester III CWEB 213 .....................3 MGMT 275 ....................3 MGMT 257 ....................3 PSYC 142/141................3 Lab Science Elec .... 3-4 Total Hours: 15-16

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by BLAW 203 or ECON 201 or MGMT 250. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by BLAW 203 or MGMT 250. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by BLAW 203. The Mathematics Intensive requirements may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV

Liberal Education Core 14-15 ECON 201 Microeconomics -orEconomics Elective ............................................................................................ 3 ENGL 205 Business Communications ............................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology -orPSYC 141 Applied Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ......................................... 3-4
Computer Skills are enhanced by COMP 110 or CWEB 213.

BLAW 203(RWS) ..........3 ECON 201(R)/ Economics Elec ............3 ENTR 121 ......................3 MGMT 280 ....................3 MGMT 293 ....................3 Business Elective ......... 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs........... 65-66

(Continued on the following page)
1 Some courses listed as Major Program Requirements will be replaced by courses listed in a concentration. See “Sequence of Courses” for a complete listing of required courses for each concentration. 2 Suggested electives: BINT 205/206 Business Internship I/II, ENTR 280 Small Business Problems and Concerns, MGMT 284 Operations Management, and OADM 266 Professional Business Image. The Finance concentration must include ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II as an elective.

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Courses in Concentrations: Entrepreneurship Concentration 5361 6 ENTR 280 Small Business Problems and Concerns ........................................ 3 MGMT 284 Operations Management ................................................................ 3 Finance Concentration 5362 (Jasper Only) 15 FINC 205 Money and Banking ....................................................................... 3 FINC 220 Credit and Collections .................................................................... 3 FINC 230 Real Estate Finance ........................................................................ 3 FINC 245 Introduction to Investments............................................................ 3 INSR 210 Principles of Insurance ................................................................... 3 Marketing Management Concentration 5363 12 MKTG 200 Retailing ......................................................................................... 3 MKTG 250 Sales Management ......................................................................... 3 MKTG 260 Advertising and Promotion ............................................................ 3 Supply Chain and Logistics Concentration 5364 15 PRDM 100 Supply Chain Logistics Management ............................................ 3 PRDM 214 Materials Management ................................................................... 3 PRDM 215 Quality Management ...................................................................... 3 PRDM 220 Warehousing and Procurement ...................................................... 3 PRDM 272 Transportation ................................................................................ 3 Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
ENTREPRENEURSHIP 5361 Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 ENTR 121 .................. 3 MATT 109/102 .......... 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 201/100 ........... 3 COMP 110.................. 3 ENGL 205 .................. 3 ENTR 280 .................. 3 MGMT 250(R/W) ....... 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester III CWEB 213 ................. 3 MGMT 255 ................ 3 MGMT 257 ................ 3 MGMT 275 ................ 3 PSYC 142/141 ............ 3 Lab Science Elec . 3-4 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester IV BLAW 203(RWS)....... 3 ECON 201(R)/ Economics Elec ........ 3 MGMT 280 ................ 3 MGMT 284 ................ 3 MGMT 293 ................ 3 Business Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs ........68-69 FINANCE 5362 (Jasper Only) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 FINC 205 .................... 3 MATT 109/102........... 3 MGMT 100 ................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 201/100 ........... 3 COMP 110 .................. 3 ENGL 205 .................. 3 FINC 220 .................... 3 MGMT 250(R/W) ....... 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester III CWEB 213.................. 3 FINC 230 .................... 3 INSR 210 .................... 3 MGMT 275 ................. 3 PSYC 142/141 ............ 3 Lab Science Elec 3-4 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester IV BLAW 203(RWS) ....... 3 ECON 201(R)/ Economics Elec ........ 3 FINC 245 .................... 3 MGMT 280 ................. 3 MGMT 293 ................. 3 Business Elective ...... 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs ........68-69 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 5363 Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109/102 .......... 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 MKTG 155................. 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 201/100........... 3 COMP 110 ................. 3 ENGL 205 .................. 3 MGMT 250(R/W) ...... 3 MKTG 200................. 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester III CWEB 213 ................. 3 MGMT 275 ................ 3 MKTG 260................. 3 PSYC 142/141 ........... 3 Lab Science Elec. 3-4 Total Hours: 15-16 Semester IV BLAW 203(RWS) ...... 3 ECON 201(R)/ Economics Elec ....... 3 MGMT 280 ................ 3 MGMT 293 ................ 3 MKTG 250................. 3 Business Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs ....... 65-66 SUPPLY CHAIN AND LOGISTICS 5364 Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATT 109/102 .......... 3 MGMT 100 ................ 3 PRDM 100 ................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ACCT 201/100 ........... 3 COMP 110 ................. 3 ENGL 205 .................. 3 MGMT 250(R/W)....... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PRDM 214 ............... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III CWEB 213 ................. 3 MGMT 275 ................ 3 PRDM 215 ................. 3 PRDM 272 ................. 3 PSYC 142/141 ........... 3 Lab Science Elec . 3-4 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester IV BLAW 203(RWS) ...... 3 ECON 201(R)/ Economics Elec ........ 3 MGMT 280 ................ 3 MGMT 293 ................ 3 PRDM 220 ................. 3 Business Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 18 Total Cr Hrs........ 68-69

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CHEMICAL SCIENCES 4070 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to A.S. Degree A degree in chemical sciences is an excellent preparation for a career in chemistry, biochemistry, clinical laboratory, dentistry, environmental health science, food science, veterinary science, optometry and pharmacy. It is also a superb preparation for students who want to enter medical and veterinary schools. Chemical scientists are much in demand for research and teaching in universities and for research and development in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, medical laboratories, state and federal governments because the graduates acquire an outstanding range of skills in mathematical competence, problem-solving, data handling, analysis, observation, team working, communication and report writing that employers value greatly. This program has been articulated with Purdue University College of Agriculture in Biochemistry.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements1 33 BIOL 105 Principles of Biology I ....................................................................... 3 BIOL 105L Principles of Biology Laboratory I .................................................... 1 BIOL 106 Principles of Biology II...................................................................... 3 BIOL 106L Principles of Biology Laboratory II ................................................... 1 CHEM 106 General Chemistry II.......................................................................... 3 CHEM 106L General Chemistry/Qualitative Analysis Laboratory ......................... 2 CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry I........................................................................... 3 CHEM 215L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ........................................................ 2 CHEM 216 Organic Chemistry II ......................................................................... 3 CHEM 216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II ....................................................... 2 MATH 119 Calculus/Analytical Geometry II ....................................................... 5 PHYS 106 General Physics II -andPHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II -orPHYS 206 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II -andPHYS 206L Laboratory for Physics for Scientists and Engineers II ...................... 5 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 105 ................. 3 BIOL 105L .............. 1 CHEM 105 .............. 3 CHEM 105L ............ 2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 115 or MATH 118 (M) 3-5 Total Hours: 15-17 Semester II BIOL 106 ................. 3 BIOL 106L .............. 1 CHEM 106(R) ......... 3 CHEM 106L ............ 2 MATH 119 .............. 5 PHYS 105/105L or PHYS 205 ....... 5 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CHEM 215 .............. 3 CHEM 215L ............ 2 ENGL 102 ............... 3 PHYS 106/106L or PHYS 206/206L .... 5 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV CHEM 216 .............. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) ... 2 ECON 201/Soc Sci Elec ........................ 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PHIL 212 ................. 3 PSYC 142/Soc Sci Elec ...................... 3 Total Hours: 16 Total Cr Hrs ..... 66-68

Basic Skills Core 9-11 ENGL 101 English Composition I ....................................................................... 3 MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I -orMATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I ............................................... 3-5 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ............................................................ 3
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by CHEM 106. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CHEM 215L or CHEM 216L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core CHEM 105 General Chemistry I ......................................................................... CHEM 105L General Chemistry/Quantitative Analysis Laboratory ..................... ECON 201 Microeconomics -orSocial Science Elective – Core List ....................................................................... ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................... PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ................................................................ PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics....................................................................... PHYS 105 General Physics I -andPHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I -orPHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I ............................................. PSYC 142 General Psychology -orSocial Science Elective – Core List .......................................................................
Computer Skills are enhanced by CHEM 105L.

24 3 2 3 3 2 3

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(Continued on the following page)
1 Some courses listed as Major Program Requirements will be replaced by courses listed in a concentration. See “Sequence of Courses” for a complete listing of required courses for each concentration.

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NOTE: Several of the classes listed above have prerequisites. Your high school record and your SAT or CPTS test scores may require you to take classes in addition to those listed in the curriculum shown here. Courses in Concentrations: Biochemistry Concentration 4071 (I.U. Transfer) BIOL 220 Molecular Biology .............................................................................. BIOL 230 General Microbiology ......................................................................... BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ...................................................... Chemistry Concentration 4072 IU-4 MATH 220 Intermediate Calculus .......................................................... 4 MATH 223 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra ......................... 7 3 2 2

PU-8 4 4

Pre-Clinical Laboratory Concentration 4073 IUPUI-11 PU-10 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I ................................................... 2 BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I ................................ 1 BIOL 211 Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology ...................... 3 BIOL 211L Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory ... 1 BIOL 230 General Microbiology .......................................................... 2 2 BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ....................................... 2 2 MATH 104 Trigonometry ....................................................................... 3 MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II ........................................................... 3 Pre-Dental Concentration 40741 10 BIOL 211 Human Systems I ................................................................................ 3 BIOL 211L Human Systems Laboratory I.............................................................. 1 BIOL 212 Human Systems II ............................................................................... 3 BIOL 212L Human Systems Laboratory II ............................................................ 1 CHEM 102 Scientific and Decorative Glass Working ........................................... 2 Pre-Environmental Health Science Concentration 4075 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I2 ................................................................ BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I2 .............................................. BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II ................................................................ BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II .............................................. MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II .......................................................................... 9 2 1 2 1 3

Food Science Concentration 4076 13 BIOL 230 General Microbiology ......................................................................... 2 BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ...................................................... 2 FACS 206 Fundamentals of Nutrition .................................................................. 3 MATH 110 Statistics .............................................................................................. 3 MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II .......................................................................... 3 Pre-Optometry Concentration 4078 11 BIOL 211 Human Systems I ................................................................................ 3 BIOL 211L Human Systems Laboratory I.............................................................. 1 BIOL 230 General Microbiology ......................................................................... 2 BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ...................................................... 2 MATH 110 Statistics .............................................................................................. 3 Pre-Pharmacy Concentration 4079 15 BIOL 211 Human Systems I ................................................................................ 3 BIOL 211L Human Systems Laboratory I.............................................................. 1 BIOL 212 Human Systems II ............................................................................... 3 BIOL 212L Human Systems Laboratory II ............................................................ 1 BIOL 230 General Microbiology ......................................................................... 2
Spanish III and IV or Conversational Spanish may be advantageous to anyone applying to Dental School. Students transferring to Indiana State University should take CHEM 216/216L Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory in place of BIOL 111/111L and 112/112L.
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Pre-Pharmacy Concentration 4079 Cont’d BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ...................................................... 2 MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II .......................................................................... 3 Pre-Veterinary Concentration 40801 14 AGRI 100 Agriculture Lectures ........................................................................... 1 AGRI 206 Principles of Animal Nutrition ............................................................ 3 AGRI 208 Genetics .............................................................................................. 4 MATH 110 Statistics .............................................................................................. 3 MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II .......................................................................... 3 Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
BIOCHEMISTRY 4071 (Transfer to IU) Semester I BIOL 105................... 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 Total Hours: 17 Semester II BIOL 220................... 3 CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 MATH 119 ................ 5 PHYS 205................ 5 Total Hours: 16 CHEMISTRY 4072 (Transfer to PU)2 Semester I CHEM 105................. 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 118(M) .......... 5 SPCH 148 ................ 3 Total Hours: 16 CHEMISTRY 4072 (Transfer to IU)3 Semester I CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 112 .................. 3 MATH 118(M)........... 5 SPCH 148 ................ 3 Total Hours: 16 PRE-CLINICAL LABORATORY 4073 (Transfer to IUPUI) Semester I BIOL 105 .................. 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 102 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106 .................. 3 BIOL 106L ................ 1 CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 MATH 104 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 211 .................. 3 BIOL 211L ................ 1 BIOL 230 .................. 2 BIOL 230L ................ 2 CHEM 215 ................ 3 CHEM 215L .............. 2 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV CHEM 216 ................ 3 CHEM 216L(W/S)..... 2 MATH 110(M) .......... 3 PFWL 100 ................. 2 PHIL 212 ................... 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core4 .. 3 Total Hours: 16 Total Credit Hrs...... 65 PRE-CLINICAL LABORATORY 4073 (Transfer to PU) Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 ................. 3 PSYC 142 .................. 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II BIOL 106 ................... 3 BIOL 106L ................ 1 CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 MATH 115(M) .......... 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester III BIOL 111 ................... 2 BIOL 111L ................ 1 BIOL 230 ................... 2 BIOL 230L ................ 2 CHEM 215 ................ 3 CHEM 215L(W/S) ..... 2 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L ............. 1 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV MATH 116 ................ 3 PHYS 106 .................. 4 PHYS 106L ............... 1 PHIL 212 ................... 3 SOCL 151 ................ 3 Total Hours: 14

Semester II CHEM 106(R) ........... 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 MATH 119 ................ 5 HIST 139 .................. 3 PHYS 205 ................ 5 Total Hours: 18

Semester II CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 MATH 119................. 5 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 205 ................ 5 Total Hours: 17

Semester III BIOL 230................... 2 BIOL 230L ................ 2 CHEM 215 ................ 3 CHEM 215L .............. 2 PHYS 206.................. 4 PHYS 206L ............... 1 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV CHEM 216 ................ 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) ..... 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 HIST 139 ................... 3 PFWL 100 ................. 2 PHIL 212 ................... 3 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Total Hours: 19 Total Credit Hrs ....... 69

Semester III CHEM 215................. 3 CHEM 215L .............. 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 MATH 220 ................ 4 PHYS 206 .................. 4 PHYS 206L ............. 1 Total Hours: 17

Semester III CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L .............. 2 MATH 220................. 4 PHYS 206 .................. 4 PHYS 206L .............. 1 Total Hours: 14

Semester IV CHEM 216................. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) .... 2 HIST 140 .................. 3 MATH 223 ............... 4 PFWL 100 ................. 2 PHIL 212 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ....... 68

Semester IV CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) .... 2 HIST 132.................... 3 PHIL 212.................... 3 PSYC 142 .................. 3 SOCL 151 ............... 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ....... 64

Total Credit Hrs ....... 66

1 Biochemistry and Microbiology will need to be taken before a student can be considered for admission into the School of Veterinary Medicine. Both courses are available at Vincennes University. (See academic advisor for details.) 2 Students transferring to ISU should follow the Purdue column but substitute SPCH 143 for SPCH 148 and PSYC 142 for HIST 140. They do not need to take MATH 223. 3 Students transferring to IUPUI should substitute ENGL 101/102 for ENGL 112, SOCL 154 for PSYC 142, and SPCH 143 for SPCH 148. 4 Students should select from the following Social Science courses based on where they plan to transfer: ECON 201 Microeconomics, ECON 202 Macroeconomics, HIST 139 American History I, POLS 111 American National Government, POLS 112 State and Local Government, PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology, and SOCL 154 Cultural Anthropology.

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PRE-DENTAL 4074

Semester I BIOL 105.................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 1121 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106.................... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 MATH 111(M) ........... 3 SPCH 148 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III BIOL 211.................... 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 CHEM 2152 ................ 3 CHEM 215L(W/S) ...... 2 PHIL 212 .................... 3 PHYS 105................... 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOL 212.................... 3 BIOL 212L ................. 1 CHEM 102 ................. 2 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 106................... 4 PHYS 106L ................ 1 POLS 210 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Total Credit Hrs ........ 63

PREENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCE 4075 Semester I BIOL 105 .................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105.................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 115(M) ......... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 106 .................... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 MATH 116 ................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III BIOL 111 .................... 2 BIOL 111L ................. 1 CHEM 215.................. 3 CHEM 215L(W/S) ...... 2 ENGL 108 .................. 3 PHYS 105 ................... 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV BIOL 112 .................... 2 BIOL 112L ................. 1 ECON 201 .................. 3 PHIL 212 .................... 3 PHYS 106 ................... 4 PHYS 106L ................ 1 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ........ 65

FOOD SCIENCE 4076

PRE-OPTOMETRY 4078

PRE-PHARMACY 4079

Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 115(M)........... 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester II BIOL 106 ................... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 MATH 116................. 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 230 ................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L .............. 2 ECON 201.................. 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) ..... 2 FACS 206 .................. 3 MATH 110................. 3 Humanities ElecCommon Core3 ........ 3 Soc Sci Elec-Core4 ... 3 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ....... 69

Semester I BIOL 105 ................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 1125 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 MATH 118(M) or 115(M)/116............ 5-6 PSYC 201 ................... 3 SPCH 148 ............ 3 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester III BIOL 211 ................... 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 BIOL 230 ................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(W/S)...... 2 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV HLTH 211 .................. 2 MATH 110 ................. 3 PFWL 115 .................. 1 PHIL 212 .................... 3 PHYS 106 .................. 4 PHYS 106L .............. 1 Total Hours: 14

Semester I BIOL 105 .................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 1125 ................. 3 MATH 115(M) ........... 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester II BIOL 106 .................... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 MATH 116 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 211 .................... 3 BIOL 211L ................. 1 BIOL 230 .................... 2 BIOL 230L ................. 2 CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L ............... 2 Humanities ElecCommon Core ........ 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV BIOL 212 .................... 3 BIOL 212L ................. 1 CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) ...... 2 ECON 201/202 ........... 3 PHYS 1056 ................. 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ....... 68

Total Credit Hrs. 63-64

Students not qualifying for ENGL 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 English Composition I and II, or (2) ENGL 101 English Composition I, LITR 220 and LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature I and II. If the latter option is chosen, LITR 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities requirement for the A.S. degree. Students transferring to IU School of Arts and Science and Purdue School of Engineering are encouraged to consider option 2. 2 It is recommended that students also take CHEM 216/216L Organic Chemistry II because it is required by most dental schools and Organic Chemistry is a prerequisite for most biochemistry courses. Biochemistry is required for admission to most dental schools. 3 Students should select from the following Humanities Common Core courses based on where they plan to transfer: ARTT 110 Art Appreciation, LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I, LITR 222 American Literature I, MUSM 118 Music Appreciation, PHIL 111 Introduction to Philosophy and PHIL 112 Introduction to Ethics. 4 Students should select from the following Social Science courses based on where they plan to transfer: ECON 201 Microeconomics, ECON 202 Macroeconomics, HIST 139/140 American History I/II, HIST 235/236 World Civilization I/II, POLS 111 American National Government, POLS 112 State and Local Government, PSYC 142 General Psychology and SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology. 5 Students not qualifying for ENGL 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: (1) ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 English Composition I and II, or (2) ENGL 101 English Composition I, LITR 220 and LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature I and II. If the latter option is chosen, LITR 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities requirement for the A.S. degree. 6 Students planning to transfer to Purdue University in Pharmaceutical Science should also take PHYS 106 and PHYS 106L.

1

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PRE-VETERINARY 4080 Semester I AGRI 100 ................... 1 BIOL 105.................... 3 BIOL 105L ................. 1 CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 115(M) ......... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester II BIOL 106.................... 3 BIOL 106L ................. 1 CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 MATH 110 ................. 3 MATH 116 ................. 3 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Summer SOCL 151 ................... 3 Humanities ElecCommon Core ......... 3 Total Hours: 6 Semester III CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L ............... 2 ECON 202/POLS 201 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 105................... 4 PHYS 105L .............. 1 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV AGRI 206 ................... 3 AGRI 208 ................... 4 CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L(W/S) ...... 2 PHYS 106................... 4 PHYS 106L .............. 1 Total Hours: 17 Total Credit Hrs ....... 75

____ 63-75

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CLERICAL – GENERAL 5606 A Certificate of Program Completion This program is designed to provide the initial skills or upgrade skills of persons who desire initial employment in entry-level clerical positions. In addition to the development of keyboarding skills, this program will provide exposure to computer software and applications as well as general office protocol.
Credit Hours

ACCT 100 COMP 111 OADM 150 OADM 210 OADM 155 OADM 161 OADM 215 OADM 232 OADM 233 OADM 234 OADM 266

Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 Using the Internet ........................................................................... 1 Keyboarding II -and/orAdvanced Communication Tools1 ............................................. 3-5 Records Management ..................................................................... 3 Word Processing ............................................................................ 3 Machine Transcription ................................................................... 2 Presentation Software .................................................................... 3 Spreadsheets................................................................................... 3 Databases ....................................................................................... 3 Professional Business Image .......................................................... 3 _____ 27-29

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ACCT 100 ......................3 OADM 150 or 210 ....................... 2-3 OADM 161 ....................3 OADM 232 ....................3 OADM 233 ............. 3 Total Hours: 14-15 Semester II COMP 111 .....................1 OADM 210 ................ 0-3 OADM 155 ....................3 OADM 215 ....................2 OADM 234 ....................3 OADM 266 ............. 3 Total Hours: 12-15

NOTE 1: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011, READ 009 and 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109. NOTE 2: The courses in this certificate are also required in the Administrative Office Technology A.A.S. Degree. Students interested in obtaining a two-year degree, please see the Administrative Office Technology Degree.

1 The student's previous coursework and current skill level will determine the number of keyboarding courses required. The minimum skill level required is the equivalent of successfully completing OADM 210.

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CLERK – MEDICAL 5610 A Certificate of Program Completion This program is designed to provide the initial skills or upgrade skills of persons who desire initial employment in entry-level clerical positions in a medical facility. In addition to the development of keyboarding skills, this program will provide exposure to computer software and applications as well as information specific to the medical field.
Credit Hours

OADM 210 OADM 155 OADM 161 OADM 170 OADM 215 OADM 219 OADM 230 OADM 231 OADM 233 OADM 234

Advanced Communication Tools 1 ................................................. 3 Records Management ..................................................................... 3 Word Processing ............................................................................ 3 Medical Terminology..................................................................... 3 Machine Transcription ................................................................... 2 Medical Transcription .................................................................... 2 Medical Insurance Billing .............................................................. 3 Advanced Medical Insurance Billing ............................................. 3 Spreadsheets................................................................................... 3 Databases ....................................................................................... 3 __ 28

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I OADM 210 ....................3 OADM 161 ....................3 OADM 170 ....................3 OADM 230 ................... 3 OADM 215 .................. 2 Total Hours: 14 Semester II OADM 155 ....................3 OADM 219 ....................2 OADM 231 ....................3 OADM 233 ....................3 OADM 234 .................. 3 Total Hours: 14

NOTE 1: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011, READ 009 and 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109. NOTE 2: The courses in this certificate are also required in the Administrative Office Technology A.A.S. Degree. Students interested in obtaining a two-year degree, please see the Administrative Office Technology Degree.

1 The minimum skill level required in OADM 210 is 45 wpm. The student may need to enroll in OADM 150 Keyboarding II to attain the minimum speed for OADM 210.

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COLLEGIATE STUDIES CERTIFICATE 2257 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion This curriculum is designed as a formalized pathway designed to move students into a program of study leading to an AAS, AS, AA, BS or BA degree. Upon completion of this certificate, students will have fulfilled the requirements of at least the first semesters of an Associate degree. Courses included in the curriculum are part of VU programs of study, are listed on Indiana’s Core Transfer Library (CTL), and meet the Core 40 dual enrollment requirements.
Credit Hours

ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. 3 MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ..................................... 3 SPCH 143 Speech ........................................................................................... 3 CTL Electives .................................................................................................. 6-7 ____ 15-16

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ......................3 MATH 102 .................... 3 Total Hours: 6 Semester II SPCH 143 .......................3 CTL Electives .......... 6-7 Total Hours: 9-10

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COLLISION REPAIR AND REFINISHING 8070 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares students for positions in body shops, collision repair facilities. Training activities include panel replacement and repair, frame and unibody straightening, refinishing and estimating.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 52-53 AUTO 102 Alternative Fuel Vehicles ............................................................. 2 AUTO 105 Transportation Fundamentals........................................................ 2 AUTO 115 Mechanical and Electrical Systems............................................... 4 AUTO 115L Mechanical and Electrical Systems Laboratory ............................ 4 BODY 100 Body Repair I ................................................................................ 5 BODY 100L Body Repair Laboratory I ............................................................. 4 BODY 150 Body Repair II .............................................................................. 5 BODY 150L Body Repair Laboratory II ............................................................ 4 BODY 200 Body Repair III ............................................................................. 5 BODY 200L Body Repair Laboratory III .......................................................... 5 BODY 250 Body Repair IV ............................................................................. 5 BODY 250L Body Repair Laboratory IV ........................................................ 5 Directed Elective1 .......................................................................................... 2-3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I AUTO 105 ................. 2 BODY 100 ................. 5 BODY 100L ............... 4 ENGL 101 ................ 3 Directed Elective .... 2-3 Math Elective ...... 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester II AUTO 115................ 4 AUTO 115L ............... 4 BODY 150 ................. 5 BODY 150L .............. 4 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester III

Basic Skills Core ENGL 11 English Composition I ................................................................. 100-level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) ....................................... SPCH 143 Speech ...........................................................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by BODY 250 and BODY 250L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

Liberal Education Core 14-15 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................................................... 2-3 Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List .................................................................... 3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ........................................... 6 The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. ____ 75-77

AUTO 102.................. 2 BODY 200 ................. 5 BODY 200L ............... 5 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ............. 2-3 Science Elective .. 3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester IV BODY 250(R/W/S)..... 5 BODY 250L(R/W/S) .. 5 Hum/Math/Sci/Soc Sci/Writing Elec ....... 6 Social Sci Elec ......... 3 Total Hours: 19

NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

1 Students should select one of the following: DRAF 101 Introduction to Drafting DRAF 120 Computers for Technology DRAF 140 Introduction to CAD MTTD 105 Metallurgy and Industrial Blueprint Reading

MTTD 205 Welding and Fabrication WELD 160 General Welding WELD 165 Advanced General Welding

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COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (ROBOTICS) TECHNOLOGY 8480 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates for employment in different industries as maintenance technicians, engineering technicians, industrial programmers, field service engineers, sales engineers, and many other high tech employment opportunities in automated manufacturing. Graduates are prepared to install, operate, program, interface, service, troubleshoot, and implement computers, automated equipment, and robotic systems for various applications. Graduates are well prepared in electronics, industrial networking, industrial computers, robotic systems, computer software and hardware applications, industrial control circuits, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), hydraulics and pneumatics. Students also receive specialized courses in automated manufacturing systems such as Automated Process Control that prepares graduates to work in food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries. Starting salaries and job opportunities are great for the graduates who enter the exciting career of robotics and computer automated manufacturing. Students intending to complete the Purdue University Industrial Technology B.S. Degree through the VU partnership program are encouraged to consult with their advisor regarding specific course requirements not listed in this catalog.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 55 CIMT 100 Electronics for Automation I..................... 3 CIMT 100L Electronics for Automation Laboratory I .. 4 CIMT 125 Introduction to Robotics and Automation . 2 CIMT 125L Introduction to Robotics and Automation Laboratory ............................................. 2 CIMT 140 Mechanical Drives .................................... 2 CIMT 140L Mechanical Drives Laboratory .................. 1 CIMT 150 Electronic and Electrical Applications for Manufacturing. ...................................... 2 CIMT 150L Electronic and Electrical Applications for Manufacturing Laboratory .................... 3 CIMT 160 Hydraulics and Pneumatics ....................... 1 CIMT 160L Hydraulics and Pneumatics Laboratory .... 2 CIMT 175 Electro-Mechanical Controls .................... 2 CIMT 175L Electro-Mechanical Controls Laboratory .. 2 CIMT 200 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) . 3 CIMT 200L Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) Laboratory ............................................. 4 CIMT 204 Troubleshooting Automated Systems ....... 1 CIMT 204L Troubleshooting Automated Systems Laboratory ............................................. 1 CIMT 206 Motors and Motor Controls....................... 1 CIMT 206L Motors and Motor Controls Laboratory .... 1 CIMT 225 Programming Industrial Robots ................ 2 CIMT 225L Programming Industrial Robots Laboratory ............................................. 2 CIMT 250 Robotics Applications and Servicing ........ 2 CIMT 250L Robotics Applications and Servicing Laboratory ............................................. 2 CIMT 265 Industrial Networking and PC Control Systems ................................................. 1 CIMT 265L Industrial Networking and PC Control Systems Laboratory............................... 2 CIMT 290 Instrumentation and Automated Process Control .................................................. 3 CIMT 290L Instrumentation and Automated Process Control Laboratory................................ 4

55 3 4 2 2 2 1 2 3 1 2 2 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CIMT 100 ................ 3 CIMT 100L ............. 4 CIMT 125 ................ 2 CIMT 125L ............. 2 CIMT 140 ................ 2 CIMT 140L ............. 1 SPCH 143/148 ......... 3 Math Elec .............. 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester II CIMT 150 ................ 2 CIMT 150L ............. 3 CIMT 160 ................ 1 CIMT 160L ............. 2 CIMT 175 ................ 2 CIMT 175L ............. 2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 Science Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III CIMT 200(R/W) ...... 3 CIMT 200L(R/W) .... 4 CIMT 204 ................ 1 CIMT 204L ............. 1 CIMT 206 ................ 1 CIMT 206L ............. 1 CIMT 225 ................ 2 CIMT 225L ............. 2 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Soc Sci Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 20-21

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CIMT 100 ................3 CIMT 100L ..............4 CIMT 125 ................2 CIMT 125L ..............2 CIMT 140 ................2 CIMT 140L ..............1 MATH 102...............3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester II CIMT 150 ................2 CIMT 150L ..............3 CIMT 160 ................1 CIMT 160L ..............2 CIMT 175 ................2 CIMT 175L ..............2 ENGL 101/112.........3 MATH 104............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III CIMT 200(R/W) .......3 CIMT 200L(R/W) ....4 CIMT 204 ................1 CIMT 204L ..............1 CIMT 206 ................1 CIMT 206L ..............1 CIMT 225 ................2 CIMT 225L ..............2 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Sci Elective .......3 Writing Elective. 0-3 Total Hours: 21-24

(Continued on the following page)

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General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Semester IV CIMT 250(S) ........... 2 CIMT 250L.............. 2 CIMT 265 ................ 1 CIMT 265L.............. 2 CIMT 290 ................ 3 CIMT 290L.............. 4 Hum/Math/Sci/Soc Sci/Writing Elec .. 6 Total Hours: 20

Semester IV CIMT 250(S) ........... 2 CIMT 250L .............. 2 CIMT 265 ................ 1 CIMT 265L .............. 2 CIMT 290 ................ 3 CIMT 290L .............. 4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ......... 2-3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Sci Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 22-23

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I -orENGL 112 Rhetoric and Research1 ............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) . SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by CIMT 200 and CIMT 200L. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by CIMT 250. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 for A.S. or by a subsequent mathematics course for A.A.S. or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 17-21 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ............................................... 2-3 2-3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3 Social Science Electives – Core List ............................. 3 6 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 0-3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ....................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by CIMT 125.

____ ____ 78-79 81-85

NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

Students seeking an A.S. degree who do not qualify for ENGL 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: (1) ENGL 101 and 102 English Composition I and II, or (2) ENGL 101 English Composition I, LITR 220 and 221 Introduction to World Literature I and II. If the latter option is chosen, LITR 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities Common Core requirement.

1

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COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE CONCENTRATION 8481 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This program prepares graduates for employment in industrial maintenance by providing a variety of experience in electrical controls, electronics, robotics, industrial computers, programmable logic controllers, hydraulics and pneumatics along with basic machining and welding skills. Graduates are prepared to install, fabricate, troubleshoot, repair and replace mechanical parts, electrical and electronic controls, and programmable controls for industrial machines and automated equipment. Students intending to complete the Purdue University Industrial Technology B.S. Degree through the VU partnership program are encouraged to consult with their advisor regarding specific course requirements not listed in this catalog.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 50 CIMT 100 Electronics for Automation I ................... 3 CIMT 100L Electronics for Automation Laboratory I . 4 CIMT 125 Introduction to Robotics and Automation 2 CIMT 125L Introduction to Robotics and Automation Laboratory............................................ 2 CIMT 140 Mechanical Drives ................................... 2 CIMT 140L Mechanical Drives Laboratory................. 1 CIMT 150 Electronic and Electrical Applications for Manufacturing. ..................................... 2 CIMT 150L Electronic and Electrical Applications for Manufacturing Laboratory ................... 3 CIMT 160 Hydraulics and Pneumatics ...................... 1 CIMT 160L Hydraulics and Pneumatics Laboratory ... 2 CIMT 175 Electro-Mechanical Controls ................... 2 CIMT 175L Electro-Mechanical Controls Laboratory . 2 CIMT 200 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) 3 CIMT 200L Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) Laboratory............................................ 4 CIMT 204 Troubleshooting Automated Systems ...... 1 CIMT 204L Troubleshooting Automated Systems Laboratory ............................................. 1 CIMT 206 Motors and Motor Control ....................... 1 CIMT 206L Motors and Motor Control Laboratory .... 1 CIMT 250 Robotics Applications and Servicing ....... 2 CIMT 250L Robotics Applications and Servicing Laboratory ............................................. 2 PMTD 105 Metallurgy and Industrial Blueprint Reading ................................................ 2 PMTD 110 Manufacturing Processes ......................... 2 PMTD 110L Manufacturing Processes Laboratory....... 1 WELD 160 General Welding ...................................... 2 WELD 165 Advanced Welding .................................. 2 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

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Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CIMT 100 ................ 3 CIMT 100L ............. 4 CIMT 125 ................ 2 CIMT 125L ............. 2 CIMT 140 ................ 2 CIMT 140L ............. 1 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Math Elec ............. 3 Total Hours: 20

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CIMT 100 ................3 CIMT 100L ..............4 CIMT 125 ................2 CIMT 125L ..............2 CIMT 140 ................2 CIMT 140L ..............1 MATH 102...............3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 20

Semester II CIMT 150 ................ 2 CIMT 150L ............. 3 CIMT 160 ................ 1 CIMT 160L ............. 2 CIMT 175 ................ 2 CIMT 175L ............. 2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 Hum/Sci/Soc Sci/ Writing Elective .. 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II CIMT 150 ................2 CIMT 150L ..............3 CIMT 160 ................1 CIMT 160L ..............2 CIMT 175 ................2 CIMT 175L ..............2 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 104 (M)........3 PMTD 110 ...............2 PMTD 110L ........... 1 Total Hours: 21 Semester III CIMT 200(R/W) .......3 CIMT 200L(R/W) ....4 CIMT 204 ................1 CIMT 204L ..............1 CIMT 206 ................1 CIMT 206L ..............1 WELD 160 ...............2 Humanities Elec .......3 Lab Science Elec... 3 Total Hours: 19

Semester III CIMT 200(R/W) ...... 3 CIMT 200L(R/W) .... 4 CIMT 204 ................ 1 CIMT 204L ............. 1 CIMT 206 ................ 1 CIMT 206L ............. 1 WELD 160 .............. 2 Hum/Sci/Soc Sci/ Writing Elective .. 3 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I -orENGL 112 Rhetoric and Research1 ............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) . SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication...................

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1 Students seeking an A.S. degree who do not qualify for ENGL 112 must satisfy the writing requirements by completing either of the following course sequences: (1) ENGL 101 and 102 English Composition I and II, or (2) ENGL 101 English Composition I, LITR 220 and 221 Introduction to World Literature I and II. If the latter option is chosen, LITR 220 and 221 will satisfy the second writing requirement and the Humanities Common Core requirement.

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The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by CIMT 200 and CIMT 200L. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by CIMT 250. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by Mathematics Elective for A.A.S. or by MATH 104 for A.S. or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV CIMT 250(S) ........... 2 CIMT 250L.............. 2 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ......... 2-3 PMTD 105 ............... 2 PMTD 110 ............... 2 PMTD 110L ............ 1 WELD 165 .............. 2 Science Elective ...... 3 Soc Sci Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 19-20

Semester IV CIMT 250(S) ........... 2 CIMT 250L .............. 2 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ......... 2-3 PMTD 105 ............... 2 WELD 165............... 2 Soc Sci Electives ... 6 Writing Elec..... 0-3 Total Hours: 16-20

Liberal Education Core 14-15 17-21 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ............................................... 2-3 2-3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3 Social Science Elective(s) – Core List........................... 3 6 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, or 210) .................................................................. 0-3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ....................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by CIMT 125.

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NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING – DATABASE CERTIFICATE 5455 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion Students who complete this sequence of courses will be qualified to enter careers in which they would function as entry-level database developers. Three relational database software packages will be presented: Microsoft Access, Visual dBASE, and Oracle. Programming classes enhance the longstanding interface between computer languages and database development.
Credit Hours

COMP 110 COMP 176 COMP 193 COMP 203 COMP 215 COMP 252 COMP 285 COMP 293

Introduction to Computer Concepts .............................................. 3 Introduction to Visual Programming.............................................. 3 Oracle Fundamentals/SQL*Plus .................................................... 3 Visual C++ ..................................................................................... 3 Database Management/SQL........................................................... 3 Introduction to Java Programming ................................................. 3 Content Management Solutions and Portals .................................. 3 Oracle Application Development ................................................... 3 __ 24

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 110 .....................3 COMP 176 .....................3 COMP 193 .....................3 COMP 215 ................... 3 Total Hours: 12 Semester II COMP 203 .....................3 COMP 252 .....................3 COMP 285 .....................3 COMP 293 ................... 3 Total Hours 12

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in ENGL 009 or 011, READ 009 and 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

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COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNOLOGY 5450 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This sequence of both theory and practical applications of computer techniques is aimed at preparing students for entry-level positions as programmers. The goals are to build a solid foundation in several languages and computer usage. Students will develop skills in problem solving and be able to write code from design specifications.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 48 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts ............................................... 3 COMP 130 Communications and Networking.................................................. 3 COMP 146 Personal Computer Configuration and Management ..................... 3 COMP 175 Principles of Computer Programming............................................ 3 COMP 176 Introduction to Visual Programming.............................................. 3 COMP 193 Oracle Fundamentals/SQL*Plus .................................................... 3 COMP 203 Visual C++ ..................................................................................... 3 COMP 215 Database Management/SQL........................................................... 3 COMP 252 Introduction to Java Programming ................................................. 3 COMP 273 Advanced Visual C++ .................................................................... 3 COMP 276 Advanced Visual Programming ..................................................... 3 COMP 285 Content Management Solutions and Portals .................................. 3 COMP 293 Oracle Application Development ................................................... 3 COMP 295 Systems Development .................................................................... 3 OADM 266 Professional Business Image .......................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 110 .....................3 COMP 146 .....................3 COMP 175 .....................3 COMP 215 .....................3 MATH 102 .....................3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 ..... 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester II ACCT 100 ......................3 COMP 130 .....................3 COMP 176 .....................3 ENGL 101 ......................3 Soc Sci Elective .............3 SPCH 143 ..................... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III COMP 193 .....................3 COMP 203 .....................3 COMP 276 .....................3 COMP 285 .....................3 ENGL 108 ......................3 OADM 266 .................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV COMP 252 .....................3 COMP 273 .....................3 COMP 293 .....................3 COMP 295(R/W/S).........3 ECON 100/201...............3 Lab Science Elec .... 3-4 Total Hours: 18-19

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

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The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by COMP 295. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-16 ECON 100 Elements of Economics -orECON 201 Microeconomics ............................................................................. 3 ENGL 108 Technical Writing .......................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ..................................................................................... 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ........................................ 3-4 Social Science Elective – Core List .................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by Major Program Requirements.

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COMPUTER/SOFTWARE SUPPORT SPECIALIST 5440 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This program provides students the training required to enter the workforce in the nation’s fastest growing career track as a Computer/Software Support Specialist. Students will be exposed to theoretical and practical applications of programming logic, networking concepts, administration, and computer management, as well as how to assist with the use of computer applications including the Microsoft Office Suite. This program is designed to train the student as a support specialist in computer and software diagnostics. Graduates of this program may be employed as a Computer Support Specialist, Software or Application Support Specialist, Help Desk representative or Technical Analyst.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 48 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting ............................................................... 3 CMET 240 Computer Maintenance I ................................................................. 6 CMET 275 Computer Maintenance II .............................................................. 6 CNET 151 Security Essentials .......................................................................... 3 CNET 236 Operating Systems I ........................................................................ 3 CNET 237 Operating Systems II ....................................................................... 3 CNET 238 Operating Systems III ..................................................................... 3 COMP 107 Web Page Design ............................................................................ 3 COMP 130 Communications and Networking................................................... 3 COMP 146 Personal Computer Configuration and Management ...................... 3 COMP 201 Computer in Business ..................................................................... 3 COMP 230 Advanced Communications and Networking.................................. 3 OADM 161 Word Processing.............................................................................. 3 OADM 232 Presentation Software ..................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 107 ................. 3 COMP 130 ................. 3 COMP 146 ................. 3 OADM 161 ................ 3 MATH 102 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 . 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester II ACCT 100 .................. 3 CNET 236 .................. 3 COMP 230 ................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 SPCH 143 .................. 3 Soc Sci Elective ....... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III CMET 240 ................. 6 CNET 151 .................. 3 CNET 237 .................. 3 ENGL 108 .................. 3 OADM 232 .............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV CMET 275 (R/W/S) ... 6 CNET 238 .................. 3 COMP 201 ................. 3 ECON 100/201(R) ..... 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ....................................... SPCH 143 Speech .............................................................................................
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by CMET 275 or ECON 201. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CMET 275. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

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Liberal Education Core 14-15 ECON 100 Elements of Economics -orECON 201 Microeconomics .............................................................................. 3 ENGL 108 Technical Writing ........................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ...................................................................................... 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................. 3 Social Science Elective – Core List ..................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by Major Program Requirements.

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CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 8240 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Graduates are prepared for positions in residential contracting leading into opportunities in management, estimating, and technology in related fields.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 49 ARCH 102 Architectural Drafting and Print Reading . 4 BLAW 201 Commercial Law I .................................... CNST 100 Construction Seminar ................................ 1 CNST 105 Framing ..................................................... 2 CNST 105L Framing Laboratory .................................. 2 CNST 120 Construction Safety ................................... 2 CNST 155 Electrical Wiring ....................................... 2 CNST 155L Electrical Wiring Laboratory .................... 1 CNST 160 Finish Carpentry........................................ 2 CNST 160L Finish Carpentry Laboratory ..................... 2 CNST 180 Concrete and Masonry .............................. 2 CNST 180L Concrete and Masonry Laboratory............ 2 CNST 205 Residential House Construction I.............. 8 CNST 210 Mechanical Systems .................................. 2 CNST 250 Residential House Construction II ............ 8 CNST 255 Construction Material Takeoff .................. 3 CNST 261 The Indiana Residential Code for Oneand-Two-Family Dwellings................... 3 CNST 270 Construction Labor Rating and Pricing ..... 2 CNST 270L Construction Labor Rating and Pricing Laboratory ............................................. 1 MGMT 257 Supervision ............................................... General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

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Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CNST 100 ................ 1 CNST 105 ................ 2 CNST 105L ............. 2 CNST 180 ................ 2 CNST 180L ............. 2 ENGL 101 ............... 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Math Elective ........ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II ARCH 102 ............... 4 CNST 120 ................ 2 CNST 155 ................ 2 CNST 155L ............. 1 CNST 160 ................ 2 CNST 160L ............. 2 ENGL 108 ............... 3 Math Elective ........ 3 Total Hours: 19

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARCH 102 ...............4 CNST 100 ................1 CNST 105 ................2 CNST 105L ..............2 CNST 180 ................2 CNST 180L ..............2 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102............. 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester II CNST 120 ................2 CNST 155 ................2 CNST 155L ..............1 CNST 160 ................2 CNST 160L ..............2 MATH 104(M).........3 SPCH 143 ................3 Soc Sci Elec .............3 Writing Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 21 Semester III CNST 205 ................8 CNST 255 ................3 CNST 261 ................3 MGMT 257 ..............3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Lab Sci Elec ..... 3 Total Hours: 22-23 Semester IV BLAW 201...............3 CNST 210 ................2 CNST 250 ................8 CNST 270(R/W/S) ...2 CNST 270L(R/W/S) .1 HUMN 210 ..............3 Soc Sci Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 22

Basic Skills Core 9 ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 3 MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech ........................................................ 3 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .. 3

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Semester III CNST 205 ................ 8 CNST 210 ................ 2 CNST 255 ................ 3 CNST 261 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CNST 270 and CNST 270L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by Mathematics Elective for A.A.S., or by MATH 104 for A.S., or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester IV

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 ENGL 108 Technical Writing ..................................... 3 HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities I ..................... 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ............................................... 2-3 2-3

CNST 250 ................ 8 CNST 270(R/W/S) ... 2 CNST 270L(R/W/S) 1 Soc Sci Elective....... 3 Science Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17

(Continued on the following page)

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Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ....................... Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... Social Science Elective(s) – Core List...........................
Computer Skills are enhanced by CNST 270.

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72-73 84-85 NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

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CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY BUILDING MATERIALS MARKETING CONCENTRATION 8241 Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree Graduates are prepared for entry level positions in sales, marketing and management with building materials suppliers and manufacturers.
Credit Hours – A.A.S. A.S. Major Program Requirements 43-47 43-47 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting ......................... 3 3 ARCH 102 Architectural Drafting and Print Reading . 4 4 CNST 100 Construction Seminar ................................ 1 1 CNST 105 Framing ..................................................... 2 2 CNST 105L Framing Laboratory .................................. 2 2 CNST 160 Finish Carpentry........................................ 2 2 CNST 160L Finish Carpentry Laboratory ..................... 2 2 CNST 255 Construction Material Takeoff .................. 3 3 CNST 261 The Indiana Residential Code for One-and Two-Family Dwellings ......................... 3 3 CNST 270 Construction Labor Rating and Pricing ..... 2 2 CNST 270L Construction Labor Rating and Pricing Laboratory ............................................. 1 1 CNST 292 Internship in Building Materials1 ........ 0-4 0-4 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .......... 3 3 ENTR 121 Creating a Small Business......................... 3 3 MGMT 255 Principles of Salesmanship ....................... 3 3 MGMT 257 Supervisory Management ......................... 3 3 MGMT 280 Introduction to Marketing ......................... 3 3 Professional Electives2 .................................................. 3 3 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARCH 102 ............... 4 CNST 100 ................ 1 CNST 105 ................ 2 CNST 105L ............. 2 CNST 261 ................ 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester II ACCT 100 ............... 3 CNST 160 ................ 2 CNST 160L ............. 2 ECON 100 ............... 3 ENGL 107 ............... 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Math Elec............... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CNST 255 ................ 3 COMP 110 ............... 3 PSYC 141 ................ 3 Math Elec................. 3 Science Elec............. 3 Professional Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV CNST 270(R/W/S) ... 2 CNST 270L(R/W/S). 1 ENTR 121 ................ 3 MGMT 255 .............. 3 MGMT 257 .............. 3 MGMT 280 ............ 3 Total Hours: 15 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ARCH 102 ............... 4 CNST 100 ................ 1 CNST 105 ................ 2 CNST 105L ............. 2 CNST 261 ................ 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II ACCT 100 ............... 3 CNST 160 ................ 2 CNST 160L ............. 2 MATH 104 .............. 3 PSYC 141 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Writing Elec .......... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CNST 255 ................ 3 ECON 100 ............... 3 ENTR 121................ 3 HUMN 210 .............. 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Professional Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV CNST 270(R/W/S) ... 2 CNST 270L(R/W/S). 1 COMP 110............... 3 MGMT 255.............. 3 MGMT 257.............. 3 MGMT 280.............. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ....... 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18

General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core 9 ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 3 MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech ........................................................ 3 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .. 3

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The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CNST 270 and CNST 270L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by Mathematics Elective A.A.S. or by MATH 102 for A.S. or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 17-18 20-21 ECON 100 Elements of Economics ............................. 3 3 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 ENGL 107 Business English ....................................... 3 HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities I ..................... 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness –orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness –andHLTH 211 First Aid ............................................... 2-3 2-3

(Continued on the following page)

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See course description for details regarding this optional internship. Strongly recommended electives: CNST 120 Construction Safety, CNST 155 Electrical Wiring, CNST 210 Mechanical Systems.

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PSYC 141 Applied Psychology .................................. 3 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ....................... 3 Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3 ____ ____ Computer Skills are enhanced by CNST 255. 69-74 72-77 NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

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CORRECTIONS 7150 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree (Available only through Florida Education Program.) This curriculum provides a broad overview of the correctional field and is designed to prepare graduates for a wide range of employment in the correctional field.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 39 CORR 120 Introduction to Corrections ....................... 3 CORR 125 Correctional Institutions ............................ 3 CORR 155 Legal Trends in Corrections ...................... 3 CORR 220 Treatment in Corrections .......................... 3 CORR 230 Report Writing for the Criminal Justice Professional ........................................... 3 CORR 240 Institutional Security ................................. 3 CORR 260 Correctional Administration...................... 3 CORR 265 Contemporary Community Corrections .... 3 LAWE 100 Survey of Criminal Justice ........................ 3 LAWE 150 Introduction to Criminology ..................... 3 LAWE 250 Juvenile Delinquency ................................ 3 Electives1................................................... 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

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Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CORR 120 ............... 3 CORR 125 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 LAWE 100 .............. 3 SOCL 151 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CORR 120 ...............3 CORR 125 ...............3 ENGL 101 ................3 LAWE 100 ...............3 SOCL 151 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester II

Semester II CORR 155 ...............3 LAWE 150 ...............3 PFWL 100 ................2 SPCH 148 ................3 Humanities Elec .......3 Writing Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 100-level or Higher Mathematics Course ...................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . SPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

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CORR 155 ............... 3 ENGL 102 ............... 3 LAWE 150 .............. 3 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SPCH 148 .............. 3 Total Hours: 17

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by CORR 260. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CORR 230. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III CORR 220 ............... 3 CORR 240 ............... 3 CORR 265 ............... 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester III CORR 220 ...............3 CORR 240 ...............3 CORR 265 ...............3 MATH 102...............3 PSYC 142 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Liberal Education Core 14 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205, 210)............................................................................. ENGL 102 English Composition II ............................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology ............................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... Science Elective – Common Core List .......................... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ......................................................... The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

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Semester IV CORR 230(W/S) ...... 3 CORR 260(R) .......... 3 LAWE 250 .............. 3 Math Elective .......... 3 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester IV CORR 230(W/S) ......3 CORR 260(R) ..........3 LAWE 250 ...............3 Hum/Sci/Math Elective ..................3 Lab Science Elec.... 3 Total Hours: 15

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1 CORR 270 Internship in Corrections may be served after completion of thirty hours in the program. See course description for details.

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COSMETOLOGY 7200 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This program is designed to prepare students for opportunities in all fields of cosmetology. Some of the areas included are as follows: beauty salon owner, make-up artist, sales technician, salon manager, facial and skin care expert, hair stylist, platform artist, hairpiece consultant, hair coloring technician, manufacturer’s representative, cosmetic stylist, and cosmetology instructor. In this program, emphasis is on practical skills, professionalism and business education. Upon completion of this program, graduates are eligible for state licensure. Guidelines for Cosmetology Credit: Persons who have completed an accredited cosmetology program and have passed the Indiana Cosmetology State Boards may be granted up to 30 credit hours by: a. b. c. d. e. Making application and being accepted as a Vincennes University student; Submitting a copy of the valid Indiana Cosmetology License; and Submitting payment for up to 30 credit hours at $25 per credit hour. Credit will be awarded for COSM 100, COSM 150, COSM 200, and COSM 250. The student will be required to complete COSM 275. The student will be assessed on their current cosmetology skills. They will meet at the Vincennes Beauty College 30 hours during the semester.
Credit Hours Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COSM 100 ................. 7 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 PSYC 142 ............ 3 Total Hours: 15-16

Major Program Requirements 39 ACCT 100 Basic College Accounting .............................................................. 3 COSM 100 Cosmetology I ................................................................................ 7 COSM 150 Cosmetology II............................................................................... 7 COSM 200 Cosmetology III ............................................................................. 7 COSM 250 Cosmetology IV ............................................................................. 9 ECON 208 Personal Financial Management -orACCT 206 Payroll Accounting -orOADM 233 Spreadsheets................................................................................... 3 ENTR 121 Creating a Small Business.............................................................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or Higher Mathematics Course ........................................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................

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Semester II ACCT 100 .................. 3 COSM 150 ................. 7 ENGL 107 .................. 3 SPCH 143/148(W) ... 3 Total Hours: 16

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by ECON 208 or ENTR 121. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by ENTR 121 or SPCH 148. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by ENTR 121. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III COSM 200 ................. 7 ECON 208/ACCT 206/OADM 233 ...... 3 Hum/Math/Soc Sci/ Sci Elec .................... 3 Math Elective ........... 3 Total Hours: 16

Liberal Education Core 15-16 BIOL 100 Human Biology .............................................................................. 4 ENGL 107 Business English ............................................................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ..................................................................................... 2-3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 One course from a Liberal Education Core list in one of the following areas: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, or Social Science ................................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

Semester IV BIOL 100 ................... 4 COSM 250 ................. 9 ENTR 121(R/W/S) ... 3 Total Hours: 16

____ 63-64

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CULINARY ARTS 7250 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum combines both the practical and theoretical aspects of food preparation with emphasis on those technical skills required for occupations that include all facets of food preparation. Laboratory experience is stressed to achieve technical excellence in quantity food preparation. Although several years of work experience after graduation will be required to produce the finished chef or cook, the program will provide the fundamentals that individuals would spend years in learning without the completion of this program. Typical entry-level job positions upon graduation include first cook, second cook, chef junior assistant, sauce cook, pastry cook, and sous chef trainee.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S. Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CULN 110 ............... 6 ENGL 101 ............... 3 REST 120(R) ........... 3 Math Elective ........ 3 Total Hours: 15 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CULN 110 ...............6 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102...............3 REST 120(R) ...........3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 18

Major Program Requirements 43-45 43-45 CULN 110 Quantity Food Production ......................... 6 6 CULN 150 Advanced Quantity Food Production ........ 6 6 CULN 210 Pastry and Bake Shop Production ............. 6 6 CULN 215 Supervision of the Quantity Food Facility 3 3 CULN 260 Haute Cuisine and Specialty Food Items .. 7 7 CULN 270 Culinary Practicum1 ............................... 0-2 0-2 REST 100 Introduction to Hospitality Management .. 3 3 REST 120 Food Service Sanitation ............................ 3 3 REST 155 Quantity Food Purchasing ......................... 3 3 REST 210 Beverage Sales and Service ...................... 3 3 REST 230 Menu Planning and Facility Design .......... 3 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . 100-level or Higher Mathematics Course ...................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester II CULN 150 ............... 6 REST 100 ................ 3 REST 155 ................ 3 REST 230 ................ 3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II CULN 150 ...............6 ENGL 102/107/ 108 .........................3 REST 100.................3 REST 155.................3 REST 230............... 3 Total Hours: 18

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by REST 120. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CULN 215. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III CULN 210 ............... 6 CULN 215(W/S) ...... 3 ENGL 107/108 ........ 3 REST 210 .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

Semester III CULN 210 ...............6 CULN 215(W/S) ......3 PSYC 142 ................3 REST 210.................3 Soc Sci Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 18

Liberal Education Core 14 ENGL 102 English Composition II -orENGL 107 Business English -orENGL 108 Technical Writing ..................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ......................................................... Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

20

3 2 3 3 3 3 3

Semester IV CULN 260 ............... 7 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Sci Elective..... 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester IV CULN 260 ...............7 PFWL 100 ................2 Humanities Elec .......3 Lab Sci Elec .............3 Hum/Sci/Math Elective ................ 3 Total Hours: 18

____ ____ 66-68 72-74

1

This practicum may be served in the summer after completing one year of the program. See course description for details.

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DANCE/THEATRE CERTIFICATE 2605 A Certificate of Program Completion The focus of this program of study is to provide training in the fields of Dance and Theatre. Upon completion of this certificate, students will have prepared for employment at a dance/theatre studio in an entry-level position. Students wishing to explore this area can also take additional course work and complete an associate degree in General Studies.
Credit Hours

DANC 104 Ballet I -orDANC 105 Ballet II ......................................................................................... 1 DANC 106 Tap I -orDANC 107 Tap II.............................................................................................. 1 DANC 108 Jazz I -orDANC 109 Jazz II ............................................................................................. 1 DANC 111 Modern Dance I -orDANC 112 Modern Dance II ............................................................................ 1 DANC 120 Introduction to Choreography ........................................................ 2 DANC 121 Dance Performance and Production ............................................... 1 DANC 149 Dance Appreciation........................................................................ 3 ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. 3 MUSM 118 Music Appreciation ........................................................................ 3 SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................ 3 THEA 100 Theatre Appreciation...................................................................... 3 THEA 146 Fundamentals of Acting ................................................................. 3 Theatre Elective1 ................................................................................................ 3 __ 28

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I DANC 104/105 .......... 1 DANC 108/109 .......... 1 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MUSM 118 ................ 3 THEA 100 .................. 3 THEA 146 ................ 3 Total Hours: 14 Semester II DANC 106/107 .......... 1 DANC 111/112 .......... 1 DANC 120 ................. 2 DANC 121 ................. 1 DANC 149 ................. 3 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Theatre Elective ....... 3 Total Hours: 14

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in READ 011, and MATH 010 or MATT 014, MATT 108 or MATT 109.

1

Recommended Electives: THEA 125 Stage Make-up Design; THEA 147 Stage Combat; THEA 225 Costume Construction I; THEA 246 Acting II.

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DIESEL TECHNOLOGY 8272 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree The curriculum is designed for those planning to complete a degree leading to employment within the Diesel Industry. Students must select one of three degree concentrations (Diesel Truck and Heavy Equipment Mechanics Technology; John Deere Ag-Tech; or John Deere C & CE-Tech).
Credit Hours - A.A.S./A.S.

Major Program Requirements 42-55 AUTO 110 Transportation Electrical ...................................................................................................... 3 AUTO 110L Transportation Electrical Laboratory ................................................................................... 1 AUTO 230 Transportation HVAC.......................................................................................................... 3 AUTO 230L Transportation HVAC Laboratory ....................................................................................... 1 DESL 130 Diesel Engine Systems ......................................................................................................... 4 DESL 130L Diesel Engine Systems Laboratory ...................................................................................... 3 DESL 140 Diesel Hydraulic Systems .................................................................................................... 2 DESL 140L Diesel Hydraulic Systems Laboratory ................................................................................. 2 DESL 215 Diesel Drive Trains .............................................................................................................. 3 DESL 215L Diesel Drive Trains Laboratory ........................................................................................... 2 DESL 240 Diesel Electronic Systems.................................................................................................... 3 DESL 240L Diesel Electronic Systems Laboratory ................................................................................. 2 Courses in Concentration Areas ........................................................................................................ 13-26 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the General education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ......................................................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ................................................................................................................................. Math requirement (See Concentrations) ....................................................................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking requirements may be met by designated courses in areas of concentration. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

Liberal Education Core 15-22 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................ ........... .............................................................. 2-3 Social Science Elective.............................................................................................................................. 3 Additional Liberal Education Courses (See Concentrations) .............................................................. 10-16 (Continued on the following page)

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Courses in Concentration Areas

13-26

Diesel, Truck and Heavy Equipment Concentration 8273 A.A.S.-15 A.S. -13 AUTO 105 Transportation Fundamental ................................................................................. 2 2 CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants ........................................................................... 4* DESL 120 Diesel Chassis Systems ........................................................................................ 4 4 DESL 120L Diesel Chassis Systems Laboratory...................................................................... 3 3 DESL 260 Diesel Preventative Maintenance ......................................................................... 3 3 DESL 260L Diesel Preventative Maintenance LaboratoryR/W/S ................................................ 1 1 ENGL 108 Technical Writing ................................................................................................. 3* HIST 125 History of American Technology ......................................................................... 3* MATH 102 College Algebra.................................................................................................... 3* Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elec........................................................................................... 3* Hum/Sci/Math Elective ............................................................................................................. 3* 3* Humanities Elective................................................................................................................... 3* Lab Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................................................... 3* 100-level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .............................................................. 3* Welding Elective ....................................................................................................................... 2 John Deere Ag-Tech Concentration 8274 A.A.S.-26 AGBS 250 John Deere Tech Computer Technology ............................................................................. 2 CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants .......................................................................................... 4* DEER 150 John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products ...................................................... 2 DEER 150L John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products Laboratory .................................... 1 DEER 161 Agricultural Machinery ....................................................................................................... 1 DEER 161L Agricultural Machinery Laboratory..................................................................................... 2 DEER 163 Tractor System Fundamentals ............................................................................................. 2 DEER 163L Tractor System Fundamentals Lab ...................................................................................... 1 DEER 190 Cooperative Work Experience ................................................................................................ 3 DEER 237 Advanced Hydraulics .......................................................................................................... 3 DEER 237L Advanced Hydraulics Laboratory........................................................................................ 3 DEER 270 Advanced DiagnosticsR/W/S .................................................................................................. 3 DEER 270L Advanced Diagnostics Laboratory ...................................................................................... 1 Hum/Math/Sci/Writing Elective ............................................................................................................... 3* Hum/Math/Soc Sci/Writing Elective ........................................................................................................ 3* 100-level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) ............................................................................. 3* Welding Elective ...................................................................................................................................... 2 John Deere C & CE (Consumer & Commercial Equipment) Concentration 8275 A.A.S.-23 AGBS 250 John Deere Tech Computer Technology ............................................................................. 2 CHMT 100 Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants .......................................................................................... 4* DEER 150 John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products ...................................................... 2 DEER 150L John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products Laboratory .................................... 1 DEER 163 Tractor Systems Fundamentals............................................................................................ 2 DEER 163L Tractor Systems Fundamentals Lab .................................................................................... 1 DEER 190 Cooperative Work Experience ............................................................................................ 3 DEER 237 Advanced Hydraulics .......................................................................................................... 3 DEER 237L Advanced Hydraulics Laboratory........................................................................................ 3 DEER 270 Advanced DiagnosticsR/W/S .................................................................................................. 3 DEER 270L Advanced Diagnostics Laboratory ...................................................................................... 1 Hum/Math/Sci/Writing Elective ............................................................................................................... 6* 100-level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) ............................................................................. 3* Welding Elective ...................................................................................................................................... 2
*Required credits specific to this concentration for the General Education and/or Liberal Education Core are counted in the General Education and/or Liberal Education Core areas.

(Continued on the following page)

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Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
DIESEL, TRUCK AND HEAVY EQUIPMENT CONCENTRATION 8273 A.A.S. Degree Semester I AUTO 105 ............................ 2 AUTO 110 ............................ 3 AUTO 110L ......................... 1 DESL 120 ............................. 4 DESL 120L .......................... 3 ENGL 101 ............................ 3 Welding Elec ...................... 2 Total Hours: 18 DIESEL, TRUCK+HEAVY EQUIPMENT CONCENTRATION 8273 A.S. Degree Semester I AUTO 105 ........................... 2 AUTO 110 ........................... 3 AUTO 110L ........................ 1 DESL 120 ............................ 4 DESL 120L ......................... 3 ENGL 101 ........................... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec ............ 3 Total Hours: 19 JOHN DEERE AG-TECH CONCENTRATION A.A.S. Degree 8274 JOHN DEERE C & CE CONCENTRATION 8275 (Consumer+Commercial Equipment) A.A.S. Degree Semester I AUTO 110 ............................ 3 AUTO 110L ......................... 1 DEER 163 ............................ 2 DEER 163L .......................... 1 ENGL 101 ............................ 3 Math Elective ....................... 3 Welding Elec ...................... 2 Total Hours: 15

Semester II DESL 130 ............................. 4 DESL 130L .......................... 3 DESL 140 ............................. 2 DESL 140L .......................... 2 SPCH 143 ............................. 3 Math Elective ..................... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester II DESL 130 ............................ 4 DESL 130L ......................... 3 DESL 140 ............................ 2 DESL 140L ......................... 2 MATH 102 .......................... 3 SPCH 143 .......................... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester I AUTO 110 ............................ 3 AUTO 110L ......................... 1 DEER 161 ............................ 1 DEER 161L .......................... 2 DEER 163 ............................ 2 DEER 163L .......................... 1 ENGL 101 ............................ 3 Math Elective ....................... 3 Welding Elec ...................... 2 Total Hours: 18 Semester II AGBS 250 ............................ 2 DEER 150 ............................ 2 DEER 150L .......................... 1 DESL 130 ............................. 4 DESL 130L .......................... 3 DESL 140 ............................. 2 DESL 140L .......................... 2 SPCH 143 ........................... 3 Total Hours: 19 Summer DEER 190 ............................ 3 Semester III CHMT 100 ........................... 4 DESL 215 ............................. 3 DESL 215L .......................... 2 DESL 240 ............................. 3 DESL 240L .......................... 2 Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elective ................. 3 Soc Sci Elec ........................ 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester IV AUTO 230 ............................ 3 AUTO 230L ......................... 1 DEER 237 ............................ 3 DEER 237L .......................... 3 DEER 270(R/W/S) ................ 3 DEER 270L .......................... 1 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......................2-3 Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elective .......... 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Total Credit Hours ........79-80

Semester II AGBS 250 ............................ 2 DEER 150 ............................ 2 DEER 150L .......................... 1 DESL 130 ............................. 4 DESL 130L .......................... 3 DESL 140 ............................. 2 DESL 140L .......................... 2 SPCH 143 ........................... 3 Total Hours: 19 Summer DEER 190 ............................ 3 Semester III CHMT 100 ........................... 4 DESL 215 ............................. 3 DESL 215L .......................... 2 DESL 240 ............................. 3 DESL 240L .......................... 2 Social Science Elective ........ 3 Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elective ............... 3 Total Hours: 20 Semester IV AUTO 230 ............................ 3 AUTO 230L ......................... 1 DEER 237 ............................ 3 DEER 237L .......................... 3 DEER 270(R/W/S) ................ 3 DEER 270L .......................... 1 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......................2-3 Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elective .......... 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Total Credit Hours ........76-77

Semester III CHMT 100 ........................... 4 DESL 215 ............................. 3 DESL 215L .......................... 2 DESL 240 ............................. 3 DESL 240L .......................... 2 Hum/Math/Soc Sci or Writing Elective ............... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester IV AUTO 230 ............................ 3 AUTO 230L ......................... 1 DESL 260 ............................. 3 DESL 260L(R/W/S).............. 1 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......................2-3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec .............. 3 Soc Science Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 16-17

Semester III DESL 215 ............................ 3 DESL 215L ......................... 2 DESL 240 ............................ 3 DESL 240L ......................... 2 ENGL 108 ........................... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...................... 2-3 Soc Sci Elec .................. 3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester IV AUTO 230 ........................... 3 AUTO 230L ........................ 1 DESL 260 ............................ 3 DESL 260L(R/W/S)............. 1 HIST 125 ............................. 3 Humanities Elec .................. 3 Lab Science Elec .............. 3 Total Hours: 17

Total Credit Hours ........68-69

Total Credit Hours ....... 71-72

The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

_____ 70-80

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DRAFTING AND DESIGN/CAD 8330 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This program prepares graduates for entry-level employment as drafters and designers in manufacturing or engineering firms and related industry. The use of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) is an integral part of the program. Students intending to complete the Purdue University Industrial Technology B.S. Degree through the VU partnership program are encouraged to consult with their advisor regarding specific course requirements not listed in this catalog.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S. Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I DRAF 110 ............... 4 DRAF 120 or DRAF 140 ............ 2-3 DRAF 145 ............... 3 DRAF 150 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 Math Elec (M) .. 3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II DRAF 155 ............... 4 DRAF 185 ............... 3 DRAF 230(R) .......... 3 PMTD 110 ............... 2 PMTD 110L ............ 1 Math Elec .............. 3 Total Hours: 16 Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I DRAF 110 ................4 DRAF 120 or DRAF 140 ............ 2-3 DRAF 145 ................3 DRAF 150 ................3 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102(M). 3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II DRAF 155 ................4 DRAF 185 ................3 DRAF 230(R)...........3 MATH 104...............3 PMTD 110 ...............2 PMTD 110L .............1 Writing Elective ..... 3 Total Hours: 19 Summer DRAF 200 ............ 0-3 Semester III DRAF 210 ................4 DRAF 220 ................3 DRAF 278 ................3 DRAF 285(W) ..........1 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ............ 2-3 SPCH 143/148 .........3 Soc Sci Elec ..... 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester IV DRAF 260(S) ...........4 DRAF 292 ................3 DRAF 294 ................3 Humanities Elec .......3 Lab Science Elec......3 Soc Sci Elec ......... 3 Total Hours: 19

Major Program Requirements 46-50 46-50 DRAF 110 Mechanical Drafting ................................ 4 4 DRAF 120 Computers for Technicians -orDRAF 140 Introduction to CAD (transfer only) ........ 2-3 2-3 DRAF 145 Pro/ENGINEER Fundamentals................ 3 3 DRAF 150 Descriptive Geometry .............................. 3 3 DRAF 155 Advanced Mechanical Drafting ............... 4 4 DRAF 185 Pro/ENGINEER Advanced Part Design .. 3 3 DRAF 200 Internship in Industrial Drafting ......... 0-3 0-3 DRAF 210 Jig and Fixture Design ............................. 4 4 DRAF 220 Plastic Part Design ................................... 3 3 3 DRAF 230 Tolerancing Applications ......................... 3 DRAF 260 Die/Mold Design...................................... 4 4 DRAF 278 Pro/ENGINEER Production Drawings and Surface Modeling .......................... 3 3 DRAF 285 Employment Seeking Methods ................ 1 1 DRAF 292 Pro/ENGINEER Sheetmetal, Cabling and Piping Design ................................. 3 3 DRAF 294 Pro/ENGINEER Advanced Assembly and Mechanism Design................................ 3 3 PMTD 110 Manufacturing Processes ......................... 2 2 PMTD 110L Manufacturing Processes Laboratory....... 1 1 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Basic Skills Core 9 ENGL 101 English Composition I ............................. 3 MATH 102 College Algebra ....................................... 100-Level or Higher Mathematics (MATH or MATT) .. 3 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication .................. 3
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by DRAF 230. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by DRAF 285. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by DRAF 260. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by Mathematics Elective for A.A.S. or by MATH 102 for A.S. or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

Summer DRAF 200 ............ 0-3 Semester III DRAF 210 ............... 4 DRAF 220 ............... 3 DRAF 278 ............... 3 DRAF 285(W) ......... 1 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ............ 2-3 SPCH 143/148 . 3 Total Hours: 16-17

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 MATH 104 Trigonometry ........................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid .............................................. 2-3 2-3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ....................... 3 Lab Science Elective – Common Core List ................... 3 3 Social Science Elective(s) – Core List........................... 3 6

Semester IV DRAF 260(S) .......... 4 DRAF 292 ............... 3 DRAF 294 ............... 3 Hum/Science/Soc Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Sci Elec .......... 3 Total Hours: 19

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Writing Elective1 ........................................................... One course from one of the following areas: Humanities or Science – Broad Core List -orSocial Science – Core List .......................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by DRAF 120 or DRAF 140.

3 -

____ ____ 69-74 75-80 NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both. NOTE: A grade of C or better must be maintained in all DRAF courses to advance and graduate.

1 Select one of the following: ENGL 102 English Composition II, ENGL 107 Business English, ENGL 108 Technical Writing, ENGL 205 Business Communications, or ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing.

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EDUCATION, TEACHER Two Year Programs Leading to the A.A.S./A.S./A.A. Degrees Requirements for teachers within Indiana and nationally are changing. Students pursuing degrees focused on teacher education should communicate frequently with their advisors to plan their programs consistent with the most recent requirements. Public school teachers in the state of Indiana must successfully complete a four-year-course of study in order to obtain a teaching license. Vincennes University has been authorized by the Indiana Commission of Higher Education (ICHE) to offer the first two years of the requirements leading to such licensure in nineteen different teacher education programs and concentrations. The curricula of a university’s education programs in the state of Indiana must be approved by the Division of Professional Standards. In addition, the course work must follow general guidelines as set down in the Administrative Rules of the Indiana State Board of Education (Rules 2002), prepared by the Indiana Department of Public Instruction. It is the Department of Public Instruction, Division of Teacher Certification, which ultimately issues the license permitting the holder to be employed as a teacher in the state of Indiana. Vincennes University has created a variety of alternative education concentrations to permit students to transfer successfully to other Indiana colleges and universities to complete their four-year degrees and to obtain licensing as teachers. The course work for education majors at Vincennes University has been selected to provide students with a sound, comprehensive, introduction to the field, to meet Rules 2002 guidelines, and to provide for efficient transfer to most teacher preparation institutions in Indiana. However, students completing their two-year program in education at Vincennes University may find, upon transfer, some differences exist in the requirements for course work in the first two years between Vincennes University and the transfer institution. It is recommended that a VU student majoring in education review the requirements of their proposed transfer institution as soon as possible after initial enrollment at Vincennes University. Formal admission into a teacher education program at most four-year Indiana teacher preparation institutions commences during the fall semester of the Junior year. Prior to admission to the education programs most universities require that students attain a minimum cumulative GPA and meet Indiana state required scores on the Praxis I . Vincennes University offers nineteen teacher education programs and concentrations. These correspond to the teacher license content and developmental areas as listed in Rules 2002. The content majors and developmental areas of these concentrations are outlined below. Concentrations Developmental Area A. Education, Early Childhood ............................................................................................ Pre-kindergarten B. Education, Elementary ........................................................................................................................ K-6 C. Education, Secondary ......................................................................................................................... 7-12 1. Business ...................................................................................................................................... 7-12 2. Chemistry .................................................................................................................................... 9-12 3. English/Language Arts ................................................................................................................ 9-12 4. Family and Consumer Sciences .................................................................................................. 7-12 5. Fine Arts: Visual Arts ................................................................................................................ 7-12 6. Health .......................................................................................................................................... 7-12 7. Mathematics A.S./A.A. ............................................................................................................... 9-12 8. Music........................................................................................................................................... 7-12 9. Technology.................................................................................................................................. 7-12 D. Education, All Grade 1. Fine Arts: Visual Arts ............................................................................................................... K-12 2. Music.......................................................................................................................................... K-12 3. Physical Education ..................................................................................................................... K-12 4. Special Education ....................................................................................................................... K-12 5. Teaching Paraprofessional ......................................................................................................... K-12 6. Technology................................................................................................................................. K-12

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EDUCATION, TEACHER Four Year Programs Leading to B.S. Degrees Requirements for teachers within Indiana and nationally are changing. Students pursuing degrees focused on teacher education should communicate frequently with their advisors to plan their programs consistent with the most recent requirements. Vincennes University has been authorized by the Indiana Commission of Higher Education (ICHE) to offer three selected four-year teacher education programs: Special Education, Mild Intervention, Elementary; Secondary Math Education; and Secondary Science Education. The Special Education, Mild Intervention, Elementary teacher education program is a course of study that leads to dual licensure in Special Education (Mild Intervention) and Elementary Education, Grades K6. The Special Education Mild Interventions license includes teaching students with learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, and mild mental disabilities. Students must be admitted into the Special Education Mild Intervention, Elementary Teacher program and into Student Teaching. The Secondary Science program is designed for those planning to complete a bachelor’s degree leading to licensure as secondary teachers of science. Licensure will be available in the following content areas: Chemistry, Earth and Space, Biology, Physical Science, and Physics. Students must be admitted into the Science Education program and into Student Teaching. The Secondary Mathematics program is designed for those planning to complete a bachelor’s degree leading to licensure as secondary teachers of mathematics. Students must be admitted into the Mathematics Education program and into Student Teaching. The Vincennes University education programs have been approved by the Division of Professional Standards at the Indiana Department of Education. In addition, the course work follows general guidelines as set forth by the Administrative Rules of the Indiana State Board of Education (Rules 2002), prepared by the Indiana Department of Public Instruction. The Department of Public Instruction, Division of Teacher Certification, will ultimately issue the license permitting the holder to be employed as a teacher in the state of Indiana. During the first two years of the Teacher Education program, students work toward completing General Education requirements, Liberal Education courses, and Education core courses. Students must complete all Education Core courses before being admitted to the Teacher Education program. Formal admission to the program commences in the spring semester of the sophomore year by submitting an application to the Teacher Education program. Formal admission to the program commences in the spring semester of the sophomore year. All prospective students must submit an application to the Teacher Education program. The following provides a description of the Special Education Gateways: Gateway One: Pre-Admission to Education  Passing scores (Indiana) on Praxis I o Reading: 176 o Mathematics: 175 o Writing: 172  GPA of 2.75 in major program requirements for Semester I and II  Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher  Satisfactory criminal history report Gateway Two: Admission to Teacher Education  Submission of an application to the Teacher Education Program  Passing scores (Indiana) on Praxis I  Completion of all 100 and 200 level education courses  Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher  GPA of 2.75 or higher in education core classes: EDUC 200, EDUC 242, EDUC 290, EDUC 291, EDUC 292 with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any education coursework  Satisfactory assessment of initial portfolio by education faculty members (EDUC 290)  Satisfactory updated criminal history report  Satisfactory performance evaluations from field experiences (EDUC 290) 2010-11 Programs of Study 183

 

Satisfactory rating on dispositional evaluations from supervisors of field experiences and core course instructors Signed recommendation form from advisor

Gateway Three: Admission to Student Teaching  Submission of an application for the student teaching experience  Completion of all prerequisite education coursework  Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher  GPA of 2.75 or higher on education coursework with no grade lower than a “C” and no incomplete grade (“I”) in any education course  Continued satisfactory ratings on dispositional evaluations from select methods courses  Satisfactory updated criminal history report Note: Students must attend a mandatory student teacher preparation meeting after admission to student teaching Gateway Four: Program Completion and Indiana State Licensure  Successful completion of student teaching in both the Elementary and Special Education placements  Passing scores (at Indiana licensure level) on the Praxis II  Satisfactory completion of Teacher Education Portfolio on LiveText  Completion of the application materials for an Indiana teaching license  Submission of a satisfactory updated criminal history report  Current certification in the Heimlich Maneuver and CPR The following provides a description of the Math and Science Education Gateways: Gateway One: Pre-Admission to Education  Passing scores (Indiana) on Praxis I o Reading: 176 o Mathematics: 175 o Writing: 172  GPA of 2.75 in major program requirements for Semesters I and II  Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher  Satisfactory criminal history report Gateway Two: Admission to Teacher Education  Submission of an application to the Teacher Education Program  Passing scores (Indiana) on Praxis I  Completion of all 100 and 200 level education courses  Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher  GPA of 2.75 or higher in education core classes: EDUC 200, EDUC 218, EDUC 290, EDUC 291, EDUC 292 with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any education coursework  For the Secondary Science program, GPA of 2.75 or higher in Semester I through IV General Science Core and Concentration courses with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any General Science Core or Concentration courses  For the Secondary Mathematics program, GPA of 2.75 or higher in Semester I through IV Major Program Requirements courses with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any Major Program Requirement courses  Satisfactory assessment of initial portfolio by education faculty members (EDUC 290)  Satisfactory updated criminal history report  Satisfactory performance evaluations from field experience (EDUC 290)  Satisfactory rating on dispositional evaluations from supervisors of field experiences and core course instructors  Signed recommendation form from advisor Gateway Three: Admission to Student Teaching  Submission of an application for the student teaching experience  Completion of all prerequisite education coursework 184 2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

 

Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher GPA of 2.75 or higher on education coursework with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any education course  For the Secondary Science program, GPA of 2.75 or higher in General Science Core and Concentration courses with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any General Science Core or Concentration courses  For the Secondary Mathematics program, GPA of 2.75 or higher in Major Program Requirements courses with no grade lower than a “C” and no Incomplete grade (“I”) in any Major Program Requirement courses  Continued satisfactory ratings on dispositional evaluations from select methods courses  Submission of an updated criminal history report Note: Students must attend a mandatory student teacher preparation meeting after admission to student teaching

Gateway Four: Program Completion and Indiana State Licensure  Successful completion of student teaching experiences  Passing scores (at Indiana licensure level) on the Praxis II  Satisfactory completion of Teacher Education Portfolio on LiveText  Completion of the application materials for an Indiana teaching license  Submission of an updated criminal history report  Current certification in the Heimlich Maneuver and CPR Each teacher candidate must see his/her advisor for information regarding the criminal history reports. Costs for the reports are the responsibility of the student. The criminal history reports become a part of the teacher candidate’s file and will be reviewed by faculty members of the Education Department. If the criminal history reports yield any significant findings, a faculty committee will determine the acceptability of the applicant’s criminal history for admission into the teacher education program and/or admission into student teaching. If the applicant is not approved for admission to either the program or student teaching, then the applicant may appeal the decision. The appeal will be reviewed by a committee composed of faculty, the teaching candidate’s advisor, and the Dean of Social Sciences/Performing Arts Division. After considering all the information, the decision regarding termination from either the program or student teaching will be made. The teacher candidate will receive written notification within five calendar days of the meeting. If the student is to be removed from the education program and/or student teaching, the written notification will include the reasons for termination. Following a successful student teaching experience*, receiving passing scores on the Praxis II, and satisfactory completion of the Teacher Education Portfolio, the teacher candidate may apply for an Indiana teaching license through the Department of Public Instruction, Division of Teacher Certification. State requirements change frequently. In licensing our teacher candidates, Vincennes University does not determine whether the teacher candidate receives a teaching license from the state of Indiana. The state of Indiana will determine whether a candidate receives a license. A candidate must complete all requirements for a bachelor’s degree before the state will grant permission to apply for a teaching license. Note: EDUC 401, EDUC 477, and EDUC 492 (student-teaching courses) are offered on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only. Bachelor Degrees Developmental Area A. Education – Mathematics 4000 ......................................................................................................... 9-12 B. Education – Science 4001 .................................................................................................................. 9-12 C. Education – Special Education, Mild Intervention 1000 ..................................................................... K-6

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185

EDUCATION – ART CONCENTRATION 2051/2052 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 7-12 (Secondary), Grades K-12 (All Grade) A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This program prepares students who are interested in teaching art to children and/or young adults. This program approaches teacher preparation in two ways. It concentrates on providing a strong foundation in the visual arts. It provides essential courses that prepare students for further concentration in Art Education and Education courses after transferring. It is recommended that students interested in college teaching follow the Art-Design, Graphic Design/Visual Communication Emphasis or the Art-Studio, Fine Arts Emphasis programs. Vincennes University is accredited with the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Credit Hours - A.S. A.A. Recommended Recommended Major Program Requirements 42 36 Sequence of Courses Sequence of Courses ARTT 111 Two-Dimensional Design ......................... 3 3 for A.S. for A.A. ARTT 112 Color and Design ...................................... 3 3 (This assumes any (This assumes any ARTT 114 Three-Dimensional Design ....................... 3 3 necessary developmen- necessary developmenARTT 116 Drawing I .................................................. 3 3 tal requirements have tal requirements have been met.) been met.) ARTT 117 Drawing II ................................................. 3 3 ARTT 130 Art History I--Pre-history to 1500............. 3 3 Semester I Semester I ARTT 131 Art History II--1500 to Present ................. 3 3 ARTT 111 ............... 3 ARTT 111 ................3 ARTT 140 Computer Art and Design -orEDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers.......... 3 - ARTT 114 ............... 3 ARTT 116 ................3 ARTT 116 ............... 3 ARTT 130 ................3 ARTT 211 Art Portfolio Development ........................ 2 2 ARTT 130 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ................3 ARTT 212 Art Portfolio Assessment .......................... 1 1 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102...............3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education ............... 3 3 PFWL 100 ............. 2 PFWL 100 .............. 2 Total Hours: 17 Total Hours: 17 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education ......................... 3 3 1 200-Level Studio Elective, 2D Area ............................ 3 3 200-Level Studio Elective, 3D Area2 ............................ 3 3 Semester II Semester II 200-Level Studio Elective ............................................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.
ARTT 112 ............... 3 ARTT 117 ............... 3 ARTT 131(R/W) ...... 3 ARTT 140/ EDUC 200 ............. 3 MATH 102 .............. 3 SPCH 143/148 ....... 3 Total Hours: 18 ARTT 114 ................3 ARTT 117 ................3 ARTT 131(R/W) ......3 ENGL 102 ............ 0-3 LITR 220/ Humanities Elec .....3 PSYC 142 ................3 SPCH 143/148 . 3 Total Hours: 18-21

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) . SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by ARTT 131. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by a 200-Level Studio Elective. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination

Semester III ARTT 211 ............... 2 EDUC 290 ............... 3 ENGL 102 ............ 0-3 LITR 220/ Humanities Elec .... 3 PSYC 142 ................ 3 200-Level 2D Studio Elec(S)........ 3 200-Level 3D Stud Elec(S) ... 3 Total Hours: 17-20

Semester III ARTT 112 ................3 ARTT 211 ................2 EDUC 290 ...............3 LITR 221/ Humanities Elec .....3 Foreign Lang ............4 200-Level 2D Studio Elec(S) ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

(Continued on the following page)

1

Select from the following: ARTT 200 Drawing III, ARTT 208 Printmaking I, ARTT 218 Painting I or ARTT 220 Photography I. Select from the following: ARTT 213 Ceramics I or ARTT 215 Sculpture I.

2

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

Liberal Education Core 18-21 26-29 ENGL 102 English Composition II1 ......................... 0-3 0-3 LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orHumanities Elective – Common Core List. ................... 3 3 LITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II -orHumanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List1 ......................................................... 3 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 4 4 Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3 3 Foreign Language Elective ............................................ 8
The A.A. Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. Computer Skills are enhanced by ARTT 140 or EDUC 200 for A.S. The Second Writing Skills Course requirement may be met by LITR 220/221 _____

Semester IV ARTT 212................ 1 EDUC 292 ............... 3 LITR 221 or Hum/ Sci/Math Elec ........ 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 4 Soc Sci Elective ....... 3 200-Level Studio Elective(S) .......... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester IV ARTT 212 ................ 1 EDUC 292 ............... 3 Foreign Lang ........... 4 Lab Science Elec ..... 4 Soc Sci Elective ....... 3 200-Level 3D Studio Elec(S) ...... 3 Total Hours: 18

_____

69-72 71-74

1

A.A. degree students not selecting the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 6 hours of Humanities Electives in addition to ENGL 102. A.S. degree students not selecting the combination of LITR 220/221 to satisfy the second writing skills requirement will need to complete 3 hours in a Humanities Elective and a 3-hour elective to be selected from Humanities, Science or Mathematics courses in addition to ENGL 102. Students transferring to Indiana University should take ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing or the literature option of LITR 220 and 221 instead of ENGL 102.

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187

EDUCATION – BUSINESS CONCENTRATION 5100 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 6-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed to provide the first two years of a four-year program of courses leading to licensing as secondary education teachers in business. This program also prepare students for careers in professional secretarial work, general office administration and management, or administrative and office systems.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 39 ACCT 201 Principles of Accounting I ............................................................. 3 ACCT 202 Principles of Accounting II ............................................................ 3 ECON 201 Microeconomics ............................................................................. 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 ENGL 250 English Grammar ........................................................................... 3 ERTH 100 Earth Science ................................................................................. 4 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 MGMT 265 Business Statistics .......................................................................... 3 OADM 100 Keyboarding I -orOADM 150 Keyboarding II ............................................................................... 2 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology............................................................ 3 PSYC 242 Educational Psychology ................................................................. 3 Literature Elective .............................................................................................. 3 Elective1.............................................................................................................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 ERTH 100 .................. 4 HIST 139/140............. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16

Semester II ENGL 102 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 242 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148............ 3 Literature Elec ............ 3 Elective ..................... 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 111.

9 3 3 3

Semester III ACCT 201 .................. 3 BIOL 100/101 ............ 4 ECON 201(R) ............. 3 EDUC 290(W/S)......... 3 MATH 111(M) ......... 3 OADM 100/150 ....... 2 Total Hours: 18

Liberal Education Core 21 BIOL 100 Human Biology -orBIOL 101 Plant an Animal Biology ................................................................ 4 ECON 202 Macroeconomics ............................................................................ 3 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 MATH 111 Finite Mathematics ......................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List ......................................................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

Semester IV ACCT 202 .................. 3 ECON 202 .................. 3 ENGL 250 .................. 3 MGMT 265 ................ 3 PSYC 201 ................... 3 Humanities Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 18

__ 69

1

Strongly recommended electives: MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I or BLAW 203 Legal Environment of Business.

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

EDUCATION – CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 4120 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 9-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed to complete the first two years of a four-year program of courses leading to licensing as secondary education teachers of chemistry.1
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 31 CHEM 105 General Chemistry I ...................................................................... 3 CHEM 105L General Chemistry/Quantitative Analysis Laboratory .................. 2 CHEM 106 General Chemistry II..................................................................... 3 CHEM 106L General Chemistry/Qualitative Analysis Laboratory .................... 2 CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry I...................................................................... 3 CHEM 215L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I ................................................... 2 CHEM 216 Organic Chemistry II .................................................................... 3 CHEM 216L Organic Chemistry Laboratory ..................................................... 2 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education ................................................... 3 ENGL 250 English Grammar .......................................................................... 3 PHYS 106 General Physics II ......................................................................... 4 PHYS 106L General Physics Laboratory II ...................................................... 1 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CHEM 105 ................. 3 CHEM 105L ............... 2 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 118(M) ........... 5 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester II CHEM 106(R) ............ 3 CHEM 106L ............... 2 ENGL 102 .................. 3 MATH 119 ................. 5 SPCH 148 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester III

Basic Skills Core 11 ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. 3 MATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I .............................................. 5 SPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ....................................................... 3
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by CHEM 106. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CHEM 215L. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 118.

Liberal Education Core 24 ENGL 102 English Composition II ................................................................. 3 MATH 119 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II ............................................. 5 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ............................................................. 2 PHYS 105 General Physics I .......................................................................... 4 PHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I........................................................ 1 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics.................................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ...................................................................... 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology .......................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by CHEM 215L.

CHEM 215 ................. 3 CHEM 215L(W/S) ..... 2 EDUC 290 .................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L ................ 1 PSYC 201 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV CHEM 216 ................. 3 CHEM 216L ............... 2 ENGL 250 .................. 3 PHIL 212 .................... 3 PHYS 106 .................. 4 PHYS 106L .............. 1 Total Hours: 16

__ 66

1 Students wanting to transfer to Purdue University to earn a teaching degree should take the same curriculum as the chemistry major, Biological and Physical Sciences – Chemistry Concentration 4090.

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189

EDUCATION – EARLY CHILDHOOD CONCENTRATION 1150 Teaching License Coverage: Pre-Kindergarten A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree The State of Indiana will soon require a 4-year teaching license for those wishing to teach prekindergarten-aged children in state-funded programs. This license is also required by those who operate certified private pre-school day-care centers and programs. Teachers working for Indiana Head Start are presently required to have an associate degree in Early Childhood Education or a related area. This major provides a good foundation for those wishing to transfer to a four-year program in Early Childhood Education.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 31 EDUC 218 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence .................................. 3 EDUC 260 Childhood Health, Safety, and Nutrition ........................................ 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 MATH 212 Math for Teachers II ...................................................................... 4 Child Care Electives1 .......................................................................................... 6 Directed Electives2 ............................................................................................. 9 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 260 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148(W)...... 3 Directed Elective ...... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II BIOL 100.................... 4 EDUC 291 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 Directed Electives .... 6 Total Hours: 16 Semester III EDUC 218 .................. 3 ERTH 207 .................. 3 LITR 220(R/W/S)/ 221(R/W/S) ............... 3 MATH 112 ................. 4 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Child Care Elec ........ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 HIST 139 .................... 3 LITR 240(R) ............... 3 MATH 212 ................. 4 Child Care Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core 10 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 MATH 112 Math for Teachers I ........................................................................ 4 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................ 3
The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by EDUC 290 or LITR 220 or LITR 221 or LITR 240. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by EDUC 290 or LITR 220 or LITR 221 or SPCH 148. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by EDUC 290 or LITR 220 or LITR 221. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 212.

Liberal Education Core 24 BIOL 100 Human Biology .............................................................................. 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 ERTH 207 World Geography........................................................................... 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orLITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II ................................................ 3 LITR 240 Children's Literature....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

__ 65

1

To be chosen from the following: FACS 130 Infant, Toddler and Child Care, FACS 235 Child Care and Curriculum Development, or FACS 237 Child Care Administration. To be chosen from the following: EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers, EDUC 292 Foundations of Education, HIST 236 World Civilization II, MUSM 225 Music in the Elementary Classroom, or PHED 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School.

2

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

EDUCATION – ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION 1100 Teaching License Coverage: Grades K-6 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree Students selecting this curriculum will begin their preparations for a career as elementary education teachers in grades K through 6. These courses provide the first two years of a four-year degree program leading to teacher licensing. The curriculum can also provide the foundation for careers in a variety of child-care occupations other than teaching.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 35-36 EDUC 101 Introduction to Education............................................................... 1 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 HIST 236 World Civilization II ...................................................................... 3 MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II ....................................... 4 MUSM 225 Music in the Elementary Classroom .............................................. 3 PHED 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School .............................. 3 Psychology Elective1 ....................................................................................... 3-4 Physical Science Elective ................................................................................... 3 Art Elective2 ....................................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 100 ................... 4 EDUC 101 .................. 1 EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Art Elective .............. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II EDUC 291 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 HIST 236 .................... 3 MATH 112(M) ........... 4 SPCH 143/148.......... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester III

Basic Skills Core 10 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 MATH 112 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I ........................................ 4 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................ 3
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 112.

Liberal Education Core 21-22 BIOL 100 Human Biology .............................................................................. 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orLITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II ................................................ 3 LITR 240 Children's Literature....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ...................................................................................... 2-3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 LITR 240 .................... 3 MATH 212 ................. 4 Psychology Elec .. 3-4 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester IV HIST 139/140............. 3 LITR 220/221............. 3 MUSM 225 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ............. 2-3 PHED 210 .................. 3 Phys Sci Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 17-18

_____ 66-68

1 To be chosen from the following: PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, or PSYC 242 Educational Psychology. An optional 1hour laboratory course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Education Psychology. 2

ARTT 104 Design in Materials or ARTT 110 Art Appreciation recommended.

2010-11 Programs of Study

191

EDUCATION – ENGLISH CONCENTRATION 2151 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 9-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed for students wishing to complete the first two years of a four-year program leading to licensing as a secondary education teacher in English.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 33-34 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 ENGL 249 Elements of General Linguistics .................................................... 3 ENGL 250 English Grammar ........................................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Literature Electives ............................................................................................. 9 Psychology Elective1 ...................................................................................... 3-4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 HIST 139 .................... 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Literature Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II EDUC 291 .................. 3 ENGL 102/210 ........... 3 HIST 140 .................... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Literature Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 ENGL 249(R/W) ........ 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 Psychology Elec .. 3-4 Total Hours: 15-16 Semester IV ENGL 250 .................. 3 Lab Science Elec ........ 3 Literature Elective ...... 3 Humanities Elec ......... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 15

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290 or ENGL 249. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 20 ENGL 102 English Composition II -orENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing........................................................ 3 HIST 139 American History I......................................................................... 3 HIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List ......................................................... 3 Humanities or Science/Math Elective – Broad Core List ................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200. _____

62-63

1 To be chosen from the following: PSYC 242 Educational Psychology, PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, or PSYC 218 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. An optional 1-hour laboratory course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Education Psychology.

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2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

EDUCATION – FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES CONCENTRATION 2306 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 7-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed for students wishing to complete the first two years of a four-year program leading to licensing as a Family and Consumer Sciences teacher in grades 7 through 12.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 32-33 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education1 ................................................... 3 FACS 100 Survey of Family and Consumer Sciences ..................................... 1 FACS 130 Infant, Toddler, and Child Care ..................................................... 3 FACS 156 Marriage and Family ...................................................................... 3 FACS 206 Fundamentals of Nutrition ............................................................. 3 FACS 210 Food Preparation ............................................................................ 3 FACS 225 Textiles........................................................................................... 3 PSYC 242 Educational Psychology2................................................................ 3 Interior Design and Housing Elective3 ............................................................... 3 Clothing Elective4........................................................................................... 3-4 Electives ............................................................................................................. 4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 FACS 100 ................... 1 FACS 130 ................... 3 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Interior Desn Elec..... 3 Total Hours: 13

Semester II ARTT 110/130/131 .... 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 FACS 156(R/W) ......... 3 FACS 210(S) .............. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 Clothing Elective 3-4 Total Hours: 18-19

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by FACS 156. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by FACS 210. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Semester III ECON 100/201/202 .... 3 EDUC 290 .................. 3 FACS 206 ................... 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 PSYC 242 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15

Liberal Education Core 21 ARTT 110 Art Appreciation -orARTT 130 Art History I – Pre-history to 1500 -orARTT 131 Art History II – 1500 to Present ..................................................... 3 ECON 100 Elements of Economics -orECON 201 Microeconomics -orECON 202 Macroeconomics ............................................................................ 3 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 4 Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ....................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum.

Semester IV FACS 225 ................... 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Hum/Sci/Math Elec .. 3 Lab Science Elec ........ 4 Electives ................... 4 Total Hours: 16

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1 Students should confer with a Family and Consumer Sciences advisor at intended school of transfer to determine which of the following should be taken: EDUC 200 Introduction to Classroom Computing, EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities, or EDUC 292 Foundations of Education. 2

An optional 1-hour laboratory course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Education Psychology. Students must select one of the following: FACS 101 Color, Texture and Furniture or FACS 202 Housing Design. Students must select one of the following: FACS 115 Clothing I, FACS 215 Clothing II, or FACS 220 Tailoring.

3

4

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193

EDUCATION – HEALTH PROMOTION/HEALTH EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 3106 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 7-12 (Secondary) A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed as a two-year transfer program for students who wish to pursue a health and wellness related career. Upon completion of this program, students will be eligible to transfer to their selected four-year institution leading to a degree in health and safety education, community health, occupational health and safety, and other health promotion related degrees. Potential employment settings include Public and Private education, national, state, and local health agencies, and private industry.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 36 ATTR 199 Freshmen Seminar: Athletic Training & Health Promotion.......... 3 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 HLTH 101 Foundations of Health and Sports Medicine Professions ............... 3 HLTH 201 Personal Health Science ................................................................. 3 HLTH 210 Community Health and Wellness................................................... 3 HLTH 211 First Aid ......................................................................................... 2 HLTH 213 Advanced First Aid ........................................................................ 3 PHED 225 Physical Fitness and Conditioning for Majors ............................... 2 Directed Electives1 ............................................................................................. 8 Directed Sociology Electives.............................................................................. 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ATTR 199 .................. 3 BIOL 111 ................... 2 BIOL 111L ................. 1 ENGL 101 .................. 3 HLTH 101 .................. 3 HLTH 211 .................. 2 SPCH 143 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II BIOL 112 ................... 2 BIOL 112L ................. 1 ENGL 102 .................. 3 HLTH 210(R) ............. 3 Dir Sociology Elec ..... 3 Dir Elective .............. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester III EDUC 200 .................. 3 HLTH 201(R/W/S) ..... 3 Math Elective ............. 3 PHED 225 .................. 2 SOCL 151 .................. 3 Dir Elective .............. 2 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV HLTH 213 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Dir Human Elec ......... 3 Dir Sociology Elec ..... 3 Directed Elec ............ 3 Total Hours: 15

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or higher MATH course ..................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading Intensive requirement may be met by HLTH 201 or 210. The Writing and Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by HLTH 201. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 18 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I ............................................................. 2 BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I .......................................... 1 BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology ............................................................... 2 BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory ............................................ 1 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 SOCL 151 Principles of Sociology .................................................................. 3 Directed Humanities Elective – Common Core List .......................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200. The Physical Education Fitness/Wellness requirement is met by PHED 225.

__ 63

1 All selections should be based upon General Education graduation requirements, transfer institution/2+2 requirements, and developing career interests of students.

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EDUCATION – MATHEMATICS 4000 A Program Leading to a B.A. or B.S. Degree This curriculum is designed for those planning to complete a bachelor's degree leading to licensing as secondary teachers of mathematics. Students must be admitted into the Mathematics Education program and into Student Teaching. In addition, there are several additional mandatory requirements that students must meet (including appropriate background checks and passing required teacher examinations) at various points in the program. These additional requirements are stated in the Education Handbook and Student Teaching Handbook.
Credit Hours - BS BA

Major Program Requirements1 87 CSCI 159 C Programming for Scientists and Engineers ........................................ 3 EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching .................... 1 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers ... 3 EDUC 218 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence .................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education ......... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities.......... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education ................... 3 EDUC 310 Management of Classroom Behavior . 3 EDUC 421 Teaching Secondary Mathematics I ... 3 EDUC 422 Teaching Secondary Mathematics II .. 3 EDUC 423 Topics in Mathematics Education ...... 3 EDUC 424 Geometries for Teachers..................... 1 EDUC 480 Constructivism and Secondary Education Standards ........................ 2 EDUC 494 Capstone Experience, Secondary Science or Mathematics Education 3 EDUC 495 Teaching in Public Schools .............. 12 MATH 119 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II ... 5 MATH 220 Intermediate Calculus ......................... 4 MATH 223 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra ........................................... 4 MATH 224 Special Projects for Mathematics Majors ............................................ 1 MATH 301 Introduction to Abstract Mathematics 3 MATH 311 Geometries.......................................... 3 MATH 312 Probability and Statistics .................... 3 MATH 322 Introduction to Analysis ..................... 3 MATH 411 Linear Algebra .................................... 3 MATH 412 Abstract Algebra................................. 3 MATH 430 Topics in Applied Mathematics .......... 3 MATH 440 Historical Development of Concepts in Mathematics ............................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

87 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 3 12 5 4 4 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Recommended Sequence of Courses for B.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 101 ............... 1 EDUC 200 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II EDUC 291 ............... 3 EDUC 292 ............... 3 ENGL 102 ............... 3 MATH 119 .............. 5 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ....... 2-3 Total Hours: 16-17

Recommended Sequence of Courses for B.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 101 ............... 1 EDUC 200 ............... 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester II EDUC 291 ............... 3 EDUC 292 ............... 3 ENGL 102 ............... 3 MATH 119 .............. 5 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Foreign Lang .... 4 Total Hours: 20-21 Semester III EDUC 218 ............... 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .. 3 MATH 220 .............. 4 PHIL 212 ................. 3 History Elect-Soc Sci Core ................. 3 Foreign Lang ......... 4 Total Hours: 20 Semester IV CSCI 159 ................. 3 ERTH 207 ............... 3 MATH 223 .............. 4 MATH 224 .............. 1 MATH 301 .............. 3 MATH 3122 ........... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester III EDUC 218 ............... 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .. 3 MATH 220 .............. 4 PHIL 212 ................. 3 History Elect-Soc Sci Core ............... 3 Total Hours: 16

Semester IV CSCI 159 ................. 3 ERTH 207 ............... 3 MATH 223 .............. 4 MATH 224 .............. 1 MATH 301 .............. 3 MATH 3122 ........... 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core 11 ENGL 101 English Composition I ........................ 3 MATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I .... 5 SPCH 143 Speech ................................................ 3

11 3 5 3

(Continued on the following page)

1 2

The 200 level EDUC courses under Major Program Requirements comprise the Education Department Gateway Core Classes. MATH 312 and MATH 430 are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI).

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The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290.

Semester V EDUC 310 ............... 3 EDUC 421 ............... 3 EDUC 4231 .............. 3 EDUC 4242 .............. 1 MATH 3112 ............. 3 MATH 4113 ............. 3 PHIL 313 ............... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester VI

Semester V EDUC 310 ...............3 EDUC 421 ...............3 EDUC 4231 ..............3 EDUC 4242 ..............1 MATH 3112 .............3 MATH 4113 .............3 PHIL 313 ............... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester VI EDUC 422 ...............3 MATH 4304 .............3 PHYS 205 ................5 Biological Sci Elec ..3 Foreign Lang............4 Humanities Common/Broad ... 3 Total Hours: 21 Semester VII EDUC 480 ...............2 MATH 3222 .............3 MATH 4123 .............3 MATH 4401 .............3 Foreign Lang............4 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester VIII EDUC 494 ...............3 EDUC 495 ............ 12 Total Hours: 15

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 118. Liberal Education Core 34-35 ENGL 102 English Composition II......................... 3 ERTH 207 World Geography ................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid............................................ 2-3 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics ........................... 3 PHIL 313 Contemporary Ethical Issues ................ 3 PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I 5 PSYC 142 General Psychology .............................. 3 Foreign Language ....................................................... Biological Science Elective ........................................ 3 Humanities Elective – Common or Broad Core List .. 3 History Elective – Social Science Core List ............... 3 Social Science Elective – Social Science Core List ... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by CSCI 159

50-51 3 3

2-3 3 3 5 3 16 3 3 3 3

EDUC 422 ............... 3 MATH 4304 ............. 3 PHYS 205 ............... 5 Biological Sci Elec .. 3 Humanities Common/Broad .. 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester VII EDUC 480 ............... 2 MATH 3222 ............. 3 MATH 4123 ............. 3 MATH 4401 ............. 3 Soc Sci Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 14

______ ______ 132-133 148-149

Semester VIII EDUC 494 ............... 3 EDUC 495 ............ 12 Total Hours: 15

1 2

EDUC 423 and MATH 440 are offered in alternating years (Semester V or VII). Concurrent courses EDUC 424 and MATH 311 are offered in alternating years with MATH 322 (Semester V or VII). 3 MATH 411 and MATH 412 are offered in alternating years (Semester V or VII). 4 MATH 312 and MATH 430 are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI).

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EDUCATION – MATHEMATICS CONCENTRATION 4602 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. or A.A. Degree This curriculum is designed for those planning to transfer to complete a baccalaureate program leading to licensing as secondary education teachers of mathematics. Students are advised to check with the transfer institution before selecting electives to assure their appropriateness.
Credit Hours - A.S. A.A.

Major Program Requirements 30 CSCI 159 C Programming for Scientists and Engineers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education ............... 3 MATH 119 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II ......... MATH 220 Intermediate Calculus ............................... 4 MATH 223 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra.................................................. 4 MATH 224 Special Projects for Mathematics Majors.. 1 Electives1 ............................................................... 15 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

24 3 3 5 4 4 1 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 PSYC 142 ................ 3 SPCH 143 .............. 3 Total Hours: 14 Semester II ENGL 102 ............... 3 MATH 119 .............. 5 PFWL 100 ............... 2 Hum Elec................. 3 Lab Sci Elec ..... 3-5 Total Hours:16-18 Semester III CSCI 159 ................. 3 EDUC 290 ............... 3 MATH 220 .............. 4 PSYC 201 ................ 3 Elective .................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV MATH 223 .............. 4 MATH 224(R/W/S) . 1 Electives ................ 12 Total Hours: 17

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 118(M) ........ 5 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Foreign Lang ......... 4 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ENGL 102 ............... 3 MATH 119 .............. 5 Foreign Lang ........... 4 Lab Sci Elec ..... 3-5 Total Hours:15-17

Basic Skills Core 11 ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. 3 MATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I........... 5 SPCH 143 Speech ....................................................... 3

11 3 5 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by MATH 224. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 118.

Semester III CSCI 159 ................. 3 EDUC 290 ............... 3 MATH 220 .............. 4 PSYC 142 ................ 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV MATH 223 .............. 4 MATH 224(R/W/S) . 1 PFWL 100 ............... 2 PSYC 201 ................ 3 Humanities Elec ...... 3 Elective .................. 4 Total Hours: 17

Liberal Education Core 22-24 28-30 ENGL 102 English Composition II ............................. 3 3 MATH 119 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II ......... 5 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ......................... 2 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................. 3 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology....................... 3 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List2 ... 3-5 3-5 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 3 Humanities Elective – Broad Core List ......................... 3 Foreign Language Electives .......................................... 8
Computer Skills are enhanced by CSCI 159.

_____ _____ 63-65 63-65

1

Students should check specific requirements of baccalaureate institution.

2 Laboratory science electives are to be chosen from the following. Students wishing to concentrate on one specific area in science may choose 200-level courses in that area the second year. BIOL 105/105L Principles of Biology I and Laboratory BIOL 106/106L Principles of Biology II and Laboratory CHEM 105/105L General Chemistry I and Laboratory CHEM 106/106L General Chemistry II and Laboratory PHYS 105/105L General Physics I and Laboratory PHYS 106/106L General Physics II and Laboratory PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I PHYS 206/206L Physics for Scientists and Engineers II and Laboratory

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EDUCATION – MUSIC CONCENTRATION 2452/2453 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 7-12 (Secondary), Grades K-12 (All Grade) Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed for students who wish to teach music. Upon completion of this program, students will be eligible to transfer to baccalaureate institutions in either a secondary education program leading to licensing as a teacher of choral, general, or instrumental music in grades 7 through 12 or an all grade education program leading to licensing as a teacher of choral, general, or instrumental music in grades 1 through 12.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 39-43 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education1 ................................................... 3 MUSM 101 Beginning Piano Class -or- Equivalent2 ....................................... 1 MUSM 102 Intermediate Piano Class -or- Equivalent2 ................................... 1 MUSM 113 Music Skills I ................................................................................. 1 MUSM 114 Music Skills II ................................................................................ 1 MUSM 115 Music Theory I ............................................................................... 3 MUSM 116 Music Theory II ............................................................................. 3 MUSM 150 Introduction to Music History ........................................................ 2 MUSM 151 Introduction to World Music .......................................................... 2 MUSM 201 Advanced Piano Class I -or- Equivalent2 ..................................... 1 MUSM 202 Advanced Piano Class II -or- Equivalent2.................................... 1 MUSM 213 Music Skills III .............................................................................. 1 MUSM 214 Music Skills IV .............................................................................. 1 MUSM 215 Music Theory III ............................................................................ 3 MUSM 216 Music Theory IV ............................................................................ 3 Private Music Lessons in Major Area ................................................................ 6 Private Music Lesson and Recital ...................................................................... 2 Music Ensembles ...............................................................................................4-8 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 MUSM 101/Equiv ...... 1 MUSM 113 ................ 1 MUSM 115 ................ 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Music Ensemble ...... 1-2 Music Lesson/Major Area ................... 2 Total Hours: 16-17 Semester II ENGL 102 .................. 3 MUSM 102/Equiv ...... 1 MUSM 114 ................ 1 MUSM 116 ................ 3 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Humanities Elec ......... 3 Music Ensemble ...... 1-2 Music Lesson/Major Area ................... 2 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester III EDUC 290 .................. 3 Math Elective ............. 3 MUSM 150 ................ 2 MUSM 201/Equiv ...... 1 MUSM 213 ................ 1 MUSM 215 ................ 3 Music Ensemble ...... 1-2 Music Lesson/Major Area .......................... 2 Soc Science Elec . 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester IV MUSM 151 ................ 2 MUSM 202/Equiv ...... 1 MUSM 214 ................ 1 MUSM 216(R/W/S) .... 3 Hum/Sci/Math Elec .... 3 Lab Science Elec ........ 4 Music Ensemble ...... 1-2 Lesson+Recital Major Area ........ 2 Total Hours: 17-18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or higher MATH course ..................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by MUSM 216. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

Liberal Education Core 21 ENGL 102 English Composition II3 ................................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 4 Humanities Elective – Common Core List ......................................................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List .................................................................... 3 Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List ....................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. _____

69-73

1 Students should confer with a Music Education advisor at their intended school of transfer to determine which of the following should also be taken: EDUC 200 Introduction to Classroom Computing, EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities, EDUC 292 Foundations of Education. 2

Not required for piano majors. See explanation of equivalents under course descriptions. Students transferring to Indiana University should substitute ENGL 210 Advanced Expository Writing for ENGL 102.

3

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EDUCATION – PHYSICAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 3104 Teaching License Coverage: Grades K-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This program is designed for Physical Education students who wish to teach in grades K-12. Upon completion of this program, students may transfer to their selected baccalaureate institution in programs preparing for the Indiana State Department of Education licensing options for teaching physical education.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 36 ATTR 209 Introduction to Athletic Training .................................................. 3 BIOL 112 Anatomy and Physiology II ........................................................... 2 BIOL 112L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II ......................................... 1 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 HLTH 211 First Aid ........................................................................................ 2 PHED 150 Foundations of Physical Education ................................................ 3 PHED 202 Teaching of Individual and Dual Sports -orPHED 203 Teaching of Team Sports -orPHED 204 Teaching of Lifetime Sports and Recreational Activities .............. 2 PHED 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School .............................. 3 PHED 225 Physical Fitness and Conditioning for Majors ............................... 2 Directed Physical Education Activity (PHED) Electives ................................... 2 Directed HLTH/PHED Electives1 ...................................................................... 3 Swimming Elective ............................................................................................ 1 Directed Electives1 ............................................................................................. 3 Social Science Elective1 ..................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ENGL 101 .................. 3 PHED 150 .................. 3 PHED 225 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Dir PHED Activity ..... 1 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II EDUC 292 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 PSYC 201 ................... 3 SPCH 143 ................... 3 Dir PHED Activity ... 1 Hum/Sci/Math Elective................... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester III BIOL 111 ................... 2 BIOL 111L ................. 1 EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 HLTH 211 .................. 2 Math Elective ............. 3 PHED 202, 203, or 204 ....................... 2 HLTH/PHED Elec 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV ATTR 209 .................. 3 BIOL 112 ................... 2 BIOL 112L ................. 1 PHED 210(R/W)......... 3 Directed Elective ........ 3 Swimming Elective .... 1 Humanities Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or higher MATH course ..................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech ............................................................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading and Writing Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290 or PHED 210. The Speaking Intensive requirement may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 18 BIOL 111 Anatomy and Physiology I ............................................................. 2 BIOL 111L Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I .......................................... 1 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology............................................................ 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List1........................................................ 3 Humanities or Science/Mathematics Elective – Broad Core List1 ..................... 3
The Computer Skills requirement is met by Computers Across the Curriculum. The Physical Education Fitness/Wellness requirement may be met by PHED 225.

__ 63

1 All selections should be based upon General Education graduation requirements, transfer institution/2+2 requirements, and developing career interests of students.

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EDUCATION – SCIENCE 4001 A Program Leading to a B.S. Degree In Science Education there are five different ways in which students can prepare for licensure. We have as the major Physical Science with four concentrations of Chemistry, Earth/Space Science, Biology, and Physics. Pursuing a degree in one of these areas provides students an opportunity to apply for licensure. Students must be admitted into the Science Education program and into Student Teaching. In addition, there are several additional mandatory requirements that students must meet (including appropriate background checks and passing required teacher examinations) at various points in the program. These additional requirements are stated in the Education Handbook and Student Teaching Handbook.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements1 86 CHEM 106 General Chemistry II .................................................................. 3 CHEM 106L General Chemistry Qualitative Analysis Laboratory.................. 2 CHEM 315 Organic Chemistry I ................................................................... 3 CHEM 315L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I................................................. 2 CHEM 316 Organic Chemistry II .................................................................. 3 CHEM 316L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II ............................................... 2 EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching ............................................................ 1 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers ........................................... 3 EDUC 218 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence ............................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education ................................................. 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities.................................................. 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .......................................................... 3 EDUC 310 Management of Classroom Behavior ........................................ 3 EDUC 431 Teaching Secondary Science I ................................................. 3 EDUC 432 Teaching Secondary Science II .................................................. 3 EDUC 433 Topics in Science Education....................................................... 2 EDUC 480 Constructivism and Secondary Education Standards ................. 2 EDUC 494 Capstone Experience, Secondary Science or Mathematics Education ................................................................................. 3 EDUC 495 Teaching in Public Schools ........................................................ 12 ERTH 115 Physical Geology ........................................................................ 3 ERTH 115L Physical Geology Laboratory ..................................................... 2 MATH 119 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II ........................................... 5 PHYS 205 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I ........................................ 5 PHYS 206 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II ....................................... 4 PHYS 206L Laboratory for Physics for Scientists and Engineers II .............. 1 PHYS 300 Physics III ................................................................................... 3 PHYS 300L Advanced Physics Lab ............................................................... 1 PHYS 306 Dynamics for the Physical Sciences ........................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CHEM 105 .....................3 CHEM 105L ...................2 EDUC 101 ......................1 EDUC 200 ......................3 ENGL 101 ......................3 MATH 118 ................... 5 Total Hours: 17 Semester II CHEM 106 .....................3 CHEM 106L ...................2 MATH 119 .....................5 PHYS 205 ......................5 PSYC 142 ..................... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III EDUC 218 ......................3 EDUC 292 ......................3 ENGL 102 ......................3 PHYS 206 ......................4 PHYS 206L ....................1 SPCH 143 ..................... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOL 105 .......................3 BIOL 105L .....................1 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .........3 EDUC 4333.....................2 PHIL 212 ........................3 PHYS 306 .................... 3 Total Hours: 15

Basic Skills Core 9-11 ENGL 101 English Composition I................................................................ 3 MATH 115 Survey of Calculus I -orMATH 118 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I2 ...................................... 3-5 SPCH 143 Speech ........................................................................................ 3

(Continued on the following page)

1 The 200 level EDUC courses under Major Program Requirements comprise the Education Department Gateway Core Classes. Some courses listed as Major Program Requirements will be replaced by courses listed in a concentration. See “Sequence of Courses” for a complete listing of required courses for each concentration. 2 MATH 118 is required in the Physical Science Major, Chemistry Concentration and Physics Concentration. MATH 115 is required in the Earth and Space Science Concentration and Biology Concentration. 3 EDUC 433 and EDUC 291 are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI).

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The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290.

The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 115 or higher. Liberal Education Core 35-36 BIOL 105 Principles of Biology I............................................................... 3 BIOL 105L Principles of Biology Laboratory I ............................................. 1 CHEM 105 General Chemistry I ................................................................... 3 CHEM 105L General Chemistry Quantitative Analysis Laboratory................ 2 ENGL 102 English Composition II............................................................... 3 ERTH 207 World Geography ....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid.................................................................................. 2-3 PHIL 212 Introduction to Ethics ................................................................. 3 PHIL 313 Contemporary Ethical Issues ...................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology .................................................................... 3 History Elective - Social Science Core List ....................................................... 3 Humanities Elective - Common Core List.......................................................... 3 Social Science Elective - Social Science Core List ............................................ 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200. _______

Semester V CHEM 315 ................. 3 CHEM 315L ............... 2 EDUC 310 .................. 3 EDUC 431 .................. 3 PHYS 300 .................. 3 PHYS 300L ................ 1 History Elective........ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester VI CHEM 316 .....................3 CHEM 316L ...................2 EDUC 2911.....................3 EDUC 432 ......................3 ERTH 115 ......................3 ERTH 115L ....................2 ERTH 207 .................... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester VII EDUC 480 ......................2 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 ......... 2-3 PHIL 313 ........................3 Humanities Elective .......3 Soc Sci Elec ............ 3 Total Hours: 13-14 Semester VIII EDUC 494 ......................3 EDUC 495 ................... 12 Total Hours: 15 Total Credit Hrs . 132-133

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(Continued on the following page)

1

EDUC 433 and EDUC 291 are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI).

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Courses in Concentration Areas

11-35

Chemistry Concentration 4002 12 CHEM 204 Elementary Quantitative Analysis ........................................................................................ 4 CHEM 325 Introductory Physical Chemistry .......................................................................................... 4 CHEM 426 Biochemistry ........................................................................................................................ 4 Earth and Space Science Concentration 4003 33 ERTH 111 Introduction to Remote Sensing ........................................................................................... 3 ERTH 112 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) ............................................................................... 3 ERTH 204 Oceanography ....................................................................................................................... 3 ERTH 208 Principles of Conservation ................................................................................................... 3 ERTH 210 General Astronomy .............................................................................................................. 3 ERTH 221 Meteorology ......................................................................................................................... 3 ERTH 304 Soil Science .......................................................................................................................... 4 ERTH 314 Evolution of the Earth .......................................................................................................... 3 ERTH 314L Evolution of the Earth Laboratory ........................................................................................ 1 ERTH 316 The Rock Forming Minerals ................................................................................................ 3 ERTH 316L The Rock Forming Minerals Laboratory .............................................................................. 1 MATH 116 Survey of Calculus II ............................................................................................................ 3 Biology Concentration 4004 35 BIOL 106 Principles of Biology II ........................................................................................................ 3 BIOL 106L Principles of Biology Laboratory II...................................................................................... 1 BIOL 211 Human Systems I: Anatomy & Physiology ......................................................................... 3 BIOL 211L Human Systems I: Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory ...................................................... 1 BIOL 212 Human Systems II: Anatomy & Physiology ....................................................................... 3 BIOL 212L Human Systems II: Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory ..................................................... 1 BIOL 230 General Microbiology .......................................................................................................... 2 BIOL 230L General Microbiology Laboratory ...................................................................................... 2 BIOL 308 Genetics ................................................................................................................................ 4 BIOL 310 Cellular Biology ................................................................................................................... 3 BIOL 318 Developmental Biology ........................................................................................................ 3 BIOL 423 Ecology and Evolution ......................................................................................................... 4 PHYS 105 General Physics I .................................................................................................................. 4 PHYS 105L General Physics Laboratory I ............................................................................................... 1 Physics Concentration 4006 11 PHYS 317 Linear Circuits for the Physical Sciences ............................................................................... 3 PHYS 317L Linear Circuits for the Physical Sciences Laboratory ............................................................. 1 PHYS 335 Thermodynamics for the Physical Sciences ........................................................................... 3 PHYS 366 Digital Systems for the Physical Sciences .............................................................................. 3 PHYS 366L Digital Systems for the Physical Sciences Laboratory ........................................................... 1

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Recommended Sequence of Courses for Concentration Areas follow: (Each sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)
EARTH+SPACE CHEMISTRY SCIENCE CONC CONCENTRATION 4003 4002 Semester I Semester I CHEM 105 .................. 3 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L ................ 2 CHEM 105L.............. 2 EDUC 101 ................... 1 EDUC 101................. 1 EDUC 200 ................... 3 EDUC 200................. 3 ENGL 101 ................... 3 ENGL 101 ................. 3 MATH 118 ................ 5 ERTH 115 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 ERTH 115L............. 2 Total Hours: 17 Semester II Semester II CHEM 106 .................. 3 CHEM 106 ................ 3 CHEM 106L ................ 2 CHEM 106L.............. 2 ENGL 102 ................... 3 EDUC 292................. 3 MATH 119 .................. 5 ENGL 102 ................. 3 PSYC 142 .................. 3 PSYC 142.................. 3 Total Hours: 16 SPCH 143................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III CHEM 315 .................. 3 CHEM 315L ................ 2 EDUC 218 ................... 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) ...... 3 EDUC 292 ................... 3 SPCH 143 .................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III EDUC 218................. 3 ERTH 111 ................. 3 ERTH 204 ................. 3 ERTH 210 ................. 3 MATH 115 ................ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 . 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION 4004 Semester I BIOL 105................... 3 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 105 ................ 3 CHEM 105L .............. 2 EDUC 101 ................. 1 EDUC 200 ................. 3 ENGL 101 ............... 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester II BIOL 106................... 3 BIOL 106L ................ 1 CHEM 106 ................ 3 CHEM 106L .............. 2 ENGL 102 ................. 3 PSYC 142 .................. 3 SPCH 143 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 230................... 2 BIOL 230L ................ 2 CHEM 315 ................ 3 CHEM 315L .............. 2 EDUC 218 ................. 3 EDUC 292 ................. 3 MATH 115 .............. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester IV BIOL 308................... 4 BIOL 310................... 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .... 3 EDUC 291 ................. 3 EDUC 4334 ................ 2 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 . 2-3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester V BIOL 211................... 3 BIOL 211L ................ 1 BIOL 3185 ................. 3 EDUC 431 ................. 3 PHIL 212 ................... 3 PHYS 105 .................. 4 PHYS 105L ............. 1 Total Hours: 18 Semester VI BIOL 212................... 3 BIOL 212L ................ 1 EDUC 432 ................. 3 ERTH 207.................. 3 PHIL 313 ................... 3 Humanities Elective4 3 Total Hours: 16 PHYSICS CONCENTRATION 4006 Semester I CHEM 105 .................3 CHEM 105L ...............2 EDUC 101 ..................1 EDUC 200 ..................3 ENGL 101 ..................3 MATH 118 ............... 5 Total Hours: 17 Semester II CHEM 106 .................3 CHEM 106L ...............2 MATH 119 .................5 PHYS 205...................5 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester IV Semester IV CHEM 316 .................. 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .... 3 CHEM 316L ................ 2 EDUC 291................. 3 EDUC 291 ................... 3 EDUC 4333 ............... 2 EDUC 4331 .................. 2 ERTH 112 ................. 3 PHYS 205.................. 5 ERTH 221 ................. 3 Total Hours: 15 MATH 116 .............. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester V Semester V BIOL 105..................... 3 BIOL 105 .................. 3 BIOL 105L .................. 1 BIOL 105L ................ 1 CHEM 2042 ................. 4 EDUC 310................. 3 EDUC 431 ................... 3 EDUC 431................. 3 PHYS 206.................... 4 ERTH 208 ................. 3 PHYS 206L ............... 1 PHIL 212 ................. 3 Total Hours: 16 Total Hours: 16 Semester VI Semester VI EDUC 432 ................... 3 EDUC 432................. 3 ERTH 207 ................... 3 ERTH 207 ................. 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL ERTH 304 ................. 4 115/HLTH 211 ....... 2-3 ERTH 314 ................. 3 PHIL 2121 .................... 3 ERTH 314L............... 1 History Elective ........... 3 History Elective3 ..... 3 Total Hours: 17 Humanities Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 17-18

Semester III EDUC 218 ..................3 EDUC 292 ..................3 ENGL 102 ..................3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/HLTH 211 ..... 2-3 PHYS 206...................4 PHYS 206L ................1 SPCH 143 ........... 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester IV BIOL 105....................3 BIOL 105L .................1 EDUC 290(R/W/S) .....3 EDUC 291 ..................3 EDUC 4333 .................2 PHYS 306................. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester V EDUC 431 ..................3 PHYS 300...................3 PHYS 300L ................1 PHYS 317...................3 PHYS 317L ................1 PHYS 366...................3 PHYS 366L .............. 1 Total Hours: 15 Semester VI EDUC 432 ..................3 ERTH 207 ..................3 PHIL 212 ....................3 PHYS 335...................3 History Elective3 ...... 3 Total Hours: 15

(Continued on the following page)

1 2 3

EDUC 433 and PHIL 212 are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI). CHEM 204 and CHEM 426 are offered in alternating years (Semester V or VII). EDUC 433 and History Elective are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI). 4 EDUC 433 and Humanities Elective are offered in alternating years (Semester IV or VI). 5 BIOL 318 and BIOL 423 are offered in alternating years (Semester V or VII).

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CHEMISTRY EARTH+SPACE CONCENTRATION SCIENCE CONC 4002 4003 (Continued) (Continued) Semester VII Semester VII CHEM 325 ................. 4 EDUC 480 ................. 2 CHEM 4262 ................ 4 ERTH 316 .................. 3 EDUC 310 .................. 3 ERTH 316L ............... 1 EDUC 480 .................. 2 PHIL 313 ................... 3 PHIL 313 .................... 3 Humanities Elective .. 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Social Science Elec . 3 Total Hours: 19 Total Hours: 15 Semester VIII Semester VIII EDUC 494 .................. 3 EDUC 494 ................. 3 EDUC 495 ............... 12 EDUC 495 .............. 12 Total Hours: 15 Total Hours: 15 Total Cr Hrs ... 132-133 Total Cr Hrs .. 131-132

BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION 4004 (Continued) Semester VII BIOL 4235 .................. 4 EDUC 310.................. 3 EDUC 480.................. 2 History Elective ......... 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester VIII EDUC 494.................. 3 EDUC 495............... 12 Total Hours: 15 Total Cr Hrs ...133-134

PHYSICS CONCENTRATION 4006 (Continued) Semester VII EDUC 310 .................. 3 EDUC 480 .................. 2 PHIL 313 .................... 3 Humanities Elective ... 3 Social Science Elec .. 3 Total Hours: 14 Semester VIII EDUC 494 .................. 3 EDUC 495 ............... 12 Total Hours: 15 Total Cr Hrs... 128-129

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EDUCATION – SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 1350 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 9-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree Students selecting this curriculum will be undertaking the first two years of a four-year degree program leading to licensing as a teacher of subject matter in the secondary school. While there is a core of courses required in this curriculum, students must also choose a minimum of twelve (12) credit hours of subject area course work. These subject area courses include (with VU division area) agriculture, earth sciences, biology, mathematics, and physics (Science and Mathematics); art, English, modern foreign language, family and consumer sciences, journalism, economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology (Humanities/Social Science). See page 182 for a complete listing of secondary education subject area concentrations.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 35-37 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 ENGL 250 English Grammar ........................................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Psychology Elective1 ...................................................................................... 3-4 Science or Mathematics Elective ........................................................................ 3 Electives ..................................................................................................... 11-12 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 HIST 139 .................... 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 Lab Science Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II ENGL 102 .................. 3 HIST 140 .................... 3 SPCH 143/148............ 3 Electives ................... 6 Total Hours: 15 Semester III EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 EDUC 291 .................. 3 Math Elective ............. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 Psychology Elec ...... 3-4 Literature Elec ..... 3 Total Hours: 17-18 Semester IV ENGL 250 .................. 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 Literature Elec ............ 3 Science/Math Elec ..... 3 Electives .............. 5-6 Total Hours: 17-18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 100-level or higher MATH course ..................................................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 20 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 HIST 139 American History I......................................................................... 3 HIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ............................................ 3 Literature Elective – Common Core List............................................................ 3 Literature Elective – Broad Core List ................................................................. 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

____ 64-66

1 To be chosen from the following: PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology, or PSYC 242 Educational Psychology. An optional 1hour laboratory course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Education Psychology.

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EDUCATION – SPECIAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 1252 Teaching License Coverage: Grades K-12 A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree (PENDING ICHE APPROVAL FOR EXTENSION TO JASPER CAMPUS) Students selecting this curriculum will complete the first two years of a four-year program leading to licensing as a teacher of special education. The students’ concentration in two areas of exceptionality, as required in a special education curriculum, will be pursued at a transfer institution. Graduates of this twoyear program are qualified to work as teacher aides in special education classes.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 34-35 EDUC 101 Introduction to Education............................................................... 1 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 EDUC 293 Practicum in Special Education ..................................................... 3 HIST 236 World Civilization II ...................................................................... 3 MUSM 225 Music in the Elementary Classroom .............................................. 3 PHED 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School .............................. 3 PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology............................................................ 3 PSYC 242 Educational Psychology1.............................................................. 3-4 Art Elective2 ....................................................................................................... 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 100 ................... 4 EDUC 101 .................. 1 EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148.......... 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester II EDUC 291 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 HIST 139/140............. 3 MATH 112(M) ........... 4 MUSM 225 .............. 3 Total Hours: 16

Basic Skills Core 10 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 MATH 112 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I ........................................ 4 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................ 3
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 112.

Semester III EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 LITR 240 .................... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ............. 2-3 PHED 210 .................. 3 PSYC 242 ............ 3-4 Total Hours: 17-19

Liberal Education Core 21-22 BIOL 100 Human Biology .............................................................................. 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 LITR 220 Introduction to World Literature I -orLITR 221 Introduction to World Literature II ................................................ 3 LITR 240 Children's Literature....................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ...................................................................................... 2-3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

Semester IV EDUC 293 .................. 3 HIST 236 .................... 3 LITR 220/221............. 3 PSYC 201 ................... 3 Art Elective .............. 3 Total Hours: 15

_____ 65-67

1

An optional 1-hour laboratory course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Education Psychology. ARTT 104 Design in Materials or ARTT 110 Art Appreciation recommended.

2

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EDUCATION – SPECIAL EDUCATION, MILD INTERVENTION 1000 A Program Leading to a B.S. Degree The undergraduate program in Special Education is a course of study leading to a Bachelor of Science degree and a standard Indiana license in Exceptional Needs: Mild Interventions, Elementary (learning disabilities, emotional disabilities and mild mental disabilities) and/or the Generalist License (standard Indiana license in Elementary Education K-6).
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 91 EDUC 101 Introduction to Education............................................................... 1 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 242 Educational Psychology1................................................................ 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 EDUC 293 Practicum in Special Education ..................................................... 3 EDUC 310 Management of Classroom Behavior ............................................. 3 EDUC 312 Organization and Administration of Assistive Technology ........... 3 EDUC 330 Teaching Methods and Materials ................................................... 3 EDUC 340 Learning Disabilities ...................................................................... 3 EDUC 342 Emotional Disabilities .................................................................... 3 EDUC 344 Mild Mental Disabilities ................................................................ 3 EDUC 346 Autism Spectrum Disorders ........................................................... 3 EDUC 350 Evaluation and Exceptionality: Curriculum and Assessment ....... 3 EDUC 352 Collaboration and Partnering: Community, Family and Paraprofessionals ......................................................................... 3 EDUC 360 The Teaching of Elementary Social Studies .................................. 3 EDUC 361 The Teaching of Elementary Science ............................................ 3 EDUC 362 The Teaching of Elementary Language Arts and Reading ........... 3 EDUC 363 The Teaching of Elementary School Mathematics ........................ 2 EDUC 364 Corrective Reading in the Elementary School ............................... 3 EDUC 372 Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom ............................................. 3 EDUC 374 Classroom Assessment ................................................................... 3 EDUC 477 Supervised Student Teaching in Elementary Education ................ 6 EDUC 492 Supervised Student Teaching in Mild Intervention ........................ 6 EDUC 493 Senior Capstone Experience in Education ..................................... 3 MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II ...................................... 4 MUSM 225 Music in the Elementary Classroom .............................................. 3 PHED 210 Physical Education for the Elementary School .............................. 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I BIOL 100.................... 4 EDUC 101 .................. 1 EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148 .......... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II ARTT 110 .................. 3 EDUC 291 .................. 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 LITR 220/221 ............. 3 MUSM 225............... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III EDUC 242 .................. 3 EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 HIST 139/140 ............. 3 MATH 112 ................. 4 PHED 210 ................ 3 Total Hours: 16 Semester IV HIST 236 .................... 3 HUMN 245/ SOCL 245(R/W/S) .... 3 LITR 240 .................... 3 MATH 212 ................. 4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .............2-3 Physical Sci Elec . 3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester V EDUC 310 .................. 3 EDUC 312 .................. 3 EDUC 342 .................. 3 EDUC 344 .................. 3 EDUC 293 .................. 3 PHIL 313 .................. 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core 10 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 MATH 112 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I ........................................ 4 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................ 3
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290 or HUMN 245 or SOCL 245. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 112.

(Continued on the following page)
1 An optional 1-hour course (EDUC 242L) is available for students transferring to baccalaureate institutions requiring field experience in addition to the lecture content of Educational Psychology.

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Liberal Education Core 36-37 ARTT 110 Art Appreciation ............................................................................ 3 BIOL 100 Human Biology .............................................................................. 4 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 HIST 139 American History I -orHIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 HIST 236 World Civilization II ...................................................................... 3 HUMN 245 Cultural Diversity: Humanities -orSOCL 245 Cultural Diversity: Sociology ....................................................... 3 LITR 220 World Literature I -orLITR 221 World Literature II ......................................................................... 3 LITR 240 Children’s Literature ...................................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ...................................................................................... 2-3 PHIL 313 Contemporary Ethical Issues.......................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Physical Science Elective1 .................................................................................. 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

Semester VI EDUC 330 .................. 3 EDUC 340 .................. 3 EDUC 350 .................. 3 EDUC 362 .................. 3 EDUC 363 .................. 2 EDUC 374 ................ 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester VII EDUC 346 .................. 3 EDUC 352 .................. 3 EDUC 360 .................. 3 EDUC 361 .................. 3 EDUC 364 .................. 3 EDUC 372 ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester VIII EDUC 477 .................. 6 EDUC 492 .................. 6 EDUC 493 ................ 3 Total Hours: 15

______ 137-138

1

PSCI 102 is preferred.

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EDUCATION – TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 8340 Teaching License Coverage: Grades 7-12 (Secondary), Grade K-12 (All Grade) A Two-Year Transfer Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This curriculum is designed for students who have selected the career choice to teach technology education in the secondary school. The license permits teaching in the four areas of technology education: construction, communications, manufacturing and transportation in grades K-12.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 42 DRAF 101 Introduction to Drafting ................................................................. 3 DRAF 140 Introduction to CAD ...................................................................... 3 EDUC 200 Computer Technology for Teachers............................................... 3 EDUC 290 Initial Experiences in Education .................................................... 3 EDUC 291 Introduction to Exceptionalities ..................................................... 3 EDUC 292 Foundations of Education .............................................................. 3 ELEC 100 Basic Electricity and Electronics ................................................... 5 ENGL 250 English Grammar ........................................................................... 3 PRNT 155 Computer Aided Publishing I......................................................... 2 PRNT 155L Computer Aided Publishing Laboratory I ...................................... 2 PSYC 142 General Psychology ....................................................................... 3 Technical Electives ............................................................................................. 6 Science Elective1 ................................................................................................ 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I DRAF 101 .................. 3 EDUC 200 .................. 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102 ................. 3 PFWL 100 .................. 2 PSYC 142 ................. 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II DRAF 140 .................. 3 EDUC 291 .................. 3 ENGL 102 .................. 3 HIST 139 .................... 3 SPCH 143/148............ 3 Lab Science Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III EDUC 290(R/W/S) ..... 3 EDUC 292 .................. 3 HIST 140 .................... 3 PRNT 155 .................. 2 PRNT 155L ................ 2 Technical Elective ...... 3 Science Elec ............. 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester IV ELEC 100 ................... 5 ENGL 250 .................. 3 HUMN 210 ................ 3 Technical Elective ...... 3 Science Elec ............. 3 Total Hours: 17

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EDUC 290. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a second mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 20 ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................. 3 HIST 139 American History I......................................................................... 3 HIST 140 American History II ....................................................................... 3 HUMN 210 Introduction to Humanities I .......................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 Lab Science Elective – Common Core List ........................................................ 3 Science Elective – Broad Core List1 ................................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by EDUC 200.

__ 71

NOTE: Lecture/laboratory classes are designed to be taken concurrently. They cannot be taken separately or dropped separately. Failure in either the lecture or lab will require that the entire course be taken again. Students wishing to withdraw from either the lecture or lab must withdraw from both.

1 Student must choose from three different science areas from among chemistry, earth science, biology and physics. Student must include one course in biology and one in a physical science.

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ELECTRONICS FUNDAMENTALS 8367 A One-Year Certificate of Program Completion This one-year curriculum prepares students in the foundations of electronics technology. The primary electronics concepts of circuit analysis, digital electronics, linear electronics, and cabling will be studied by students. Courses in this curriculum contain extensive hands-on experiences in the underlying fundamentals of electronics technology. This program will benefit those who wish to train for entry-level careers in electronics technology. This curriculum will also be of special interest to maintenance workers, electricians, cable installers, automotive-truck mechanics, laboratory assistants, and those individuals who already possess an expertise in other fields of technology but require knowledge of electronics. No previous experience in electronics is required.
Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELEC 110 ................... 6 ELEC 130 ................... 3 ENGL 101 .................. 3 Math Elective ........... 3 Total Hours: 15 Semester II CPNS 150 ................... 2 ELEC 151 ................... 4 ELEC 180 ................... 3 ELEC 210 ................... 2 SPCH 143/148.......... 3 Total Hours: 14

Credit Hours

CPNS 150 Computer Telecommunications ..................................................... 2 ELEC 110 Basic Component and Circuit Analysis ......................................... 6 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ................................................................................ 3 ELEC 151 Linear Circuits ............................................................................... 4 ELEC 180 Digital Logic II .............................................................................. 3 ELEC 210 Advanced Linear Circuits .............................................................. 2 ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... 3 100-level or higher MATH or MATT course ..................................................... 3 SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................ 3 __ 29

NOTE: All students must satisfy the University’s minimal requirements through either placement tests or enrollment in READ 011.

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ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY – BIOMEDICAL TECHNICIAN CONCENTRATION 8361 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates for employment as service technicians, engineering assistants, or manufacturer's representatives. Students gain laboratory experiences in electronic fundamentals, communications techniques, digital systems, microprocessors, and biomedical systems. Students with a recentered SAT Math score of less than (R)480 may have difficulty completing the program in four semesters.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 46 BIOM 200 Biomedical Electronics I ........................... 6 BIOM 250 Biomedical Electronics II.......................... 6 CPNS 150 Computer Telecommunications .......... 2 ELEC 110 Basic Component and Circuit Analysis .... 6 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ........................................... 4 ELEC 151 Linear Circuits .......................................... 4 ELEC 180 Digital Logic II ......................................... 4 ELEC 210 Advanced Linear Circuits ......................... 2 ELEC 215 Receiver and Video Circuit Analysis ........ 4 ELEC 220 Industrial Electrical Controls .................... 4 ELEC 230 Computer Electronics ................................ 4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

46 6 6 2 6 4 4 4 2 4 4 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELEC 110 ............... 6 ELEC 130 ............... 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102 (M)....... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ....... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II CPNS 150 ............... 2 ELEC 151 ............... 4 ELEC 180 ............... 4 ELEC 210 ............... 2 SPCH 143/148 ........ 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective ................ 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III BIOL 107 ................ 3 BIOL 107L .............. 1 BIOM 200 ............... 6 ELEC 220 ............... 4 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOM 250(R/W/S) .. 6 ELEC 215 ............... 4 ELEC 230 ............... 4 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective ................ 3 Total Hours: 17

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELEC 110................ 6 ELEC 130................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ........ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II CPNS 150................ 2 ELEC 151................ 4 ELEC 180................ 4 ELEC 210................ 2 MATH 104 .............. 3 SPCH 143/148 ........ 3 Writing Elec .......... 3 Total Hours: 21

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing Intensive and Speaking requirements may be met by BIOM 250. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 15-16 21-22 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 BIOL 107 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology............................................. 3 3 BIOL 107L Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory .......................... 1 1 ECON 203 Survey of Labor Economics ...................... 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................. 2-3 2-3 PSYC 141 Applied Psychology .................................. 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by ELEC 230.

Semester III BIOL 107 ................ 3 BIOL 107L .............. 1 BIOM 200 ............... 6 ECON 203............... 3 ELEC 220.............. 4 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV BIOM 250(R/W/S) .. 6 ELEC 215................ 4 ELEC 230................ 4 PSYC 141................ 3 Humanities Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 20

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ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER NETWORKING SECURITY AND WIRELESS SPECIALISTS 8256 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates for employment in a large number of computer networking fields, with emphasis in network security and wireless network technologies. Extensive network training, including hands-on experience with many WAN (Wide Area Networking) and LAN (Local Area Networking) technologies is provided. Courses help prepare students for CompTIA, Cisco, Microsoft, Cisco Security, and Cisco Wireless computer certifications. Extensive studying and certification test preparation are required for students to become certified. Graduates are trained for entry-level positions as network installers, network technicians, and network managers with specialized skills in security and wireless technologies.
Credit Hours – A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 51 CMET 240 Computer Maintenance I ........................... 6 CMET 275 Computer Maintenance II ......................... 6 CPNS 101 LAN Basics and OSI Model ..................... 3 CPNS 102 WAN Basics and Routers ......................... 3 CPNS 103 VLANs and Network Management.......... 3 CPNS 104 WAN Design and Protocols ...................... 3 CPNS 170 Computer Networking I ............................ 4 CPNS 221 Network Security for WANs..................... 4 CPNS 222 Wireless Networking for WANs ............... 4 CPNS 240 Computer Networking II ........................... 4 CPNS 248 Network Security for LANs ...................... 2 ELEC 100 Basic Electricity and Electronics .............. 5 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ........................................... 4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

51 6 6 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 5 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CPNS 101 ................ 3 CPNS 102 ................ 3 ELEC 100 ................ 5 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............. 3 Total Hours: 18

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CPNS 101 ................ 3 CPNS 102 ................ 3 ELEC 100 ................ 5 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ...... 3 Total Hours: 21 Semester II

Semester II

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

CPNS 103 ................ 3 CPNS 103 ................ 3 CPNS 104 ................ 3 CPNS 104 ................ 3 CPNS 170 ................ 4 CPNS 170 ................ 4 MATH 102 (M) ....... 3 MATH 104 .............. 3 SPCH 143/148......... 3 SPCH 143/148(W)... 3 Soc Science Elec ... 3 Writing Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 19 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CMET 240............... 6 CPNS 222 ................ 4 CPNS 240 ................ 4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ........... 2-3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective............ 3 Total Hours: 19-20 Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) .. 6 CPNS 221 ................ 4 CPNS 248 ................ 2 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III CMET 240 ............... 6 CPNS 221 ................ 4 CPNS 240 ................ 4 Humanities Elec ...... 3 Soc Science Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 20

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CMET 275. The Writing Intensive requirement may be met by SPCH 148. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematic assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................. 2-3 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Social Science Elective(s) – Core List........................... 3 6 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by Major Program Requirements. _____ _____

Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) .. 6 CPNS 222 ................ 4 CPNS 248 ................ 2 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Science Elec ..... 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ..... 2-3 Total Hours: 20-21

74-75

80-81

212

2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER NETWORKING SPECIALIST 8255 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates for employment in a large number of computer networking fields, with emphasis on network administration and design. Extensive network training, including hands-on experience with many WAN (Wide Area Networking) and LAN (Local Area Networking) technologies is provided. Networking courses also help to prepare students for CompTIA, Cisco, and Microsoft certification tests. Graduates may find entry-level employment as LAN-WAN network installers, network service technicians, network administrators, network designers, and LAN managers. Extensive reading, studying, and certification test preparation are required for student success.
Credit Hours – A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 49 CMET 240 Computer Maintenance I ........................... 6 CMET 275 Computer Maintenance II ......................... 6 CPNS 101 LAN Basics and OSI Model ..................... 3 CPNS 102 WAN Basics and Routers ......................... 3 CPNS 103 VLANs and Network Management.......... 3 CPNS 104 WAN Design and Protocols ...................... 3 CPNS 170 Computer Networking I ............................ 4 CPNS 240 Computer Networking II ........................... 4 CPNS 280 Computer Networking III.......................... 4 ELEC 100 Basic Electricity and Electronics .............. 5 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ........................................... 4 ELEC 230 Computer Electronics ................................ 4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

49 6 6 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 4 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CPNS 101 ................ 3 CPNS 102 ................ 3 ELEC 100 ................ 5 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............. 3 Total Hours: 18

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I CPNS 101 ................3 CPNS 102 ................3 ELEC 100 ................5 ELEC 130 ................4 ENGL 101 ................3 MATH 102(M)....... 3 Total Hours: 21 Semester II CPNS 103 ................3 CPNS 104 ................3 CPNS 170 ................4 MATH 104...............3 SPCH 143/148 .........3 Writing Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CMET 240 ...............6 CPNS 240 ................4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Lab Science Elec.......3 Soc Sci Elec ...... 3 Total Hours: 18-19

Semester II

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ...................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

CPNS 103 ................ 3 CPNS 104 ................ 3 CPNS 170 ................ 4 SPCH 143/148 ......... 3 Math 102 (M) .......... 3 Soc Science Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 19 Semester III CMET 240 ............... 6 CPNS 240 ................ 4 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 .......... 2-3 Lab Sci Elec ............ 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective ............ 3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) .. 6 CPNS 280 ................ 4 ELEC 230 ................ 4 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective ................. 3 Total Hours: 17

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CMET 275. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematic assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................. 2-3 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Common Core List ....... 3 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List ..................... 3 6 Social Science Elective(s) – Core List........................... 3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by ELEC 230.

Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) ..6 CPNS 280 ................4 ELEC 230 ................4 Humanities Elec .......3 Soc Science Elec .... 3 Total Hours: 20

____ ____ 72-73 78-79

2010-11 Programs of Study

213

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER REPAIR TECHNICIAN TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 8363 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates for employment in the desktop computer maintenance field. Students gain installation and repair experience with computer systems, networks, video displays, multimedia hardware, laser and impact printers, CD-ROMs, associated software, and preparation for A+ certification. Graduates may find entry-level employment as computer repair technicians, factory field representatives, component level technicians, technical computer assistants, or in computer sales.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 46 CMET 240 Computer Maintenance I ........................... 6 CMET 275 Computer Maintenance II ......................... 6 CPNS 150 Computer Telecommunications ................ 2 CPNS 170 Computer Networking I ............................ 4 ELEC 110 Basic Component and Circuit Analysis .... 6 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ........................................... 4 ELEC 151 Linear Circuits .......................................... 4 ELEC 180 Digital Logic II ......................................... 4 ELEC 210 Advanced Linear Circuits ......................... 2 ELEC 215 Receiver and Video Circuit Analysis ........ 4 ELEC 230 Computer Electronics ................................ 4 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

46 6 6 2 4 6 4 4 4 2 4 4

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.)

Semester I ELEC 110 ................ 6 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ........ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ....... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19

Semester I ELEC 110 ................ 6 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ........ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

Semester II CPNS 150 ................ 2 ELEC 151 ................ 4 ELEC 180 ................ 4 ELEC 210 ................ 2 SPCH 143/148......... 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective................. 3 Total Hours: 18

Semester II CPNS 150 ................ 2 ELEC 151 ................ 4 ELEC 180 ................ 4 ELEC 210 ................ 2 MATH 104 .............. 3 SPCH 143/148......... 3 Writing Elec .......... 3 Total Hours: 21

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by CMET 275. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematic assessment examination.

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 ECON 203 Survey of Labor Economics ...................... 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................ 2-3 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Broad Core List ............ 3 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Humanities, Social Science, Science, Mathematics, -orWriting Elective ......................................................... 3 Social Science Elective – Core List ............................... 3 3 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6 Computer Skills are enhanced by ELEC 230.

Semester III CMET 240............... 6 ELEC 230 ................ 4 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 16

Semester III CMET 240 ............... 6 ECON 203 ............... 3 ELEC 230 ................ 4 Humanities Elec ...... 3 Soc Sci Elective ... 3 Total Hours: 19

Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) .. 6 ELEC 215 ................ 4 CPNS 170 ................ 4 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective................. 3 Total Hours: 17

Semester IV CMET 275(R/W/S) .. 6 CPNS 170 ................ 4 ELEC 215 ................ 4 Lab Science Elec ... 3 Total Hours: 17

____ ____ 69-70 75-76

214

2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN) 8360 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. or A.S. Degree This curriculum prepares graduates as electronics technicians. Employers requiring technicians for service and repair, engineering assistants, digital and computer interfacing, installation and maintenance of communications and video systems, as well as many other facets of the electronics industry, will require electronics technicians. Students with a recentered SAT Math score of less than (R)480 may have difficulty completing the program in four semesters.
Credit Hours - A.A.S. A.S.

Major Program Requirements 46 CPNS 150 Computer Telecommunications ................ 2 ELEC 110 Basic Component and Circuit Analysis .... 6 ELEC 130 Digital Logic I ........................................... 4 ELEC 151 Linear Circuits .......................................... 4 ELEC 180 Digital Logic II ......................................... 4 ELEC 210 Advanced Linear Circuits ......................... 2 ELEC 215 Receiver and Video Circuit Analysis ........ 4 ELEC 220 Industrial Electronics Control ................... 4 ELEC 230 Computer Electronics ................................ 4 ELEC 245 Communications Electronics .................... 6 ELEC 285 Electronic Applications ............................. 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

46 2 6 4 4 4 2 4 4 4 6 6

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELEC 110 ................ 6 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ........ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II

Recommended Sequence of Courses for A.S. (This assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELEC110 ................. 6 ELEC 130 ................ 4 ENGL 101 ............... 3 MATH 102(M) ........ 3 PFWL 100 or PFWL 115/ HLTH 211 ...... 2-3 Total Hours: 18-19 Semester II

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .............................. MATH 102 College Algebra ........................................ SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .................

9 3 3 3

9 3 3 3

The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by ELEC 285. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematic assessment examination.

CPNS 150 ................ 2 CPNS 150 ................ 2 ELEC 151 ................ 4 ELEC 151 ................ 4 ELEC 180 ................ 4 ELEC 180 ................ 4 ELEC 210 ................ 2 ELEC 210 ................ 2 SPCH 143/148......... 3 MATH 104 .............. 3 Hum/Math/Sci/ SPCH 143/148......... 3 Soc Sci/Writing Writing Elec ........... 3 Total Hours: 21 Elective................. 3 Total Hours: 18 Semester III Semester III ELEC 220 ................ 4 ELEC 230 ................ 4 ELEC 245 ................ 6 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV ELEC 215 ................ 4 ELEC 285(R/W/S) ... 6 Humanities Elec ...... 3 Lab Science Elec ..... 3 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 19

Liberal Education Core 14-15 20-21 Writing Skills Course (ENGL 102, 107, 108, 109, 205 or 210) .................................................................. 3 MATH 104 Trigonometry ............................................ 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness -orPFWL 115 Concepts in Wellness -andHLTH 211 First Aid ................................................. 2-3 2-3 Laboratory Science Elective – Broad Core ................... 3 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List .................... 3 Social Science Elective(s) – Core List........................... 3 6 One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: Humanities, Mathematics, Science, Social Science or Writing ...................................................... 6 Computer Skills may be enhanced by ELEC 230.

ELEC 220 ................ 4 ELEC 230 ................ 4 ELEC 245 ................ 6 Soc Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV ELEC 215 ................ 4 ELEC 285(R/W/S) ... 6 Hum/Math/Sci/ Soc Sci/Writing Elective.................. 3 Lab Sci Elective .... 3 Total Hours: 16

____ ____ 69-70 75-76

2010-11 Programs of Study

215

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY – SPECIALIST CONCENTRATION 8366 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.A.S. Degree This curriculum, available through Distance Education only, prepares graduates as electronics technicians. Employers requiring technicians for service and repair, engineering assistants, digital and computer interfacing, installation and maintenance of communications and video systems, as well as many other facets of the electronics industry will require an electronics technician.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 42 ELED 110 Basic Component and Circuit Analysis ......................................... 6 ELED 120 Computers for Technology ............................................................ 2 ELED 130 Digital Logic I ................................................................................ 3 ELED 151 Linear Circuits ............................................................................... 3 ELED 180 Digital Logic II .............................................................................. 3 ELED 210 Advanced Linear Circuits .............................................................. 2 ELED 215 Receiver and Video Circuit Analysis ............................................. 3 ELED 220 Industrial Electronics Control ........................................................ 3 ELED 230 Computer Electronics ..................................................................... 3 ELED 245 Communication Electronics ........................................................... 6 ELED 280 Advanced Computer Electronics.................................................... 2 ELED 285 Electronics Applications ................................................................ 6 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I ELED 110 ......................6 ELED 120 ......................2 ELED 130 ......................3 ENGL 101 ......................3 MATH 102 ................... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester II ELED 151 ......................3 ELED 180 ......................3 ELED 210 ......................2 MATH 104 (M) ..............3 SPCH 143/148................3 Soc Sci Elective ........... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester III

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I ................................................................... MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ...................................... SPCH 143 Speech - orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................

9 3 3 3

The Reading Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by ELED 285. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by MATH 102 or by passing a mathematics assessment examination..

Liberal Education Core 15 MATH 104 Trigonometry ................................................................................. 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness .............................................................. 2 PHYT 101 Technical Physics........................................................................... 4 Social Science Elective – Core List .................................................................... 3 One course from a Liberal Education Core List in one of the following areas: Humanities, Science, Social Science or Writing ............................................. 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by ELED 120.

ELED 220 ......................3 ELED 230 ......................3 ELED 245 ......................6 PFWL 100 ......................2 Hum/Science/Soc Sci Writing Elective ......... 3 Total Hours: 17 Semester IV ELED 215 ......................3 ELED 280 ......................2 ELED 285 (R/W/S) .........6 PHYT 101 .................... 4 Total Hours: 15

__ 66

216

2010-11 Vincennes University Catalog

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING 6034 A Two-Year Program Leading to the A.S. Degree This program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in the emergency management profession. Emergency managers work in a variety of professional settings. There is a critical and growing need for emergency management personnel in government agencies, private corporations and industry, and education or health care institutions.
Credit Hours

Major Program Requirements 36-39 COMP 110 Introduction to Computer Concepts .............................................. 3 EMAP 100 Principles of Emergency Management ......................................... 3 EMAP 130 Incident Management Systems .................................................... 3 EMAP 160 Emergency Preparedness and Planning ........................................ 3 EMAP 180 Weapons of Mass Destruction ...................................................... 3 EMAP 205 Responding to Terrorism Incidents ............................................... 3 EMAP 215 Exercise and Design...................................................................... 3 EMAP 230 Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Management ..................... 2 EMAP 230L Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Management Laboratory .. 1 EMAP 250 Continuity of Operations............................................................... 3 EMTF 120 Medical First Responder -orEMTB 212 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic ..................................... 3-6 FIRE 204 Hazardous Materials I ................................................................... 2 FIRE 204L Hazardous Materials Laboratory I ................................................ 1 MGMT 260 Organizational Leadership ............................................................ 3 General Education Requirements
See pages 73 to 84 in this catalog for a complete description of the general education and assessment requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Courses (This sequence assumes any necessary developmental requirements have been met.) Semester I COMP 110 ................. 3 EMAP 100.................. 3 EMTF 120/EMTB 212 ......................... 3-6 ENGL 101 .................. 3 MATH 102 .......... 3 Total Hours: 15-18

Semester II CHEM 120 ................. 3 EMAP 130.................. 3 EMAP 160.................. 3 EMAP 180.................. 3 PSYC 142 ................... 3 SPCH 143/148(W) ... 3 Total Hours: 18

Basic Skills Core ENGL 101 English Composition I .................................................................. MATH 102 College Algebra (or higher mathematics) ..................................... SPCH 143 Speech -orSPCH 148 Interpersonal Communications .....................................................
The Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive requirements may be met by EMAP 250. The Mathematics Intensive requirement may be met by a subsequent mathematics course or by passing a mathematics assessment examination.

9 3 3 3

Semester III EMAP 205.................. 3 EMAP 250(R/W/S) ..... 3 FIRE 204 .................... 2 FIRE 204L.................. 1 HUMN 245(R/W/S) .... 3 MGMT 260 ................ 3 PFWL 100 ................ 2 Total Hours: 17

Liberal Education Core 20 CHEM 120 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials ............................................... 3 ENGL 107 Business English -orENGL 108 Technical Writing ......................................................................... 3 HUMN 245 Cultural Diversity: Humanities .................................................... 3 PFWL 100 Lifetime Fitness/Wellness ............................................................. 2 POLS 112 State and Local Government ......................................................... 3 PSYC 142 General Psychology ...................................................................... 3 Humanities Elective – Common Core List ......................................................... 3
Computer Skills are enhanced by COMP 110.

Semester IV EMAP 215.................. 3 EMAP 230.................. 2 EMAP 230L ............... 1 ENGL 107 or 108....... 3 POLS 112 ................... 3 Humanities Elec ....... 3 Total Hours: 15

____ 65-68

2010-11 Programs of Study

217

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 6030 Two-Year Program Leading to the A.S. Degree

This program provides an opportunity for students to become Emergency Medical Technicians, meet general studies requirements, and, if qualified, to attain an Associate of Science degree in Emergency Medical Services. Graduates will be prepared to function as a paramedic in advanced prehospital emergency care. While working under the direction of a physician, the paramedic utilizes knowledge and skills to manage medical emergencies of acutely ill or injured clients in prehospital settings. For students enrolled in the Florida Education Program: Licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education. Additional information regarding this institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission at 325 W. Gaines Street, Ste. 1414, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400; toll free # (888) 224-6684. Admission Requirements Basic Requirements Each application is reviewed individually. The following criteria are used as a guide for admission. 1. Meet the Admission requirements of the University. 2. Graduation from an accredited high school ranking in upper half of the graduating class. 3. Possess physical and mental health acceptable for performance as evidenced by examination by licensed physician. Program Requirements ALL items must be completed PRIOR to application to EMTP course. 1. Be 18 years of age or older. 2. Be state certified or nationally registered as an EMT in order to enroll in the second year of the Emergency Medical Services-Paramedic Program. Student must provide a copy of a current valid EMT certification. 3. Concurrent enrollment in or a grade of C or better in an Anatomy and Physiology elective. 4. Must possess an American Heart Association (AHA) Healthcare Provider CPR card. 5. Students are required to provide a limited criminal history as part of their entrance requirements. The limited criminal history may be obtained by writing the Central Repository for the Indiana State Police, 100 North Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 or by completing the form at www.state.in.us/isp. A money order or certified check must accompany the application, or a credit or debit card is needed for on-line fees. Hospital and ambulance providers may require a more extensive criminal background check or drug screening. Students are responsible for the cost of these. 6. Submit a copy of the immunization records to the Program Coordinator. 7. Students are required to test and achieve a CPTS score of at least 80 in English, 89 in Reading and 35 in Math, or take ENGL 101/MATH 013. In addition, students must successfully complete MATH 102 as part of the program requirements. 8. Experience: Prior to enrolling in the EMTP course, students must provide documentation showing ONE of the following: a. TWO years of patient care at a service that has

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...recently with the Fusion razor). Probably any one industry will have no more than a few innovators that can build their new product strategy 11 John Saunders and David Jobber, “Product Replacement: Strategies for Simultaneous Product Deletion and Launch,” Journal of Product Innovation Management, 11(5), November 1994, pp. 433–450. 400 Part Five Launch FIGURE 16.1 Product Line Replacement Strategies Butt-on product replacement Low-season switch High-season switch The existing product is simply dropped when the replacement is announced. Example: Ford’s marketing of Focus and dropping of Escort. Same as butt-on, but arranging the switch at a low point between seasons. Tour companies use this switch when they develop their new catalogs. Same as butt-on, but arranging the new item at the top of a season. Example: Polaroid used this strategy often, putting new replacement items out during the holiday buying season. Another version of butt-on, but arranged by a sequence of market segments. Mercedes introduced its C series country by country. Keeping the earlier product alongside the new, but with decreased support. Example: Older computer chips are marketed alongside newer ones but with less channel support. Putting the new item in a different channel or diverting the existing product into another channel. Example: Old electronic products often end up in discounter channels. Roll-in, roll-out Downgrading Splitting channels Needless to say, there are......

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...Case Study 3.1 Dell Premier customer extranet provides e-business services Dell provides Premier Dell.com (formerly Premier Pages) for its business customers. This is how Dell describes the service to customers: Premier.Dell.com is a secure, customizable procurement and support site designed to save your organization time and money through all phases of I/T product ownership. Easy Ordering – A custom online store ensures access to your products at your price. Easy Tracking – View real-time order status, online invoices and purchase history details. Easy Control – Custom access groups define what users can see and do within Premier. It explains how Dell Premier can be used for e-procurement as follows: Dell integrates a customized Premier catalog with your Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system to give you more control over your purchasing process and to help ensure accurate and efficient transactions. Aligning with your Procurement System – Dell can integrate with a variety of ERP applications, including: Ariba, Commerce One, Lawson, Oracle Purchasing, SAP, SciQuest and more. Dramatic Savings – E-Procurement integration can reduce purchasing overhead and order processing time. Consolidating purchase records into one system streamlines administration, while electronic invoicing and payment save employee processing time. The Solution for You – Return your shopping contents to your ERP system electronically as Dell’s integrated platform is designed to help improve......

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