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Week 8 Mathematician Occupations

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Mathematician OccupationsWeek 8
4/28/2015
Timothy Steiner
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Mathematicians, on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/mathematicians.htm (visited April 28, 2015). |

Similar Positions
Because the occupation is small and there are relatively few mathematician positions, strong competition for jobs is expected. Despite the strong competition for mathematician positions, many candidates with a background in advanced mathematical techniques and modeling will find positions in other closely related fields. Those with a graduate degree in math, very strong quantitative and data analysis skills, and a background in a related discipline, such as business, computer science, or statistics, should have the best job prospects. Computer programming skills are also important to many employers.
Occupations with Math
There are several occupations that require math. Some of these positions are listed below:
Actuaries - Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty. They use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to assess the risk that an event will occur and they help businesses and clients develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk.
Computer Programmers - Computer programmers write code to create software programs.
Financial Analysts - Financial analysts provide guidance to businesses and individuals making investment decisions.
Entry Education?
Actuaries – Bachelor’s degree
Computer Programmers – Bachelor’s degree
Financial Analysts - Bachelor’s degree
2012 Medium Pay
Actuaries – $93,680
Computer Programmers – $74,280
Financial Analysts - $76,950
Medium Salary for Mathematician Background?
The median annual wage for mathematicians was $101,360 in May 2012. The medium wage for mathematicians in the Scientific research and development service industry is $118,030. The medium wage for mathematicians in the Manufacturing industry is 116,860. For the Federal government industry, medium wage is $106,360. For Management of companies and enterprises, the medium wage 74,980. Overall, the medium wage for people with a mathematic occupation is $34,750.

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