Free Essay

Wester Way of War

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Willzie
Words 1298
Pages 6
WESTERN WAY OF WAR
(Name)
(Institutional Affiliation)
(Date)

Warfare plays different roles. It is at times used as a way through which large empires are built. Civil war as another form of warfare is, on the other hand, what leads to the downfall of the empires. All societies and all historical periods have experienced war at one point in time. Different nations or militaries use diverse war approaches and tactics depending on their experiences and goals. Over time, different war approaches have been utilized by various regions across the globe. The Western Way of War has been instrumental in ensuring the long-standing dominance of the western nations all over the globe. In the last two centuries, it has turned out to be the prevailed and used by majority of the globes militaries. The ‘Western Way’ is defined by five main facets, namely: dependence on technological advancement, advanced training and discipline, capability to implement new technological innovations (innovativeness) and strategic vision. These aspects have been attributed to the supremacy of the western culture. A pioneer of war is Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden.1 He is highly regarded as an exceptional commander. Under his tenure, Sweden became very powerful, and his battles were won through innovativeness, superb and effective weaponry, impeccable training and government support.2 Gustavus Adolphus is arguably one of the highly respected generals owing to his outstanding military expeditions during his era. His military tactics are closely illustrated by the ‘Western Way’. Substantial aspects present in the ‘Western Way' sufficiently epitomize the Gustavus era, and they include innovation, preeminent technology, top-notch training, effective weaponry, and government support.3 This is an argumentative essay on the characteristics found on the ‘Western Way' that typify the Gustavus Adolphus era. Military spending all over the world is extremely high. The Western Way of War entails high military spending, and states have come up with ways of making sure their armies are fully funded. The amount of resources countries set aside for maintaining and elevating their militaries is insanely high running into Trillions. However, this funding is justified owing to the numerous threats that countries face each day.4 Military funding is not unique to the 21st century. Centuries ago states realized the importance of army funding and development of powerful establishments such as the financial institutions was ensured. Establishment of such institutions made sure that militaries were adequately funded.
During his tenure as Sweden’s King, Gustavus ably formulated ways of ensuring military dominance.5 The period was characterized by continued warfare and better ways to guarantee victory had to be made. Gustavus began by structuring the government and building of strong institutions to promote efficiency. He introduced the initial central bank in the globe. He also introduced the initial Parish registrations which helped the government tax the citizens efficiently. These institutional reforms were instrumental not only in improving the economy but also facilitating military spending. The government efficiency brought about by these reforms ensured full support of the military, and it is no secret that Gustavus's era was exceptionally successful. The Western Way is characterized by among other things innovativeness. The Western Way has for centuries continued to dominate warfare globally. Majority of the world states have embraced it for its proven effectiveness. At the forefront of this war, strategy is innovativeness. Warfare strains the financial muscle of any country. This ranges from equipment to personnel. Countries set substantial amounts of their budgetary allocations to be used by their militaries. War affects every area of a countries economy, and it is in general an expensive affair. However, wars also do have positive impacts on technological and economic development. Generally, wars are instrumental in spurring technological development through innovation. Militaries are obliged to innovate new ways to gain advantage over their adversaries. The developments adapted in solving particular military needs later evolve into non-military apparatus. The point, nevertheless, is that inventiveness is paramount in ensuring successful expeditions. Over the years, militaries have come up with sophisticated and exemplary technological innovations.
This inclusion of innovation is among the characteristics that best exemplify Gustavus era. Gustavus was the leading figure in Sweden’s military supremacy in the 17th century when the Thirty Years War took place. His efforts helped Sweden become a European powerhouse and also influence Europe’s political and religious power. Gustavus's military prowess is well recognized, and he is viewed as the founder of modern day warfare. Relating technological innovation as a characteristic of Gustavus's war era might seem like a fallacy because those are ages ago. Technology, however, is the end product of innovation. Gustavus is well-remembered for his innovative and creative war tactics. During that period, war was common and through Gustavus's influence innovativeness was up to standard.6 He introduced the tactic of integrating infantry, cavalry and logistics. Science advancements in military led to Sweden being the leading Baltic power. Among the famous innovations influenced by Gustavus were the use of mobile weaponry on the front line and the use of the combined arms approach that entailed incorporating an assortment of warfare weaponry to get equal corresponding outcomes.7 Innovation is indeed an evident tactic that characterizes Gustavus’s era. Excellent training and respect of the command is a prerequisite for successful armies. Massive military funding and innovativeness are meaningless if the people tasked with utilizing them are not adequately prepared. Military training has over the years become sophisticated, and the ‘Western Way' is usually characterized by this. Different armies have their own training tactics. Training in the military takes time and army personnel are supposed to perform the tactics to precision. The sole aim of the sophistication and precision is to ensure that the troops are well equipped to face any situation in the battlefield. Gustavus realized the importance of a well-prepared army and during his era, and he made sure that his army men were finely trained. Speed and precision were crucial at that time, and combatants had to quickly fire as well as reload their rifles. Respect among the troops was imperative, duties and commands were well coordinated. Using the combined arms strategy soldiers had to be excellently trained to ensure proper coordination. Ensuring excellent military discipline and training is imperative for any nation, and it is one of the main aspects of the ‘Western Way' and it no doubt characterizes the kind of warfare present in Gustavus's era. A countries military is a precious asset that determines its power. The success of a military in any war is dependent on numerous aspects. These aspects include innovativeness, government support and funding and superb discipline and training among others.8 These three characteristics were effectively utilized in the era of Gustavus, the renowned former Swedish king. They are also among aspects synonymous with the ‘Western Way' warfare strategy, and they evidently epitomize the age of the great Swedish king.

Notes 1. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 68. 2. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 72. 3. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 76 4. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 105 5. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 123. 6. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 134. 7. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 89 8. Geoffrey Parker, The Cambridge History Of Warfare, 1st ed. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 138

Bibliography
Parker, Geoffrey. The Cambridge History Of Warfare. 1st ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Reconstruction and the West

...Reconstruction and the West Jennifer Bryan HIS /165 December 9, 2015 Dr. J. Randall III Reconstruction and the West The post-Civil War South has been called the “New South”. In what ways did it succeed in reinventing itself? In what ways did it fail? After the civil war the south was devastated, having most of the war fought on its soil the entire infrastructure was wiped out and nearly 23% of its men had been killed in the war. Something drastic needed to happen to deal with the humanitarian crises that was freed slaves with nowhere to go and no background. During this time newly freedmen tried to purchase land if they could and the number of black churches grew. Their new found freedom was expressed in many ways; some bought guns, while others owned dogs, some sought to get married and enjoyed the ability to move and look for family members they had not seen since brought over from Africa. While congress fought back and forth about a reconstruction plan that was either too lenient or too oppressive the south started to rebuild. Eventually, though the south fell in line with the Military Reconstruction Act and were allowed back into the union and back into the political spectrum. Politics aside, while the North had managed to free the slaves they failed to give them the life they had envisioned for them. “1) they did not redistribute lad to freed slaves; 2) they did not provide black people with guaranteed access to education: 3) they did not forbid racial......

Words: 355 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Case

...Preface iii v Chapter 1 The Cold War Era 1 Chapter 2 The End of Bipolarity 17 Chapter 3 US Hegemony in World Politics 31 Chapter 4 Alternative Centres of Power 51 Chapter 5 Contemporary South Asia 65 Chapter 6 International Organisations 81 Chapter 7 Security in the Contemporary World 99 Chapter 8 Environment and Natural Resources 117 Chapter 9 Globalisation 135 Chapter 1 The Cold War Era OVERVIEW This chapter provides a backdrop to the entire book. The end of the Cold War is usually seen as the beginning of the contemporary era in world politics which is the subject matter of this book. It is, therefore, appropriate that we begin the story with a discussion of the Cold War. The chapter shows how the dominance of two superpowers, the United States of America and the Soviet Union, was central to the Cold War. It tracks the various arenas of the Cold War in different parts of the world. The chapter views the NonAligned Movement (NAM) as a challenge to the dominance of the two superpowers and describes the attempts by the non-aligned countries to establish a New International Economic Order (NIEO) as a means of attaining economic development and political independence. It concludes with an assessment of India’s role in NAM and asks how successful the policy of nonalignment has been in protecting India’s interests. The end of the Second World War led to the rise of two......

Words: 52386 - Pages: 210

Free Essay

Doc Holiday

...bDoc Holliday 1 Doc Holliday Doc Holliday Holliday's dental school graduation photo, age 20, 1872 Born John Henry HollidayAugust 14, 1851Griffin, Georgia, U.S. Died November 8, 1887 (aged 36)Glenwood Springs, Colorado, U.S. Education Graduated from Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery in 1872 at age 20 Occupation Dentist, Professional gambler, Gunfighter Known for Arizona War *Gunfight at the O.K. Corral *Earp Vendetta Ride John Henry "Doc" Holliday (August 14, 1851 – November 8, 1887) was an American gambler, gunfighter and dentist of the American Old West, who is usually remembered for his friendship with Wyatt Earp and his involvement in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Early life and education "Doc" Holliday was born in Griffin, Georgia, to Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice Jane Holliday (née McKey).[1] His father served in the Mexican–American War and the Civil War.[2] His family baptized him at the First Presbyterian Church in 1852.[3] In 1864 his family moved to Valdosta, Georgia.[3] Holliday's mother died of tuberculosis on September 16, 1866, when he was 15 years old.[1] Three months later his father married Rachel Martin. While in Valdosta, he attended the Valdosta Institute,[3] where he received a strong classical secondary education in rhetoric, grammar, mathematics, history, and languages – principally Latin, but also French and some Ancient Greek.[3] Autographed photo of Holliday taken in 1879 in......

Words: 6757 - Pages: 28

Free Essay

Ihrm

...M A G A Z I N E FA L L 2 0 0 2 Volume 20 Number 2 SPANNING THE GLOBE Duke Leads the Way in International Law Teaching and Scholarship inside plus Duke admits smaller, exceptionally well-qualified class Duke’s Global Capital Markets Center to launch new Directors’ Education Institute from the dean Dear Alumni and Friends, It is not possible, these days, for a top law school to be anything other than an international one. At Duke Law, we no longer think of “international” as a separate category. Virtually everything we do has some international dimension, whether it concerns international treaties and protocols, commercial transactions across national borders, international child custody disputes, criminal behavior that violates international human rights law, international sports competitions, global environmental regulation, international terrorism, or any number of other topics. And, of course, there is little that we do at Duke that does not involve scholars and students from other countries, who are entirely integrated with U.S. scholars and students. Students enrolled in our joint JD/LLM program in international and comparative law receive an in-depth education in both the public and private aspects of international and comparative law, enriched by the ubiquitous presence of foreign students; likewise, the foreign lawyers who enroll in our one-year LLM program in American law enroll in the same courses, attend the same......

Words: 58370 - Pages: 234

Free Essay

Spanning Globe

...M A G A Z I N E FA L L 2 0 0 2 Volume 20 Number 2 SPANNING THE GLOBE Duke Leads the Way in International Law Teaching and Scholarship inside plus Duke admits smaller, exceptionally well-qualified class Duke’s Global Capital Markets Center to launch new Directors’ Education Institute from the dean Dear Alumni and Friends, It is not possible, these days, for a top law school to be anything other than an international one. At Duke Law, we no longer think of “international” as a separate category. Virtually everything we do has some international dimension, whether it concerns international treaties and protocols, commercial transactions across national borders, international child custody disputes, criminal behavior that violates international human rights law, international sports competitions, global environmental regulation, international terrorism, or any number of other topics. And, of course, there is little that we do at Duke that does not involve scholars and students from other countries, who are entirely integrated with U.S. scholars and students. Students enrolled in our joint JD/LLM program in international and comparative law receive an in-depth education in both the public and private aspects of international and comparative law, enriched by the ubiquitous presence of foreign students; likewise, the foreign lawyers who enroll in our one-year LLM program in American law enroll in the same courses, attend the same......

Words: 58047 - Pages: 233

Premium Essay

Mass Media

...Media History Contents 1 Introduction 1.1 Mass media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.1.5 1.1.6 1.1.7 1.1.8 1.1.9 Issues with definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Forms of mass media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Professions involving mass media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Influence and sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ethical issues and criticism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . See also . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 2 6 6 7 8 10 10 10 10 11 11 12 12 12 12 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 17 18 19 20 21 21 21 1.1.10 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.11 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.12 Further reading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.13 External links . . . . . . . . ....

Words: 146891 - Pages: 588

Free Essay

Regerneration

...PENGUIN CELEBRATIONS REGENERATION Pat Barker was born in 1943. Her books include the highly acclaimed Regeneration trilogy, comprising Regeneration (1991), which was made into a film of the same name, The Eye in the Door (1993), which won the Guardian Fiction Prize, and The Ghost Road (1995), which won the Booker Prize, as well as the more recent novels Another World, Border Crossing and Double Vision. She lives in Durham. PAT BARKER _________________ REGENERATION PENGUIN BOOKS PENGUIN CELEBRATIONS For David, and in loving memory of Dr John Hawkings (1922–1987) PENGUIN BOOKS Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada Inc.) Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd) Penguin Group (Australia), 250 Camberwell Road, Camberwell, Victoria 3124, Australia (a division of Pearson Australia Group Pty Ltd) Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, 11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi – 110017, India Penguin Group (NZ), 67 Apollo Drive, Rosedale, North Shore 0632, New Zealand (a division of Pearson New Zealand Ltd) Penguin Books (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, 24 Sturdee Avenue, Rosebank, Johannesburg 2196, South Africa Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R......

Words: 82986 - Pages: 332

Premium Essay

Literature Review Psychology

...Chapter 1. Literature Review: Borderline Personality Disorder in university students 1.1 Chapter Overview The literature review first presents the evolution of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) over the past 60 years, highlighting the shift from psychodynamic perspectives to that of biological and environmental determinates. Diagnostic classification of BPD is then examined, and subsequently discussed in terms of sectors of psychopathology that serve to demarcate the disorder. Next, dominant contemporary aetiologies of BPD are discussed, leading to an examination of comorbidities and the prevalence of BPD across populations. The focus of the review shifts to an examination of BPD in university students, commencing with treatments that are both efficacious and suited for delivery in a university context. Then, management of BPD related behaviours on campus are discussed in terms of the role of university staff in providing assistance to students with BPD. The chapter concludes with a summation of considerations in assisting university students with severe symptoms of BPD while on campus. 1.2 Borderline Personality Disorder 1.2.1 The development of the Borderline construct Reliable and valid differentiation of the borderline construct has proved elusive. The phenomena was initially reported in psychodynamic literature in the 1930’s, however was not distinguished as a syndrome until 1953 (Knight, 1953). Indeed, the use of the term ‘borderline’ arguably represents a......

Words: 9234 - Pages: 37

Free Essay

First Chimurenga

..."CHII"IURENGA II 1896 - 1897: A REVISIONIST STUDY THESIS Submitted in Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF ARTS of Rhodes University I by MARK PHILLIP MALCOLM HORN January 1986 The following typog~aphical co~~ections attention since submission of this thesis. have come to my p.i line 8, "Phillip" should ~ead Philip. p.vi, li.ne 11, "Risings" should ~ead Rising. p.Vll, line 12, "~esponce" should ~ead ~esponse. p.3, line 17, "wa~f-io~" should read warriors. p.5, line 4, "96" should read 1896. p .. 8, line 3, IILomangLlndi should read LomagLlndi. p.9, line 2, " (inve~ted comma) missing after "role". p.19, line 9, "triatises" should read treatises. p.28, line 18, "analysis" should ~ead analyses. p.30, line 10, "the and" should ~ead "and the". p.42, line 28, "Histo~ians" should ~ead Histo~ian's. p.47, line 13, "Lomangundi" should ~ead Lomagundi. p.48, line 12, ~ sign missing befo~e the figu~e of 121 000. p.52, line 5, 1. ~5ign missing before the figure of 3. p.55, line 1, ~ sign missing befo~e the figu~es 10 to 60. p.55, line 3, -£ sign missing befo~e the figu~e of 100. p.56, lines 7 - 10, quote to be indented. p.b2, li.ne 1tJ, "dela" should be separated out to read "de la". p.tI4, line 4, "assisthim" should be sepa~ated out to ~ead "assist him"~· p.b"?, line 11, "inte~nicine" should t-ead intet-necine. p.83, line 17, "Ma~ch 1895" should ~ead Ma~ch 1894. p.89, line 5, "faction" should ~ead fl~action. p.95, line 29, fn. 12, "lNA" should ~ead......

Words: 104376 - Pages: 418

Premium Essay

Psychology Dissertation

...Borderline Personality Disorder Name of Student Course name Date of submission Borderline Personality Disorder Literature Review The literature review first presents the evolution of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) over the past 60 years, highlighting the shift from psychodynamic perspectives to that of biological and environmental determinates. Diagnostic classification of BPD is then examined, and subsequently discussed in terms of sectors of psychopathology that serve to demarcate the disorder. Next, dominant contemporary aetiologies of BPD are discussed, leading to an examination of comorbidities and the prevalence of BPD across populations. The focus of the review shifts to an examination of BPD in university students, commencing with treatments that are both efficacious and suited for delivery in a university context. Then, management of BPD related behaviours on campus are discussed in terms of the role of university staff in providing assistance to students with BPD. The chapter concludes with a summation of considerations in assisting university students with severe symptoms of BPD while on campus The development of the Borderline construct Reliable and valid differentiation of the borderline construct has proved elusive. The phenomena was initially reported in psychodynamic literature in the 1930’s, however was not distinguished as a syndrome until 1953 (Knight, 1953). Indeed, the use of the term ‘borderline’ arguably represents a misnomer due to its......

Words: 9604 - Pages: 39

Premium Essay

Free Paper

...Proceedings of the Fourth International Annual Conference of the Asia Pacific Academy of Business in Society Sustainable Decision-Making in a Time of Crisis Public and Private Perspectives Malcolm McIntosh and Susan Forbes Authors Malcolm McIntosh Director, Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise Susan M Forbes Adjunct Research Fellow, Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise © 2011 Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise Published by Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise Griffith Business School Griffith University, South Bank campus 226 Grey Street, South Brisbane Queensland, 4101 Australia www.griffith.edu.au/business-commerce/sustainable-enterprise All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Copyright rests with the individual authors. ISBN 978-1-921760-45-7 Foreword The conference reflected lessons learnt and being learned from the global financial crisis, from the climate change prognosis and from rethinking global governance. The conference preceded the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) 2010 Meetings and Summit (7-14 November in Yokohama, Japan) and coincided with the 10th anniversary of the United Nations (UN) Global Compact, and the UN Year of Biodiversity. Given the birth of the G20 group of nations,......

Words: 32741 - Pages: 131

Free Essay

Irvine Welsh "Trainspotting"

...Irvine Welsh Trainspotting IRVINE WELSH works, rests and raves in Edinburgh. He has had a variety of occupations too numerous and too tedious to recount. Trainspotting was his first novel and he has also published a collection of short stories, a novella entitled The Acid House and a second novel, Marabou Stork Nightmares. IRVINE WELSH TRAINSPOTTING Minerva Thanks to the following: Lesley Bryce, David Crystal, Margaret Fulton–Cook, janice Galloway, Dave Harrold, Duncan McLean, Kenny McMillan, Sandy Macnair, David Millar, Robin Robertson, Julie Smith, Angela Sullivan, Dave Todd, Hamish Whyte, Kevin Williamson. Versions of the following stories have appeared in other publications: 'The First Day Of The Edinburgh Festival' in Scream If You Want To Go Faster: New Writing Scotland 9 (ASLS), 'Traditional Sunday Breakfast'in DOG (Dec, 1991), 'It Goes Without Saying' in West Coast Magazine No. 11, 'Trainspotting at Leith Central Station' in A Parcel of Rogues (Clocktower Press), 'Grieving and Mourning In Port Sunshine' in Rebel Inc No. 1 and 'Her Man, The Elusive Mr Hunt' and 'Winter In West Granton' in Past Tense (Clocktower Press). The second part of 'Memories of Matty' also appeared in the aforementioned Clocktower Press publication as 'After The Burning'. Contents KICKING – – * THE SKAG BOYS, JEAN–CLAUDE VAN DAMME AND MOTHER SUPERIOR; JUNK DILEMMAS NO. 63; THE FIRST DAY OF THE EDINBURGH FESTIVAL; IN OVERDRIVE; GROWING UP IN PUBLIC; VICTORY ON NEW YEAR'S DAY; IT GOES......

Words: 104455 - Pages: 418

Free Essay

Sybil

...Sybil 1 Sybil Project Gutenberg's Sybil, or the Two Nations, by Benjamin Disraeli Copyright laws are changing all over the world, be sure to check the laws for your country before redistributing these files!!! Please take a look at the important information in this header. We encourage you to keep this file on your own disk, keeping an electronic path open for the next readers. Please do not remove this. This should be the first thing seen when anyone opens the book. Do not change or edit it without written permission. The words are carefully chosen to provide users with the information they need about what they can legally do with the texts. **Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **Etexts Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These Etexts Are Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!***** Information on contacting Project Gutenberg to get Etexts, and further information is included below, including for donations. The Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization with EIN [Employee Identification Number] 64-6221541 Title: Sybil, or the Two Nations Author: Benjamin Disraeli Release Date: February, 2003 [Etext #3760] [Yes, we are about one year ahead of schedule] [The actual date this file first posted = 08/24/01] Edition: 10 Language: English Project Gutenberg's Sybil, or the Two Nations, by Benjamin Disraeli ********This file should be named sybil10.txt or sybil10.zip******** Corrected EDITIONS of......

Words: 162470 - Pages: 650

Premium Essay

Nothing

...TELECOMMUNICATION SWITCHING AND NETWORKS TElECOMMUNICATION SWITCHING NffiWRKS AND THIS PAGE IS BLANK Copyright © 2006, 2005 New Age International (P) Ltd., Publishers Published by New Age International (P) Ltd., Publishers All rights reserved. No part of this ebook may be reproduced in any form, by photostat, microfilm, xerography, or any other means, or incorporated into any information retrieval system, electronic or mechanical, without the written permission of the publisher. All inquiries should be emailed to rights@newagepublishers.com ISBN (10) : 81-224-2349-3 ISBN (13) : 978-81-224-2349-5 PUBLISHING FOR ONE WORLD NEW AGE INTERNATIONAL (P) LIMITED, PUBLISHERS 4835/24, Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi - 110002 Visit us at www.newagepublishers.com PREFACE This text, ‘Telecommunication Switching and Networks’ is intended to serve as a onesemester text for undergraduate course of Information Technology, Electronics and Communication Engineering, and Telecommunication Engineering. This book provides in depth knowledge on telecommunication switching and good background for advanced studies in communication networks. The entire subject is dealt with conceptual treatment and the analytical or mathematical approach is made only to some extent. For best understanding, more diagrams (202) and tables (35) are introduced wherever necessary in each chapter. The telecommunication switching is the fast growing field and enormous research and development are undertaken by...

Words: 115682 - Pages: 463

Premium Essay

Doctor

...Courtesy of L E K A R SPECIAL EDITION Authors: Marino, Paul L. Title: ICU Book, The, 3rd Edition Copyright ©2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins ISBN: 0-7817-4802-X Authors Dedication Quote Preface to Third Edition Preface to First Edition Acknowledgments Table of Contents Section I - Basic Science Review Basic Science Review Chapter 1 - Circulatory Blood Flow Chapter 2 - Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Transport Section II - Preventive Practices in the Critically Ill Preventive Practices in the Critically Ill Chapter 3 - Infection Control in the ICU Chapter 4 - Alimentary Prophylaxis Chapter 5 - Venous Thromboembolism Section III - Vascular Access Vascular Access Chapter 6 - Establishing Venous Access Chapter 7 - The Indwelling Vascular Catheter Section IV - Hemodynamic Monitoring Hemodynamic Monitoring Chapter 8 - Arterial Blood Pressure Chapter 9 - The Pulmonary Artery Catheter Chapter 10 - Central Venous Pressure and Wedge Pressure Chapter 11 - Tissue Oxygenation Section V - Disorders of Circulatory Flow Disorders of Circulatory Flow Chapter 12 - Hemorrhage and Hypovolemia Chapter 13 - Colloid and Crystalloid Resuscitation Chapter 14 - Acute Heart Failure Syndromes Chapter 15 - Cardiac Arrest Chapter 16 - Hemodynamic Drug Infusions Section VI - Critical Care Cardiology Critical Care Cardiology Chapter 17 - Early Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes Chapter 18 - Tachyarrhythmias Section VII - Acute Respiratory Failure Acute Respiratory Failure Chapter 19 -......

Words: 91543 - Pages: 367