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Western Medicine in Africa

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Submitted By stacylefrancois
Words 1901
Pages 8
Western medicine and how it has affected African culture
Stacy Lefrancois
English 106
Professor Bollert
17 April 2015

Abstract A few western medicine care givers have caused a huge suspicion of mistrust among many African cultures. Many Africans prefer their traditional treatments from their home lands and do not trust western medicine. Unaware that western medicine can also be beneficial when it is incorporated with the traditional medicine. Western medicine needs to rebuild their trust in African cultures because of the past destruction done to the people of Africa. The western medical community can learn from the traditional medicine in Africa and Africa can also benefit in the advances of western medicine.

Due to the untrustworthiness of some Western health care workers who have intentionally infected their patients with HIV, many Africans do not trust western medicine for treatments of illness because of the fear of being infected. Instead they trust and prefer the traditional treatments offered in their homelands which include traditional practices, herbal medicines, spiritual healing, and their own medical practitioners. . Because Western researchers have experimented on African populations in the past, many Africans to not trust western medicine. Therefore, they reject western treatments for HIV/AIDS. It would be best for Africans and worldwide health if all treatment options both traditional and modern were available to all Africans. “Western medicine is based on clinical research and methods, including surgery as a treatment option.” (Hunter, 2015) The History of Western medicine follows a number of safety protocols for all of the various treatments offered. Western medicine also has strict guidelines for treatments in clinical trials. When a new drug is introduced it has to be approved and go through rigorous testing in a laboratory and...

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