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Western Medicine

In: Social Issues

Submitted By integras75
Words 4626
Pages 19
(Wells, The 11 most toxic vaccine ingredients and their side effects., 2012b)

Scott A. Goodman
EN1320-E4
01-12-2013
Thesis

Professor L. Hansen

Scott A. Goodman
EN1320-E4
01-12-2013
Thesis

Professor L. Hansen

The Following will include my homework for Chapters 7.3 and 7.5 from our student textbooks. The Following will include my homework for Chapters 7.3 and 7.5 from our student textbooks.
2012
2012
Class Project: Thesis
Class Project: Thesis

The following will include our class project of writing an argumentative Thesis. It will project my opinion and supporting arguments of my viewpoint.

The following will include our class project of writing an argumentative Thesis. It will project my opinion and supporting arguments of my viewpoint.

The FDA negatively effects the lives of everyone in the world with their desire to control enslave and poison everyone on a global scope. The FDA, Big Pharmaceuticals, and Governments make trillions of dollars, not caring for the health or welfare of the population of the world. There is massive corruption between these organizations with very strong ties. Big Pharmaceuticals such as Bayer, Mereck, BASF, Monsanto, and Pfizer are just a few of the influential lobbing companies, with strong ties to the FDA government regulators of products Pharmaceutical companies produce and invest heavily in. Keeping the masses sick, controlled, and monopolizing every aspect they can. From food, crops, medicine, natural herbs, and the way any ingredient is introduced or allowed to be used.
Our bodies are continually poisoned and polluted every day of our lives, all while being told what to think and lied to. It is a conflict of interest that the very people approving the use of ingredients and drugs in everything, profit financially from the very ingredients and drugs they approve. Not just the FDA but...

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