Premium Essay

Westward Expansion

In: Historical Events

Submitted By calvin74
Words 1343
Pages 6
The Westward Expansion The westward expansion is one of the most fascinating and significant topics in the history of the United States. Nowhere else has an area of equal size been settled by small groups and individuals. Westward expansion helped stimulate the American economy. At the time, progress was beneficial for the United States, but those benefits came with a cost, such cost that instead of advancements and developments being advantageous for humanity, it also became a harmful process in which numerous people were affected in many facets of life. This all means that progress is remarkable to achieve, but when achieved, people have to realize the process they had to do to achieve it, which was stepping on other people to get there. To gain access to the western part of the country the white settlers had to pass through the Native Americans. While pushing westward the white culture clashed with the plain Indians and their culture. As a result of these bloody battles and the white settlers that were victorious, the Native Americans were restricted to small portions of their land. The government supported assimilation, which was the plan to unite the Native American culture with the white one. White settlers started moving westward to settle the land gained by the victory over the Native Americans. A major factor that caused this major movement, other than by the victory of the war, was the Homestead Act. This act provided and granted 160 acres of free land to any citizen who was the head of a house or family. While moving, the settlers were challenged by the new environment of the plains and they had to start adapting to the new environment. While moving west, all farmers were supported by the government on technical aspects and on agricultural education. (Worth) After settlements were established, farmers opposed the government. The farmers...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion

...The purchase of the Louisiana Territory in 1803 opened the door to westward expansion. Thomas Jefferson purchased this extensive plot of land with the hopes of strengthening and expanding the Republic, unaware that it would have the opposite effect. Jefferson’s fateful decision to expand the United States nearly destroyed the Republic that Americans worked so hard to build. It triggered the rise of divisions amongst Americans. These small cracks continued to grow and tear at the seams of the nation. Although westward expansion between 1800 and 1848 granted many new opportunities to the American people, it also brought about tension that plagued the nation for years to come. Some historians may construe westward expansion as beneficial to the...

Words: 1540 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion

...“The term Western Expansion encompasses the acquisition of territories by the United States across the whole area of the North American continent from the Atlantic Ocean in the east to the Pacific Ocean in the west.” (www.american-historama.org/1841-1850-westwardexpansion/westwardexpansion.htm). There were many factors that lead up to the Westward Expansion. For example, an overflowing population, the government opens new land (i.e. Louisiana Purchase), Pacific expansion, and finally seeking expansion beyond borders all lead up to the Westward expansion. Also, there is a vase amount of impacts that the Western Expansion had on America and its people. Overflowing Population Many people think major increase in population is good...

Words: 892 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion

...Westward Expansion involves the increase of territories in the United States. Westward expansion was a result from buying land, wars, treaties and the removal of Native American Indians. Progressive Transportation systems: roads, canals, the railroads and the belief in the Manifest Destiny of the United States of America made an increase in settlement. The notion of the "Manifest Destiny" of the United States was a divine right of the American people. Manifest Destiny was based on the belief of cultural and racial superiority over other nations and the obligation to bring enlightenment and civilization to other races like the Native American Indians. Cowboys adopted a distinctive, colorful style of dress that reflected the requirements of the job, the local work environment, and included many elements of the Mexican Vaqueros' personal taste. Most wore wide-brimmed hats to protect their head from sun and weather, tall-topped boots with slanted high heels to help secure their feet in the saddle stirrups, and spurs, embellished with silver. In brush-infested regions they also donned leather leggings, called chaps. Anyone who ropes broncos with a lariat and pens them in a corral should be aware of their debt to the Spanish language (Cook, n/a). In the arid region of their Northern frontier, known now as California, New Mexico, Arizona and Texas, cattle grazing was the sole economic prospect until dams and irrigation techniques were developed. Spanish cattle leather often......

Words: 297 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion Benefits

...Would you rather move west and risk your health or prevent the Civil War? As you look deeper into the westward expansion, you will realize that it was not the best groundbreaking discovery for American settlers. At first, the westward expansion seemed like a good idea and a fruitful business plan but the westward expansion played a much deeper role in American history. Unfortunately, people did not realize the long term effects of moving elsewhere. The westward expansion was unnecessary because it created an unhealthy environment for new settlers and helped encourage the Civil War. Many people suffer from loneliness and that is exactly was the westward expansion promises. Moving west, there was nothing out there except for the fertile land...

Words: 647 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Essay On Westward Expansion

...Westward Expansion was a very important piece of America’s history that helps make it what it is today. Expansionists started to take interest in California, Texas, and New Mexico. They liked territorial growth and thought these provinces would bring many useful resources. Expansionists believed in Manifest Destiny which was the belief that that God wanted the U.S. to own all of North America. Many expansionists used the Oregon Trail and the Santa Fe Trail to travel west. The Oregon Trail started in Missouri and ended in Oregon and many people used this trail in hope of a better life. The Santa Fe Trail was a famous trail in New Mexico that was used for business and trade. Other traders traveled up the Missouri River into the Rocky Mountains in search of beaver skin. In this search of the Rockies,...

Words: 494 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion Analysis

...Critical Analysis of Westward Expansion “Go west, young man”. It was the phrase of the 19th Century advocating for Manifest Destiny. Manifest Destiny was the idea that settlers were destined to expand to the west. “Americans not only considered Westward expansion a desirable objective but an endowment from God through which they could take their democratic republicanism across North America (Dobson, 2013). There were many factors that urged westward expansion, but the most common reasons for settlers were for the social environment, the natural environment, and the economic opportunities. The social environment of the west included the idea of freedom and the idea of Native American interaction. The natural environment was thriving in the west as gold and other precious minerals were discovered throughout westward expansion. The economic opportunities in the west were almost endless. As settlers took adapted Manifest Destiny, opportunist and businessmen took it towards their advantage...

Words: 982 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

19th Century Westward Expansion

...seemed to be controversial among the new American nation, but during the 19th century westward expansion seemed to have a stirring effect, as it was seen as unconstitutional and a mistake to the half the people, particularly the federalists. Moreover, Americans believed that buying more land would entangle the U.S. in foreign affairs, a warning given by George Washington in his farewell address, and cause strain on the original 13 eastern states. However, government officials saw land as a power source and a way to expand the empire and economy. Both supporting and opposing sides influenced the ideas of territorial expansion and caused a changed in federal policy resulting in a new nation stretching from [present...

Words: 1260 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

The Role Of Nationalism In Westward Expansion

...Westward expansion at the end of the American Revolution and through the end of the Civil War was driven by an increase in nationalism, the establishment of a single governmental entity, population growth, immigration, the development of infrastructure of roads, as well as an inherent belief in manifest destiny. Nationalism, by definition, is “a sense of national consciousness and loyalty that promotes the interests and attributes of that nation over all others.”1 Prior to the American Revolution, the colonies were completely separate. While people traveled around the colonies, there was no unity in the legal systems, monetary systems, or trade systems, nor was there any interest in what the other colonists were doing or how they were...

Words: 988 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Manifest Destiny And Westward Expansion

...imperialism is rule by an emperor. The Colonists took to the new world and set out on their duty of manifest destiny. Manifest destiny means the doctrine or belief that the expansion of the U.S. throughout the American continents was both justified and inevitable. Manifest destiny and westward expansion were acts of imperialism. Manifest destiny made people travel around the country and take land from others. They would kill Native Americans for their land and make them their slaves. They would then put Native Americans in reservations where they were forced to live and they weren’t able to leave. Native Americans were forced to harvest crops and do what the Europeans told them. The Europeans expanded west and and made civilizations. Native Americans were becoming overwhelmed with incoming Europeans. The Europeans took their land by force, which is an example of imperialism. Westward expansion made America into a civilized country with many businesses and agriculture. Everyone moved to America hoping for a better, new life. People advertized with paintings that America was the place to be. People would paint pictures of a beautiful America, hoping to get people to move over to...

Words: 586 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion Research Paper

...Do you know what happens when cultures collide? When cultures collide it usually leads into wars or the two cultures might be friendly and trade with each other. One culture might actually overpower the other which will lead to massive killings and enslavement.The westward expansion involved in a lot of cultures colliding with one another for example the mexIcan and American war or the French and Indian war. It was when the thirteen colonies were expanding west for more land and for better lives. They also moved west to become more powerful all because of this thing that they thought of called manifest destiny. Which meant nothing would stop them from expanding west.When cultures collide wars begin to start up, they trade with one another, or one of them overpowers the other. In the westward expansion many wars had happen. A lot of the wars happened because of the Americans taking and making people unhappy. After making the Constitution the Americans wanted to travel west for more land, valuable metals, and to start something new. One thing that motivated them from not...

Words: 781 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

People Involved In The Westward Expansion Migration

...The Westward Expansion Migration While migrating west about 15000 immigrants are estimated to have died on the Oregon Trail.The Westward Expansion Migration was the migration of about seven million people to the west via the Oregon trail, in 1803 through 1840. It gave America more farmland, double its size, and it helped the population grow. The Westward Expansion Migration was an important part of America's history because it expanded America’s border. Some of the people involved in the Westward Expansion Migration were John L.O’Sullivan, Lucinda Brown, and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, both played an important part in the westward expansion migration. Despite their different personalities, they were appointed by Thomas Jefferson to go on an expedition. Simultaneously Lewis and Clark went on a two thousand mile expedition. Lewis and Clark were chosen by Thomas Jefferson because of their knowledge and experience. They went on an expedition to explore and discover the land bought in the Louisiana Purchase. Together they discovered the path of the Oregon Trail. The Oregon Trail was the path in which 7 million people migrated to the west on....

Words: 543 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion In Thomas Jefferson's America

...West, written by Robert Morgan. The Way to Rainy Mountain, by N. Scott Momaday. Thomas Jefferson’s America, by Stephen Ambrose. Lastly, Chief Joseph Speaks, written by Chief Joseph. In Robert Morgan’s book, his central idea is that history was not just made up of heroes and villains. Citizens had a major impact on the Westward Expansion. As it states in the text, “It is natural and perhaps necessary for historians and story-tellers to view the dramatic shifts of history through the actions of a few famous figures, whether heroes or villains. Certainly the story of the westward expansion of the United States has many examples of each, and sometimes it seems the villains outnumber the heroes.” During Chief Joseph's article, he says that the Indians were a type of hero to the explorers, Lewis and Clark, however, Lewis and Clark turned out to be the villains that had taken advantage of the Indians. As it states in the article, “Whenever the white man treats the Indian as they treat each other then we shall have no more wars. We shall be alike--brothers of one father and mother, with...

Words: 473 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Manifest Destiny Vs Westward Expansion

...Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion were fundamental ideas so the United States can be the size it is today however, there was a lot controversy going on back then, especially between native Americans and the colonists that came to America. Things such as land, trade were points of focus back then that caused conflicts such as King Philip's War, and then came things like benefits and non-benefits from Westward Expansion and Manifest Destiny, and how there was a huge backlash such as the French and Indian War, which caused a lot of future prejudices and hatred for In the light of the controversy of Manifest destiny and how both Americans and Native Americans are affected, the land is an issue that is brought up frequently, especially because...

Words: 1178 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Westward Expansion Between 1820 And 1850

...The period between 1820 and 1850 in America was a time of significant development and changes. Westward expansion in the 1820s was initiated by th Panic of 1819 and farming in the west was on the rise because soil was losing nutrients in the east (Palmer). Western expansion prompted a dramatic increase in new forms of transportation that made transporting and selling products easier. During this time, new and improved roads were built, water transportation and canals allowed large quantities of goods to efficiently be transported, and the introduction of railroads made an immense contribution to increasing mobility throughout the nation. Expanding commerce not only led to new forms of transportation, but also the Industrial Revolution. The...

Words: 274 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Robber Barons Role In Westward Expansion

...Robber Barons played a huge role in westward expansion as well as the connection between the eastern and western parts of the United States. Names such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, James Hill, and Edward Harriman were all railroad tycoons who shaped the way America transported goods, as well as themselves. After the civil war America entered a second industrial revolution, where capitalism grew, and business tycoons took advantage of poverty and dependence from the American public. These Business tycoons, also known as Robber Barons, were able to take advantage of the way the country was and make money off it. In the late 1800s, wealthy industrialists controlled much of America’s wealth. Many of these "Robber Barons" took advantage of post-Civil...

Words: 385 - Pages: 2