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What Are the Causes of Crime and How Could Crime Be Reduced?

In: Social Issues

Submitted By chubbyz
Words 293
Pages 2
In this world, it is almost impossible if people live without rule. Rules are made to stop anarchy and to provide order. People need to be accountable for their actions so rules are needed. However in reality, some people still do not follow the rules or even they don’t care about the rules at all. This action of breaking rules or laws is called crime. Nowadays, the reported cases of crime all over the world are alarmingly increasing. It is believed that the main reason behind this is the rise in population which will lead to unemployment. The crime can be reduced with the involvement of the government to the society.

Firstly, I would like to state that the population of a country will be the first and foremost reason behind this increase in crime. Take Indonesia for instance, it is a developing country and in the prevailing scenario its population is sharply increasing, which creates a significant number of problems. With respects to that, unemployment is the major one, because of that, educated and sophisticated people survive without jobs and result in indulge in the crime to bear their expenses.

To combat this grave problem, governments can arrange educational classes and programs to increase public awareness about the adverse effects of the increase in population. If the increase rate of population decrease, there will be less unemployment which will of course decrease the number of crimes.

Eventually, after analyzing all the views, I would like to conclude that crime in any way is a major problem for any country. It needs a combined effort by governments and masses of any country to join hands together to fight against crime. Otherwise it is expected that it could be worsen in near future.

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