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What Major Changes in Political Structures, Social and Economic Life, Occurred During Each of the Following? Essay

In: Historical Events

Submitted By tuanlove1
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Politics of the Tang Dynasty: Military force helped the Tang Dynasty to enhance the empire’s borders and influence. Power was shared by the scholarly-elite and imperial families (Craig, et al, 2010) and imperial unity was restored reducing aristocratic rule. A Bureau of Censors was established to oversee all officials. Improvements for civil service were done by investigation. Emphasis was placed on knowledge of Chinese literature and Confucian classics.
Society of the Tang Dynasty: Wise governing, international trade, national strength and a strong economy established a stable social order. An open door policy was in place and there was a lack of extortion.
Economics of the Tang Dynasty: The dynasty faced economic stress due to the focus on the arts and pleasurable existence. Political weakening of power led to further economic distress.
Politics of the Sui Dynasty: The 29 year Sui Dynasty built the Grand Canal and began the restoration of the Great Wall. This required over-taxation of the peasants. A rebellion in 618 ended the dynasty. The country returned to a focus on establishing a legal code.
The political structure has endured. A central government system united China under a new system. Political unity returned as nomads and nobility were brought together under state control and the bureaucracy was rebuilt. The central government was known as the “System of Three Cabinets and Six Departments” .The three cabinets were a legislative policy making branch, a deliberation branch and an executive branch. Departments covered other political needs as personnel, income, formal procedures, justice and the law, and the political workings of the government. The Sui government has been the framework for all governmental systems, which have followed. The complicated local governmental systems needed simplification. In addition, terms of office and residency...

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