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What Makes an Argument

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How can we reduce our dependence on foreign oils?
In today’s society, we have become very dependent on foreign oil in order to fuel our transportation, hobbies, and even everyday chores. If you think about it, we use foreign oil for any type of machine that burns fuel. Should we begin looking for a more reliable and safer energy source? This is certainly a topic that will affect every American today, because of the simple reason that we are all ran by foreign oil. How would we survive if one day, our oil supply had run out? The outcome would be catastrophic, until we somehow learned to survive with an alternate fuel supply. Natural gas is a great alternative to reducing out dependence on foreign oils, and not as harmful to our environment.
In finding a better fuel source to power technology today, are we ready for such a drastic change? If we switched to natural gas and became less dependent, how would that affect our foreign relations with the rest of the world? What type of negative effects would it have on our economy? This world runs on fossil fuel and maybe we should start thinking if we are really ready to evolve. This topic makes it argumentative because it is one of today’s biggest topics. Our society has grown and our fuel source is obviously not abundant anymore, gas prices have risen and our environment is paying the toll for our negligence. It would also be supported in a researched argumentative...

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